US1986422A - Automatic packaging machine - Google Patents

Automatic packaging machine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1986422A
US1986422A US700097A US70009733A US1986422A US 1986422 A US1986422 A US 1986422A US 700097 A US700097 A US 700097A US 70009733 A US70009733 A US 70009733A US 1986422 A US1986422 A US 1986422A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
tube
means
sealing
mechanism
machine
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US700097A
Inventor
Walter R Zwoyer
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
TRANSPARENT WRAP MACHINE CORP
TRANSPARENT-WRAP MACHINE Corp
Original Assignee
TRANSPARENT WRAP MACHINE CORP
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Family has litigation
Application filed by TRANSPARENT WRAP MACHINE CORP filed Critical TRANSPARENT WRAP MACHINE CORP
Priority to US700097A priority Critical patent/US1986422A/en
Priority claimed from US75542334 external-priority patent/US2047243A/en
Priority claimed from US75542434 external-priority patent/US2037555A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1986422A publication Critical patent/US1986422A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
First worldwide family litigation filed litigation Critical https://patents.darts-ip.com/?family=24812172&utm_source=google_patent&utm_medium=platform_link&utm_campaign=public_patent_search&patent=US1986422(A) "Global patent litigation dataset” by Darts-ip is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.
Application status is Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B9/00Enclosing successive articles, or quantities of material, e.g. liquids or semiliquids, in flat, folded, or tubular webs of flexible sheet material; Subdividing filled flexible tubes to form packages
    • B65B9/10Enclosing successive articles, or quantities of material, in preformed tubular webs, or in webs formed into tubes around filling nozzles, e.g. extruded tubular webs
    • B65B9/20Enclosing successive articles, or quantities of material, in preformed tubular webs, or in webs formed into tubes around filling nozzles, e.g. extruded tubular webs the webs being formed into tubes in situ around the filling nozzles
    • B65B9/2014Tube advancing means
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B9/00Enclosing successive articles, or quantities of material, e.g. liquids or semiliquids, in flat, folded, or tubular webs of flexible sheet material; Subdividing filled flexible tubes to form packages
    • B65B9/10Enclosing successive articles, or quantities of material, in preformed tubular webs, or in webs formed into tubes around filling nozzles, e.g. extruded tubular webs
    • B65B9/20Enclosing successive articles, or quantities of material, in preformed tubular webs, or in webs formed into tubes around filling nozzles, e.g. extruded tubular webs the webs being formed into tubes in situ around the filling nozzles
    • B65B9/213Enclosing successive articles, or quantities of material, in preformed tubular webs, or in webs formed into tubes around filling nozzles, e.g. extruded tubular webs the webs being formed into tubes in situ around the filling nozzles the web having intermittent motion
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S264/00Plastic and nonmetallic article shaping or treating: processes
    • Y10S264/37Processes and molds for making capsules

Description

Jan. 1, 1935. w. R. ZWOYER AUTOMATIC PACKAGING MACHINE 7 Sheets-Sheet 2 Filed Nov. 28, 1953 INVENTOR WM)? A'I I'ORNEYS J an.,l, 1935. v w. R. ZWOYER 1,986,422

. AUTOMATIC PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Nov. 28, 1933 7 Sheets-Sheet 4 Jan. 1, 1935. w. R. ZWOYER AUTOMATIC PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Nov. 28, 1955 7 Sheets-Sheet 5 ATTORNEYS Jan. 1, 1935. w. R. ZWOYER 1,986,422

AUTOMATIC PACKAGING MACHINE I Filed Nov. 28, 1933 7 Sheets-Sheet 6 INVENTOR J-ZZWJ I ATTORNEYS Jan. 1, 1935. Q w R, ZWOYER 1,986,422

AUTOMATIC PACKAGING MACHINE Filed Nov. 28, 1935 '7 Sheets-Sheet 7 I 1k ID h t) 2 E Fag. 22.

INVENTOR l 7 ATTORNEY a Patented Jan. 1, 1935 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE AUTOMATIC PACKAGING MACHINE tion of New York Application November 28, 1933, Serial No. 700,097

Claims.

This invention relates to an automatic packaging machine and aims to provide certain improvements therein.

The invention is particularly directed to the packaging of one or more small articles, such as pieces of candy either singly or in bulk. It is, however, adapted for use in the packaging of any articles of suitable size. It finds its greatest field of usefulness in connection with articles which can be fed either mechanically or automatically, and preferably those which will suecessfully feed by gravity. Among such articles may be enumerated candy of all kinds, dry medicines, particularly in tablet or pill form, various staples such as sugar, salt, coffee, tea, cereals, etc., and other articles of not too great bulk which it is desired to protect by some form of flexible package. It is not intended that the package shall follow closely the contour of the article to some conventional form, such as an oblong or square receptacle, without particular regard to the contour of the article being packed. The general shape of the container, however, may be varied at will.

In proceeding to carry out the invention I form a series of containers into which the articles to be packaged are fed. These containers are not necessarily entirely closed but should be sufficiently so to prevent the escape of the contents after the feeding operation and before the completion of the packaging operation. More specifically the method comprises the formation from a strip of packaging material of what may be called a partially completed bag. The bottom of the bag while still attached to the strip is closed (or sufliciently so to prevent escape of the article to be fed), whereupon the article or articles to be fed are passed into the partly completed bag, usually by gravity, and in a measured quantity. The bag is then sealed at the top and simultaneously (or shortly thereafter) detached from the strip and delivered out of the machine.

In accordance with the preferred form of the invention packaging material is drawn from a reel and passed over a former by which it is bent to a tubular shape and, if desired, the meeting side edges are sealed so as to form a complete tubular portion several times the length of the package. The bottom of this tubular portion is sealed; the article to be packed is dropped through the entire tube to its bottom; the top of the container is then sealed, preferably while it is still attached to the remainder of the tube;

remainder of the tube.

the filled container still attached is pulled down to the delivery position and severed from the Preferably the mechanism is so arranged that the sealing and pulling devices are combined, and preferably also the pulling operation is utilized to advance the strip over the tube former so that no other mechanism is required to form the tube.

The machine embodying the herein-disclosed invention is intended to utilize any suitable sheet material and particularly thin transparent material such as regenerated cellulose preferably of the moisture-proof type, or any similar moistureproof transparent or semi-transparent material, hereinafter referred to as packaging material; and in using such material the sealing of the bottom, top, and, if desired, the side seam also, may be efiected by the application of heat. Hence in the construction shown the sealing members are heated, preferablyelectrically, bythe use of resistance material. It will be understood, however, that as to some of the aspects of the invr ntion it is contemplated that the joining of the n .aterial to form the tube bottom and side seams shall be by the use of adhesives, or folds, or an," other approved method.

It is feasible in some instances to feed the article into the receptacle as thus described either by hand or by hand-controlled mechanism, but it is preferable in most cases to feed it automatically in timed relationship to the formation of the container. By so doing a very considerable speed of operation is attained. The automatic feed will take different forms depending upon the material to be fed and the quantity. It may be either a quantity measuring device, or a weighing device, or a counting device. In most instances, however, the feeding mechanism is designed to feed a single article, such as a piece of candy, at a time, or if a quantity of small pieces is to be packaged ineach container the feed mechanism is appropriately a quantity measuring device. In the form of the invention shown in the drawings the feed mechanism is designed to feed into each container a measured quantity of small candy articles such as chocolate-covered peanuts, candy drops, or other similar articles.

Referring to the drawings which are illustrative of one form of the invention,

Figure 1 is a perspective view showing principally the front of the machine at which are located the principal operative parts of the mechanism and the delivery chutes one of which has been omitted in order to reveal underlying structure.

Fig. 2 is a front elevation on an enlarged scale illustrating the tube formers, the tubes, and several packages which are completed and about to be severed.

Fig. 3 is a side elevation looking to the left in Fig. 1 and showing the position of the reel of packaging material, a side view of the tube formers, and a part of the driving mechanism.

Fig. 4 is a detail of Fig. 3 showing the construction of the feeding mechanism and of the sealing mechanism for the tops and bottoms of the containers.

Fig. 5 is a vertical sectional view of the feeding mechanism and adjacent parts.

Fig. 6 is a section taken on the line 6-6 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 7 is a section taken on the line 7-7 of Fig. 5.

Fig. 8 is a top view partly in horizontal section of the top and bottom sealing mechanism, the mechanism being shown closed around the container tube.

Fig. 9 is a view similar to Fig. 8 but' showing the sealing mechanism open.

. Fig. 10 is a front view partly in section of the tube former.

Fig. 11 is a central vertical section of Fig. 10 taken on the line 1111 in Fig. 10.

Fig. 12 is a cross-section of the tube former taken on the line 12-12 in Fig. 10.

Fig. 13 is a cross-section taken on the line 1313 of Fig. 11.

Fig. 14 is an elevation of a detail showing the operationof the cutting mechanism and also the gripping mechanism above the cutting mechamsm.

Fig. 15 is a view taken at right-angles to Fig. 14, certain parts being shown in section.

Fig. 15a is a detail view of the lower cutting knife.

Fig. 16 is a top view of the gripping mechanism of Fig. 14 taken on the line 1616 in that figure, the cutting knives being omitted.

Fig. 17 is a view similar to Fig. 16 with the grippers shown in open position.

Fig. 18 is a section taken on the line 18-18 in Fig. 16.

Fig. 19 is a detail taken in horizontal section approximately on the line 19-19 in Fig. 1.

Fig. 20 is a view showing the progressive formation of the containers and their several positions with regard to the sealing clamp, gripping mechanism, and cutting mechanism when the gripping mechanism is used.

Fig. 21 is a view similar to Fig. 20 showing the positions when the gripping mechanism is omitted.

Fig. 22 is a horizontal section showing the main driving connections.

Fig. 23 is a horizontal sectional view taken through the feed mechanism and showing the vibrators.

Fig. 24 is a detail of the vibrators.

Fig. 25 is a face view of one of the dies used in the sealing operation.

Fig. 26 is an end view of the two dies, the showing being fragmentary.

Referring to Figs. 1 and 3 of the drawings, it will be understood that the structure generally is built upon a framework in which A is a suitable base-plate, B is a table mounted upon legs 5 C- so as to be spaced apart from the base-plate.

D, D are standards constituting side frames, which standards are mounted upon the table B. At the top of the standards is carried a platform E which supports the feed mechanism and various other parts of the machine. The structural framework thus formed may be varied at will so long as the operative parts are properly supported.

The machine shown in the drawings is a duplex machine. That is to say, it is designed to simultaneously operate to produce two series of packages. the machine two container tubes are constantly being made, filled, severed and delivered. Any suitable number of tubes may be thus simultaneously produced, but I prefer the duplex type since it enables me to take advantage of a single operating mechanism for actuating each of two like parts, and thus obtains simplicity while at the same time the output of the machine is doubled as compared with a single type.

Referring first to Fig. 3, it will be observed that at the rear of the machine is a reel 10 mounted on a spindle 11 which fits in grooves 12 formed on the side frames D. On this reel 10 is indicated as being wound a long strip of packaging material of a width which is suitable to form the complete container. Pivoted to rest on the top of the roll of material is a steadying weight 13 which prevents overrunning of the reel. There is a similar roll of packaging material on the opposite side of the machine.

The strip of packaging material G is led down over a tension roll 14 mounted on a pair of arms 15 which are given a proper tension by a spring 16, one end of which is attached to a fixed point In other words, in the operation of 17 of the frame, and the other end of which is attached to a short lug 18 on a rock shaft which connects the arms 15. The strip G then passes with a slight bend over a fixed roll 19 and thence to the former H.

Turning now to Figs. 10 to 13, it will be seen that the former is provided with a pair of arms 21 and 22. In Fig. 10 the strip G is shown as passing up at the rear of the former, then over the arms 21, 22, and then sharply down, over the upper edge of, and into the outer former tube 23. The center of the strip passes down at the rear of the inner former tube 24 (which inner tube also forms a feed tube for the articles to be packaged), the position of the center of the strip being indicated at 25 in Fig. 11. The edges of the strip are led downwardly and crossed one inside the other, as best shown in Fig. 10. In this figure the edge 26 is shown as being led to the right by a former guide strip 27', while the edge 2'7 is shown as being led to the left by a former guide strip 28. Any suitable type of former may be used, it being sufiicient that it be such as to form the strip into a tube-like structure, preferably with one edge overlapping the other, as indicated at 29 in the lower part of Fig. 10. It will be observed that so long as the tube portion thus formed is pulled downwardly the former will continue to develop the strip into a tube.

Having thus formed the strip G continuously into a tube, it is desirable in some cases to seal the edges of the tube together. Where the packaging is of a single, relatively small article. however, the lapping of the edges of the strip together with the closing of the ends of the container, which is finally accomplished, is sufficient to protect the article from dust, dirt, and even to an extent to exclude the atmosphere. In packaging a group or number of articles, however, which are movable within the container, it is very desirable to sealthe latter along the edges. This may be done very easily in the case of regenerated cellulose or similar packaging material by the use of a heated wheel such as is shown at I (or I) in Fig. 2. This wheel is preferably provided with an ordinary resistance ,wire through which is fed a current which is suitably proportioned to maintain the periphery of the wheel at proper sealing temperature. Preferably the periphery is formed with circumferential ribs or ridges such as 30 which indent the packaging material. The lower part of the inner forming tube 24 may be formed with grooves 31 matching such ridges, as best shown at the right in Fig. 2. Indentations are thus formed in the side seam of the tube whereby the sealing of the latter is facilitated. The electrical line connections to the sealing wheels I, I are not shown, but the terminals are indicated at 32 and 33.

It should be noted that each of the sealing wheels I and I is mounted upon an axle 34, supported in an electric terminal box 35, connected to a rotatable hub 36, mounted to turn upon a fixed shaft 37. A spring 38 encircles the shaft 37, one end of the spring being connected with the hub 36 and the other with the shaft 3'7 through the medium of a collar 39. This spring is placed under tension, with the result that the sealing wheel is yieldingly urged against the partly completed tube of packaging material so that it exerts a definite pressure against the side edges of the latter as before described. The spring being adjustable by displacing the collar 39 angularly, the exact degree of pressure which is desirable for the best sealing results can be easily attained.

It should also be noted that this mounting of the sealing wheels permits the entire sealing wheel to be swung around to the position of the wheel I in Fig. 2, thus permitting the tube of packaging material to be inspected or rearranged or removed in case of accident or disturbance. In Fig. 2 the sealing wheel I at the left of the machine is shown in operative position.

The tube of packaging material being thus formed either with or without side sealing, is drawn down below the end of the inner former tube 24, the extreme lower end of the tube being now ready to be closed to form the bottom of the container. As soon as the container tube is closed, or partially so, the package is in condition to receive its contents. It is of course not strictly necessary at this point that the end seal of the package be fully completed. It is only necessary that the ends be closed toward each other sufficiently to prevent the contents from dropping out of the bottom of the package. Preferably, however, the machine is so organized as to close the part of the tube which has been drawn through the former and either wholly or partly complete the seal before the introduction of the contents.

The mechanism for forming the end closure of a package which may serve as its bottom may be of various forms, but I prefer that illustrated. It comprises generally a clamping mechanism which is shown generally at J, such clamping mechanism, if packaging material appropriate for heat sealing is used, comprising a pair of clamps provided with heated sealing dies which are designed to be brought together to embrace the container, while it is still attached to the body of the tube, at a position near the lower end of the inner forming tube 24, this position being illustrated in front elevation in Fig. 2, in side elevation in Fig. 3 and in vertical section in Fig. 4. Preferably it comprises a front bar 40 and a rear bar 41, the rear bar carrying a pair of elongated studs 42, 43 which pass through holes 44, 45 in the front bar, springs 46, 4'7 encircling the studs and being confined between nuts 48, 49 at the ends of the studs and shoulders formed on the front bar around the holes 44, 45 as indicated by the reference numerals 50,51. The effect of the springs is hence normally to draw the bars toward each other with an adjustable force designed to produce the proper compression of the bars over the container tubes. It will be observed from Figs. 8 and 9 that each of the bars carries a pair of heating dies 52, 53 which are screwed to the bars, each element being bored to admit an electric heater 54, 55.

The bars 40, 41 are mounted upon rods '7, 58 (see Fig. 1) and are permitted to move toward and away from each other by the expedient of holding them between flanged collars 59, 60 which are fixed on the rods 57 or 58 (see, Fig. 4). For this purpose the ends of the barsare provided with curved bearing faces which are best indicated in Fig. 8 at 61, 62. The tension on the springs 46, 47 is sufficient to hold the bars in place and permit them to approach and recede from each other without escaping from the collars 59, 60. This construction also permits the rods 5'7, 58 to be rotated without disturbing the clamping mechanism, thus enabling these rods to be used as shafts for purposes to be described.

The mechanism for opening and closing the clamping bars is best illustrated in Figs. 4, 8 and 9. As shown in these figures the curved interiors of the ends of the bars are hollowed so as to contain a double-armed cam lever 63, which cam lever is keyed to the shaft 5'7. The cam lever preferably carries at each end a cam roller 64 for antifriction purposes, which cam roller bears against the hollow interior cam surfaces of the clamping bars to open the same and to guide their closing upon rotation of the shaft 57. Fig. 4 shows the position of the cam lever 63 when the clamps are separated, as does also Fig. 9. The closed position of the clamps, corresponding to the position of the heater elements when the bottom of the tube is being sealed, is shown in Fig. 8.

The mechanism for opening and closing the clamps through the oscillation of the shafts 57, 58 is best seen in Figs. 1, 3 and 22. Referring to these figures it will be seen that the base A of the machine is provided with bearing standards 66, 67 adapted to form journals for a cam shaft 68 carrying a rotary cam 69. Cam shaft 68 is driven in any suitable manner in timed relationship to the remainder of the machine. The cam 69 is provided with a cam track '71, shown in dotted lines in Fig. 1, in which cam track is mounted a cam roller '72 connected by a pitman '73 to the short arm of a bell-crank lever mounted in a bearing '75 on the table B. The cam movement is such as to reciprocate the pitman '73 in a vertical direction, which movement, being translated by the bell-crank lever, insures a horizontal reciprocation of an elongated rack '77. This rack '77, which is best seen in Fig. 1, extends across the front of the machine, being held in suitable guide recesses '78, as shown in Fig. 3. Each of the shafts 5'7, 58 has fixed to it an elongated gear 80 or 81, which two gears mesh with the rack '77 so that upon reciprocation of the latter the shafts 57, 58 will be oscillated approximately a quarter of a turn in each direction. This angular movement of the shafts insures the displacement of the cam lever 63 to approximately ninety degrees from the position of Fig. 8 to the position of Fig. 9, thus opening the clamp bars J at the end of each sealing movement of the latter.

Hitherto the clamp J and associated mechanism have been described as a means for effecting a tube closure adapted to serve as the bottom of a receptacle. After the articles to be packed have been inserted in the receptacle, I it of course becomes necessary to make some kind of a closure at the top. The invention contemplates any suitable means for accomplishing this result, but by far the simplest mechanism is that illustrated in the present drawings wherein the clamp operates not only as a bottom sealer but also as a top sealer. When using packaging material appropriate for heat sealing this can be accomplished by so proportioning the vertical widths of the sealing dies 52 and 53 II that they will seal a portion of the tube of sufficient breadth to enable the filled container to be severed from the tube across the sealed portion, thus leaving the top of the undertube sealed and forming a sealed bottom for the next succeeding :0 tube above. The widths of the sealing dies are well illustrated in Fig. 20, and this figure will be referred to later in connection with the explanation of the timing of the machine and general method of operation.

It has heretofore been said that the mere pulling of the container tubes downwardly through the former is sufficient to continue the formation of the tubes. This operation of pulling down the tubes to bring a new tube section into filling position after a section below has been filled and sealed, may be accomplished by any suitable mechanism. I prefer, however, the mechanism shown in the drawings in which the clamps J constitute the pulling mechanism so that no separate mechanism is required for this purpose. This has the additional advantage that it enables the sealing dies 52, 53 to remain in contact with the container tube for a longer time than would be feasible if thesedies merely closed to seal the tube and opened to let the tube pass.

This particular object is accomplished by reciprocating the clamp J vertically, so that after it has clamped the container tubes when in its uppermost position it will pull them down to an extent which brings those portions of the container tubes above the clamps to a position ready to receive a fresh charge of contents, thus sealing the top of the lower tube and the bottom of the upper tube. After this feed motion of the clamp, the cam levers 63 come into play to open the clamp whereupon the clamp rises to its upper position and the sequence is repeated.

A suitable mechanism for accomplishing this motion is shown best in Fig. 1. In this mechanism the two rods or shafts 57, 58 are mounted at their ends in a crosshead 90 in which said shafts are journaled, and this crosshead in turn is mounted on the top of a reciprocating bar 91 which passes through and has a bearing in the table B and also in the base A. The bar 91 is given a vertical reciprocation by a bell-crank lever 92 oscillating in bearings 93 and actuated by a pitman 94, which in turn is operated by a cam 95 having a shaft 96 which turns in bearings 97, as seen in Figs. 3, 4 and 22. The cam is provided with the usual cam roller 98 running in customary cam track 99. The shaft 96 may be driven in suitable timed relationship to the remainder of the machine.

It will be noted that irrespective of the position of the crosshead the shafts 57 and 58 still remain in operable relation with the rack 77, this being due to the elongated gears 80 and 81 which mesh with the rack in any position of the cross- 7 head. This of course insures the proper operation of the clamp in closing at the top of its movement; remaining closed during its descent; opening at.-the bottom of its movement; and remaining open until the clamp again reaches the top preparatory to a successive clamping action.

It will be apparent that the opening and closing movement of the clamp may be adjusted either by changing the cam 71, or the length of either of the arms of the bell-crank lever 74. The upper and lower positions of the clamp may be adjusted either by changing the position of the collar 100 on which the bell-crank lever 92 operates, or by changing the cam bell-crank lever, or the point of {application of the pitman 94 to the bell-crank ever.

The machine as thus far described would produce a connected series of pockets filled with the articles to be packaged, and for some purposes the machine will be operated in this way. Some articles such as tablets, pills or the like are best purveyed in a long strip, each tablet for instance being separated from its fellows by a sealed section. The machine can also be operated in connection with the production of individual packages by severing the packages by hand. My invention, however, provides an improved severing mechanism particularly coordinated with the remainder of the machine so that the complete machine is quite automatic in its character.

Referring now to Fig. 20 which shows the preferred course of the packaging operation from the point of formation of the tube of packaging material down to the completely filled and individually separated package, it will be seen that this figure illustrates a portion of the tubular strip G surrounding the inner tube 24 of the former. Fragmentary portions of the end sealers 52, 53 are also illustrated. Fig. 20 represents that point in the operation where the end sealers have been brought together to seal the bottom of a new package X which is just being formed, the contents Y having been delivered through the tube 24 into the package.- The next previously formed package X is also at this point being sealed by the elements 52, 53; the next previously formed packages X and X are still connected with the line of containers; and the knife mechanism K is shown as just severing a still lower package X It is obvious that it is within the purview of the invention to locate the knives at a central part of the sealers and sever the package X at the same time it is being sealed at the top; it is also within the purview of the invention to sever the package X by application of the knives between the packages X' and X It is preferred, however, in the case of. very small packages to sever that package which is in the position of X Referring now to Figs. 1 and 3, the general location of the cutting knives is indicated by the reference letter K. Details of the cutting mechanism are best illustrated in Figs. 9, 14 and 15. In these figures the upper knife is indicated by the reference numeral and the lower knife by the numeral 111. The lower knife (as best seen in Fig. 151: is somewhat angularly formed so that as it passes under the upper knife it will have a slight shearing action. The upper knife is also given a slight V-shape (as best seen in Fig. 15) but at right-angles to the lower knife, so that the upper knife in fact rises during the cutting stroke against the tension of springs 110a suitably housed in the upper knife carrier 11Gb. The operating mechanism for the knives is connected with them at their middles and the two projecting ends are designed to cut the two packages. One such package is shown being cut in Fig. 20. Any suitable operating mechanism may be employed, but that illustrated comprises a pair of rackslides 112, 113, which are carried in a slide box 114 fastened to a bracket 115, as best seen in Fig. 1. Each of the racks is moved by a pinion 116, as best seen in Figs. 8 and 9, this pinion being located between the racks and operating to move the knives in opposite directions to separate them to permit the down feed of the filled packages between them and to close them to sever the packages. The driving mechanism for the knives is best seen in Figs. 1, 3 and 14. The rack 77 which drives the sealing clamps is utilized to transmit motion. to the pinion 117, which in turn meshes with a similar pinion 118, to which is fixed a shaft 119 carrying the pinion 116 midway of its length, as shown in dotted lines in Fig. 14 and in plan in Figs. 8 and 9. The proportions of the gears are so designed that the reciprocations of the rack 77 afford the necessary opening and closing movements of the knives, and these are best timed to close and sever the package simultaneously with the gripping of the tube of packaging material by the clamp J. In some instances it is desirable to introduce a steadying feature to the line of connected packages while they are being severed, and in Figs. 14 to 17 I have shown such a construction. This particular mechanism has been omitted from Figs. 1 and 3 for clearness.

The mechanism consists of a pair of clamps designed to grasp the line of unsevered packages atthe point between the packages X X in Fig. 20. The two pairs of clamps are shown at 120 and 120' and at 121 and 121' in Fig. 16. They comprise merely yoke members 122 (see Fig. 18) which are designed to be bolted to clamp plates 123, 124 by bolts 127, 128, each of the yoke members carrying a packing such as a piece of rubber 125. These clamp plates are normally held together by two bolts 127a, 128a which pass completely through the sides of the clamp plates and are fitted with springs 129, 130, which normally tend to press the clamps together to an extent which can be adjusted by varying the pressure on the springs. To separate the clamps and hold them separated while the connected packages are passing between them, a cam lever 131 is provided which operates in a suitable aperture or recess formed in each of the clamp plates, the cam lever 131 having cam rollers 132, 133 which operate respectively on bearing faces 134 and 135 on the clamp plates 123 and 124. The two positions of the gripper clamp are illustrated in Figs. 16 and 17. In Fig. 16 the clamp is shown closed, and in Fig. 17 it is shown open.

Any suitable means for driving the clamp may be provided. In the construction shown the cam lever 131 is mounted directly on the upper end of the shaft 119 so that when this shaft is oscillated by the rack 77 (through gears 117, 118) the cam lever will be oscillated with it. The total movement of the cam lever in the construction shown is approximately 90, but this full movement is not availed of in the operation of the cam lever. Fig. 17 shows the completion of its movement in an anti-clockwise direction to open the clamps, and Fig. 16 shows the completion of its eflfective movement in a clockwise direction to close the clamps, but from the position of Fig. 16 the cam lever continues its clockwise movement for approximately 70. This latter movement is idle, as is also its return movement until. it contacts with the bearing faces 134, 135. During this idle movement the clamps are closed. It is best to provide a limitation on the relative movements of the plates 123, 124, and this may be done by studs or bolts 137, 138 fixed to a stationary supporting plate 140, the cam plates having suitable slots 139, 139" through which the studs pass. The two clamp plates 123 and 124 are carried on the stationary plate 140 which is mounted on suitable standards 141, as best seen in Fig. 14.

It will be understood that this gripper clamp, by grasping the unsevered package assembly below the package X adds a steadying effect to the package X so that the knives can operate with more certainty.

Fig. 21 illustrates the operation when the gripper clamp is omitted. In this case the knives K sever the package X With the construction thus far described, it would of course be possible for an operator to drop the articles to be packed down through the tubes 24 by hand each time the end sealing clamps 52, 53 were operated. It would also be possible to adopt any suitable form of measuring or weighing device for introducing uniform quantities into the packaging tubes at the proper time.

I prefer, however, the automatic construction of feeding device illustrated in the accompanying drawings. In this construction a machine is provided with a platform 200 arranged on the upper ends of the side frames D (see Figs. 1 and 3). This platform serves as a supporting bearing for the shafts 57, 58, the inner former tubes 24, 24 (see Fig. 2) and the supporting rods 37, 37 for the side sealers I, I, as well as other parts of the mechanism.

Mounted on the top of the platform 200 is the feeding mechanism M now to be described.

It will be noted that the inner former tubes 24 (see Figs. 3, 5 and 6) are extended through the upper platform 200, and are open at their tops to form the feed passage for the materials leading to the container tube.

,The feeding mechanism M in the duplex type of machine illustrated comprises in its preferred form two measuring and feeding disks M, M, which are shown in plan in Figure 6. A section taken on the line 5--5 in Figure 6 is shown in Figure 5. Each of the feeding disks M, M is mounted to rotate in a horizontal plane, being fixed to the upper end of a shaft 201 or 202.

These shafts are carried in bearings on the platform 200, the shafts being intermittently driven in a manner to be described. Each feed disk carries an appropriate number of feeding and measuring tubes 203, the lower ends of which extend closely adjacent to a feed table 204, which is stationary on the platform 200. The upper ends of the feeding and measuring tubes are also open, and partially surrounding them are rims 205, 206, which with side walls 207, 208 (see Fig. 6) constitute a box for the supply of articles to be fed. Over this box is arranged a funnel 209 designed to receive the articles from any suitable source. Normally, the container thus formed will be partly full of the articles to be fed. The upper sides of the disks M, NP are bridged by a stationary plate 211 (Fig. 6) so as to prevent the articles to be fed from falling downwardly around the disks.

Generally speaking, each of the tubes is designed to be filled by the articles lying above them in the container 25 during its movement around its circular path, and when it reaches the discharge position over the tube 24 (see the rightof candy, there is a tendency to clog the upper ends of the tubes 203, so that they either do not contain the full measured amount when they arrive at the discharge position, or fail entirely to discharge their contents, or both. This is probably due to the weight or pressure of the body of the materials to be fed which is present above the tubes in the feed box or hopper.

The present invention provides a novel feature in this type of feed mechanism, in that it acts to fill the tubes without pressure at the time of filling. In other words, after a tube is emptied by discharging its contents at the appropriate point the articles to be fed are permitted to pour into the tube without pressure. Preferably, each of the tubes is filled before it passes under the main body of the contents of the feed box. This is accomplished preferably by the construction shown wherein for each feed disk there is arranged a barrier in the form of a brush 212 or 213. This brush does not extend entirely across the feed disk, but is so proportioned that a space 214 or 215 is left between the end of the brush and the encircling rim 205 or 206. The bristles of the brush in each case extend close to the top of the disk, so as to hold back any material from the middle of the feed box on the delivery side, thus preventing any greater quantity being fed than is contained in the particular tube 203 which is in feeding position. This is rendered more positive by plates 214a, 215a.

By reference to Figures 5 and 6, itwill be seen that the righthand disk is in the position where one of its tubes 203 is in alignment with the tube 24 and this tube 203 has discharged its contents. The next succeeding tube 203 is fully loaded, so that at the next forward movement of the feed disk M such succeeding tube is brought to the discharge position. In the meantime the feed tube which has previously been emptied has gone forward one step and begins to receive some of the loose candy which has worked through the space 214. This candy is under no pressure or weight to speak of, and drops easily down to the bottom of the tube. ,On the next movement of the feed disk the tube 203 is practically or completely filled sothat when this tube moves around under the body of the material in the feed box or hopper it is already in a filled condition and cannot be clogged or choked in any way. At the same time the constructionis such that no dangerous surplus of candy or other articles can pass through the space 214, the flow from the feed box or hopper being laterally outward along the top of the disk and being self-regulating if the space 214 is properly proportioned.

The two feed disks may be given proper intermittent motion designed to carry each tube 203 step by step over the feed pipe 24. That shown in the drawings comprises a main vertical shaft 220, which is shown in the central portion of Fig. 1 and which is best seen in Fig. 2. This shaft is driven at its bottom by a pawl lever 221, as is clearly shown in Fig. 19. This pawl lever is pivoted on the shaft, and carries at its extreme end a pawl 222, which acts upon a ratchet 223 fixed to the shaft to impart intermittent movements to the latter as the lever 221 oscillates. A pawl 23% is arranged on a fixed part of the machine, which pawl acts on the same ratchet wheel 223 and prevents reverse movement of the shaft during the idle movements of the pawl 222. The end 225 of the lever 221 enters a reciprocating yoke 226 mounted upon a rocking lever 227. This rocking lever 227 is clearly shown at the. bottom of Figure 3, being pivoted to a stationary fulcrum 228, and being driven by a crank 229 mounted on the shaft 96 through the medium of a pitman 230 which connects the crank with an adjustable pivot 231 held in a slot 232 formed in the lever 227. Thus, on every rotation of the shaft 96 the feeder shaft 220 is given a forward angular movement, the movements of the shaft being intermittent. As will be best seen in Figure 2, these intermittent movements of the feeder shaft 220 are transmitted to the shafts 201 and 202 by a gear train which comprises a large gear 235 keyed to the feeder shaft 220 and meshing directly with a pinion 236 keyed to-the lower end of the shaft 201 which operates the righ-hand feed disk M and indirectly, through the medium of an idle gear 237, Fig. 7, with a pinion 238 connected to the shaft 202. This indirect connection is provided to reverse the rotation of the feed disk NP, since I have found in practice that with a feed supply which is common to two individual disks, (such as is provided by the feed box and hopper), trouble is occasioned if the two feed disks rotate in the same direction, which trouble is avoided by reversing the direction of the disks. 1

It sometimes happens, in the feeding of particular articles such as chocolate-covered nuts or the like, that there is some adherence of the articles to the feed tubes 203, or a slight choking or jamming within these tubes. I have found that this can be obviated by striking one or more blows on the tube 203 when approximately in the feed position. In Figures 1, 23 and 24 I have shown a simple device for accomplishing this result. In these figures I have shown one or more strikers 240, which may be formed of wood or other suitable material. These strikers may be pivoted on a common stud 242 and are provided with springs 243, which may lead to a common pin 244. Being urged by the springs in a direction opposite to the direction of rotation of the feed disks and being of a length to engage the various feeding tubes 203, it will be seen that as the disks rotate they will be moved outwardly by one of the feeding tubes until they escape the tube, whereupon they will strike the next succeeding tube with a blow which is determined by the tension on the springs 243. By the simple expedient of making the strikers of varying length, the timing of the blows can be accurately adjusted. I have found that the best results are attained ifthe final blow is delivered'just as the tube 203 arrives at discharge. position. One or more additional blows can be given slightly before this position is reached.

In the construction of the machine as thus described, I have found it of value to provide various features which will now be referred to.

The sealing wheels I, I' (Fig. 2). being adapted for continued rotation in the same direction, are best supplied with electric current through the medium of slip ring connections the details of which are not shown, but which are housed in an electric terminal box 35, so as to swing with the wheel. a

The end sealing dies 52, 53 may be configured by alternate grooves and ridges. I have found, however, that if there are distinct depressions in one die and corresponding projections on the other die, a very strong seal can be made in the package. These depressions may be shallow, and may be of any desired shape. This discovery has permitted me to use the sealed end portion of a package as a suitable part in which to impress characters indicating thename of the manufacturer, the weight of the contents, or other legend. When this is done the seal is sufficiently strong that corrugations may be minimized or even omitted.

Figure 25 shows the faceof a die embodying this construction, and Figure 26 shows an end view of the two dies. The depressions are indicated at 253 and the projections are indicated at 254.

Throughout the machine provisions are made -for adequate adjustment of the parts, such as the brackets and slides 260, 261 (Fig. 2) for adjusting the position of the formers. These are for the most part ordinary expedients.

The machine is of course driven with all of its parts in timed relationship. I have already described the immediate mechanism for driving each part, but in Figure 22 I have shown the main motor connected by a chain to the sprocket wheel 271, which is connected by a suitable friction clutch 272 to. the main drive shaft 96, which in turn drives shaft 68 by means of a bevel gear connection. The cam wheel 95 is mounted directly on the main drive shaft. The friction clutch 272 is operated by a hand lever on the front of the machine, indicated at 274, which turns the rock shaft 2'75, to which is connected a shift lever 276. The ultimate delivery of the packages out of the machine can be accomplished by any appropriate means such, for instance, as a pair of delivery chutes one of which, designated 280, is shown in Figure 1 and the other of which is omitted so as to reveal underlying structure.

It is believed that the operation of the machine is sufficiently indicated by the foregoing description, but briefly it is as follows:

The strip G of packaging material is led from its roll through its guides over the top of the former H, and is formed into a tube, the side or lengthwise seam being sealed by one of the rotary sealers I or I. Assuming that the machine has progressed to the point where it is in full operation, the end sealing clamps 52, 53 may be taken to be in their upper position wherein they are commencing to seal the bottom of the partlyformed container X (Fig. 20), which at the same time has been filled with a measured quantity of candy or the like by the discharge of the contents of one of the feed tubes 203 of the feed mechanism into the tube 24. Below the container X is a filled and sealed container X, and below that still another filled and sealed container X Below that is a third filled and sealed container X all of these being connected together by their sealed end portions. The grippers 122 are gripping the sealed portion between the containers X and X and the knives are operating to sever the container X from the container X The knives then retract, the grippers open, and the end sealer clamp pulls the whole assembly down a distance equal to the height of one container. This movement makes a new partly formed tube and completes the sealing peration,,if that has not already been accomplished. The grippers then close about the sealed portion connecting containers X and X and hold the assembly firmly while the clamps are releasing the sealed portion between containers X and X and are moving upwardly to their new position above the previously partly formed container X to complete the top seal thereof and the bottom seal of the newly formed container. The knives may conveniently operate during this period. The grippers hold the assembly until the sealing clamps firmly grasp the tube, whereupon they open and the cycle recommences. If a loaded container is being produced having sufiicient weight, the grippers are not required, since the weight of the several containers in the assembly is sufficient to hold the latter in vertical position. With light packages the grippers are preferred, since they not only hold the assembly taut, but tend to prevent twisting and secure a better action of the knives. Fig. 21 shows the grippers omitted. Figs. 1 and 3 show the machine without the grippers, but by adjusting the slide box 114 downwardly the grippers may be added thereto.

While I have shown and described the preferred construction, it will be understood that I do not wish to be limited thereto, since numerous and varied changes may be made therein without departing from the spirit of the invention.

What I claim is:

1. In a packaging machine, a tube former, a heated sealing clamp, means for opening and closing the clamp to heat-seal the tube, and means for reciprocating the clamp to draw out a further length of tube.

2. In a packaging machine, in combination, a tube former, an end sealing means comprising two members adapted to approach each other to grasp the tube and to reciprocate to draw out successive lengths of tube, means for imparting said motions to said members and means for heating said members.

3. In a packaging machine, the combination of a tube former, an end sealing means comprising two members adapted to approach each other to grasp the tube and to reciprocate to draw out a further length of tube, and means for imparting both said motions to said members, said means comprising cam levers to separate the members and a crosshead to reciprocate the members and driving mechanism for operating said levers and crosshead.

4. In a packaging machine, the combination of a tube former, reciprocating clamp means for drawing the container material past said former, heat sealing means for the tube adapted to be operated by said clamp means, gripping means for holding the packages below the travel of said clamp means, and severing means arranged below the gripping means to sever the individual packages.

5. In a packaging machine, in combination, a tube former, a sealing element comprising a rotatable electric heater to seal a longitudinal joint of a formed tube, conductive connections through which the heater may be connected with a source of,electromotive force, means for heat-sealing the formed tube at one end of a portion intended to receivea charge, and means for inserting a chargein said portion, the sealing means constituting means for also heat-sealing the tube at the opposite end of the charged portion.

6. In a packaging machine, in combination, a tube former, a pair of sealing elements having opposed corrugated surface portions between which portions of the wall of a formed tube may be pressed to seal a longitudinal joint, one of said elements being an electric heater, means for sealing the formed tube at an end of a portion intended to receive a charge, and means for inserting a charge in said portion, the sealing means constituting means for also closing the tube at the opposite end of the charged portion.

"1. A packaging machine comprising, in combination, means for progressively bending successive portions of a flat strip of suitable packaging material of relatively great length as compared with its width into a tubular form, means for closing, heating, and thereby sealing spaced portions of the resulting tubular structure to produce a succession of intervening individual merchandise containers, means for imparting to the sealing means movements suchthat it may serve as means to draw packaging material through the tube forming means and means for charging the respective containers with merchandise in succession as formed during the periods intervening between the sealing of their opposite ends.

8.-In a packaging machine, a tube former, re-

ciprocating closing mechanism adapted to act.

on the tube successively to close portions of it separated by portions adapted to serve as containers, means for charging each container between the times of closing of its opposite ends, and means to apply heat to the closed portions of the tube to seal them, the reciprocating closing mechanism constituting the means to move the tube material through the former.

9. In a packaging machine, a tube former, closing mechanism adapted to act on a formed tube to close it, means for heating the closing mechanism to render it efiective as a heat sealer, and means whereby the closing mechanism may serve as a means to move the tube material through the former, said moving means comprising means I for causing said closing mechanism to successively grasp the tube, pull it away from the former, release the tube after a given movement and then move the closing means toward the former for a succeeding operation.

10. A packaging machine comprising, in combination, means for progressively bendingsuccessive portions of a flat strip of suitable packaging material'of relatively great length as compared with its width into a tubular form, means for closing, heating and thereby sealing spaced portions of the resulting tubular structure to produce a succession of intervening individual merchandise containers, means for reciprocating the sealing means whereby it may serve as means to pull the packaging material through the tube forming means, and means for charging the respective containers with merchandise as formed during the periods intervening between the sealing of their opposite ends.

11. A packaging machine, as defined by claim 10, having additional means for heat sealing the longitudinal seam of the tubular structure as formed.

1 2. In a packaging machine, a tube former, a bottom and top closer adapted to successively close spaced parts of a formed tube and thereby make separated compartments therein, said closer having a reciprocating motion so as to serve as a means for successively pulling down sections of tube from the former, means for charging the compartments as formed, means for applying heat to the parts of the tube closed by the closer, and severing means for detaching the individual containers after having been closed by said closer.

13. In a packaging machine, a tube former, a closer comprising a reciprocating clamping device adapted to close the bottoms and tops of a plurality of separate containers to be constructed from a formed tube and by its reciprocation to draw out further lengths or tube, means for charging each container after its bottom has been closed and before its top has been closed, and means for driving said tube closer comprising a reciprocating crosshead for reciprocating the closer, and means for opening the closer, said means comprising an elongated gear operative in all of the positions or the closer, and toothed means for driving said gear.

14. In a packaging machine, in combination, a tube former, a clamp provided with sealing means adapted to close the upper and lower ends of containers to be successively constructed from a formed tube, means for reciprocating said clamp to draw out further lengths oi tube, means for charging each container after its bottom has been closed and before its top has been closed, and a severing device located below the range of movement of said sealing device and operative to detach the charged and closed containers from the tube.

15. In a packaging machine, in combination, a tube former, a clamp provided with sealing means adapted to close the upper and lower ends of containers to be successively constructed from a formed tube, means for reciprocating said clamp to draw out further lengths of tube, means for charging each container after its bottom has been closed and before its top has been closed, a severing device located below the range of movement of said sealing device and operative to detach the charged and closed containers from the tube, and a common operative means for said closer and said severing device, said means comprising gears and a rack for driving said gears.

16. In a packaging machine, in combination, means to grip a tube, means for reciprocating the gripping means, spring means for urging said gripping 'means in one direction, cam levers for moving said gripping means in the opposite direction, and means for transmitting motion to said cam levers comprising a pair of gears one mounted on the body of the machine and one so mounted as to be shifted with the gripping means, said gears having their axes parallel with the direction of reciprocation and teeth of relative widths such as to remain constantly in mesh.

17. A packaging machine comprising, in combination, means for progressively bending successive portions of a flat strip of suitable packaging material of relatively great length as compared with its width into a tubular form, means for successively closing spaced portions of the resulting tubular structure to produce a succession of intervening individual merchandise containers, means for imparting to the tube closing means movements such that it may serve as means to draw packaging material through the tube former, means for charging the respective containers with merchandise in succession as formed during the periods intervening between the closings of their opposite ends and means for successively heating and thereby sealing the closed portions of the tubular structure in the order in which they are formed.

18. A packaging machine, as defined by claim 17, of which the tube forming and closing means are so positioned that the tubular portion of the strip of packaging material between the flat portion and the last portion closed will be so disposed that the open end of such tubular portion will be of a materially higher level than the closed end, whereby merchandise may be fed '7, or which the sealing means comprises a pair into the partly completed containers as formed, 01' dies having in their opposed faces complemenfrom the charging means, by gravity. tal recesses and depressions of forms adapted to 19. A packaging machine, as defined by claim impress in the sealed portions of the tubular 5 1'7, having means for sealing the longitudinal structure characters adapted. to serve as a means 5 seam of the tubular structure, as formed, by the of identification, advertising, etc. application of heat.

20. A packaging machine, as defined by claim WALTER R. ZWOYER.

US700097A 1933-11-28 1933-11-28 Automatic packaging machine Expired - Lifetime US1986422A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US700097A US1986422A (en) 1933-11-28 1933-11-28 Automatic packaging machine

Applications Claiming Priority (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US700097A US1986422A (en) 1933-11-28 1933-11-28 Automatic packaging machine
US75542334 US2047243A (en) 1933-11-28 1934-11-30 Severing mechanism
US75542434 US2037555A (en) 1933-11-28 1934-11-30 Dispensing mechanism

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1986422A true US1986422A (en) 1935-01-01

Family

ID=24812172

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US700097A Expired - Lifetime US1986422A (en) 1933-11-28 1933-11-28 Automatic packaging machine

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1986422A (en)

Cited By (49)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2419982A (en) * 1943-05-13 1947-05-06 Transparent Wrap Machine Corp Automatic packaging machine
US2432373A (en) * 1945-08-08 1947-12-09 Stokes & Smith Co System for filling containers
US2467879A (en) * 1945-05-17 1949-04-19 Milprint Inc Bagmaking machine
US2494484A (en) * 1946-01-22 1950-01-10 Nicolle Charles Apparatus for obtaining multiple packages, especially adaptable for tablets and similar products
US2503171A (en) * 1944-11-13 1950-04-04 Power John Kennedy Method and apparatus for manufacturing containers
US2555758A (en) * 1947-05-09 1951-06-05 Robinson Waxed Paper Co Ltd Wrapping machine
US2580456A (en) * 1945-10-22 1952-01-01 Kidde Mfg Co Inc Packaging machine
US2581724A (en) * 1946-11-23 1952-01-08 Kartridg Pak Machine Co Banding machine
US2641881A (en) * 1946-12-04 1953-06-16 Mckay Davis Chemical Corp Packaging equipment
US2671906A (en) * 1952-11-15 1954-03-16 Robert W Potts Liner for sanitary closets
US2685767A (en) * 1949-12-17 1954-08-10 Sterling Drug Inc Manufacture of plastic ampoules
US2741079A (en) * 1945-09-28 1956-04-10 Hermorion Ltd Apparatus for continuous production of filled and sealed tetrahedral packages of paper or the like
US2753672A (en) * 1949-01-13 1956-07-10 Sutherland Paper Co Wrapping or packaging machine
US2766568A (en) * 1952-05-14 1956-10-16 American Viscose Corp Apparatus for producing tubular articles and stuffed products therefrom
US2815620A (en) * 1953-05-21 1957-12-10 Edward F Prodigo Manufacture of packages with detachable registered printed appendages
US2831302A (en) * 1954-10-06 1958-04-22 Mayer & Co Inc O Packaging machine
US2832271A (en) * 1950-12-30 1958-04-29 Hermorion Ltd Apparatus for the continuous shaping of tubes from a web of paper or the like
US2837882A (en) * 1955-11-18 1958-06-10 Package Machinery Co Package knocker mechanism for automatic packaging machines
US2840966A (en) * 1956-08-01 1958-07-01 Dreeben Jack Forming and filling tubes for package making apparatus
US2856742A (en) * 1954-12-27 1958-10-21 American Viscose Corp Guide for sausage stuffing machine
US2861406A (en) * 1953-01-02 1958-11-25 Henry T Holsman Packaging method and apparatus
US2872762A (en) * 1956-09-27 1959-02-10 Dreeben Jack Forming and filling packages and apparatus therefor
US2894363A (en) * 1957-04-29 1959-07-14 Shell Dev Wrapping
US2902808A (en) * 1953-03-12 1959-09-08 Hoechst Ag Apparatus for forming seamless packages for fluids
US2935829A (en) * 1957-01-25 1960-05-10 Den Berg Van Coin operated vending machine
US2953882A (en) * 1959-05-08 1960-09-27 Sperry Rand Corp Packaging machine
US2956383A (en) * 1959-05-19 1960-10-18 Hayssen Mfg Company Product settling attachments for packaging machines
US2960808A (en) * 1956-09-11 1960-11-22 Gerald L Pike Machine and method for packaging food products
US3008278A (en) * 1959-09-11 1961-11-14 James B Mccalley Method and apparatus for forming, filling and sealing bags
US3015922A (en) * 1956-02-27 1962-01-09 Frank Packaging machines
US3040490A (en) * 1960-05-31 1962-06-26 Triangle Package Machinery Co Apparatus and method for making, filling, and sealing containers
US3061989A (en) * 1959-12-04 1962-11-06 Package Machinery Co Packaging machine
US3070931A (en) * 1961-01-10 1963-01-01 Gen Packaging Equip Co Packaging machine
US3078626A (en) * 1960-08-05 1963-02-26 Emile Bernat & Sons Company Means and method of wrapping
DE1152937B (en) * 1960-02-01 1963-08-14 William C Leasure A method of producing packages from a molded to the tube packaging material and apparatus for carrying out the method
US3173233A (en) * 1960-07-12 1965-03-16 Klein Karl Packaging machine for the filling of plastic foil tubing
US3293824A (en) * 1964-03-13 1966-12-27 Mayer & Co Inc O Printing apparatus for packaging machines
US3354799A (en) * 1963-11-14 1967-11-28 Harry W Harrison Packaging apparatus
US3838552A (en) * 1973-01-02 1974-10-01 E Hooley Packaging machine
US4194438A (en) * 1976-12-21 1980-03-25 Rovema Verpackungsmaschinen Gmbh & Co. Kg. Flexible tube bagging machine
EP0138649A2 (en) * 1983-09-09 1985-04-24 United States Tobacco Company Precise portion packaging machine
US4552613A (en) * 1983-04-08 1985-11-12 Robert Bosch Gmbh Apparatus for producing pouch packages in pairs
US4555289A (en) * 1983-06-01 1985-11-26 Frito-Lay, Inc. Method and apparatus forming fin-type back seal using cohesive sealants without externally applied heat
US5369941A (en) * 1991-03-11 1994-12-06 Ica S.P.A. Vertical packaging machine with two opposite forming tubes
US6729112B2 (en) * 1999-12-01 2004-05-04 Rovema Verpackungsmaschinen Gmbh Tubular bagging machine
US6876896B1 (en) 1999-04-26 2005-04-05 Ab Tetrapak Variable motion system and method
US20070186509A1 (en) * 2006-02-10 2007-08-16 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Packing device
US20120233970A1 (en) * 2011-03-17 2012-09-20 Tna Australia Pty Limited Packaging machine former
US20120297738A1 (en) * 2009-10-23 2012-11-29 Douglas Machine Inc. Packaging related process, system & apparatus

Cited By (52)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2419982A (en) * 1943-05-13 1947-05-06 Transparent Wrap Machine Corp Automatic packaging machine
US2503171A (en) * 1944-11-13 1950-04-04 Power John Kennedy Method and apparatus for manufacturing containers
US2467879A (en) * 1945-05-17 1949-04-19 Milprint Inc Bagmaking machine
US2432373A (en) * 1945-08-08 1947-12-09 Stokes & Smith Co System for filling containers
US2741079A (en) * 1945-09-28 1956-04-10 Hermorion Ltd Apparatus for continuous production of filled and sealed tetrahedral packages of paper or the like
US2580456A (en) * 1945-10-22 1952-01-01 Kidde Mfg Co Inc Packaging machine
US2494484A (en) * 1946-01-22 1950-01-10 Nicolle Charles Apparatus for obtaining multiple packages, especially adaptable for tablets and similar products
US2581724A (en) * 1946-11-23 1952-01-08 Kartridg Pak Machine Co Banding machine
US2641881A (en) * 1946-12-04 1953-06-16 Mckay Davis Chemical Corp Packaging equipment
US2555758A (en) * 1947-05-09 1951-06-05 Robinson Waxed Paper Co Ltd Wrapping machine
US2753672A (en) * 1949-01-13 1956-07-10 Sutherland Paper Co Wrapping or packaging machine
US2685767A (en) * 1949-12-17 1954-08-10 Sterling Drug Inc Manufacture of plastic ampoules
US2832271A (en) * 1950-12-30 1958-04-29 Hermorion Ltd Apparatus for the continuous shaping of tubes from a web of paper or the like
US2766568A (en) * 1952-05-14 1956-10-16 American Viscose Corp Apparatus for producing tubular articles and stuffed products therefrom
US2671906A (en) * 1952-11-15 1954-03-16 Robert W Potts Liner for sanitary closets
US2861406A (en) * 1953-01-02 1958-11-25 Henry T Holsman Packaging method and apparatus
US2902808A (en) * 1953-03-12 1959-09-08 Hoechst Ag Apparatus for forming seamless packages for fluids
US2815620A (en) * 1953-05-21 1957-12-10 Edward F Prodigo Manufacture of packages with detachable registered printed appendages
US2831302A (en) * 1954-10-06 1958-04-22 Mayer & Co Inc O Packaging machine
US2856742A (en) * 1954-12-27 1958-10-21 American Viscose Corp Guide for sausage stuffing machine
US2837882A (en) * 1955-11-18 1958-06-10 Package Machinery Co Package knocker mechanism for automatic packaging machines
US3015922A (en) * 1956-02-27 1962-01-09 Frank Packaging machines
US2840966A (en) * 1956-08-01 1958-07-01 Dreeben Jack Forming and filling tubes for package making apparatus
US2960808A (en) * 1956-09-11 1960-11-22 Gerald L Pike Machine and method for packaging food products
US2872762A (en) * 1956-09-27 1959-02-10 Dreeben Jack Forming and filling packages and apparatus therefor
US2935829A (en) * 1957-01-25 1960-05-10 Den Berg Van Coin operated vending machine
US2894363A (en) * 1957-04-29 1959-07-14 Shell Dev Wrapping
US2953882A (en) * 1959-05-08 1960-09-27 Sperry Rand Corp Packaging machine
US2956383A (en) * 1959-05-19 1960-10-18 Hayssen Mfg Company Product settling attachments for packaging machines
US3008278A (en) * 1959-09-11 1961-11-14 James B Mccalley Method and apparatus for forming, filling and sealing bags
US3061989A (en) * 1959-12-04 1962-11-06 Package Machinery Co Packaging machine
DE1152937B (en) * 1960-02-01 1963-08-14 William C Leasure A method of producing packages from a molded to the tube packaging material and apparatus for carrying out the method
US3040490A (en) * 1960-05-31 1962-06-26 Triangle Package Machinery Co Apparatus and method for making, filling, and sealing containers
US3173233A (en) * 1960-07-12 1965-03-16 Klein Karl Packaging machine for the filling of plastic foil tubing
US3078626A (en) * 1960-08-05 1963-02-26 Emile Bernat & Sons Company Means and method of wrapping
US3070931A (en) * 1961-01-10 1963-01-01 Gen Packaging Equip Co Packaging machine
US3354799A (en) * 1963-11-14 1967-11-28 Harry W Harrison Packaging apparatus
US3293824A (en) * 1964-03-13 1966-12-27 Mayer & Co Inc O Printing apparatus for packaging machines
US3838552A (en) * 1973-01-02 1974-10-01 E Hooley Packaging machine
US4194438A (en) * 1976-12-21 1980-03-25 Rovema Verpackungsmaschinen Gmbh & Co. Kg. Flexible tube bagging machine
US4552613A (en) * 1983-04-08 1985-11-12 Robert Bosch Gmbh Apparatus for producing pouch packages in pairs
US4555289A (en) * 1983-06-01 1985-11-26 Frito-Lay, Inc. Method and apparatus forming fin-type back seal using cohesive sealants without externally applied heat
US8757167B1 (en) * 1983-09-09 2014-06-24 U.S. Smokeless Tobacco Company Llc Precise snuff portion packaging machine
EP0138649A3 (en) * 1983-09-09 1987-06-03 United States Tobacco Company Precise portion packaging machine
EP0138649A2 (en) * 1983-09-09 1985-04-24 United States Tobacco Company Precise portion packaging machine
US5369941A (en) * 1991-03-11 1994-12-06 Ica S.P.A. Vertical packaging machine with two opposite forming tubes
US6876896B1 (en) 1999-04-26 2005-04-05 Ab Tetrapak Variable motion system and method
US6729112B2 (en) * 1999-12-01 2004-05-04 Rovema Verpackungsmaschinen Gmbh Tubular bagging machine
US20070186509A1 (en) * 2006-02-10 2007-08-16 Hon Hai Precision Industry Co., Ltd. Packing device
US20120297738A1 (en) * 2009-10-23 2012-11-29 Douglas Machine Inc. Packaging related process, system & apparatus
US20120233970A1 (en) * 2011-03-17 2012-09-20 Tna Australia Pty Limited Packaging machine former
US9598189B2 (en) * 2011-03-17 2017-03-21 Tna Australia Pty Limited Packaging machine former

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3492783A (en) Apparatus for forming and filling bags
US3426499A (en) Method of packaging food articles
US3469364A (en) Method and apparatus for filling bags or the like
US3303630A (en) Packaging apparatus and method for cylindrical articles
US3423902A (en) Production and filling of plastic containers
US3509682A (en) Method and apparatus for the assembling of heat sealable covers to filled containers
US4136505A (en) Tubeless vertical form, fill and seal packaging machine with improved feed means
US2248471A (en) Packaging method and machine
CA1228287A (en) Machine for forming, filling, and sealing bags
US2712717A (en) Packaging machine and method
US3328937A (en) Device for continuously feeding and packaging flowable substances
US2113658A (en) Packaging machine
US5235794A (en) Bag making apparatus and method
US4004399A (en) Packaging machine
US5465554A (en) Package, and method for packaging loose leaf material
US2113636A (en) Method and apparatus for forming packages
US2208951A (en) Packaging apparatus
US2330361A (en) Method of and apparatus for producing bags
US4041677A (en) Packaging apparatus
US2913862A (en) Machine for forming and filling foil packets
US2960808A (en) Machine and method for packaging food products
US3320718A (en) Apparatus for filling and sealing containers
US2747346A (en) Method of forming packages
US1551525A (en) Bag-sealing machine
US4002005A (en) Package of nested containers and method and apparatus for producing same