US1989502A - Conveyer belt unloader - Google Patents

Conveyer belt unloader Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1989502A
US1989502A US486939A US48693930A US1989502A US 1989502 A US1989502 A US 1989502A US 486939 A US486939 A US 486939A US 48693930 A US48693930 A US 48693930A US 1989502 A US1989502 A US 1989502A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
belt
unloader
conveyer
horizontal
beneath
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US486939A
Inventor
Willard W Wentz
Albert D Heyl
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
PORTABLE MACHINERY Co
Original Assignee
PORTABLE MACHINERY Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by PORTABLE MACHINERY Co filed Critical PORTABLE MACHINERY Co
Priority to US486939A priority Critical patent/US1989502A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1989502A publication Critical patent/US1989502A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G67/00Loading or unloading vehicles
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65GTRANSPORT OR STORAGE DEVICES, e.g. CONVEYORS FOR LOADING OR TIPPING, SHOP CONVEYOR SYSTEMS OR PNEUMATIC TUBE CONVEYORS
    • B65G2814/00Indexing codes relating to loading or unloading articles or bulk materials
    • B65G2814/03Loading or unloading means
    • B65G2814/0347Loading or unloading means for cars or linked car-trains with individual load-carriers
    • B65G2814/035Feeding or discharging devices adapted to car shapes

Description

Jan. 29, 1935. w. w. WENTZ ET AL 1,989,502
CONVEYER BELT UNLOADER Original Filed Oct. 7, 1950 3 Sheets-Sheet 1 fl/berf I, l/ y/ ATTORNEY Jan. 29, 1935.
FIG. 2
w. w. WENTZ ET AL 1,989,502
CONVEYER BELT UNLOADER Original Filed Oct. 7, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 Jan. 29, 1935. w w w -rz i- AL 1,989,502
CONVEYER BELT UNLOADER Original Filed Oct/7, 1950 3 Sheets $heet 5 ATTORNEY Patented Jan. 29, 1935 a 1,989,502
CONVEYER BELT UNLOADER Willard W. Wentz, Passaic, and Albert D.Heyl,
Clifton, N. J., assignors to Portable Machinery Company, a corporation of New Jersey Application October 7, 1930, Serial No. 486,939
Renewed June 27, 1934 2 Claims. (01. 198-53) Our invention relates to portable conveyers and being duly considered, in passing from the horimore particularly to that'type of conveyer known zontal portion onto the desired incline. Any as unloaders for use, for example, when unloadtendency of the belt to lift off its trackway will ing railway cars equipped with drops or chutes be counteracted by the guides whichwill main- 5 beneath the car through which the material in tain the belt on its trackway and thus not sub- 5 the car is. discharged. Theunloader is placed ject it to conditions, stresses and strains that beneath the drop to receive the material therewould interfere with its functioning. from and convey it beyond the side of the rail- By the useof such guides, it is possible to turn way car where it is usually received upon another the belt from the horizontal on an arc of very l0 conveyer that elevates the material into trucks much shorter radius than has heretofore been or bins or onto dump piles. known in conveyer practice. For example, in one It is importantin such unloaders that the form of conveyer we have built, with flights portion which extends beneath the railway-car spaced apart on five inch centers, a turn has be very thin, compatible with rigidity of conbeen made from the horizontal onto a 22 in-- struction, so that the unloader may be used with cline about an are having a 30% inch radius. 15 the various types of cars that dump ordischarge In the design shown in the'drawings, the-guides in this manner, the dropsinsaid cars being spaced are above the belt. It is important that no exvarying distances from the railway tracks. v This cessive pressure is created on the, guides such portion of the conveyer rests upon the tracks. as would increase the frictionalload of the con- It is likewise important that the discharge end veyer. We have found that by the use of too 20.
of such unloaders be elevated a substantial dissmall a radius, the power requirement for moving tance above the ground so that the receiving end the belt is doubled. However, it is not practical of a second conveyer may be inserted under the to mathematically define thelimits for the radii discharge end of the unloader without having to because the formulae vary-depending upon such dig a pit in the ground for that purpose. matters as the spacing of the flights, the angle 25 Unloaders of this general character have hereof the inclined portion, and a numberof factor tofore been devised, but they have been of the of that character. drag type-that is where the material is dragged Another bject of ourinvention is toprovide along a receiving plate and up an inclined plate an adjustment whereby, the, unloader may be by bars suspended between two chains. No one raised and lowered into proper; operative posi- 30 has heretofore devised such an unloader wherein tion. v j a flexible belt provided with useful flights is used Sincethe ground adjacent a railway track is to convey the material along the unloader. Howlikely to be rough and uneven, we have found it ever, it is a known fact that this belt type of desirable to provide individual adjustments for conveyer is usable more universally, that is on each side or wheel of the unloader whereby aflrm 35 a greater variety of materials and greater variety mounting for the unloader will be assured under of sizes of materials, as well as being more eflivarying ground conditions. cient both in volume handled and in time of han- Other and. further objects of our invention, dling. such as the ready portability of the unloader due 40 The difliculty that has been encountered in the to its balanced construction, and-the simplicity 0 use of conveyer belts in unloaders has been the of the drive which is protected from damage, will inability to maintain a proper are for the belt be apparent from the following description taken as it passes from the horizontal portion of the in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, unloader ontothe inclined portion. The limitwhereining factor is the relatively short distance in the Figure 1 is a perspective view of our improved 45 length ofthe unloader and the fact that it is unloader; I essential that the conveyer belt does not lift from Fig. 2 is a side elevation of our improved unthe idler pulleys upon which it may be running loader shown in operative position, parts being or, as in this case, from the trackway upon which broken away to facilitate illustration;v
it is moving. The latter condition would' not Fig. 3 isa cross section on the line 3-3 of Fig. l; 50 be practical in conveyer practice for several rea- Fig. 4 is a detail of the discharge end of the unsons well known to those skilled in the art. loader, while We overcome these difficulties by providing Figs. 5 and 6 are enlarged details of the height guides for the belt, which guides take the form adjusting mechanism. I j of a permissible arc, theabovelimiting factors Referring to the drawings, the unloader com- 55 bers 14 with one portion 1''! thereof projectinginwardly toward each other. .;.Where the horizontal portion 11 and the inclined portion; 12 join the angle iron members 16 are bent on a-proper curve, indicated at 18, to be hereinafter more fully explained, so that the members ldcont'inue up the inclined portion 12 of the conveyer to a point adjacent the driving roller 19. A driven rollerZ-L located at the opposite end of the conveyer, and
the members 16 extend to a point adjacent the driven roller also. A flexible endless 'conveyer belt 22 encircles the ro11ers 19 and 21 and extends therebetween; forming the conveying element of the unloader. The upper reach 'or lap of the belt is supported upon the horizontal portion 17 of members 16 while the lower reach or'lap is supported on'the inwardly'projecting portions 14b of theside frames. The'belt is preferably of fabric.
As will be noted from Figs. 2 and 3, these parts are arranged closetoge'ther in the horizontal portion 1 1 of the unloader so as to make this portion of the unloader as thin" as possible commensurate with rugged construction."
The belt- 2 2 has mounted thereon a plurality of flights 23". The flights 23 may take any form desired and as here shown comprise flat metal bars secured to the belt 22'} by means of rivets 24. The fi-lghts-eXtendthe full width of the belt 22. In the'drawings they are shown" as substantially the full' width for convenience of illustration. Itbe noted thatrivets24 are provided with en larged *-fl'at*heads 25 which-are located on the under surface of the belt. The rivets are so arranged that one rivet on each'side of the flight Wili b'e-in'pesition to ride" along each trackway 17. Thus, a line of rivet heads 25 are provided on each side on which the belt rides inits passage through the machine, threbysavingwar on thebelt and-'prolonginglitslife, and reducing the frictional load on the driving motor.
he flights 23 are spaced apart'on the belt a distance not in excess of 10 inches; forthe purposes explained" more fully in thecopending application of Jere L. Wentz, 'Ser. No. 451,608, filed May 12,1930, namely, to preventtne sagging of the belt between the rigid flights as well as between the side edges of the belt, even though no intermediate or idler rollers are provided over which the belt passes. In other words, this is a fabric belt provided with rigid fiightsthat give the beltsufficient body that it will'not sag in or din'ary use between the edges of the belt.
If desired, a central trackway 26 may be pro' vided beneath the-belt 22 and in position to be engaged by a row of rivet heads 25 as explained for trackway 17. The central trackway 26, if used, could bese'cured to the spacer bars 15, as shown.
The discharge end i the unloader having the upwardly inclined belt portion comprises a pair of side plates 31 and 32 secured to the frame members 14a. and in turn carrying frame member 33 projecting thereabove. Afplatform 34 is supported upon the top of the frame members 33, the motive power for driving the belt conveyer, indicated generally at 35, being mounted on the platform. The motive power may either be an electric motor, gasoline engine, or the like. The drive for the belt is indicated diagrammatically in dash. lines in Fig. 2 as extending from pulley 36, carried. on the shaft of the motor 35, through belt or chain; 37 to'pulley 38 carried upon shaft 394 As will beseen from Fig. 1; shaft 39 extends across the space between the side plates 31 and 32, and on the opposite end from pulley 38 carries pulley 41 which cooperates with a chain or belt 42 to rotate pulley 43- carried upon shaft 44. It will be noted from Fig. 2 that shaft 44 likewise extends between the'side plates-31 and 32 and is located between the upper and: lower reaches of the belt, as does the remainder of the drive about to be de scribed and showninore in detail in Fig. 4. The shaft 44 carries a second pulley 45 near its oppositeend, which through the medium of a belt or chain 46 rotates a pulley 47 carried upon the shaft 48' upon which the driving roller 19 is: mounted. Referring to- Fig. 1,;it will be seen that the drive from the motor to the shaft 39 is covered by a sheath 51 and thedrive from the shaft 39120 the shaft 44 is covered bythe sheath 52 since both 01"" these drives' are located outside of the plates 32 and 3-1 respectively. The drive on 'the shafts: 44 and 48' extends beneath the upper reach of the belt 22 on the inclined portion and-henceit is adequately protected fromdirt'a-nd' damage due to knocking, etc.
As has been pointed out heretofore, it has not been found practical to make unloaders of this type having a flat receiving portion and an up-' wa-rdly inclined discharge portion for the reason. that too long a radius was required about the bent forming the point of intersection so as to maintain the arc of the bend such that the belt would not lift from the i dl'ersor the trackway upon which it is operating in reaching the roller 19 at theupper ordischarge end. In our conveyer we provide ways and means for overcoming this condition without increase in the driving power required and thereby make possible the use of belt conveyers inthistype of unloader.
Itis for that purpose we provide a guide or guard" [54 about the belt 22 at each side of the unloader and respectively secured to the side plates 31 and 325 Each guard 54 has ahorizontal portion 55 extending parallel to the horizontal portion 11 of the belt and a curved portion 53 that is located concentrically with the are 18 between the horizontal section 11 and the in clined section 12 of the belt conveyor, but spaced therefrom. Each guide 54 is formed of an angle iron section, one end of which is bent into the particular shaped are 53 desired for the particular construction of "conveyer. The top of the flights engage the bottom of the guide 54, especially at the are 53 and thus forms a wear-receiving means for protecting the upper surface of the belt against wear from the guides. However, the spacing between the guides 54 and trackways 17 at the arcs'53 and 18 is such that the belt is forced down upon the traokway.
As explained above, a number of factors enter into the determination of the minimum radius for the are of the trackways 17, formed by the angle irons 16; on which the belt conveyer 22 runs, so that it is not practical to more specifical- 1y define the arc mathematically than has heretofore been done. When the variable factors have been determined, the arc 18 is plotted so that the radius to the top surface of the trackway is' fixed. All other measurements dependent upon .the are are taken from that surface. From the foregoing description it will be'visualized that the beltis supported beneath and is guided above by rigid members formed to the are it is desired for the particular purpose for which the conveyer or'unloader may be designed, and in this instance the conveyerruns from the horizontal portion onto a 22 incline about an intersecting archaving a 30% inch radius, the overall length of the unloader being but 17 feet. Thus, we are enabled to produce a belt conveyer unloader withinthelength commercially permissiblefor use in railway car unloaders, and that will allow the end of a portable conveyer to be inserted beneath the unloader dischargelend and on the same ground levelas the unloader. Y Theunloader isintended to be readily portable from place to place by "one man, andfor that purposeapair of traction wheels 56 are mounted approximately at thepoint of intersection between the horizontal and inclined portions of the conveyer. The power plant is mounted above the inclined section 12 and in position to balance the horizontal portion 11 of the unloader which is about twice the length of the inclined portion 12.
The axles 57 of the wheels 56 are mounted so as to be adjustable vertically in order that the discharge end of the unloader might be properly and firmly supported upon the ground in accommodation to the varying height of railway track upon which it may be desired to use the unloader. The wheels are adjustable independently of each other in order to permit of accommodation of the support to any unevenness in the ground upon which the traction wheels 56 must rest when the unloader is in operative position.
For this purpose the axles 57 are each mounted in a block 58, each of which is threaded to receive a screw threaded rod 59 journaled in the frame 14 as indicated at 61 and respectively rotatably supported on the side plates 31 and 33 by means of bracket 62. Each block 58 slides vertically in guides 63 and 64 which are mounted upon the side plates 31 and 32. The ends of the rods 59 projecting above the brackets 62 are squared to accommodate a wrench or handle 65 by means of which the screw threaded rod 59 is turned to adjust the vertical position of the block 58 and correspondingly vertically adjust the position of its associated traction wheel 56. In both Figs. 2 and 4 there is indicated the maximum upper and lower positions for the traction wheels.
In operation, in unloading a railway car, the horizontal portion 11 of the unloader is inserted beneath the railway car, indicated diagrammatically at 71 in Fig. 2, and positioned beneath the inclined drop or chute 72 of the railway car through which the contents of the car are discharged, in a manner well known to those skilled in the art. In this position the end 20 of the unloader projects beyond the opening of the drop 72 and may project beyond the side of the car. The horizontal portion 11 of the unloader is caused to rest upon the railway track rail 73, by raising or lowering the traction wheels 56 as the case may require to insure the unloader resting upon both rails and also to insure the firm support of the traction wheels upon the ground alongside the trackway with the discharge end 12 of the unloader suificiently high to permit the insertion of the nose of another conveyer beneath the end 12 so that material discharged from the unloader will fall upon a conveyer that will transport it away from the railway track and eitherjdischarge itxonto adump or into vehicles asmay be desiredr c V In 'unloaders of this description, it is important that the unloader be so arranged that the same cannot become choked upor overloaded andthus function improperly. It is; also of importance that the driven roller 21 is protected from. the material being discharged from the railway car. For. this latter purpose we provide a guard sheath 74 about the end 20. of the unloader beneath which the rolly21 is located. The sheath isinclined downwardly from the outer end of the unloader toward the conveyer belt, so as to tend to cause any material that might reach the upper side of the sheath 74 to slide therealong and onto the conveyer, belt.
We also arrange above the'conveyer belta pair of guards 75 which overlie the conveyer belt and extend from beneath the'sheath 74 to a .point adjacent'the intersection with the upwardly inclined discharge portion of the unloader so that at the sheath 74 only approximately one-third of the conveyer belt is exposed while at the point of intersection with the upwardly inclined discharge portion substantially the whole conveyer belt is exposed. The purpose of this arrangement is that at the end 20 the belt has a relatively small capacity for handling material, while as the discharge end of the unloader is approached the belt has an ever increasing capacity for handling the material, and thus it is not possible to overload the conveyer belt or to cause any choking up of material at the intersection between the horizontal and inclined portions of the unloader.
As will be seen from Fig. 3, the guard boards 75 are secured upon the frame members 14 by means of angle iron brackets 76 to which the boards 75 are bolted.
Beneath the inclined belt portion 12 is located a closure plate '77 which is secured to the side plates 31 and 32 and extends from the frame 14 upwardly to a point adjacent the driving roller 19. Here the plate is secured to cross bar 78 that is an angle iron section secured to the side plates 31 and 32 and having one part thereof extending upwardly to a point adjacent roller 19 leaving approximately only enough clearance for the passage of the flights 23 on the return path to the roller 21. The plate '77 serves a particularly useful purpose if material should pile upon or about the conveyer receiving end in that none of such material could be dragged underneath the unloader by the inverted flights 23 on the return reach of the belt. The rigid bar 78 facilitates this general purpose.
In the following claims where reference is made to a belt or a conveyer belt, the term is to be understood as having the same meaning as this term has in the art, namely, a belt of some suitable material, fabric or otherwise, upon which the material rests and is carried during the time of its transportation upon the conveyer 0r unloader. In most cases this belt extends the full distance between the side frame of the conveyer or unloader.
Modifications may be made in the arrangement and location of parts within the spirit and scope of our invention, and such modifications are intended to be covered by the appended claims.
We claim:
1. An unloader comprising a frame, having a substantially horizontal portion and an inclined portion at the end of the horizontal portion, an endless transversely stiffened load-supporting conveyer belt extending along the horizontal portion and inclined portion, two separated continuous belt contacting surfaces on the frame and spaced from each other adjacent the outer edges of the belt for supporting the upper reach of the latter on the horizontal frame portion, means for supporting the lower reach of the belt in close proximity to the upper reach, two separated continuous belt contacting surfaces on the inclined portion adjacent the outer edges of the belt for supporting the latter, guide members for conducting the upper reach of the conveyer from the horizontal portion to the inclined portion in a curved path, and wear-receiving members on the belt and in position to contact with the guides to protect the body of the belt against wearing contact with the guides.
2. An unloader comprising a frame having a Substantially horizontal portion and an inclined portion at the end of the horizontal portion, a
transversely stiffened endless load supporti-ng conveyer belt extending along the horizontal fportion and inclined portion, two separated continuous belt contacting surfaces on the frame and spaced from each other adjacent the outer edges of the belt for supporting the latter on the horizontal frame portion and having a separate continuous contacting surface between but spaced from the two separated contacting surfaces to support the belt, two separated continuous belt contacting surfaceson the inclined portion ad jacent the outer edges of the belt and a separate intermediate continuous contacting surface for supporting the belt on the inclined portion and guide members for ceta-ducting the upper reach of the conveyer from the horizontal portion to the inclined portion in a curved path.
WILLARD W. WENTZ. ALBERT D. HEYL.
US486939A 1930-10-07 1930-10-07 Conveyer belt unloader Expired - Lifetime US1989502A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US486939A US1989502A (en) 1930-10-07 1930-10-07 Conveyer belt unloader

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US486939A US1989502A (en) 1930-10-07 1930-10-07 Conveyer belt unloader

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1989502A true US1989502A (en) 1935-01-29

Family

ID=23933730

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US486939A Expired - Lifetime US1989502A (en) 1930-10-07 1930-10-07 Conveyer belt unloader

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1989502A (en)

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2565390A (en) * 1949-12-28 1951-08-21 Mitnowsky David Electric mattress heater
US2635735A (en) * 1948-09-14 1953-04-21 Barber Greene Co Conveying and unloading device
US9315589B2 (en) 2012-03-06 2016-04-19 Bridgestone Corporation Processes for the removal of rubber from non-hevea plants
US10023660B2 (en) 2012-05-16 2018-07-17 Bridgestone Corporation Compositions containing purified non-hevea rubber and related purification methods
US10113011B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2018-10-30 Bridgestone Corporation Process for recovering rubber from natural rubber latex
US10132563B2 (en) 2012-06-18 2018-11-20 Bridgestone Corporation Methods for the desolventization of bagasse
US10138304B2 (en) 2012-06-18 2018-11-27 Bridgestone Corporation Methods for increasing the extractable rubber content of non-Hevea plant matter
US10287367B2 (en) 2013-09-11 2019-05-14 Bridgestone Corporation Process for the removal of rubber from TKS plant matter
US10471473B2 (en) 2012-06-18 2019-11-12 Bridgestone Corporation Systems and methods for the management of waste associated with processing guayule shrubs to extract rubber
US10775105B2 (en) 2018-11-19 2020-09-15 Bridgestone Corporation Methods for the desolventization of bagasse

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2635735A (en) * 1948-09-14 1953-04-21 Barber Greene Co Conveying and unloading device
US2565390A (en) * 1949-12-28 1951-08-21 Mitnowsky David Electric mattress heater
US10113011B2 (en) 2008-04-14 2018-10-30 Bridgestone Corporation Process for recovering rubber from natural rubber latex
US10316110B2 (en) 2012-03-06 2019-06-11 Bridgestone Corporation Processes for recovering rubber from aged briquettes
US9611334B2 (en) 2012-03-06 2017-04-04 Bridgestone Corporation Processes for the removal of rubber from non-Hevea plants
US9637562B2 (en) 2012-03-06 2017-05-02 Bridgestone Corporation Processes for recovering rubber from aged briquettes and aged briquettes containing plant matter from non-Hevea plants
US9890262B2 (en) 2012-03-06 2018-02-13 Bridgestone Corporation Processes for the removal of rubber from non-hevea plants
US9315589B2 (en) 2012-03-06 2016-04-19 Bridgestone Corporation Processes for the removal of rubber from non-hevea plants
US10626194B2 (en) 2012-03-06 2020-04-21 Bridgestone Corporation Processes for the removal of rubber from non-hevea plants
US11028188B2 (en) 2012-03-06 2021-06-08 Bridgestone Corporation Processes for recovering rubber from aged briquettes
US10023660B2 (en) 2012-05-16 2018-07-17 Bridgestone Corporation Compositions containing purified non-hevea rubber and related purification methods
US10132563B2 (en) 2012-06-18 2018-11-20 Bridgestone Corporation Methods for the desolventization of bagasse
US10471473B2 (en) 2012-06-18 2019-11-12 Bridgestone Corporation Systems and methods for the management of waste associated with processing guayule shrubs to extract rubber
US10138304B2 (en) 2012-06-18 2018-11-27 Bridgestone Corporation Methods for increasing the extractable rubber content of non-Hevea plant matter
US11267019B2 (en) 2012-06-18 2022-03-08 Bridgestone Corporation Systems and methods for the management of waste associated with processing guayule shrubs to extract rubber
US10287367B2 (en) 2013-09-11 2019-05-14 Bridgestone Corporation Process for the removal of rubber from TKS plant matter
US10775105B2 (en) 2018-11-19 2020-09-15 Bridgestone Corporation Methods for the desolventization of bagasse

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1989502A (en) Conveyer belt unloader
US1989537A (en) Conveyer
US1970842A (en) Belt conveyer
US1726555A (en) Conveyer
US1707998A (en) Conveyer
US2979187A (en) Apparatus for conveying material
US3854571A (en) Scoop belt conveyor
US1576910A (en) Loader conveyer
US2641353A (en) Conveyer system, including a stacker, trailing conveyer, and belt lifting feed hopper
US3590974A (en) Descrambler
KR200462268Y1 (en) Apparatus for preventing ore falling on belt conveyor
US3017012A (en) Portable conveyor assembly
US3437192A (en) Material distributing device
US3595415A (en) Elevator with a pivoted support deck
US2071743A (en) Beet piling machine
US2435694A (en) Conveyor belt
US3647047A (en) Inclined drag conveyor for hot asphalt mix and the like
US3446331A (en) Unloading system
US1413138A (en) Elevating apparatus
US3355005A (en) Loading device and method for transfer points
US714357A (en) Conveyer system.
US2623652A (en) Box dumping apparatus
US2670837A (en) Flexible trough belt conveyer
US803402A (en) Conveyer.
US826066A (en) Conveyer.