US1958097A - Corrective insole - Google Patents

Corrective insole Download PDF

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Publication number
US1958097A
US1958097A US59884732A US1958097A US 1958097 A US1958097 A US 1958097A US 59884732 A US59884732 A US 59884732A US 1958097 A US1958097 A US 1958097A
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under
heel
metatarsal
heads
outer
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Expired - Lifetime
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Robert W Shaw
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Robert W Shaw
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/1405Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form
    • A43B7/1415Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot
    • A43B7/144Footwear with foot-supporting parts provided with pads or holes on one or more locations, or having an anatomical or curved form characterised by the location under the foot situated under the heel, i.e. the calcaneus bone
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B7/00Footwear with health or hygienic arrangements
    • A43B7/14Footwear with foot-supporting parts
    • A43B7/22Footwear with fixed flat-foot insertions, metatarsal supports, ankle flaps, or the like

Description

\ m 8, 1934. AW 1,958,097

CORRECTIVE INSOLE Filed March 14, 1932 Patented May 8, 1934 fUNlTED STATES PATENT oFFlcE Application March 14, 1932, Serial No. 598,841

In Canada January 18, 1932 3- Claims.

My invention differs from all others in having a raised portion under the heads of the hmer or outer metatarsal bones, in combination with a raised portion under the opposite side of the heel, 5 in order to twist the foot backto the normal position.

In flat-foot, the head of the outer metatarsal bone, and also the inner side of the heel, are too low. The heel, as a result, slides forward, and the arch bulges downwards, while the ankle bends inwards. By placing a raised portion under these points the foot is twisted back into the normal position.

When the arch is too high, the opposite condition is present, namely: the head of the inner metatarsal bone and the outer side of the heel are too low. The heel as a result slides backwards, the arch is forced upwards, and the ankle isbent outwards. By raising these points the foot is twisted back into the normal position.

By raising the head of the outer metatarsal bone, and the inslde'of the heel, in combination with a thickening under the head of the inner metatarsal, and also the outer side of the heel, the foot is held in the normal position: as a result, the arch is neither too high nor too low, the ankle is held straight, and the foot is carried in the normal position.

The thickened portions under the heads of the inner and outer metatarsal bones (thicker at the outer portions and becoming thinner as they pass towards the centre of the foot) put the weight on these heads, leaving a depression under the heads of the second, third and fourth metatarsals, and allow the heads of these bones to drop downwards, when the heel is raised in walking, the foot rocking on the prominent part under the heads of the inner and outer metatarsal bones.

I attain these objects by placing thickenings at 40 certain points on the insole, as illustrated in the accompanying drawing, in which:

Fig. 1 shows a view of the under side of the insole from the left, with a. thickened portion under the heads of the inner metatarsal bones, thicker under the head of the inner metatarsal, gradually becoming thinner as it passes outward under the heads of the centre metatarsal bones, also a thickened portion under the outer side of the heel which gradually becomes thinners-s it passes towards the inner side.

tarsal, gradually becoming thinner as it passes inwards under the heads of the centre metatarsals. There is also a thickened portion under the inner side of the heel which gradually becomes thinner as it passes towards the outer side.

Fig. 3 shows a view of the under side of the insole from the left, with a thickened portion atthe front of the heel which gradually becomes thinner as it passes towards the back of the heel.

Fig. 4 shows a view of the under side of the insole from the left, with a thickened portion at the back of the heel which gradually becomes thinner as it passes towards the anterior part of the heel.

(1) represents the insole from the left, showing the thickenings on the under side. The in- 0 sole is made of pliable material that will press downwards easily around the thickenings.

(2) represents the shape and position of a thickening across the insole under the inner and middle metatarsals. It is thickest under the head of the inner metatarsal and gradually becomes thinner as it passes under the middle metatarsals. The head of the inner metatarsal extends farther forward than that of the outer metatarsal and (5) will therefore be posterior to 2). The head of the inner metatarsal only is supported by (2) and a depression is formed in front and behind it and under the middle metatarsals. (The heads of the middle metatarsals extend farther than those of the inner and outer. Theymust therefore have a depression into which they can drop when the heel is raised in walking, in order that the weight may be carried by the inner and outer metatarsal heads only and the tender heads of the centre bones be protected.)

In a long foot the middle metatarsal heads project farther forward than in a short foot and (2) will in this case have to be thicker to provide for a deeper depression. This will also apply when high-heeled shoes are worn.

(3) represents the shape of a thickening under the outer side of the heel, thickest at the outer edge and gradually becoming thinner as it passes inwards. This is for the purpose of straightening the ankle which is bent outwards, a condition found with turned-in toes. The thickness and position of (3) vary according to how much the toes turn in. The farther the toes turn in the greater the thickness required and the farther back it is placed. 105

(4) represents the inner edge of the insole.

(5) represents the shape and position of a thickening across the insole under the outer and middle metatarsals. It is thickest under the head of the outer metatarsal and gradually bethe heel.

comes thinner as it passes under the middle metatarsals. The head of the outer metatarsal does not extend as far forward as that of the inner metatarsal and (5) will therefore be posterior to (2). The head of the outer metatarsal only is supported by (5) and a depression is formed in front and behind it and under the middle metatarnls. (The heads of the middle metatarsals extend farther forward than those of the inner and outer. They must therefore have a depression into which they can drop when the heel is raised in walking, in order that the weight may be carried by the inner and outer metatarsal heads only and the tender heads of the centre bones be protected.)

In a long foot the middle metatarsal heads proiect farther forward than in a short foot and (5) will in this case have to be thicker to provide for a deeper depression. This will also apply when high-heeled shoes are worn.

(6) represents the shape of a thickening under the inner side of the heel, thickest at the inner edge of the insole and gradually becoming thinner as it pases outwards. This is for the purpose of straightening the ankle which is bent inwards, a condition found with turned-out toes and flat feet.

The thickness and position of (6) vary according to how much the toes turn out. The farther the toes turn out the greater the thickness required and the farther forward it is placed. In all cases, however, it is placed away from the back of the heel so as to form a depression there, to facilitate the heel sliding backwards.

(8) represents the shape of a thickening under It is thicker at the front of the heel and becomes thinner as it passes backwards to prevent the heel going too far forwards in the shoe (a condition which occurs with turned-out toes and flat feet). The thickness and distance forward of (8) vary acording to how far the toes turn out. The farther the toes turn out the more the heel will slide forward and therefore the greater the thickness necessary for (8) and the farther forward its position.

(9) represents the position of a thickening \mder the heel, which is always thickest at the toes and therefore the geater the thickness of (9) and the farther forward it must extend.

The central and thinner portions of (2) and (5) form a depression under the second, third and fourth metatarsal bones thus allowing the heads of these bones to drop downwards when the heel is raised in walking, while the foot rocks on the inner and outer heads of the metatarsals which rest on the thickest part of (2) and (5) respectively.

The heads of the second, third and fourth metatarsals project farther forward than the inner and outer heads and must have a depression to drop down into or the sore callous so frequently found beneath them will result. When this callous occurs, the foot will turn inwards or outwards to avoid pressure on the sore spot.

In all other inventions where wedges are used, these project forward under one or more heads of the centre metatarsals. The absence of a depression under the centre heads is the primary cause of all ordinary foot trouble.

I claim:-

1. An insole having in combination a transverse thickened portion tapere'd from one edge of the insole to a point beyond its longitudinal centre line and restricted approximately to the portion of the insole that underlies the metatarsal heads of a superimposed foot, and another transverse thickened portion at the heel tapered from the opposite edge of the insole to a point beyond said centre line and spaced a substantial distance from the heel end.

2. An insole as set forth in claim 1 in which the thickened portion for the metatarsal heads is tapered from the inner edge of the insole.

3. An insole as set forth in claim 1 in which the thickened portion for the metatarsal heads is tapered from the outer edge of the insole.

ROBERT w. SHAW.

US1958097A 1932-01-18 1932-03-14 Corrective insole Expired - Lifetime US1958097A (en)

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CA1958097X 1932-01-18

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US1958097A true US1958097A (en) 1934-05-08

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Cited By (31)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2631387A (en) * 1949-12-10 1953-03-17 Robert W Shaw Sole of a shoe
US3958578A (en) * 1971-07-23 1976-05-25 Tennant Ross A Anti-pronating device
US4266553A (en) * 1979-10-22 1981-05-12 Faiella Joseph V Footgear embodying podiatric sole
US4333472A (en) * 1979-12-31 1982-06-08 Tager Steven E Compensatory-corrective orthopedic foot devices
US4578882A (en) * 1984-07-31 1986-04-01 Talarico Ii Louis C Forefoot compensated footwear
US4620376A (en) * 1985-01-22 1986-11-04 Talarico Ii Louis C Forefoot valgus compensated footwear
US4665576A (en) * 1984-08-30 1987-05-19 Limbach Robert C Ski boot and boot canting method
US4682425A (en) * 1986-01-31 1987-07-28 Simmons Ronald G Adapters for golf shoes
US4685227A (en) * 1986-01-31 1987-08-11 Simmons Ronald G Golf shoes
US4689898A (en) * 1985-09-11 1987-09-01 Fahey Brian W Running shoe
US4813159A (en) * 1987-05-13 1989-03-21 Weiss Robert F Foot support for optimum recovery
US4979318A (en) * 1988-05-02 1990-12-25 The Dr. Cohen Group, Inc. Pronatary insert for high-heeled shoes
US5265354A (en) * 1989-11-28 1993-11-30 Aliano Jr Joseph F Golf shoe insert
US5345701A (en) * 1991-04-26 1994-09-13 Smith Leland R Adjustable orthotic
US5394626A (en) * 1986-03-07 1995-03-07 Northwest Podiatric Laboratory, Inc. Orthotic and method of making of the same
US5448839A (en) * 1993-10-27 1995-09-12 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Stand easy shoe
WO1997000030A1 (en) * 1995-06-14 1997-01-03 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Stand easy shoe insert
US5632104A (en) * 1994-10-04 1997-05-27 Zohar; Itzchak Shoes for reducing stress in feet
US5921009A (en) * 1997-06-20 1999-07-13 Pivotal Image, Inc. Foot leverage system and method
US6098319A (en) * 1997-09-15 2000-08-08 Epstein; Merel Balancing appliance for footwear item
US6349487B1 (en) * 1997-06-20 2002-02-26 Pivotal Image, Inc. Foot leverage system and method
US20020056209A1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2002-05-16 Clough James G. Orthopedic shoe appliance and method
US6604301B1 (en) * 2000-07-10 2003-08-12 Manoli II Arthur Shoe sole insert
US20060032093A1 (en) * 2004-08-13 2006-02-16 Antonietta Vannini Orthopedic shoe
US20110009982A1 (en) * 2009-02-08 2011-01-13 Steven August King Spring orthotic device
US7913429B1 (en) * 2007-09-19 2011-03-29 Remington Products Company Orthotic wedge system
US20110126427A1 (en) * 2009-12-01 2011-06-02 Richie Jr Douglas H Support for inclusion in article of footwear and method for raising the arch of a person's foot
US20110131841A1 (en) * 2008-03-13 2011-06-09 Foster David W Article of footwear
US20120210605A1 (en) * 2011-02-23 2012-08-23 Rylo, Inc. Foot support
US20130232819A1 (en) * 2011-03-08 2013-09-12 Admark Athletic Ventures Athletic shoe incorporating an athletic positioning sole
US9668537B2 (en) * 2015-07-07 2017-06-06 Ideal Living Ventures Limited Orthotic insole for footwear with an attachable angle insert for correcting over pronation or supination of a foot

Cited By (38)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2631387A (en) * 1949-12-10 1953-03-17 Robert W Shaw Sole of a shoe
US3958578A (en) * 1971-07-23 1976-05-25 Tennant Ross A Anti-pronating device
US4266553A (en) * 1979-10-22 1981-05-12 Faiella Joseph V Footgear embodying podiatric sole
US4333472A (en) * 1979-12-31 1982-06-08 Tager Steven E Compensatory-corrective orthopedic foot devices
US4578882A (en) * 1984-07-31 1986-04-01 Talarico Ii Louis C Forefoot compensated footwear
US4665576A (en) * 1984-08-30 1987-05-19 Limbach Robert C Ski boot and boot canting method
US4620376A (en) * 1985-01-22 1986-11-04 Talarico Ii Louis C Forefoot valgus compensated footwear
US4689898A (en) * 1985-09-11 1987-09-01 Fahey Brian W Running shoe
US4682425A (en) * 1986-01-31 1987-07-28 Simmons Ronald G Adapters for golf shoes
US4685227A (en) * 1986-01-31 1987-08-11 Simmons Ronald G Golf shoes
US5394626A (en) * 1986-03-07 1995-03-07 Northwest Podiatric Laboratory, Inc. Orthotic and method of making of the same
US4813159A (en) * 1987-05-13 1989-03-21 Weiss Robert F Foot support for optimum recovery
US4979318A (en) * 1988-05-02 1990-12-25 The Dr. Cohen Group, Inc. Pronatary insert for high-heeled shoes
US5265354A (en) * 1989-11-28 1993-11-30 Aliano Jr Joseph F Golf shoe insert
US5692318A (en) * 1989-11-28 1997-12-02 Aliano, Jr.; Joseph F. Golf shoe sole
US5345701A (en) * 1991-04-26 1994-09-13 Smith Leland R Adjustable orthotic
US5625965A (en) * 1993-10-27 1997-05-06 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Stand easy shoe insert
US5448839A (en) * 1993-10-27 1995-09-12 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Stand easy shoe
US5632104A (en) * 1994-10-04 1997-05-27 Zohar; Itzchak Shoes for reducing stress in feet
WO1997000030A1 (en) * 1995-06-14 1997-01-03 Wolverine World Wide, Inc. Stand easy shoe insert
US6349487B1 (en) * 1997-06-20 2002-02-26 Pivotal Image, Inc. Foot leverage system and method
US5921009A (en) * 1997-06-20 1999-07-13 Pivotal Image, Inc. Foot leverage system and method
US7272900B1 (en) * 1997-09-15 2007-09-25 Merel Epstein Balancing appliance for footwear item
US6098319A (en) * 1997-09-15 2000-08-08 Epstein; Merel Balancing appliance for footwear item
US20020056209A1 (en) * 1999-12-21 2002-05-16 Clough James G. Orthopedic shoe appliance and method
US6874258B2 (en) * 1999-12-21 2005-04-05 Cluffy Biomedical Llc Orthopedic shoe appliance and method
US6604301B1 (en) * 2000-07-10 2003-08-12 Manoli II Arthur Shoe sole insert
US20060032093A1 (en) * 2004-08-13 2006-02-16 Antonietta Vannini Orthopedic shoe
US7913429B1 (en) * 2007-09-19 2011-03-29 Remington Products Company Orthotic wedge system
US20110131841A1 (en) * 2008-03-13 2011-06-09 Foster David W Article of footwear
US20110009982A1 (en) * 2009-02-08 2011-01-13 Steven August King Spring orthotic device
US8353968B2 (en) 2009-02-08 2013-01-15 King Family Kingetics, Llc Spring orthotic device
US20110126427A1 (en) * 2009-12-01 2011-06-02 Richie Jr Douglas H Support for inclusion in article of footwear and method for raising the arch of a person's foot
US8683717B2 (en) * 2009-12-01 2014-04-01 Douglas H. Richie, Jr. Support for inclusion in article of footwear and method for raising the arch of a person's foot
US20120210605A1 (en) * 2011-02-23 2012-08-23 Rylo, Inc. Foot support
US8756836B2 (en) * 2011-02-23 2014-06-24 Rylo, Inc. Foot support
US20130232819A1 (en) * 2011-03-08 2013-09-12 Admark Athletic Ventures Athletic shoe incorporating an athletic positioning sole
US9668537B2 (en) * 2015-07-07 2017-06-06 Ideal Living Ventures Limited Orthotic insole for footwear with an attachable angle insert for correcting over pronation or supination of a foot

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