US1988588A - Tobacco pipe - Google Patents

Tobacco pipe Download PDF

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Publication number
US1988588A
US1988588A US709940A US70994034A US1988588A US 1988588 A US1988588 A US 1988588A US 709940 A US709940 A US 709940A US 70994034 A US70994034 A US 70994034A US 1988588 A US1988588 A US 1988588A
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Prior art keywords
bowl
level
smoke
pipe
hole
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Expired - Lifetime
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US709940A
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Francis P Ellsworth
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Francis P Ellsworth
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES
    • A24F1/00Tobacco pipes
    • A24F1/02Tobacco pipes with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke
    • A24F1/04Tobacco pipes with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke with smoke chamber or slobber traps
    • A24F1/06Tobacco pipes with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke with smoke chamber or slobber traps inside the pipe
    • A24F1/10Tobacco pipes with arrangements for cleaning or cooling the smoke with smoke chamber or slobber traps inside the pipe inside the bowl
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A24TOBACCO; CIGARS; CIGARETTES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES; SMOKERS' REQUISITES
    • A24FSMOKERS' REQUISITES; MATCH BOXES; SIMULATED SMOKING DEVICES
    • A24F5/00Bowls for pipes

Description

Jam 22,1935. F, P, ELLSWORTH 1,988,588
TOBACCO PIPE Filed Feb. 6, 1934 I N V EN TUR- EPA/v06 PfLLswo/Pm ATTORNEY.
Patented Jan. 22, 1935 I i 1f 1 988 588;
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE TOBACCO PIPE Francis P. Ellsworth, New York, N. Y.
Application February 6, 1934, Serial No. 209,940
" '2 Claims. (014131-12) The present invention relates to improvements the tobacco. Around the outer surface of the inin tobacco pipes, and has for its purpose the proner bowl 12 are two peripheral grooves 15 and 16, vision of a pipe that gives a uniformly-mild smoke spaced axially along the bowl so that radial holes frombeginning to end, instead of a progressively 17-and-18,-of which there are two toeach'groove ostronger smoke as isthe case with ordinarypipes. one at each end, connecting these grooves with :5,
Another purpose is to provide a pipe in which'all the interior of the tobacco bowl, occur half-way ofthetobaccomay bereadily burned and in which down and at thebottom of the tobacco'bowl. the tobacco in the bottom does not become satu- The peripheral grooves 15 and 16 do notextend rated with moisture, allowing a longer and more entirely around the bowl but each'has a length economical smoke. y of '270 degrees the centers of the groove'measured 10 Still another purpose is to provide a pipethat angularly, being diametrically opposite and the is arranged so that the moisture, nicotine and ends of the groove overlapping for 90degrees at other volatile products in the smoke are partially the ends. Communication between grooves 515 condensed'in passing through the pipe and -dis and 16 and the pipe stem holes is obtained by posed of in such a way that they are not drawn means of an axially extending semi-circular 15 into the smokers mouth, or do not tend to block groove 1-9 drilled in theinnersurfaceof theouter the smoke passage. A further purpose is to probowl 10, directly in line with the pipe stem hole vide a pipewhich imparts to thev smoke an eX- The semi-circular groove 19 extends upward; ceptionally pleasant flavor, and whichsmokes from-the pipe stem hole 16 just far enough to 20 mildly from the firstsmoke and requires no oboverlap groove 15. Plug 21 provides means for' 2ojectionable breaking in; Another purpose isto stopping the hole m'ade in the'bottom of;the pipe provide a pipe of the type described above that is body when groove 19 i's-drilled. simply and reliably constructed,'is easily opBr- It is evident from the above description that ated, and readily cleaned. v with the innerbowl in the position shown Figfi 25 With the above and other-objects in view, em- 1 that a smoke passage is provided through holes 5 bodiments of my invention are shown in the acl7, grooves 15, 19 and stem hole 20. Asection' oompanying drawing, and these embodiments through Fig. 2, at 3-3 is shown in Fig. 3, which will be hereinafter more fully described with ref-v shows that groove 15 is in position tocommunierence thereto, and the invention will be finally Cat with groove 19 and therefore the mok i pointed out in the claims. drawn from the pipe over this path. Fig. 4, m
In the drawing: I which is a section through Fig. 2 at 44 shows 1 is a sidelelevation, With p n Of t that groove 14 does not communicate with-the p p b broken-away Of a tobacco pipe accordgroove 19 in this position, and therefore no smoke ing to one embodiment'of my invention. is drawn throughholes 18 at the bottom of the Fig. 2 is avertical sectional view thereof. tobacco bowl. This is the proper position for '5 F 3 i a horizontal Sectional V w, takEn the inner bowl during the first half of the smoke along the line 3-3 of'Fig. 2. and since the smoke is not drawn through the i a longitudinal Sectional w, taken tobacco in the lower half of the bowlit'remains along the line 4--4 of Fig. 2 fresha d 7 I I 1 v 40 Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view of a modified When the tobacco in the upper half of the bowl '40: form of the invention. is smoked or nearly so, the inner bowl is rotated; Similar reference characters indicate corre-1 through approximately 180 degrees. With the sp nd n parts throughout t s v l fi u s f bow-1 in this position the smoke is drawn through the drawing. holes'lS and grooves 16, 19 and stem hole 20 and Referring now to t e d w 10 is'the no smoke is drawn through holes 1'7 and groove 5 ven io y of the p p a preferably Of 13, as it is not in communication with groove-19.- briar wood. The inner surfaceof the bowl part The proper position of the inner bowl for each is bored cylindrically asat 11 to receive the inner position of the smoke is indicated by different bowl 12, which is turned to fit closely in 10, and is sized holesdrilled in the outer surface of the bowl, provided at its upper end with a flange 13 seatas at 22 and 23, the smaller hole, when on'the 50 ing upon the upper edge of the bowl 10' andhavstem side, indicating that the bowl is set for the ing its peripheral surface flush withthe periphfirst halfpipeful, and the large hole indicating eral surface of the bowl 10. The inner bowl 12 the setting for the lasthalf pipeful It'should isalsopreferably made of briar wood and is bored be noted that the position of the inner bowl for 5 cylindrically,-as at 14,- to form-a bowl for burning the firstorlast half 'pipeful is not critical as the valve section of the grooves in either position is effective through practically degrees of bowl position. The space 24 at the bottom of the outer bowl and the absorbent material 31, such as cotton placed therein are provided for the collection and retention of saliva and other moisture which would otherwise tend to collect in the pipe stem hole 20 and then be drawn into the smokers mouth. As the pipe is ordinarily held in an inclined position with the bowl lower than the stem, all excess moisture will collectin this space which prevents it from being drawn into the smokers mouth since it is not in the path over which smoke is drawn from the pipe. v
In Fig. 5 I have shown a modification in which the bowl 10 is provided with an axially extending hole 25, having ports 26 and 27 to communicate with the respective grooves -15 and 16 of the inner bowl 12. Plugs 28, 29 and 30 provide means of stopping the holes made in the bowl when the respective hole 25 and ports 26 and 27 are drilled.
few smokers attempt to smokeall the tobacco in the ordinary pipe and consequently more frequent reloading is required, and full and economical use of the tobacco is not obtained.
In the present invention, since the tobacco in the bottom of the bowl is kept fresh and dry, the
smoke from this-position of the pipeful is as mild as from the first half and the tobacco is all readily burned thus giving a longer and more economical s ed f I The present invention is completely effective in providing a uniform, mild and full flavored smoke. It has always been assumed by pipe makers and. smokers that removing the tar and moisture products in the smoke would result in the most desirable condition, but experience has shown that effective filters remove too much or too many of the volatile products and leave the smoke without sufficientflavor or satisfying capacity. The experience and conclusion of the inventor is that the desired flavoring of pipe smoke can best be accomplished by passing the smoke through passages, the surfaces of which are coated with a relative pure form of the tar found in tobacco smoke. The concentrated tar has absorbent properties which enable it to remove additional tar from the smoke and give the smoke the desired flavor. The presence of moisture to any extent is disadvantageous to this action; The temperature of the flavoring grooves around the inner bowl of the present invention, has an important-effect upon the quality and flavoring ability of the tar that forms there. Too high a temperature causes the tar to dry out and toolow a temperature allows too much moisture to condense, both conditions being unfavorable tothe best action of the pipe. The size and thicknessof the inner bowl affects the temperature of the grooves. An inner bowl bore of inch and a thickness .of inch with grooves not more than inch deep have been found quite satisfactory when the pipe is made of briar.
, 'Iheaction of ordinary, pipes bearsout the above conclusions. It is well known that 'pipes must'be broken in before they Smokesatisfactorily and that they smoke better if given a rest now and then. Breaking in a pipe consists of getting a coat of tar (diluted in ordinary pipes and concentrated in the present invention) on the surface of the smoke passage. When ordinary pipes are smoked in such a way that the coating has no chance to dry out it becomes so diluted that it has no acceptable flavoring action. When the pipe is unused for a time the flavoring action is restored. The present invention is not subject to this disadvantage.
Briar is the pipe wood that experience and tradition have indicated is best. The apparent explanation of this is that tobacco tar has a greater afiinity-for bn'ar wood than for other woods or materials and forms upon it more readily. Thus a briar pipe stands a better chance of acquiring a coat of tar than other woods or materials.
From the above conclusions it is evident that a really satisfactory pipe must have effective elements for (a) insuring the formation of tar in a relatively concentrated form (2)) a sufficient length of tar coated smoke passage to properly flavor the smoke (c) withdrawing the smoke from the tobacco in such a way that the smoke will be of uniform quality throughout the pipeful (d) controlling the moisture that always collects, so that it willnot work into the flavoring grooves, will not cause bubbling, and can be conveniently removed- In the present invention both conditions (a) and (b) are eifectively and inherently provided in the peripheral grooves that collectthe smoke. There is no disadvantageous condensation of moisture in them and tar does form and accumulate there in the proper concentration. These.-
grooves also provide a sufficient length of tar coated smoke passage to give the desired flavoring action. V
Condition (0) is effectively provided in the feature wherev the smoke is withdrawn from the tobacco bowl at two different levels. Thus the smoke is sufliciently uniform that the other features of the pipe are not subject to widely varying conditions that might prevent them from functioning in the. desired manner. 7
Condition (d) is effectivelyprovided in the moisture well and absorbent material placed therein. Tobacco smoke contains a considerable amount of moisture and when removed in thedegree the present invention removes its absorption becomes important. Without a well the water would collect in such quantity in the stem that it would gurgle and be drawn into the smokers mouth. If allowed tocollect loosely in the well, ordinary handling of the pipe causes it to work up into the flavoring grooves, particularly the lower one. L'oose water is also difficult to clean from the pipe as it cannot be emptied or shook out satisfactorily since it sticks to the surface of the bowl. The provision of an absorbent material, such as cotton, collects and retains the moisture in the well to a satisfactory degree and its removal is accomplished by replacing the- Cir it will be obvious that changesma'y'be madether'ein, withinthe spirit and-scope thereof, as defined in'theappended claims.
' I-Iaving thus described m invention what I claim and desire to 'secure'byLetters'Patent is:-
.1. In a smoking pipe, an outer bowl having a chamber, a stem forsaid outer bowl, said outer bowl having an axially extendingfpassage form-- ing communication between said chamber and the stem passage, an inner; bowl rotatably engaged m the chamber of said outer bowl, said inner bowl having a hole at one level, and another hole at another level, circumferentially extending means at said first level forming a passageway between said first hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, circumferentially extending means at said other level forming a passageway between said other hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said other level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, said closure means at one level being radially offset with respect to said closure means at said other level.
2. In a smoking pipe, an outer bowl having a chamber, a stem for said outer bowl, said outer bowl having an axially extending passage forming communication between said chamber and the stem passage, an inner bowl rotatably engaged in the chamber of said outer bowl, said inner bowl having a plurality of holes at one level, and another plurality of holes at another level, circumferentially xtending means at said first level forming a passageway between said first plurality of holes and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, circumferentially extending means at said other level forming a passageway between said other plurality of holes and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said other level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, said closure means at one level being radially offset with respect to said closure means at said other level.
3; In a smoking pipe, an outer bowl having a chamber, a stem for said outer bowl, said outer bowl having an axially extending passage forming communication between said chamber and the stem passage, an inner bowl rotatably engaged in the chamber of said outer bowl, said innerbowl having a hole at one level, and another hole at another level, circumferentially extending groove means at said first level forming a passageway between said first hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, circumferentially extending groove means at said other level forming a passageway between said other hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said other level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, said closure means at one level being radially of'fset with respect to said closure means at said other level.
4. In a smoking pipe, an outer bowl having a chamber, a stem for said outer bowl, said outer bowl having an axially 'extending'passage' forming communication between "said chamber and the'stem passage, an inner bowl rotatably engaged in the chamber of said outer bowl, said'in ner'bowl' having a hole at one level, andanothe'r hole at another level, circumferentially'extending gr'oove'means provided insaid inner bowl at said first level forming a passageway between said firstchole and saidjaxial passage in one position of rotation or said inner bowl, and means also at said level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, circumferentially extending groove means provided in 'said inner bowl at said other level forming a passageway between said other hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said other level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, said closure means at one level being radially offset with respect to said closure means at said other level.
5. In a smoking pipe, an outer bowl having a chamber, a stem for said outer bowl, said outer bowl having an axially extending groove forming communication between said chamber and the stem passage, an inner bowl rotatably engaged in said outer bowl, saidinner bowl having a hole at one level, and another hole at another level, circumferentially extending means at said first level forming a passageway between said first hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, circumferentially extending means at said other level formin a passageway between said other hole and said axial passage in one position of rotationjof said inner bowl, and means also at said other level adapted to close said axial passage in another position ofrotation of said inner bowl, said closure means at one level being radially offset with respect to said closure means at said other level;
6. In a smoking pipe, an outer bowl having a chamber, a stern for said outer bowl, saidouter bowl having an axially extending hole and laterally extending parts at a plurality of levels forming communication between said chamber and the stem passage, an inner bowl rotatably engaged in said outer bowl, said inner bowl having a hole at the level of one of said parts, and another hole at the level of another of said parts, circumferentially extending means at said first level forming a passageway between said first hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said bowl, circumferentially extending means at said other level forming a passageway between said other hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and means also at said other level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, said closure means at one level being radially offset with respect to said closure means at said other level.
'7. In a smoking pipe, an. outer bowl having a chamber, a stem for said outer bowl, said outer bowl having an axially extending passage forming communication between said chamber and the stem passage, an inner bowl rotatably engaged in the chamber of said outer bowl, said inner bowl having a hole at one level, and another hole at another level, circumferentially extending means at said first level forming a passageway between .said first hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and. means also at said level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, circumferentially extending means at said other level forming a passageway between said other hole and said axial passage in one position of rotation of said inner bowl, and meansvalso at said other level adapted to close said axial passage in another position of rotation of said inner bowl, said closure means at one level being radially ofiset with respect to said closure means at said other level there being a well in the lower end of said outer bowl beneath FRANCIS P. ELLSWORTI-L
US709940A 1934-02-06 1934-02-06 Tobacco pipe Expired - Lifetime US1988588A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2705013A (en) * 1950-08-18 1955-03-29 Edwin S Brothers Cigarette holder
US2718892A (en) * 1949-10-29 1955-09-27 Jim D Holderman Tobacco pipe
US3098493A (en) * 1961-10-16 1963-07-23 Frank J Garrison Pipe for smoking tobacco

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2718892A (en) * 1949-10-29 1955-09-27 Jim D Holderman Tobacco pipe
US2705013A (en) * 1950-08-18 1955-03-29 Edwin S Brothers Cigarette holder
US3098493A (en) * 1961-10-16 1963-07-23 Frank J Garrison Pipe for smoking tobacco

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