US1947456A - Coin handling machine - Google Patents

Coin handling machine Download PDF

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US1947456A
US1947456A US577825A US57782531A US1947456A US 1947456 A US1947456 A US 1947456A US 577825 A US577825 A US 577825A US 57782531 A US57782531 A US 57782531A US 1947456 A US1947456 A US 1947456A
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plate
coins
coin
slots
face
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US577825A
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Bock Alfred Charles Otto
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SATTLEY CO
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SATTLEY CO
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G07CHECKING-DEVICES
    • G07DHANDLING OF COINS OR VALUABLE PAPERS, e.g. TESTING, SORTING BY DENOMINATIONS, COUNTING, DISPENSING, CHANGING OR DEPOSITING
    • G07D3/00Sorting a mixed bulk of coins into denominations
    • G07D3/02Sorting coins by means of graded apertures

Description

1934. A. c. o. BOCK I COIN HANDLING MACHINE Fiied Nov. 28, 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet l INVENTOR fifl/ me ATTORNEYS Feb. 20, 1934. A. c. o. BocK .COIN HANDLING MACHINE Filed Nov. 28," 1951 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 VENTO 0. 54

,mcflMfs ATTORNEYS Feb. 20, 1934-. A. c. 0. 800K COIN HANDLING MACHINE Filed Nov. 28, 1931 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 ATTORNEYS Patented Feb. 20, 1934 UNITED STATES com HANDLING MACHINE Alfred Charles Otto Bock, Brooklyn, N. Y., as-

signor-to Sattley Company, Detroit, Mich., a corporation of Michigan Application November 28, 1931 Serial No. 577,825

8 Claims.

reharges the coins separately into receptacles, one

for each denomination.

At the present time there are numerous coin sorting and counting machines on the market but '10 most of these machines are large, complicated,

and expensive so that many small business organizations, churches, and the like, which have use for such a machine, are unable to afford the investment required. In these machines as commonly constructed there is a receptacle for the miscellaneous coins and a pickup plate by which the coins are removed one by one from the mass of loose coins in the receptacle. Usually the pickup plate has the form of a rotary disc which turns about an axis slightly inclined tothe horizontal, and the coins picked up in pockets or recesses in the disc are discharged therefrom into another rotary element in which the sorting or classifying operation takes place. This sortelement frequently has a form known in the art as a turret and is a short cylinderrotatable upon a vertical axis and provided with radial slots. The turret and pickup plate'are synchronized so'that at the proper instant in their rotation the coins are discharged from the pockets of the pickup plate and each coin drops into one of the slots in the turret. The turret slots are of decreasing width in a downward direction and, as the coins enter the slots, they come to rest at (different points in the slots determined by their :size. Thereafter at the proper time the coins are separately discharged from the slots according to their denominations. f

Machines of the construction above described have been developed in various forms and in general operate satisfactorily, although difficulties have been encountered due to jamming of the coins as they enter the turret. However, these machines are complicated and their cost is high, because so many of the parts require costly machining operations.

The present invention is accordingly directed to the provision of a novel coin sorting and count- M ing machine which is of simple construction and can be made at low cost. By reason of its simplicity, the machine is highly efficient in operation and functions for long periods without the occurrence of jams which require that the machine be stopped and the jammed coins removed. In the new machine I dispense entirely with a turret or other separateclassifying element and instead I employ a pickup plate which is pro vided on one face with recesses by which individual coins can be picked up from a loose mass, and on the other with classifying slots. These slots are formed in the fiat back face of the plate and extend in a generally inward direction, the slots having a decreasing width toward their inner ends. Each slot is in communication at its outer end through the plate with one of the pickup recesses and in the rotation of the plate, a coin is picked up in each recess and then, at one point in the travel of the coin,it is passed through the plate to its rear face and enters one of the slots.

As the rotation of the plate continues, the coin in the slot moves down through the latter to a position determined by the size of the coin. The coins are thus classified, with the coins of separate denomination occupying positions on the rear face of the plate at varying distances from the run thereof. After the coins have thus been classified, they are counted by suitable means and discharged into separate denominational receptacles provided for the purpose.

For a better understanding of the invention reference may be had to the accompanying drawin S, in which Fig. 1 is a face view of the machine;

Fig. 2 is a sectional view on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1; V

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary face view with parts removed, the angle from which the illustration is made being indicated by the line 3-3 of Fig. 1;

Figs. 4 and 5 are fragmentary sectional views on the lines 44 and 5-5, respectively, of Fig. 3;

Fig. 6 is a sectional view on the line 6--6 of Fig. 2;

Fig. '7 is a. sectional view on the line 7-7 of Fig. 8, showing a portion of the rear face of the classifying plate; 9

Fig. 8 is a sectional view on the line 8-8 of Fig. 7; and.

Fig. 9 is a sectional view on the line 99 of Fig. 8.

The new machine comprises a supporting plate 10 provided with a boss 11 in which is mounted a shaft 12 provided with a gear 13 meshing with a worm 14 on a shaft 15 provided with a pulley 16. The pulley 16 is driven by means of a motor 17 and belt 18, the motor being mounted on cross bars 19 extending between two upright frame members 20, which also support the plate 10 at their upper ends. The plate 10 lies with its face slightly inclined to the vertical and the shaft 12 extends through the plate at a slight angle to the horizontal.

A ring 21 is attached to the periphery of the plate 10 and a hopper plate 22 is secured to the ring near its lower edge. Mounted on the end of the shaft 12 and in contact with the face of the plate 10 is a'pickup andclassifying element 23. This element may be formed as a single plate but is more conveniently made up of a pickup disc 24 on the outer face of the element and a classifying plate on the under side, the disc and plate being secured together face to face. The element 23 may be mounted on the end of the shaft 12 in any convenient manner or the shaft may constitute an integral part of the element, as illustrated. Between the end of the boss 11 and the element 23 is a ball bearing 26 so that the element may be freely rotated by the motor.

The pickup disc or plate cooperates with the hopper plate 22 to form a receptacle for a loose mass of miscellaneous coins to be sorted and counted and the disc is provided with pickup recesses 27 preferably made by cutting away the edge of the disc as illustrated in Fig. 3. With the disc thus constructed, the movement of the disc relative to the mass of coins in the receptacle causes coins to be picked up in the recesses and carried out of the mass. The pickup plate is relatively thin and the coins in the recesses are supported therein by a ring 28 mounted between the ring 21 and the rim of the supporting plate 10, the ring 28 extending inwardly a sufficient distance so as to underlie the recesses. To prevent more than one coin from occupying any recess, a leaf spring 29 is mounted on the inner edge of the plate 21 at a point where the edge of the pickup plate is moving upwardly past the spring. The spring bears against the edges of the coins in the recesses and operates to force out the top coin if there are two in a recess.

The classifying plate 23 mounted on the underside of the pickup plate is formed with a plurality of classifying slots 30 shown more clearly in Figs. 6 and 7. These slots extend in a generally inward direction and they have a decreasing width inward. Their width decreases by steps so as to form shoulders 31 along one side thereof and the configuration of these slots is such that coins occupy difierent positions in the slots depending on the size of the coins, each denomination of coin occupying a definite position in the slot.

At its outer end, each slot would be in communication with one of the pickup recesses 27 but for the interposition of the supporting plate 28. That plate, however, is cut away at a place designated 32 where the pickup recesses are moving downwardly toward the mass of coins in the hopper. Adjacent this point, a cover 33 extends inwardly from the ring 21, overlying the outer edge of the pickup plate and preventing coins from the mass from entering pickup recesses at the point where the plate 28 is cut away.

The rear surface of the classifying plate 25 is formed with a plurality of concentric channels 34, each of which crosses all of the slots 30 and these channels are arranged so that each one enters one of the divisions of the slots. Mounted in the supporting pla e 10 near the topthereof are pivoted arms 35, each of which carries at one end a roller 36 which enters one of the con centric channels. The other end of each arm bears against a plunger 3'7 provided with a rack 38 actuating a gear 39 on the shaft of a counting device 40. The several counting devices are all mounted in one housing 41 attached to the plate 10 at a convenient point and are provided with a resetting handle 42.

The supporting plate 10 is formed with a plurality of chutes 43, which lead downwardly and discharge separately into boxes 44, one for each denomination of coin, the chutes being of different sizes according to the denomination of the coins which are to pass through them. At the top of the group of chutes is a plate 45, the edge of which in part defines openings through plate 10, through which coins may be discharged from the classifying slots in the plate 24. The coins passing through these openings enter the chutes and fall downwardly into the separate coin boxes. The plate 45 is provided with prongs 46, one for each opening, and each prong enters one of the concentric channels 34 in the classifying plate. The opening to each chute is in registry with one of these channels and, therefore, with one subdivision of each slot.

In the operation of the machine, the loose coins to be sorted and counted are introduced into the receptacle formed by the hopper plate 22 and by the face of the combined pickup and classifying element 23. As the element rotates, individual coins enter the pickup recesses in the element and are carried upwardly from the mass and then downwardly and beneath the cover 33. In their movement to the cover the coins are supported in the recesses on the ring 28 but, beneath the cover, the ring is cut away so that each coin falls through the recess and into a classifying slot in contact with the surface of a portion of the supporting plate 10. Upon continued rotation of the element 23, the coins travel upwardly as shown in Fig. 3 until a point is reached where each coin slides down in its slot by gravity to assume a position of rest determined by its size. The slots are not radially disposed but are at an angle to radii so that the coins move down the slots sooner than would be the case if the slots were radial.

As the separate coins, one in each slot, are carried along, they pass beneath the rollers on the levers 35 and when a coin lifts the roller end of the lever, the lever operates its counting mechanism. Just beyond the counting device, the coins are picked out of the slots by the prongs 48 and pass through openings into the chutes 43. These chutes lead to the separate coin boxes, one for each denomination of coins being handled.

While the construction has been described as including a picking up and classifying element 23 made up of two parts, the pickup disc 24 and the classifying plate 25, it will be evident that those parts could be made integral without departing from the principles of the invention. It is more convenient to make the parts separate and secure them together face to face, in which position they function as a single element.

It will be observed that in the new machine, the coins are picked up and classified by the same moving element and the coins are in contact with this element at all times from the time that they are picked up until they are discharged into their separate chutes. The coins lie flat at all times and in their classifying movement along the slots they are supported on their faces instead of on their edges. By using a single element for the combined purpose of picking up and classifying the coins, the construction of the machine is greatly simplified and by reason of the small extent of movement of the coins relative to the pickup and classifying element from the time the coins are picked. up until they are discharged, there is little opportunity for the coins becoming jammed.

In prior machines of the turret type, coins are picked up and then transferred into the turret, with the coins not in contact with supporting surfaces at all times during their movement. lhe coins are thus not fully guided and jamming frequently occurs. In my machine, each coin is supported on its face from the time the coin is removed from the hopper until the instant of discharge and the complete guidance and support afiforded the coins reduce the possibility of their becoming wedged or leaving the paths of travel which they are intended to take.

My machine is so constructed that only one coin can be picked up in each recess and that coin travels through an arc of approximately 540 in the machine. Throughout the first half of this movement, the coin is in a pickup recess and just before this coin would again enter the mass in the receptacle, it is passed to the rear face of the pickup and classifying element and enters one of the classifying slots. The coin remains at rest in this slot through a movement of approximately 130 and then on further movement, the coin begins to move inwardly along the slot to assume a position of rest determined by its size. 'The coin slides along a flat surface in contact with a smooth edge of the slot and eventually contacts with a shoulder on the other edge, this shoulder supporting the coin in its proper position determined by its denomination. While the coin is advancing along its path with the plate after such classification, it is counted and then discharged into the chute which delivers it into its appropriate box.

The machine is of simple, relatively inexpensive construction and does not include the large number of highly machined parts customarily present in such devices. It functions efliciently and rapidly and may be used for'long periods of time without becoming jammed or requiring any attention.

What I claim is:

1. In a coin sorting machine, a plate mounted for rotation and having coin pick-up recesses in one face, classifying slots in the other face, each slot communicating near one end with a recess and decreasing in width in successive steps toward the center of said plate, and concentric slots intersecting said classifying slots, each of the concentric slots registering with one of the steps in each classifying slot.

2. In a machine for handling coins, the combination of a receptacle for a mass of unsorted coins, a plate mounted for rotation and having one face forming a wall of the receptacle, said face being formed with pick-up recesses, each adapted to receive one coin at a time with said coin lying with its faces parallel to the face of said plate, classifying slots in the other face of said plate, each slot communicating at its outer end with a recess and extending inwardly from the periphery of said plate, each slot having a flat bottom lying parallel to the plane of said plate and being adapted to receive a coin from said communicating recess, said slot being of gradually decreasing width inwardly from said periphery, means engaging one face of each coin in a slot and supporting said coin therein while permitting it to move inwardly along said slot, concentric slots in said plate intersecting said '3 classifying slots, and means entering said concentric slots and actuated by said coins for counting them. i

3. In a machine for handling coins, the combination of a receptacle for a mass of unsorted coins, a plate mounted for rotation and having one face forming a wall of the receptacle, said face being formed with pick-up recesses, each adapted to receive one coin at a time with said coin lying with its faces parallel to the face of said plate, classifying slots in the other face of said plate, each slot communicating at its outer end with a recess and extending inwardly with a gradually decreasing width from the periphcry of said plate, each slot having a flat bottom lying parallel to the plane of the plate and being adapted to receive a coin from said communicating recess, means engaging one face of each coin in a slot and supporting said coin therein while permitting it to move inwardly along said slot, concentric slots formed in the face of the plate in which said classifying slots are formed, said concentric slots intersecting said classifying slots, and means entering said concentric slots for removing the classified coins from said classifying slots.

4. In a machine for handling coins, the combination of a receptacle for a mass of unsorted coins, a plate mounted for rotation and having one face forming a wall of the receptacle and in contact with said coins, said face being formed .with pick-up recesses, each adapted to receive one coin at a time with said coin lying with its faces parallel to the face of said plate, classifying slots in the other face of said plate extending inward from the periphery thereof, each slot communicating at its outer end with a recess and being of gradually decreasing width inward from said periphery, each slot having a flat bottom parallel to the plane of said plate and being adapted to receive a coin from said communicating recess, a stationary plate having a face engaging one face of each coin in a slot and supporting said coin while permitting it to move inwardly along said slot as said first plate rotates, concentric slots in said other face of the rotating plate intersecting said classifying slots, and means entering said concentric slots and actuated by the coins in said classifying slots for counting them.

5 In a machine for handling coins, the combination of a receptacle for a mass of unsorted coins, a plate mounted for rotation and having onerface forming a wall of said receptacle and in contact with said coins, said plate being formed with pick-up recesses extending through it and open at said face, each pick-up recess being adapted to receive one coin at a time, a plate underlying said recesses and supporting the coins therein with their faces parallel to the face of said plate, classifying slots in the other face of said plate extending inwardly from the periphery thereof, each slot intersecting one of said recesses at its outer end and being of gradually decreasing width inwardly from said periphery, each slot having a fiat bottom parallel to the plane of said plate and being adapted to receive a coin from said recess which it intersects, a plate beneath said slots having a face engaging one face of each coin in a slot and supporting said coin while permitting it to move inwardly along said slot, concentric slots in said other face of the rotating plate intersecting said classifying slots, and means entering said concentric slots and actuated by said coins in said classifying slots for counting them.

are

6. In a machine for handling coins, the combination of a receptacle for a mass of unsortedcoins, a plate mounted for rotation and having one face forming a wall of said receptacle and in contact with said coins, said plate being formed with pick-up recesses extending through it and open at said face, each pick-up recess being adapted to receive one coin at a time, a plate underlying said recesses and supporting the coins therein with their faces parallel to the face of said plate, classifying slots in the other face of said plate extending inwardly from the periphery thereof, each slot intersecting one of said recesses at its outer end and being of gradually decreasing width inwardly from said periphery, each slot having a fiat bottom parallel to the plane of said plate and being adapted to receive a coin from said recess which intersects, a plate beneath said slots having a face engaging one face of each coin in a slot and supporting said coin while permitting it to move inwardly along said slot, concentric slots in said other face of the rotating plate intersecting said classifying slots, and means entering said concentric slots for removing the classified coins from said classifying slots.

7. In a machine for handling coins, the combination of a receptacle for unsorted coins, a plate mounted for rotation and having one face forming a wall of the receptacle and in contact with said coins, said plate having pick-up recesses extending through it, each recess being adapted to receive one coin at a time, a stationary plate the-coins in said recesses, said coins lying in said recesses with their faces parallel to the plane of said rotating plate, and said stationary plate having an opening through which said coins may move out of said recesses, classifying slots formed in the other face of said rotating plate and extending inwardly from the periphery thereof with a gradually decreasing width, each slot at its outer end intersecting a recess and having a fiat bottom parallel to the plane of said rotating plate, a plate having a face engaging one face of each coin in a slot and supporting said coin while permitting it to move inwardly along said slot in a plane parallel to the face of said rotating plate, concentric slots formed in said other face of the rotating plate and intersecting said classifying slots, and means entering the concentric slots for removing the classified coins from said classifying slots and discharging them separately.

8. In a coin-sorting machine, a plate mounted for rotation and having coin pick-up recesses in one face and classifying slots in the other face, the bottoms of said classifying slots lying parallel to the plane of said plate and said slots extending inwardly from the periphery of said plate with a gradually decreasing width, each classifying slot intersecting a pick-up recess, and

concentric slots formed in said other face of said plate and intersecting said classifying slots.

ALFRED C. 0. BOOK.

US577825A 1931-11-28 1931-11-28 Coin handling machine Expired - Lifetime US1947456A (en)

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Cited By (22)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2642882A (en) * 1950-08-30 1953-06-23 Brandt Automatic Cashier Co Coin sorting and counting machine
US2720209A (en) * 1951-03-16 1955-10-11 Max L Grant Adjustable drive means for coin gauging mechanism
US2886045A (en) * 1954-02-16 1959-05-12 Abbott Coin Counter Company In Coin sorting and counting machine
US2943631A (en) * 1960-07-05 Fare box
US3090390A (en) * 1960-04-06 1963-05-21 Abbott Coin Counter Combined coin sorter and counting machine
US3143118A (en) * 1960-09-26 1964-08-04 Vacuumatic Ltd Coin sorting apparatus
US3783885A (en) * 1972-06-27 1974-01-08 P Griffiths Disc dispensing apparatus
FR2207315A1 (en) * 1972-11-20 1974-06-14 Universal Machine Co Inc
USRE28557E (en) * 1971-06-30 1975-09-23 Disc dispensing apparatus
US4304247A (en) * 1980-03-12 1981-12-08 Billcon Corporation Of America Differential speed coin sorter
US4407312A (en) * 1980-05-28 1983-10-04 General Railway Signal Company Fare collection system and components thereof
US4561457A (en) * 1984-03-01 1985-12-31 Billcon Co., Ltd. Coin sorter and counter
US4987990A (en) * 1989-07-25 1991-01-29 Mag-Nif, Inc. Coin Bank
US5662520A (en) * 1994-04-01 1997-09-02 Evdokimo; Allen J. Coin handling apparatus with coin filter and improved coin interlock
US20020111130A1 (en) * 2001-02-09 2002-08-15 Jerzy Perkitny Coin separator and sorter assembly
US20040149539A1 (en) * 2003-02-03 2004-08-05 De Raedt Peter Wolfgang Apparatus for sorting articles
US20050280212A1 (en) * 2002-06-05 2005-12-22 Ernst Blaha Counter sorting device
US20110105002A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2011-05-05 Ernst Blaha Chip Sorting Devices, Components Therefor and Methods of Ejecting Chips
US20110207390A1 (en) * 2002-06-05 2011-08-25 Ernst Blaha Chip stack cutter devices for displacing chips in a chip stack and chip-stacking apparatuses including such cutter devices, and related methods
US9562756B2 (en) 2012-09-20 2017-02-07 Jenoptik Industrial Metrology Germany Gmbh Measuring device with calibration
US10096192B1 (en) 2017-08-30 2018-10-09 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip sorting devices and related assemblies and methods
US10255741B2 (en) 2016-04-06 2019-04-09 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip sorting devices and related assemblies, components and methods

Cited By (50)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2943631A (en) * 1960-07-05 Fare box
US2642882A (en) * 1950-08-30 1953-06-23 Brandt Automatic Cashier Co Coin sorting and counting machine
US2720209A (en) * 1951-03-16 1955-10-11 Max L Grant Adjustable drive means for coin gauging mechanism
US2886045A (en) * 1954-02-16 1959-05-12 Abbott Coin Counter Company In Coin sorting and counting machine
US3090390A (en) * 1960-04-06 1963-05-21 Abbott Coin Counter Combined coin sorter and counting machine
US3143118A (en) * 1960-09-26 1964-08-04 Vacuumatic Ltd Coin sorting apparatus
USRE28557E (en) * 1971-06-30 1975-09-23 Disc dispensing apparatus
US3783885A (en) * 1972-06-27 1974-01-08 P Griffiths Disc dispensing apparatus
FR2207315A1 (en) * 1972-11-20 1974-06-14 Universal Machine Co Inc
US4304247A (en) * 1980-03-12 1981-12-08 Billcon Corporation Of America Differential speed coin sorter
US4407312A (en) * 1980-05-28 1983-10-04 General Railway Signal Company Fare collection system and components thereof
US4561457A (en) * 1984-03-01 1985-12-31 Billcon Co., Ltd. Coin sorter and counter
US4987990A (en) * 1989-07-25 1991-01-29 Mag-Nif, Inc. Coin Bank
US5662520A (en) * 1994-04-01 1997-09-02 Evdokimo; Allen J. Coin handling apparatus with coin filter and improved coin interlock
US20020111130A1 (en) * 2001-02-09 2002-08-15 Jerzy Perkitny Coin separator and sorter assembly
US20040219873A1 (en) * 2001-02-09 2004-11-04 Mag-Nif Incorporated Coin separator and sorter assembly
US7204749B2 (en) 2001-02-09 2007-04-17 Mag-Nif Incorporated Coin separator and sorter assembly
AU2002242122B2 (en) * 2001-02-09 2006-02-02 Mag-Nif Incorporated Coin separator and sorter assembly
US7048623B2 (en) * 2001-02-09 2006-05-23 Mag-Nif Incorporated Coin separator and sorter assembly
US8393942B2 (en) 2002-06-05 2013-03-12 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Methods for displacing chips in a chip stack
US8006847B2 (en) 2002-06-05 2011-08-30 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip sorting device
US20110207390A1 (en) * 2002-06-05 2011-08-25 Ernst Blaha Chip stack cutter devices for displacing chips in a chip stack and chip-stacking apparatuses including such cutter devices, and related methods
US7992720B2 (en) 2002-06-05 2011-08-09 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip sorting device
US20110005983A9 (en) * 2002-06-05 2011-01-13 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip sorting device
US20110001290A9 (en) * 2002-06-05 2011-01-06 Ernst Blaha Counter sorting device
US20070102330A1 (en) * 2002-06-05 2007-05-10 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip sorting device
US20050280212A1 (en) * 2002-06-05 2005-12-22 Ernst Blaha Counter sorting device
US9330516B2 (en) 2003-02-03 2016-05-03 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Apparatus for receiving and sorting disks
US7681708B2 (en) 2003-02-03 2010-03-23 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Apparatus for sorting articles
US20100230233A1 (en) * 2003-02-03 2010-09-16 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Apparatus for sorting articles
US7201268B2 (en) 2003-02-03 2007-04-10 Streamline Innovations Gmbh Apparatus for sorting articles
WO2004069431A3 (en) * 2003-02-03 2006-08-31 Meutter Ludo De Apparatus for sorting articles
US9990792B2 (en) 2003-02-03 2018-06-05 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Methods and apparatus for receiving and sorting disks
US7028826B2 (en) * 2003-02-03 2006-04-18 Streamline Innovations Gmbh Apparatus for sorting articles
US20050155838A1 (en) * 2003-02-03 2005-07-21 Raedt Peter W.D. Apparatus for sorting articles
US20050139528A1 (en) * 2003-02-03 2005-06-30 De Raedt Peter W. Apparatus for sorting articles
US8298052B2 (en) 2003-02-03 2012-10-30 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Apparatus for sorting articles
US9589407B2 (en) 2003-02-03 2017-03-07 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Apparatus for receiving and sorting disks
US20040149539A1 (en) * 2003-02-03 2004-08-05 De Raedt Peter Wolfgang Apparatus for sorting articles
US8678164B2 (en) 2003-02-03 2014-03-25 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Apparatus for receiving and sorting disks
US20070209975A1 (en) * 2003-02-03 2007-09-13 De Raedt Peter W Apparatus for sorting articles
US20140302762A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2014-10-09 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip Handling Devices and Related Methods
US8757349B2 (en) 2009-11-02 2014-06-24 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Methods of ejecting chips
US9384616B2 (en) * 2009-11-02 2016-07-05 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip handling devices and related methods
US9536367B2 (en) 2009-11-02 2017-01-03 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip handling devices and related methods
US20110105002A1 (en) * 2009-11-02 2011-05-05 Ernst Blaha Chip Sorting Devices, Components Therefor and Methods of Ejecting Chips
US8336699B2 (en) 2009-11-02 2012-12-25 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip sorting devices, components therefor and methods of ejecting chips
US9562756B2 (en) 2012-09-20 2017-02-07 Jenoptik Industrial Metrology Germany Gmbh Measuring device with calibration
US10255741B2 (en) 2016-04-06 2019-04-09 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip sorting devices and related assemblies, components and methods
US10096192B1 (en) 2017-08-30 2018-10-09 Shuffle Master Gmbh & Co Kg Chip sorting devices and related assemblies and methods

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