US1959601A - Chronological instrument - Google Patents

Chronological instrument Download PDF

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US1959601A
US1959601A US563754A US56375431A US1959601A US 1959601 A US1959601 A US 1959601A US 563754 A US563754 A US 563754A US 56375431 A US56375431 A US 56375431A US 1959601 A US1959601 A US 1959601A
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Prior art keywords
globe
means
ring
clock
driving
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US563754A
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Herman E Schulse
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Uniclox Corp
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09BEDUCATIONAL OR DEMONSTRATION APPLIANCES; APPLIANCES FOR TEACHING, OR COMMUNICATING WITH, THE BLIND, DEAF OR MUTE; MODELS; PLANETARIA; GLOBES; MAPS; DIAGRAMS
    • G09B27/00Planetaria; Globes
    • G09B27/08Globes
    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04BMECHANICALLY-DRIVEN CLOCKS OR WATCHES; MECHANICAL PARTS OF CLOCKS OR WATCHES IN GENERAL; TIME PIECES USING THE POSITION OF THE SUN, MOON OR STARS
    • G04B19/00Indicating the time by visual means
    • G04B19/24Clocks or watches with date or week-day indicators, i.e. calendar clocks or watches; Clockwork calendars
    • G04B19/243Clocks or watches with date or week-day indicators, i.e. calendar clocks or watches; Clockwork calendars characterised by the shape of the date indicator
    • G04B19/247Clocks or watches with date or week-day indicators, i.e. calendar clocks or watches; Clockwork calendars characterised by the shape of the date indicator disc-shaped
    • G04B19/253Driving or releasing mechanisms
    • G04B19/25333Driving or releasing mechanisms wherein the date indicators are driven or released mechanically by a clockwork movement
    • G04B19/2534Driving or releasing mechanisms wherein the date indicators are driven or released mechanically by a clockwork movement driven or released continuously by the clockwork movement
    • GPHYSICS
    • G04HOROLOGY
    • G04BMECHANICALLY-DRIVEN CLOCKS OR WATCHES; MECHANICAL PARTS OF CLOCKS OR WATCHES IN GENERAL; TIME PIECES USING THE POSITION OF THE SUN, MOON OR STARS
    • G04B19/00Indicating the time by visual means
    • G04B19/26Clocks or watches with indicators for tides, for the phases of the moon, or the like
    • G04B19/268Clocks or watches with indicators for tides, for the phases of the moon, or the like with indicators for the phases of the moon
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S362/00Illumination
    • Y10S362/806Ornamental or decorative
    • Y10S362/808Figure
    • Y10S362/809Terrestrial globe

Description

y 22, 1934- H. E. SCHULSE 1,959,601

CHRONOLOGICAL INSTRUMENT Filed Sept. 19, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 1 INVENTOR Herman llfic/mlse ATTORNEYS May 22, 1934 5 SCHULSE 1,959,601

CHRONOLOGICAL INS TRUMENT Filed Sept. 19, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORN EYS y 1934. H. E. SCHULSE CHRONOLOGICAL INSTRUMENT Filed Sept. 19, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 3 lNV ATTORNEYS "May 22, 1934. H. E. SCHULSE CHRONOLOGICAL INSTRUMENT Filed Sept. 19, 1931 4 Sheets-Sheet 4 INVENTOR Herman JZJcfia [me BY ATTORNEYS Patented May 22, 1934 CHBONOLOGICAL INSTRUMENT Herman E. Schnlse, Wilmington, Del., assignor to Uniclox Corporation, a corporation of Delaware ' Application September 19, 1931, Serial No. 563,754

44 Claims.

My present invention is concerned with the provision of a chronological and horological instrument.

An object of the invention is to provide a clock driven replica of a terrestrial globe adapted to indicate automatically at all times, the position of the earth's shadow, the mean solar and siderial time at any degree of longitude and to physically demonstrate the changing position of the earth relatively to the sun with the changing seasons, whereby current information relative to the rising and setting of the sun and hours of light or darkness at any region of the globe, is always available.

Another object is to provide an instrument, by means of which all information commonly determined by the use of almanacs can be almost instantly and correctly obtained as for instance the rising and setting of the sun for any date in the year at any place on earth.

Another object is to provide a fixture in which the translucent globeis interiorly illuminated and the representation of the earths shadow is produced by a translucent member or color filter of a type which will transmit suflicient light to permit the reading of the legends on the globe even in the region of the shadow, and only modifies without obliterating the colors of the map itself.

Another object is to provide an apparatus of this character which is capable of being conveniently manually set at the time that motion of the clock is initiated and conveniently manually reset if the clock should stop or fail to operate correctly.

Another object is to provide such an instruinent directly driven from a clock preferably of the synchronous motor type) yet an apparatus in which the globe may be freely rotated and the light .discriminating device freely manipulated for demonstrating purposes or for educational purposes without injuring the clock mechanism, without disconnecting the various clock driven elements from the driving means, and without interfering with the continuous proper operation of the clock.

Another object is to provide a rotatably supported internally illuminated globe so mounted and supported that even the polar regions of the globe may be readily observed.

Another object is to provide a globe ofthis character, the subdued internal light of which not only illuminates the globe surface in both artistic and utilitarian manner, but which is effective to cast a soft diffused light over the globe 55 support, such light being preferably sumcient to permit convenient observation of the exposed. clock, which controls the operation of the globe.

Another object is to provide an arrangement of clock and globe structure which admits of the use, as a power source, of the commercial type, so synchronous, motor driven, electric clocks without reorganization of the clock structure other than the application of the one or two gears from which the driving transmission is eflected.

Another object is to provide an instrument of this character, which is capable of serving as an attractive subdued lighting fixture, peculiarly adapted for use as a hall lamp or alcove light.

Another object of the invention is to provide a device of the character described above, which combines great accuracy of operation and great simplicity of construction with ruggedness and durability in use and which well fulfills the requirements of economical manufacture.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, a common support structure mounts both the clock and the globe. The globe mount preferably comprises a vertically disposed, ring-shaped element, in which the globe has mountings on an axis at the correct 23 degree angle to the vertical.

The mechanism for driving the globe proper is preferably associated with the lower or south pole bearing end thereof and a night indicator or a daylight and night discriminator as well as the mechanism for operating the same, is within the globe, associated with and carried by the north pole part thereof and driven by the globe itself.

The globe is rotated in a one to two ratio to the hour hand of the clock, so that the globe will turn at constant rate on its axis once every twenty-four hours. The night indicator is driven through a suitable gear mechanism contained in the globe so that it moves around the light source once every 365 days. Driven concurrently with the night indicator is a transparent time dial concentric with and adjacent the north pole of the globe and graduated in terms of hours. The time dial cooperates with a fixed calendar disc or date dial, rigid with the globe supporting frame and coacting with an arrow arranged at the noon mark on the time dial to indicate the date.

When once the globe is correctly set (which may be readily accomplished as will bev fully explained in the specification) the globe will continue to turn once a. day as long as the clock is running and the night indicator once a year,

indicating the earth's shadow throughout the changing seasons. For educational purposes,

however, or for demonstration purposes, the

globe may be conveniently turned by hand or the night indicator with its associated time dial, may be conveniently turned by hand without interfering with the normal operation of the driving train from the clock. To accomplish this, both the globe driving mechanism and the mechanism for driving the night indicator from the globe, include at one point in their power trains, a worm or gear drive which is irreversible and at another point in their trains a slip clutch.

Preferably. the globe supporting ring includes a pair of hinged sections and the globe a pair of inter-fitting hemispherical sections carried by the respective ringsections, so that the. ring and globe may be conveniently opened to facilitate the application of a new lamp at the interior of the globe. Neither the globe driving means at the south pole end thereof, nor the night indicator carriedby the north pole end of the globe is disturbed by, or interferes with this opening, of the globe.

After the globe has been manipulated for dem-.

onstration purposes, it may be quickly reset and its normal clock driven motion continued.

My present invention is a continuation in part of my copending application Serial No.332,316, filed January 14, 1929.

The invention may be more-fully understood from the following description in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein Fig. 1 is a front elevaticnal view of a combined chronological and horological instrument embodyingthe invention,

Fig. 2 is a vertical sectional view therethrough,

Fig. 2a is an enlarged sectional detail on the line 2a-2a of Fig. 2, showing the mechanism which is used to drive the time dial concurrently with the day and night discriminator.

Fig. 2b is an enlargedsectional detail on the line 2b-2b of Fig. 2,

Fig. 3 is a front elevational view showing the manner in which the hinged sections of the globe supporting ring may be swung apart to provide access to the light source,

Figs. 4, 5 and 6 are sectional detail views taken -.on the lines 4-4, 5-5, and-66 respectively of Fig. 1;

Fig. 7 is a somewhat enlarged sectional vie taken on the line 7--7 of Fig. 2;

Fig. 8 is a, plan view of the ecliptic, ring which is fixed to the globe supporting frame;

Fig. 9 and 10 are plan views of the movable time dial and the fixed calendar dial respectively.

.Fig. 11 is a detail showing part of the reduction gearing for operating the light discriminator.

ing the manner in which the-globe is irreversibly Referring with particularity to the drawings, a suitable pedestal (not shown) mounts a casing 11, at its upper end, the casing having a socket 12,

except that it includes' .a worm 14 carried by the setting handshaft 15 which in common makes of electric cloc k ,advahcesat-the'rate of one revolution each two'hours. 4' The" casingis illustratively of ornamental char- .secure a pendant extension 19 of the ring 17 driven from the setting hand shaft of the clock? preferably screwingonto the upper end ofthe' acter with an upwardly and laterally extending hollow flared formation, constituting a cradle C upon the outer edges of which is sustained an upright parallel indicator ring 17. Screws 18 against the casing. Ring 1'7 is suitably calibrated to register with the parallels of latitude-20, upon the surface of the terrestrial globe A. Suitable legends may be associated with the ring to identify the various zones of the earth. The globe A which is preferably of translucent material, has secured thereto the semi-lunar elements making up. the map of the eeggyi's surface. The globe may be'constructed in desired manner, but is preferably formed of o separable upper and lower hemispheres and generally in accordance with the construction shownin my copending application, Serial No. 380,893 filed July 25, 1929 and allowed Dec. 6, 1932.

As this construction is not materialto the invention claimed herein, it is briefly noted that it comprises (Figs. 2 and 3) two hollow, transparent molded hemispherical bodies, one of which carries at its rim an internal band 21 of the same material as the bodies. The mouth of this band 1 9 projects beyond the band carrying globe section to which it isintimately bonded and is tapered as at 22 to facilitate its entry into the mouth of the lower globe section. Thus the two hemispherical sections are aligned and strengthened 05 adjacent their abutting rims which correspond with the equator of the globe. The ring 17 is made in two semi-circularsections 23, 24, which carry and provide supports and bearings for the two hemispherical globe sec- 10 tions. These sections at their abutting ends 28 are embraced by a pair of channel pieces 25 and 26. One channel 25 constitutes a "hinge element being pivoted on a screw 27 on the lower ring section 23 and connection to the upper movable ring section 24 by a screw 27a. A slot 27b in the channel piece 25 receives screw 27 and allows sufficient play for the upper globe ring section to be liftedout of abutting relationship with the lower section and thereby afford clearance for the 2 swinging of the upper section'about the hinge screw 27. The corresponding channel piece 26 at the opposite side of the globe is pivotally connected as at 29 to the upper movable ring section 24 and has its lower end removably, rigidly connected to the lower stationary ring section 23 by the use of a screw 30. When this screw is in position, the two ring sections 23, 24 are locked together and the screw 30 must be removed as a preliminary to swinging the movable ring section 24 about on the pivot 27, and thereby separating the upper half of the globe from the lower Y half thereof. Fig. 12 is a fragmentary sectional detail show- The two channel pieces 25 and 26 also serve an additional function in supporting a graduated ring member 31 disposed in the ecliptic plane of the globe. This ring, (shown in Fig. 8) is provided with a pair of diametrically opposite notches 32 to straddle the ring 17 and is supported by lugs 33 at the top of the channel piece 25 and lugs 34 at the bottom of the channel piece 26. The same screw 30 which normally serves to lock the split ring against opening, may also serve to secure the ecliptic ring in position, the latter being provided with a pendant lug 35 threaded to receive the end of the screw. Rigidly fixed as by screws 67" to section 24 of the split ring immediately under the north pole thereof,-which is slightly offset from the rest of the ring, is a disclike datt dial 67 of-transparent material graduated in terms of months and days, and also showing, if desired, the various zodiacal constellations in proper arrangement with respect to the months.

The globe has a bearing hub 37 at its south pole, this hub including a flange 38 overlying and riveted to the globe as at 38'. Fange 38 is sustained upon the flanged lower end 39 of a thrust bearing 40'supported uponring section 23 and affording a journal for the hub 37. A set screw 47 through thrust bearing 40 secures the latter to shaft 47 axially through said bearing. Integral with the ring enlargement or extension 19 are spaced integral pendant bearing ears 42 and 43, which suspend the transmission for driving the globe from the clock. This transmission includes a shaft 44 mounted in the cars 42, 43, and having a worm gear 16 of twelve teeth fixed at its inner end. At the opposite end of the shaft 44 is a mitre gear 45 which meshes with a gear 46 on the lower part of shaft 47.

The section 23 with the complete assembly of globe and transmission for daily and seasonal variations is laid upon the cradle formed by wings C and there fastened in place by screws 18 through the front of the wings. when thus positioned the gear 16 enters into mesh with worm 14 on the shaft 13 of the clock assembly. The twelve to one reduction from shaft 15 to shaft 44 effects a rotation ofshaft 47 and with it the globe C at a uniform rate of one revolution in 24 hours.

Fixedly mounted upon the upper end of the shaft 47 is a washer member 49 retained in position by a screw 50, and loosely surrounding said shaft and resting upon the inner end of the hub 37 is a washer 51. Interposed between the washers 49 and 51, is a coiled expansion spring 52, which forces the washer 51 into frictional engagement with the hub 37. The washers49 and 51 and their spring 52 constitute a friction driving clutch between the shaft 47 and bearing the hub 37 of the globe. This clutch will slip to permit manual spinning of the globe for demonstration purposes but will hold without slippage when driven by the clock. The support as thus far described, would sustain the globe even without any separate bearing for the north polar end of its axis.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that as long as the clock is running, shaft 47 will be driven through the transmission from the worm 14 to the gear 16, thence through the shaft 44 and the gear 45. Movement of the shaft 47 drives the washers 51 through the medium of washer 49 and the spring 52. Engagement of the washer 51 with the end of the hub 37 causes a rotary movement of the globe at a rate which is one-half that of the hour hand shaft, the globe thus making one complete revolution every twenty-four hours.

The driving connection above described, which includes both the friction clutch and the irreversible worm and gear 14, 16, permits free spinning of the globe by hand, independentlyof the clock and positively prevents driving of the clock by hand turning of the globe.

In the present embodiment of the invention, the stationary ecliptic ring 31 which is carried by the globe supporting ring 17, is calibrated in terms of months and days; It may also show the seasons of the year.

Means isprovided for effecting contrasting degrees of illumination on the globe surface in simulation of daylight and-night, and illustratively comprises a central interior source of light, and a light discriminator movable there around. For this purpose, there is secured in the north pole part of the supporting ring, a tube 53, extending through a polar aperture in the globe and thus constituting the upper hemisphere of the globe, which fixedly mounts a hollow elongated hub 41 rotatable on the tube 53. The hub is flanged over the globe as at 54 and affixed thereto by screws 54'.

The inner end of the sleeve 53 carries a bracket 55 afllxed thereto by set screw 55 having a laterally projecting lug portion mounting a vertical tube 56, this tube being secured in a suitable bore in the lug preferably by a set screw 57 tube 56 sustaining at the lower end thereof, a lamp socket 58, carrying a diminutive incandescent lamp 59. A gear 60 is driven upon a vertical mounting tube 61 which in turn carries the daylight and night discriminator 65. This device may comprise a generally oval frame 63 soldered to flange 62 in tube 61 and disposedin a vertical plane that bisects the globe. By means of split pinsv 64 or equivalent devices, there is secured within frame 63 a purplish translucent filter 65 having a convex center and flat ends, and which will modify the light transmitted therethrough to a purplish hue. The light modification is such that color distinctions on the map portion of the globe will not be obliterated and the darker half of the globe still receives enough light through the filter or discriminator to permit the legends on the map to be conveniently read. Thus, at all times, half of the globe will be illuminated directly to simulate daylight and the other half will have a purplish glow to simulate night.

I have found that the use of the light filter with the fiat extending ends and the shielding frame is productive of a more well defined line of demarcation between the regions of daylight and darkness, particularly at the equatorial regions, than is a semi-spherical filter.

From the foregoing, it will be apparent that as the globe revolves about the incandescent lamp 59, the line of demarcation between the two degrees of illumination of the globe surface, will on one side of the globe, indicate sunrise and upon the diametrically opposite side, indicate sunset.

The electric circuit to the lamp 59 includes a suitable double conductor 68, extending longitudinally through the tube 56, which is made hollow for this purpose. The conductors 68 extend from the tube 56 into the interior of the sleeve 53 at a point adjacent its inner end and pass out of the sleeve at a point adjacent its outer end and lie in a channel 69 formed in the outer face of the parallel indicator ring 17. The ends of the conductor pass into the casing 11 and a snap switch 70 mounted in the back cover of the clock unit, serves to control the lamp circuit.

In the construction thus far described, no compensation has been provided for the changing seasons. Such compensation may be effected by an advancing movement of the filter 65 about the lamp 59 at the rate of one revolution for every 365 revolutions of the globe, that is, one revolutlonper year. Preferably this is accomplished by automatic means whereby the correct relation of the hemispheres of contrasting degrees of illumination are maintained throughout the changing seasons.

In the present case, I have shown a special type of reduction mechanism for driving the filter from the globe, at therate of one revolution per year. This mechanism includes a gear 71, the hub 72 of which is slidable on a key 73 carried by the outer surface of the hub member 41. The tendency of the gear 71 is to drop by gravity into engagement with a corresponding gear 71a fixed upon the end of a shaft 74 mounted in the bracket 55. The gears 71 and 71a are not of the ordinary beveled type but to insure proper intermeshing without jamming, are each of frusto-conical formation with teeth of uniform width andthickness arranged on their tapering surfaces.

The normal tendency of the gear 71 is to drop by gravity into engagement with the gear 71a, the weight of the gear and its hub and the ease of sliding movement alongthe globe hub 41 being sufiicient to insure constant engagement whenever the globe is in upright position. Regardless of careless handling and inversion of the article in transit, the sliding bevel gear will always ride down into operative position under the influence of gravity when the globe is set up on its standard.

The shaft 74 carries a pinion 75 which meshes with a gear 76 carried upon a shaft 77, supported in the arms 78 which form a part of the bracket 55. The shaft 77 carries a worm 79 which meshes with a worm wheel 80 loosely mounted upon a contiguous gear 60. A bevelled idler 85 occupies the small gap between said gears and has an axle pin 86 in a corresponding bore in the bracket 55. That ratio of the gears 75, 76,79, 80 and 82, is of course such that as the driving shaft 47 makes one complete revolution, the shade 65 will be advanced through 1/365 of a revolution.

The interposition of idler 85 brings about rotation of the driven gear 60 and the light filter in the same direction as the driving gear 82 and the globe; thereby to reproduce the phenomena of daylight and darkness as they actually occur due to the combined motion of rotation and of revolution which the earth executes. v

One ratio of gearing which affords a compac transmission with but few elements and none of them of large diameter, will now be described.

The pinion has six teeth and the gear 76' has seventy-three teeth, so that the six-toothed pinion 75 meshing therewith and driven by the globe through gears 71, 71a, at the rate of 365 revolutions per year, will thus move the gear 76 and its shaft 78 and the worm 79 through 30 revolutions per year. The worm wheel 80 has thirty teeth and is, therefore, driven by the worm 79 and with it the gear 82 at a uniform rate of but one revolution per year. The gear 82 making one revolution per year, drives the gear 60 through the idler 85 at the same rate, it being understood that these gears 82 and 60 have the same number of teeth, and consequently the gear 60 and the light filter 65 carried thereby, will be moved through but one revolution per year. This movement of the filter causes an advancement in the line of demarcation, of different degrees of illumination upon the globe surface at the rate of 1/365 of a revolution every twenty-four hours, substantially as occurs due to the movement of the earth in its orbit.

The driving connection between the worm esaeor wheel 80 and the shaft-81 is preferably of the friction type and may comprise a coiled spring 87 interposed between two plates 88 and 89, which engage respectively the gears 80 and 82. Thus, as the gear 82 is driven by the gear 80 through the medium of the friction coupling just described the shaft 81 will likewise be rotated.

A transparent disc-like time dial 66 is located above the north pole end of the globeunder the disc-like calendar dial 67 and projects beyond the edges of the latter. Means is provided for driving the time disc 66 without speed reduction or speed increase from the shaft 81, the time-dial thus moving in synchronism with the filter 65 and making but one revolution per year.

This slightly convex time dial 66 shown in plan in Fig. 9, is graduated into twenty-four peripheral sub-divisions, marked in terms of the hours of the day, and it is provided with an arrow 90 at 12 noon which is adapted to be set in conjunction with the calendar disc 67 above it at the date of the original setting of the globe, or for purposes of demonstrating the particular location of the earths shadow at any point on the globe and at any season of the year.

The problem of driving the time dial 66 which is disposed below the stationary date dial 67 from the shaft '81 has in the present instance, been solved as follows:--

Shaft 81 extends outwardly beyond the tube 108 53 and the globe carrying ring 17, and has fixed thereto as byset screw 91, a gear 92, preferably integral with the collar '84. Joumaled in the ring section 24 and extending radially therethrough and through the calendar disc, is a shaft 93. Pinions 94 and 95 are arranged at the outer and inner ends of this shaft respectively, the outer pinion meshing with the gear 92 and the inner pinion meshing with a gear 96 fixed with respect to the time dial and rotatable therewith on a suitable bearing bushing 97 which encircles the tube 53 and rests upon a shoulder 98 integral with the tube. Above this bearing bushing, there is provided a support or spacer bushing 99 in engagement with the under face of the fixed calendar disc 67. Preferably the gears 92 and 94 are housed and protected against access of dust and dirt by a hollow cap member 100, having a flange 101 to encircle the gears 92 and 94 and having a drive or other frictional fit upon the upwardly extended hub 102 of the thrust col lar 84.

Preferably the cap 100 and the associated exposed parts are of an ornamental character as shown so that they in no way, detract from the appearance of the article.

The method of originally setting the globe at any desired point of use, is as follows:

The time dial 66 is rotated by the knob or cap 100 until the arrow 90 registers with the correct date on the calendar ring 67. During this operation, the friction clutch 87-89 slips and the filter 65 is brought to a position to correctly indicate the earths shadow for that particular day of the year. The particular meridian location of use of the globe is then moved into registration with the correct time of day on the time dial by manually turning the globe.

As long as the clock is operating, the globe is now driven at a uniform rate of one revolution 4.5 per day, and through the reduction gearing previously described, the time dial and filter are rotated uniformly at the rate of one revolution per year, the arrow 90 always serving to indicate the date and the season and the filter 65 showing 150 at all times, the line of demarcation of day and night with respect to the earth's axis.

The time at the locality of use may 'be read either from the clock or from the time dial at the intersection therewith of the local meridian.

By similarly following the meridian for any place on earth upto the time dial, the latter will give the localtime at such place. With equal facility, the various places at which the sun is rising or setting or at which the clock shows any particular time, may be easily read from the time dial. The unique possibilities of the device for educational or demonstrating purposes, will become apparent upon consideration of the fact that the clutch arrangement 87-89 permits the light contrasting device, together with the associated time dial to be selectively manually moved to show the relation of the earth's shadow and the clutch 49-51 permits manual rotation of the globe to set any place thereon to any time of the day. Thus any information ascertainable from an almanac may be almost instantly obtained by appropriate rotation of knob 100 to the day of the year and appropriate rotation of the globe to time of day. For instance the time of sunrise or of sunset or of high noon for any place on earth may immediately be determined for any day in the year. After the globe has thus been used for demonstrating or informational purposes, it may be conveniently reset in the manner described above, so

that the clock drive will continue and normal operation of the instrument will be resumed. The irreversible transmissions associated with the clutches preclude any interference with clock operation due to manipulation of knob 100 or of globe C. Due to the fact that the date dial 6'? is not only graduated into months, but also into the twelve major constellations which correspond to the signs of the zodiac, the constellation at the zenith at any time may be incidentally determined.

Throughout rotation of'the globe whether by the clock or by hand, the t'me dial and the light filter remain in synchronism, therewith, the former advancing or receding one day for each advance or reverse rotation of the globe and the filter correspondingly moving l/365 revolution for each revolution of the globe. The night filter is synchronized with the time dial so that for each position of the filter the arrow 90 on the dial will register the correct day on the date dial 67. The globe is synchronized with the clock, so that setting of the latter will bring about corresponding advance or recession of the globe.

Practically the only part of the assemblage which is likely to require attention, is the bulb, which will of course, eventually burn out. The present type of construction is peculiarly adapted to facilitate the convenient replacement of the bulb. To gain access to the interior of the globe for this purpose, it is merely necessary to remove a single screw 30, lift off the ecliptic ring and swing the movable upper section of the globe supporting ring about its pivot, thereby separating the upper and lower hemispheres of the globe, as indicated in Fig. 3, and giving access to the bulb. The globe may be separated without disconnecting any part of the driving mechanism and the use of the tapered centering ring 21, which is carried by the upper globe section and telescopes into the lower one, assures convenient and facile re-alignment of the two globe hem spheres when the globe encircling ring I is swung into closed position.

The apparatus has a marked educational value aside from its attractiveness as a portable fixture in the home, school or office. The device has, moreover, considerable utility in various arts in that it may dispense entirely with the need for almanacs or any computation or elaborate tables, to furnish data which is important in navigation, astronomy, radio communication, air transportation and possibly in other relations.

From one aspect of the invention, it will be apparent that the globe may be driven from any timecontrolled device and need not necessarily be associated with a clock. I prefer to use the clock, however, not only because it assists in the production of a h'ghly ornamental chronological and horological device, but because a clock affords one of the most convenient mechanisms for driving the globe. It is of course, possible within the scope of the present invention to dis pose the motor within the globe and to drive the clock therefrom.

It being well recognized that to impose a materially extra load on the main spring of an ordinary clock, generally results in inaccurate operation of the clock itself, the use of an electric clock is preferred, such for instance, as the ord'nary Telechron type, for driving, and the same source of current which supplies the clock, may be suitably connected to the lead 68 for illumination of the light source 59 which may be switched on or oil at will without disturbing the clock circuit.

By using a time dial and a calendar or date dial of transparent material and by making the bearings which support the clock of comparatively small dimensions, substantially no part of the surface of the map will be obscured and the map may be read even in the polar regions with convenience and facility.

It will thus be seen that there is herein described apparatus in which the several features of this invention are embodied, and which apparatus in its action attains the various objects of the invention and is well suited to meet the requirements of practical use.

As many changes could be made in the above construction, and many apparently widely different embodiments of this invention could be made without departing from the scope thereof, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:

1. Apparatus of the character described including a hollow translucent geographical globe mounted for rotation on its polar axis, a light source disposed centrally within the globe, and means for filtering the light to produce contrasting degrees of illumination on the globe surface.

2. A chronological instrument of the class described including a hollow translucent geographical globe mounted for rotation on its inclined polar axis, a light source disposed centrally within the globe and filter means in the path of rays from said source of light for producing contrasting degrees of illumination on the globe surface and mounted for rotation on the vertical axis.

. 3. A chronological instrument of the class described, including a hollow, translucent geographical globe mounted for rotation on an inclined polaraxis, a light source disposed centrally of the globe, a filter device associated with the light source and turnable on the vertical axis of the globe, means for rotating the globe, means for rotating the filter device, and means V for maintaining a definite ratio of speed between said two rotating means.

4. A chronological instrument of the character described including a hollow translucent geographical globe mounted for rotation on its inclined polar axis, a light source disposed centrally within the globe, means for filtering the light to produce contrasting degrees of illumination with a vertical great circle of demarcation on the globe surface, means for rotating the globe and means interrelating the light filtering means therewith for rotation thereof at the rate of 1/365th that of said globe.

5. A chronological instrument of the character described including a hollow translucent geographical globe mounted for rotation on its inclined polar axis, a light source disposed centrally within the globe, means for filtering the light to produce contrasting degrees of illumination with a vertical great circle of demarcation on the globe surface, means for rotating the globe at the rate of one revolution per day and means for rotating said filtering means at the rate of one revolution per year.

6. A chronological instrument of the class described including a hollow translucent geographical globe mounted for rotation on its inclined polar axis, a light source disposed centrally within the globe, means for filtering the light to produce contra-sting degrees of illumination with a vertical great circle of demarcation on the globe surface, means for continuously rotating the globe at the rate of one revolution per day and means for continuously rotating the illuminating means 1/365 of a revolution per day.

7. A chronological instrument ofthe class described including a hollow translucent geographical globe mounted for rotation on its polar axis at an angle of approximately 23 /2 degrees to the vertical, a light source disposed centrally within the globe, means for producing contrasting degrees of illumination on the globe surface and mounted for rotation on the vertical axis of the globe, and motor means for rotating one of said members at one revolution per day and the other of said members at one revolution per year.

8. An instrument of the class described comprising a terrestrial globe, means for continuously driving the same at the rate of one revolution per day, and means for producing contrasting degrees of illumination on the globe surface, said last mentioned means being mounted within the globe and slowly and continuously changed in position from the globe driving means.

9. A chronological instrument of the character described comprising a support, a translucent terrestrial globe mounted thereon, a source of light within said globe, a filter associated with said source of light, producing contrasting degrees of illumination on the globe with a vertical great circle of demarcation on the globe surface, means for driving said filter about its vertical axis at the rate of one revolution per year, manual means including speed reducing mechanism for rotating said filter at will, and a friction clutch adapted for rotation of the filter independently of the speed reducing mechanism.

10. A chronological instrument of the char acter described comprising a base, a translucent terrestrial globe having an inclined axis and resting on a thrust bearing upon said base, a source of light within said globe, a light filter to produce contrasting degrees of illumination with a vertical great circle of demarcation on the globe surface, a motor in said support, a driving transmission from said motor through said thrust bearing to drive the globe at the rate of one revolution per day, a speed reducing mechanism within said globe'and intervening between said motor and said filter to drive the latter at the rate of one revolution per year, friction drive means associated with said thrust bearing to permit manual rotation vof the globe independently of the motor, a handle to permit rotation of the filter independently of the motor, and a friction clutch permitting said latter manual operation independently of the speed reduction filter driving mechanism.

11. In a chronological instrument, a translucent globe having a thrust bearing at its south pole for sustaining the same, means at said thrust bearing for the application of the globe driving torque, a lamp support within said globe and centrally thereof, a light filter associated with said lamp to project contrasting degrees of illumination therefrom upon the globe, presenting a great circle line of demarcation upon the globe, a speed reducing driving transmission associated with said filter to cause the same to rotate at 1/365th'the speed imparted to the globe, a handle associated with said filter for revolving the same at will to any position and a clutch, permitting slippage with respect to said speed reduction transmission while said handle is being turned.

12. The combination claimed in claim 11 in which the lamp and the speed reduction transmission are sustained upon a bracket depending from the north pole of the globe, and in which the filter adjusting handle is accessible from the north pole of the globe.

13. A chronological instrument of the class described including a replica of a translucent terrestial globe, a globe support providing bearings for the globe at its poles, a clock for driving the globe at the rate of one revolution per day, a fixed light source within the globe, a light filtering device associated with the light source and movable thereabout to represent the shadow of the earth upon the surface of the globe, and means for driving the light filter from the globe at the rate of one revolution per year.

14. Apparatus of the character described, including a hollow, translucent geographical globe, mounted for rotation on its polar axis, a light source disposed centrally within the globe, means for filtering the light to produce contrasting degrees of illumination on the globe surface, said globe including a plurality of interfitting sections, a globe support, means normally acting to prevent separation of said sections and selectively movable to permit such separation and provide rotating the globe, said means being so arranged source disposed centrally within the globe, means for filtering the light to produce contrasting degrees of illumination on the globe surface, said globe including a plurality of interfitting sections,

1, a globe support, means normally acting to prevent separation of said sections and selectively movable, to permit such separation and provide access to the lamp, and means for automatically driving the light filtering means, said means being so arranged that it is not disturbed by opening of the globe.

17. Apparatus of the character described, including a hollow, translucent geographical globe, mounted for rotation on its polar axis, a light source disposed centrally within the globe, means for filtering the lightto produce contrasting degrees of illumination on the globe surface, said globe' including a plurality of interfitting sections, a globe support, means normally acting to prevent separation of said sections and selectively movableto permit such separation and provide access to the lamp, and means at the south polar axis of the globe end of the globe for actuating the light modifying device, said globe being made in a pair of upper and lower hemispherical sections, capable of separation for lamp replacement without disturbing either of said driving means.

18. A chronological instrument of the class described including a replica of a translucent terrestrial globe, a globe support providing bearings for the globe at its poles, a clock for driving the globe at the rate of one revolution per day, a fixed light source within the globe, a light filtering device associated with the light source and movable thereabout to represent the shadow of the earth upon the surface of the globe, and means for driving the light filter from the globe at the rate of one revolution per year, the polar axis of the globe being disposed at a 23 degree angle to the vertical and the light filtering device being rotatable about a-vertical axis.

19. In an instrument of the class described, a support, a clock mounted on the support, a globe supporting vertical ring rising from the support, an internally illuminated globe carried thereby and driven from the clock said globe including a plurality of interfitting sections, the supporting ring including a hinged section carrying a movable section of the globe, whereby to permit displacement of said globe section and access to the source of illumination.

20. The combination with a clock and a terrestrial globe, of means to support the globe and means to drive the globe from the clock, the driving train including a slip clutch and also including an irreversible worm and gear drive at the clock, whereby to permit manual rotation of the globe and prevent driving of the clock by the globe. H l v 21 Thecombination with a clock and a terrestrial globe, of means to support the globe and means to drive the globe from the clock, the driving train including a slip clutch and also including an irreversible worm and gear drive at the clock, whereby to permit manual rotation of the globe and prevent driving of the clock by the globe, the clock including a setting hand shaft carrying said worm, whereby the globe is set as an incident of setting theclock.

22. A chronological instrument of the character described, including a geographical globe mounted for rotation on its polar axis, a vertical ring encircling and supporting the globe and peripherally graduated, a fixed date dial carried by the ring v and disposed over the north polar region of the globe, a movable transparent time dial rotatably mounted adjacent the transparent date dial and having an arrow thereon to register with the date on the date dial, clock mechanism to rotate the globe at one revolution per day and a reduction gear train operated from the globe for driving the time dial at one revolution per year.

23. A chronological instrument of the character described, including a geographical globe mounted for rotation on its polar-axis, a vertical ring encircling and supporting the globe, a peripherally graduated, fixed circular transparent date dial carried by the ring and disposed over the north polar region of the globe, a movable transparent time dial rotatably mounted under the date dial and having an arrow thereon to register with the date on said dial, clock mechanism to rotate the globe at one revolution per day and a reduction gear train operated from the globe for driving the time dial at one revolution per year, the connection between the globe driving mechanism and the time dial driving mechanism being through the globe.

24. A chronological instrument of the character described, including a geographical globe mounted for rotation on its polaraxis, a vertical ring encircling and supporting the globe, a peripherally graduated, fixed calendar dial carried by the ring and disposed over the north polar region of the globe, a movable transparent time dial rotatably mounted under the calendar dial and having an arrow thereon to register with the date on the calendar dial, clock mechanism to rotate the globe at one revolution per day and a reduction gear train operated from the globe driving the time dial at one revolution per year, the connection betwen the globe driving mechanism and the time dial driving mechanism being through the globe, an internal source of illumination for the globe, a light filtering device associated therewith, and producing areas of relative darkness and light on the surface of the globe to represent the earth's shadow.

25. A chronological instrument of the character described, including a geographical globe mounted for rotation on its polar axis, a vertical ring encircling and supporting the globe, a peripherally graduated, fixed circular calendar dial carried by the ring and disposed over the north polar region of the globe, a movable circular time dial rotatably mounted under the calendar dial and having an arrow thereon to register with the date on the said dial, clock mechanism to rotate the globe at one revolution per day and a reduction gear train operated from the globe for driving the time dial at one revolution per year, the connection between the globe driving mechanism and the time dial driving mechanism being through the globe, an internal sourceof illumination for the globe, a light filtering device associated therewith, and producing areas of relative darkness and light on the surface of the globe to represent the earth's shadow, the light filtering device being driven in synchronism with the time dial.

26. A chronological instrument of the character described, including a geographical globe mounted for rotation on its polar axis, a vertical ring encircling and supporting the globe, a peripherally graduated, fixed date dial carried by the ring and disposed over the north polar region of the globe, a movable time dial rotatably mounted under the date dial and having an arrow thereon to register with the date thereon, clock mechanism to rotate the globe at one revolution per day and a reduction gear train operated indirectly from the globe rotating mechanism for driving the time dial at one revolution per year, the connection between the globe driving mechanism and the time dial driving mechanism being through the globe, and internal source of illumination for the globe, a light filtering device associated therewith, and producing areas of relative darkness and light on the surface of the globe to represent the earths shadow, the light filtering device being driven in synchronism with the time dial, the globe at its north polar end having a hollow tubular bearing element passing through the stationary date dial, the means for driving the time dial including shafting extending outwardly through the hollow globe bearing and shafting geared to the first shafting but disposed outside of the globe bearing and transmitting motion to the time dial.

27. In an instrument of the class described, a hollow translucent globe, means for supporting the same including a split supporting ring consisting of two sections hingedly connected together, the globe comprising two separable hemispheres carried by the respective sections, and separable as an incident of opening the hinged section.

28. In an instrument of the class described, a hollow translucent globe, means for supporting the same including a split supporting ring consisting of two sections hingedly connected together, the globe comprising two separable hemispheres carried by the respective sections, and separable as an incident of opening the hinged section and an ecliptic ring supported on the globe supporting ring and removably connected thereto.

29. In an instrument of the class described, a hollow translucent globe, means for supporting the same including a split supporting ring consisting of two sections hingedly connected together, the globe comprising two separable hemispheres carried by the respective sections, and separable as in incident of opening the hinged section, and ecliptic ring supported on the globe supporting ring and removably connected thereto, the connecting means normally blocking opening movement of the globe supporting ring sections.

30. In an instrument of the class described, a hollow translucent globe, means for supporting the same, including a split supporting ring consisting of two sections hingedly connected together, the globe comprising two separable hemispheres carried by the respective sections and separable as an incident of opening the hinged sections, and ecliptical ring supported on the globe supporting ring end and removably connected thereto, channel pieces embracing the globe supporting ring sections and extending across the lines of abutment thereof, one of said channel pieces constituting the hinge for the movable ring section and being pivotally connected to the immovable ring section.

31. In an instrument of the class described, a hollow translucent globe, means for supporting the same, including a split supporting ring consisting embracing the globe supporting ring sections and extending across the lines of abutment thereof, one of said channel pieces constituting the hinge for the movable ring sectionand being pivotally connected to the immovable ring section, the other channel piece being carried by the free end of the removable section and removably secured to the adjacent end of the immovable section.

32. In an instrument of the class described, a hollow translucent globe, means for supporting the same, including a split supporting ring consisting of two sections hingedly connected together, the globe comprising two separable hemispheres carried by the respective sections and separable as an incident of opening the hinged sections, an ecliptic ring supported on the globe supporting ring and removably connected thereto, channel pieces embracing the globe supporting ring sections and extending across the lines of abutment thereof, one of said channel pieces constituting the hinge for the movable ring section and being pivotally connected to the immovable ring section, and other channel piece being carried by the free end of the removable section and removably secured to the adjacent end of the immovable sect-ion, said channel pieces providing shoulders for supporting the ecliptic ring.

33. In an instrument of the class described, a hollow translucent globe, means for supporting the same, including a split supporting ring consisting of two sections hingedly connected together, the globe comprising two separable hemispheres carried by the respective sections and separable as an incident of opening the hinged sections, an ecliptic ring supported on the globe supporting ring and removably connected thereto, channel pieces embracing the globe supporting ring sections and extending across the lines of abutment thereof, one of said channel pieces constituting the hinge for the movable ring section and being pivotally connected to the immovable ring section, the other channel piece being carried by the free end of the removable section and removably secured to the adjacent end of the immovable section, said channel pieces providing shoulders for supporting the ecliptic ring, the latter having diametrically opposed notches therein to straddle the globe supporting ring.

34. In an instrument of the class described, a hollow translucent globe, means for supporting the same, including a split supporting ring consisting of two sections hingedly connected together, the globe comprising two separable hemispheres carried by the respective sections and separable as an incident of opening the hinged sections, an ecliptical ring supported on the globe supporting ring and removably connected thereto;

channel pieces embracing the globe supporting ring sections and extending across the lines of abutment thereof, one of said channel piecesconstituting the hinge for the movable ring section and being pivotally connected to the immovable ring section, the other channel piece being carried by the free end of the removable section and removably secured to the adjacent end of the immovable section, said channel pieces providing shoulders for supporting the ecliptical ring, the latter having diametrically opposed notches therein to straddle the globe supporting ring, said ecliptical ring including a pendant lug adapted to be secured by the means which normally prevents relative movement of the globe supporting means.

35. In an instrument of the class described, a terrestrial globe supported at its polar axis and a clock operatively connected to the globe for rotatim the latter once every twenty-four hours, a date dial graduated in terms of months and days fixed with respect to the stationary globe support, and covering the north polar area of the globe, a time dial graduated in sub-divisions of a day, said time dial having a pointer associated therewith and reading on the calendar dial and means for rotating-the time dial at the rate of once per year to indicate dates.

36. In an instrument of the class described, a terrestrial globe supported at its polar axis and a clock operatively connected to the globe for rotating the latter once every twenty-four hours, a date dial graduated in terms of months and days fixed with respect to the stationary globe support, and covering the north polar area of the globe, a time dial graduated in sub-divisions of a day, said time dial having a pointer associated therewith and reading on the date dial means for rotating the time dial at the rate of once per year to indicate dates, a hollow hub providing a bearing for the north polar end of the globe, a driving shaft arranged within the hub and extending outwardly therebeyond, a countershaft geared to the driving shaft and arranged exteriorly of the hub and connected to the time dial through the stationary date dial and a speed reduction gear for driving said first mentioned shaft.

37. In an instrument of the class described, a terrestrial globe supported at its polar axis and a clock operatively connected to the globe and rotating the latter once every twenty-four hours, a date dial graduated in terms of months and days fixed with respect to the stationary globe support, and covering the north polar area of the globe, a time dial graduated in sub-divisions of a day, said time dial having a pointer associated therewith and reading on the date and means for rotating the time dial at the rate of once per year to indicate dates, a hollow hub providing a bearing for the north polar end of the globe, a driving shaft arranged within the hub and extending outwardly therebeyond, a countershaft geared to the driving shaft and arranged exteriorly of the hub and connected to the time dial through the stationary date dial, a speed reduction gear for driving said first mentioned shaft, a hollow cap concealing the external gearing through which the time dial is driven and operatively connected to part of the gear train, whereby to permit manual rotation of the time dial.

38. In an instrument of the class described, a terrestrial globe supported at its polar axis and a clock operatively connected to the globe for rotating the latter once every twenty-four hours, a date dial graduated in terms of months and days fixed with respect to the stationary globe support, and covering the north polar area of the globe, a time dial graduated in sub-divisions of a day, said time dial having a pointer associated therewith and reading on the date dial and means for rotating the time dial at the rate of once per year to indicate dates, a hollow hub providing a bearing for the north polar end of the globe, a driving shaft arranged within the hub and extending outwardly therebeyond, a countershaft geared to the driving shaft and arranged exteriorly of the hub and connected to the time dial through the stationary date dial, speed reduction gearing for driving said first menlioned shaft from a hollow cap concealing the external gearing thfinugh which the time dial is driven and operatively connected to part of the gear train, whereby to permit manual rotation of the time dial, the gear train which operates the time dialincluding a slip clutch ,and an irreversible worm and gear whereby to permit manual rotation of the time dial without driving clock.

39. A chronological instrument of the class described including a replica of a translucent terrestrial globe, a globe support providing bearings for the globe at its poles, a clock for driving the globe at the rate of one revolution per day, a fixed light source within the globe, a light filtering device associated with the light source and movable thereabout to represent the shadow of the earth upon the surface of the globe, and means for driving the light filter from the globe at the ra e of one revolution per year, the driving train between the clock and the globe including a slip clutch to permit manual turning of the globe independently of the clock and an irreversible gear train section to prevent operation of the clock by manual turning of the globe.

40. A chronological instrument of the class described including a replica of a translucent terrestrial globe, a globe support providing bearings for the globe at its poles, a clock for driving the globe at the rate of one revolution per day, a fixed light source within the globe, a light filtering device associated with the light source and movable thereabout to represent the shadow of the earth upon thesurface of the globe, and means for driving the light filter from the globe at the rate of one revolution per year, the driving train between the globe and the light filter including a slip clutch, handle means for rotating the light filter independently of the globe and an irreversible mechanism in the driving train to prevent the globe from being driven by manual actuation of the light filtering device.

41. A translucent replica of a terrestrial globe having a light source disposed substantially centrally therewithin, a light filtering device rotatable about the light source, and affording on the surface of the globe, a simulation of the regions of daylight and darkness, means for driving the globe, means connecting the globe to the filtering device, whereby the latter is driven from the former, means independent of the globe for manually actuating the filtering device, a slip clutch in the reduction gear train between the globe and the filtering device, whereby manual rotation of the filtering device will not interfere with the normal driving of the globe.

42. A translucent replica of a terrestrial globe having a light source disposed substantially centrally therewithin, a light filiering device rotatable about the light source, and afiording on the surface of the globe, a simulation of the regions of daylight and darkness, means for driving the globe, means connecting the globe to the filtering device, whereby the laiter is driven from the former, means independent of the globe for manually actuating the filtering device, a slip clutch in the reduction gear train between the globe and the filtering device, whereby manual rotation of the filtering device will not interfere with the normal driving of the globe, and an irreversible worm and gear connected in said train to prevent the actuation of the globe by the manual actuating means of the filtering device.

43. In combination with a translucent terrestrial globe and means to afford supports and polar axial bearings therefor of a light source disposed centrally within the globe, a light filter movable about said source and adapled to produce a simulation of the regions of light and darkness on the globe surface, of a reduction gearinginterposed between the globe and the light filter,

fixedly carried by said hub for supporting a lamp within the globe, a light filtering device movable about the lamp and driven from the globe, through areduction gearing and means for transmitting moiion from the globe to the reduction gearing including a fixedly mounted bevel gear and a second bevel gear keyed on the mounting hub of the globe and movable by gravity into mesh with.

the first mentioned bevel gear.

HERMAN E. SCHULSE.

US563754A 1931-09-19 1931-09-19 Chronological instrument Expired - Lifetime US1959601A (en)

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Cited By (30)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2420048A (en) * 1943-03-24 1947-05-06 Link Aviation Inc Training device
US2603940A (en) * 1947-06-20 1952-07-22 John C Packard Horological apparatus
US2632359A (en) * 1948-05-03 1953-03-24 Armand N Spitz Planetarium
US2785528A (en) * 1954-07-01 1957-03-19 Emily T Kernick Globe clock
US2907166A (en) * 1956-09-06 1959-10-06 Baccara Mario Universal clock
US3049863A (en) * 1960-04-26 1962-08-21 Boivin C Ranney Globe and clock construction
DE1167752B (en) * 1958-03-19 1964-04-09 Ulrich Brueckner Zeitanzeigegeraet, especially World Clock
DE1215598B (en) * 1964-02-05 1966-04-28 Christian Schnekenburger World Clock
US3305946A (en) * 1964-12-02 1967-02-28 Gardin Tristan Du Apparatus simulating the illumination of earth by the sun at any time and date
US3997980A (en) * 1975-11-05 1976-12-21 National Geographic Society Globe and measuring device
WO1988005198A1 (en) * 1986-12-31 1988-07-14 Niesyn Z Joseph Planet model with solar display
US4797102A (en) * 1984-08-20 1989-01-10 Forsyth Maria K Instructional globe
US4936779A (en) * 1989-08-07 1990-06-26 Carlson Ronald B Earth planet model
US5008867A (en) * 1990-07-23 1991-04-16 Ko Wei C Ornamental clock with decorative time indicating device
US5033965A (en) * 1989-10-19 1991-07-23 Sam Chiu Three dimensional globe
US5080591A (en) * 1984-08-20 1992-01-14 Forsyth Maria K Instructional globe
US5280458A (en) * 1992-12-18 1994-01-18 Scott Craig S Sunlit world globe
US5545041A (en) * 1993-11-11 1996-08-13 Kazuyuki Katsuno Earth globe
US6299451B1 (en) * 2000-06-19 2001-10-09 Natural Science Industries, Llp Time teaching globe
JP2007017570A (en) * 2005-07-06 2007-01-25 Yanoman:Kk Supporting device for planetary globe, and planetary globe
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USD836346S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2018-12-25 Dyson Technology Limited Handle for dental appliance
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USD846884S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2019-04-30 Dyson Technology Limited Head for dental appliance
USD847513S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2019-05-07 Dyson Technology Limited Head for dental appliance
USD848746S1 (en) * 2016-11-02 2019-05-21 Dyson Technology Limited Dental cleaning appliance
USD848747S1 (en) * 2016-11-02 2019-05-21 Dyson Technology Limited Dental appliance
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Cited By (34)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2420048A (en) * 1943-03-24 1947-05-06 Link Aviation Inc Training device
US2603940A (en) * 1947-06-20 1952-07-22 John C Packard Horological apparatus
US2632359A (en) * 1948-05-03 1953-03-24 Armand N Spitz Planetarium
US2785528A (en) * 1954-07-01 1957-03-19 Emily T Kernick Globe clock
US2907166A (en) * 1956-09-06 1959-10-06 Baccara Mario Universal clock
DE1167752B (en) * 1958-03-19 1964-04-09 Ulrich Brueckner Zeitanzeigegeraet, especially World Clock
US3049863A (en) * 1960-04-26 1962-08-21 Boivin C Ranney Globe and clock construction
DE1215598B (en) * 1964-02-05 1966-04-28 Christian Schnekenburger World Clock
US3305946A (en) * 1964-12-02 1967-02-28 Gardin Tristan Du Apparatus simulating the illumination of earth by the sun at any time and date
US3997980A (en) * 1975-11-05 1976-12-21 National Geographic Society Globe and measuring device
US5080591A (en) * 1984-08-20 1992-01-14 Forsyth Maria K Instructional globe
US4797102A (en) * 1984-08-20 1989-01-10 Forsyth Maria K Instructional globe
US4761138A (en) * 1986-12-31 1988-08-02 Niesyn Joseph Z Planet model with solar display
WO1988005198A1 (en) * 1986-12-31 1988-07-14 Niesyn Z Joseph Planet model with solar display
US4936779A (en) * 1989-08-07 1990-06-26 Carlson Ronald B Earth planet model
US5033965A (en) * 1989-10-19 1991-07-23 Sam Chiu Three dimensional globe
US5008867A (en) * 1990-07-23 1991-04-16 Ko Wei C Ornamental clock with decorative time indicating device
US5280458A (en) * 1992-12-18 1994-01-18 Scott Craig S Sunlit world globe
US5545041A (en) * 1993-11-11 1996-08-13 Kazuyuki Katsuno Earth globe
US6299451B1 (en) * 2000-06-19 2001-10-09 Natural Science Industries, Llp Time teaching globe
JP2007017570A (en) * 2005-07-06 2007-01-25 Yanoman:Kk Supporting device for planetary globe, and planetary globe
JP4723935B2 (en) * 2005-07-06 2011-07-13 株式会社やのまん 遊球 ceremony for the support and 遊球 Yi
USD839598S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2019-02-05 Dyson Technology Limited Dental cleaning appliance
USD836346S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2018-12-25 Dyson Technology Limited Handle for dental appliance
USD839597S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2019-02-05 Dyson Technology Limited Dental cleaning appliance
USD839599S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2019-02-05 Dyson Technology Limited Dental cleaning appliance
USD836345S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2018-12-25 Dyson Technology Limited Handle for dental appliance
USD846884S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2019-04-30 Dyson Technology Limited Head for dental appliance
USD847513S1 (en) 2016-11-02 2019-05-07 Dyson Technology Limited Head for dental appliance
USD848746S1 (en) * 2016-11-02 2019-05-21 Dyson Technology Limited Dental cleaning appliance
USD848747S1 (en) * 2016-11-02 2019-05-21 Dyson Technology Limited Dental appliance
USD854329S1 (en) * 2016-11-02 2019-07-23 Dyson Technology Limited Dental appliance
USD854330S1 (en) * 2016-11-02 2019-07-23 Dyson Technology Limited Dental appliance
USD854328S1 (en) * 2016-11-02 2019-07-23 Dyson Technology Limited Dental appliance

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