US1938214A - Packing structure for dry cells - Google Patents

Packing structure for dry cells Download PDF

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US1938214A
US1938214A US458633A US45863330A US1938214A US 1938214 A US1938214 A US 1938214A US 458633 A US458633 A US 458633A US 45863330 A US45863330 A US 45863330A US 1938214 A US1938214 A US 1938214A
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dry cells
partitions
box
dry
cells
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US458633A
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Paul F Boeye
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Waldorf Paper Products Co
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Waldorf Paper Products Co
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01MPROCESSES OR MEANS, e.g. BATTERIES, FOR THE DIRECT CONVERSION OF CHEMICAL ENERGY INTO ELECTRICAL ENERGY
    • H01M6/00Primary cells; Manufacture thereof
    • H01M6/42Grouping of primary cells into batteries
    • H01M6/44Grouping of primary cells into batteries of tubular or cup-shaped cells

Description

Dec. 5, 1933. P. F. BoEYE PACKING STRUCTURE FOR DRY CELLS 5 Sheets-Sheet l Filed May 3l, 1930 Dec. 5, 1933. P F BQEIYE 1,938,214

PACKING STRUCTURE FOR DRY CELLS Filed May 3l, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet` 2 Fi 7 Fi .9

l .5 j ez 62 55 1| I I: '-r' Dec. 5, 1933. p, F, BOEYE 1,938,214

?ACKING STRUCTURE FOR DRY CELLS Filed May 3l, 1950 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Fig. 15

J 6G M 65 @5 34 G5 e6 57 l r5o 44 44- I' 65 i r 5 '5 i 1 l 5 i Dec- 5 1933- P. F. BOEYE PACKING STRUCTURE FOR DRY CELLS Filed May 3l, 1950' 5 Sheets-Sheet 4 Fig. 24

Jwwmtoc Paul F. oeye Fig. 22

Dec. 5, 1933. P. F. BoEYE PACKING STRUCTURE FOR DRY CELLS Filed May 5l, 1930 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 nl l Iltalntllvlllll: lill!!! "Il, l.

A lllllvfilnvllllIrII/lnll Il l l.

` Patented Dec. 5, 1933 mclane STRUCTURE-ron nur cErLs Paul E. Boeye, St. Paul', Minn.,I assignor to Waldorf Paper Products Company, St. Paul, Minn., a corporation of' Minnesota Application May 31V, 1930. Serial No. 458,633I s claims. (ci. 20a-4c) My invention` relates toA paclring structures and particularly to packing structures adapted to be used' for packingv dry cells for shipment.

' AnAuobjectv of the invention resides in providing a structureincluding a box in which the dry cell` maybe packed, said structure-preventing the dry cells from being injured during shipment thereof.

Another object of the `invention resides in providingf' the-box in which the dry cells are disposed J with. a bottomy onwhich the dry cells may rest and a-topfspaced fromthe upper ends of the dry cells,A and in further arranging the dry cells in a plurality offrowsL withinv said box, and in disposing partitions between the rows of drycells and other l 15. partitionsbetweexr the individual cells of each Af featureof' the invention'resides in providing spacers adapted to be disposed between the upper ends of the dry cells and the topof the box-for '20.y liolrling` the dry 'cells in place within the box andi-for preventing thebindingposts of the dry,

cells from contacting with the top of the box.

An object of the invention resides in constructing said spacersin the form of strips withgseportions lying between the respective bindingy posts of each dry`celltoassist in preventing the binding posts of adjacent dry cells from contactin'gwithV oneanother,

'4 Another-object ofthe invention resides 1n pro- 30. vidinglmembers operatingin conjunction with said spacers andI extending at right angles there-A to; said members having portions lying betweenthe binding posts of the corresponding dryv cells or ad'acent rows tofffurther assist in preventing 35. thelbin'dingposts otadjacent dry cells from contacting with one another. f i

A stilli further object Vof the invention resides informingl portions. of the i surfaces of said partitions in proximity tothe upper and lower ends 40. of said dry cells and oppositethe adjacent portions AthereofL discontinuous to cause said dry cells to` clear thepartitions and one another so as to prevent injury` tothe extreme ends of the dry .cells l f 4.57. A feature of ythe invention resides in forming theportions for clearing the upper and lower ends of the dryfcells by cutting away vparts of the partitions.

-An object off' the invention resides in con-- 50. structing the partitions ofsufilcient thickness to prevent the protruding partsgof the dry cells disfposedlwithin thecut away'portions of` saidA partitions from contactingwith onev another.

@ther objects of the inventionfreside 'in thej 55 novel! combination andarrangement of parts and lrfc. 2v,

inthe details of construction hereinafter illustrated and/or described.

VIn' the'l drawings:

g. 1 isa perspective viewofan embodiment of my invention with portions of' the containerl 60 out away to show the interior construction of thepacking structure.

Fig; 2 isan elevational sectional view taken on line 2-2 of Fig. 1*.

Fig. 3 isl a plan sectional view` taken on line 65 3-3' of Fig. 2.

Figs. 4 andy 5 are developed views of the partitions used with the invention.

Fig. 6 is a perspective view of' the'spacer usedj with the invention. l I

Fig. 'l` is a view vsimilar to Fig. 2 showing an-v other form of the invention and taken on line '7-7 ofI4 Fig. 8;

' Fig. 8 is` a. plan sectional view similar to Fig. 3' and taken on line 8-8'of Fig'. 1; 75

Fig. 9A is an elevational sectional view taken on line9j-9 of Fig; 8. A

Figs. 1.10 and 11 are developed views of' the par.- titions employed with the form of the invention shown in Figs. "1*, 8 and'9.

Fig. 12 is a perspective view similar to'Fig.A 6 ofthe spacer used with the form ofthe invention shown in Figs. 7, 8' and 9. Y

Fig. 13 is a perspective View of stillV another" form of theinvention. v Y

Fig; 14 is a plan sectionalview taken on line, 14--14l ofFig. 13.

Fig. 15` is an elevational sectional view taken, on line 15,--15ofv Fig. 14. f A

Figs. 16. and 17 aredeveloped views. of,l the partitions used 'withl the form of theinvention shownf nFigslS.

Figs. 18 and 19 are developed` views ot the.A spacersused in the form of the invention4 shown in- Fig.. 13'. 1

Fig- 20l is a perspective view, ot still. another form ofthe invention.

Fig'L 21= is a plan sectional view taken on. line 21.-21o: Fig. 2o. 100

Fig. 22,is an elevational sectional view taken. on l1ne22j-22 of Fig. 21.

' Figs. 232 and 24` are developed views of the partitions used in thev form of the invention shown l innigzo. Y v 10s Fig. 25- is a developed view ofthe spacerA usediin` theform of the invention shown in Fig; 201

Fig- 26 is a plan ksectional View of, astill diierent form of the invention taken on line 261-2 6"of Fig. 27 is an elevational sectional view taken on line 27--27 of Fig. 26.

Figs. 28 and 29 are developed views of the partitions used in the form of the invention shown in Figs. 26 and 27.

Fig. 30 is a perspective view of the spacer used in the form oi the invention shown in Figs. 26 and 27.

Fig. 31 is an enlarged cross sectional view of one of the partitions shown in Figs. 28 and 29.

Dry cells are usually constructed from a Zinc shell closed at the top through a suitable sealing wax cap and encased in a suitable paste board case having a bottom overlapping the sides of the case. Such dry cells are ordinarily provided with binding posts protruding outwardly beyond the dry cell proper, the negative post being attached to the zinc shell. In the shipment of such dry cells the wax, which is extremely fragile, readily becomes broken through the engagement of adjoining dry cells with one another near the upper ends thereof or with other solid objects and through similar engagement of the negative binding posts with one another or with other objects. In addition such dry cells frequently become injured at the locality of the overlapping portions of the bottom and side wall structure of the case and the binding posts often become loosened and occasionally broken. With my invention, such injury to the cells is prevented and the dry cells are packed in such a manner `hat the saine are practically immovable within the shipping container in which they are disposed so that rough handling and misuse of the container cannot cause the dry cells to contact with one another at the fragile portions thereof, thereby preventing injury to the cells during the shipment thereof.

In conjunction with my invention, I employ a container which may be of any desired type or construction. For the purpose of illustration I have shown in all of the forms of the invention an ordinary pasteboard box indicated in its entirety at 30 which comprises sides 3l and 32 and ends- 33 and34. rIhis box may be constructed with a bottom indicated in its entirety at 35 which consists of a number of flaps 36 bent from the lower edges of the sides 31 and 32 and the ends 33 and 34 of the box. In a similar manner, the top indicated in its entirety at 37 (Fig. 2) is constructed from a number of naps 38 which are bent from the upper edges oi the sides 3l and 32 and the ends 33 and 34 of the box and which are adapted to be secured to one another as by 'gluing orin any other suitable manner such as isnow well known in the art. The particular construction of the box 30 forming no feature of the invention, it can readily be comprehendeol that any suitable construction may be employed and the box built from any suitable material.

As previously stated, the invention is primarily for the purpose of packing dry cells. In order to more clearly illustrate the application of the invention a number of dry cells 29 have been illustrated in the various forms of the invention, which dry cells are identical in construction. Each of these dry cells comprise a cylindrical case 39 in which the dry cell proper is containedgvhich case is constructed with a bottorn 40 having a rim-like portion or band 4l initegrally connected therewith. This rim-like portion overlaps the lower end of the case proper and is secured thereto as by gluing or otherwise. This rim-like portion or band 4l encircles the entire case along the lower end thereof and q causes this part oi the case to protrude outwardly beyond the remainder of the case. The dry cell proper is constructed in the usual manner with a zinc case which is closed at the upper end thereof with a wax cap 42. The dry cell includes a negative binding post 43 and a positive binding post 44 which extend upwardly from the cap 42. The positive binding post 44 is usually disposed centrally with respect' to the dry cell while the negative binding post 43 is attached to the zinc shell of the dry cell and extends apprecably outwardly beyond the exterior surface of the case 39 when the dry cell is mounted Within the case. In the form of dry cell shown, the case 39 is open at the top to expose the wax cap 42 though in some types of dry cells, said case may be closed. lIhe invention operates equally as well with either type or" dry cell and holds the dry cell supported so as to prevent injury thereto.

In the form of the invention shown in Fig. 1 I employ a number or" partitions 45 and 46 illustrated in Figs. 4 and 5 which are constructed of any suitable material such as cardboard or the like. The partitions 45 are constructed with longitudinal slits 47 extending from the lower edges thereof and upwardly, while ,the partitions 46 are similarly constructed with slits 48 extending from the upper edges thereof and downwardly. By means of these slits the various partitions may be interconnected with one another to form spaced compartments 58 as best shown in Figs. "1

1 and 3 for the reception of the various dry cells. The box proper and these partitions are so proportioned that the cases 39 of the various dry cells nt snugly between said partitions and the sides and ends of the into the saine.

For the purpose of clearing the rim or band 4l on the case 39 of the various dry cells, the extreme lower edges 49 of the partitions 45 and 46 are formed with a number of slots 50 which are of a height greater than the height of said bands and which are located in proximity to the tangent portions of the dry cells. These slots form pockets into which said bands or rims41 of the dry cells may extend. In this manner, the lower portions of the dry cells are free from the partitions while the intermediate portions thereof are rmly in contact with said partitions. The partitions 45 are constructed of a length equal to the distance between the top 37 and the bottom 35 of the box 30 so as to hold said partitions from movement when the box is closed. As will be noted in Fig. l the partitions 46 are considerably shorter than theV partitions 45. The partitions 46 are held in place within the box through the slits 47 and 48 which are so disposed as to permit downward movement only of the partitions 46 with respect to the partitions 45 thereby precluding the movement of any of the partitions when. the box is closed.

For the purpose of preventing injury to the wax caps 42 of the vdry cells, the upper ends of the partitions 45 are formed with slotsy 60 Which extend downwardly from the edges of said partitions and to a distance somewhat below the extreme upper edges 5l of the various dry cells. These slots correspond to the slots 50 and are so disposed as to lie opposite the portions of the dry cells contacting with the various partitions so that the extreme upper ends of the i dry cells are free from said partitions and from box when inserted i f Y ricevente@ lpartitions 46 are of suoli` e height thet the same reach up to the lower edges 52..A of the slots 60 so l.that the upper edges` ofA the dry cells are free on allsides thereof and injury thereto In Order to holdthe dryv cells 29 from longitudinal movement within the box 30 a number of Spooerrstrips 53 are. employed which are detached from. the pack-.lng structure in Fig. 6.` These` spacer strips are preferablyconstructed from corrugated board and are bent in the shape of a U to formx side membersy 54 and 55 anda oonneotins meeneemt The erdoor .strips 53 are of; Such. e. widthA to snug-,1y received within the Slots- .60 of the. Partitions 455 and the. Side, members 54 thereof are of such a height that when thesame rest upon the caps 42 of the various d ry cells the connecting portion 56 ofl said members snugly contacts with the under surface of the top. 37 oi the box proper. The distancev between theside portions 54 and. 55 of thespacer strips 53 is such thatthe same forms a space 57 ofgsuitable dimensions to comfortably receive the positive binding post 44 of the various dry cells. leaves one of the side members 54 andY 55 disposed between respective binding posts of each f of the dry cells which ,checksv the rotation of the dry cells in one direction thereby preventing the binding; posts of adjacent dry cells from con.

tacting with one` another, when the dry cell rotated in such direction. o l

Inthe. use of form,l of the invention, the

partitions are assembledand'placed within `the interior of: the box 3 0 through the open upper end. thereof. The cells areY then placed one by one., within the. various compartments 58 formed between thepartitionsasand 4c. Thiais readily accomplished through thespringing of siifd partitions andthe walls ofthe box and particularly. before the cover of the box has been closed. After all of theA dry cellsH have been placed within the various con'lpartments,` said dry cells are turned so that the negative binding posts thereof; lie` inthe corners of said compartments in which said` binding posts are `as far away" fromone another as possible. The spacer strips 53 are next inserted into the slots 60 and the. cover 37j closedl byi folding the. various aps 36 upon one. another and gluingf or otherwise securing the same together. The drycells are now lodged within the interior ofthe box 30 insuch a manner that the cases 39. oiosaid dry cells ContactI with one another throughout theirA extent excepting at the extreme upper and lower` ends. thereof which are freefrom one another andl from. thek partitions` o f the device. Atthe- Sametime-the Soeoer etriosaohold the dry.; cells from longitudir'ial movement and. protect the binding posts: from contacting" with, the top 37 of the lbox and; also serve to prevent theldr-ycell from rotating to bring the negativebinding. post i in contact. o e

fIhe 'form of. the` invention shown in Figs. 7, 8.

and 9 diiers only from thaty shownin Fig. .1 in the' use of a slightly modied type of spacer.

spacer is illustrated in 1!ig.,l2` and is indiesteem irsentiretyat s1. The spacer 61 is iden- Vvtical1 with theY spacer strip 5,3, excepting that the` side` portion 54 thereof.. ,isl constructed with a number of tabs"k 62 extending. outwardly therefrom( These. tabs` are( spaced. apart .eqdisterleef reduci to. the ylfidth' of the compartments. 5.8 andV are. adapted to extend medially over the :various dry cells and to. operate in conjunction with-.the sides 54 and 55 ofi said spacers to preclude the, rotation of the dry cell so as to prevent the nega-i tive binding posts from coming into ,any` POSition whereby the same will contact with one another or with any other portion of the packing device whereby injury to the dry cell might result.v Forthej purpose of Supporting. kthe tabs 62, a parti.- tion, 6 3v is employedl which is used in place ofthe partition 46 and which is constructed ident- I cally thesame as the` partition with slots: 64. corresponding to the slots 60. This partition however is formed with the slits 48` the sameas the slits in the partition 46 sor that thel same may be assembled with the;A partitions 45` to support thev dry cellsaS previously brought out. When the spacers filare laid inthe slots the tabs. 62 thereof extend into the slots. 64 where the same are held from movement and the dry cells rigidly and firmly supported in proper position. 4 In Fig."13, I have,A shown a still different form of 'spacer.- With thisv form of the invention exactly thesame type of; partitions are employed as illustrated in Figs. lO-and 11, these partitions being designated by the .o reference numerals 45 and 63. The spacers used with this modification l ofthe invention consist of small strips of cardboard or the like which aregindic'ated at 65 and 66. 'I'he strips 65 are constructed with slits 6'? extending upwardly from the lower edges thereof and the strips 66 are constructed with similar slits 68 extending downwardly from the upper edges thereof. These strips are adaptedA to be interconnected to form a cellular structure similar tothe partitions 45 Vand 63. It will be noted that the slits 6"(` and 68 are not centrally disposed with respectto said strips. The slits are on the contrary so arranged that when thestrips are assembled, the same lieY adjacent the edges ofthe n@ I slots `6() and 64 of thepartitions 45 and 63, `This causes the said strips to clear the positiveV tex'- niinals 44 of@ the various dry cells and to form small compartments 69 between said strips and said partitions to receive thernegative binding 1205 y 125 In Figs.. 20to 25 a still different form of the inventionis illustrated. This form of the invention isvsubstantially the same as that illustrated in Fig.. 13 excepting forthe'diiference in construction of the spacers'employed. However, in .this 130.l

formof the invention, the box which is employed and` whichY is indicated at 70 is of slightly `less height than, the; box 30 shown in Fig. 1 andthe partitions '71 and '72 employed therewith are of slightly less height than thepartitions45 and 63 .135;

of theotherv forms of` the invention. With the exception of the fdifference in height the con-l struction of both the box 70 and the partitions '71 and72.is exactly the same as the, box 307 and the partitions 45 and 63. In vthis form of the in- 1 vention, a spacer strip such as shownY at '73r is em ployed which is `constructed of corrugated ,board or some .other suitabley board having" an appref.. ciable thickness. This strip is of a 'widthsome-- what; greater than the diameter ofthe bindingf postv of ,thevv dry cell. and fis `constrjucted with ai. numberof holes .'Zldisp'osedV at suitable 'intervals toreccive the positive binding'post i441` of the dy.fcells.. In the use of this form of. the inventionthe?` stripsl '13I are disposed within the slots` 60 and 15@ 'suitable manner.

of the various partitions 71 and 72 so that the binding posts are received within the opening 74 in said device. It will be noted in Fig. 21 that two sets of strips are employed which are ar ranged at right angles to one another so that the same form in conjunction with the upper ends of the partitions 7l and 72 compartments similar to the compartments 69 of the form of the invention shown in Fig. 13, whereby the dry cells are deprived of rotation and the negative binding posts 43 fully protected. The thickness of the strips 73 is somewhat greater than onehalf the height of the binding post above the upper surfaces of the dry cells so that the upper ends of the said binding posts are clear of the top 37 of box 70. In this manner the dry cells are held in identically the same relation with respect to the various parts of the box as in the form of the invention shown in Fig. 3.

In Figs. 26 to 3l, I have shown a form of the invention in which the clearance provided at the delicate parts of the dry cells may be formed without the use of slots extending completely through the partitions. In this form of the invention, a box 75 is employed which is identical with the box 30 excepting that the same may be slightly larger in dimensions due to the fact that partitions of a slightly greater thickness are employed. Otherwise the said box is identically the same as that employed in the various other forms of the invention and particularly the box shown in Fig. l. The partitions utilized in this form of the invention are shown in detail in Figs. 28 and 29 and are indicated at 76 and '77. These partitions are constructed of corrugated board or some other readily compressible material of like nature. The partitions 76 and 77 extend the full height of the box and are formed with slits 78 and 79 corresponding with the slits 4'7 and 48 of the other forms of the invention whereby said partitions may be interconnected in identically the same manner to icrm compartments in which the various dry cells may be disposed. The extreme upper ends 80 and 8l of the partitions '76 and 77 and the lower ends 82and 83 thereof are compressed or ilattened to a thickness less than the major portion of said partitions as best shown in Fig. 3l. This may be accomplished by rolling the end portions of said partitions or in any other By means of this construction a space 84 is formed on either side of the surface of said partitions which is adapted to receive the bands or rims 41 of the various dry cells or the upper portions of said dry cells so as to prevent ithe vsame from contacting with one another as in the other form of the invention. The compressed porticns of the partitions 76 and 77 serve the same purpose as the slots 50 and 60 of the other forms of the invention.

In conjunction with the structure shown in Figs. 26 and 27, I employ a spacer illustrated in detail in Fig. 30. This spacer is indicated in its entirety at 85 and comprises a strip of sheet material which is bent along three parallel lines 86, 87 and 88 to form a rectangle best shown in Fig. 30. This rectangle is adapted to be inserted into thev upper `portions of the various compartments formed between. the partitions 76 and ,'77 and the walls oi the box 75 and engages the up- Lper ends of the dry cells and the under side of the box in identically the same manner as the strips 65`and 66 used in the form of the invention shown in Fig. 13. The length of the portions of said strip 85 between' the folds`86, 87 and 88 .thereof is somewhat greater than the width of the compartments between the partitions 76 and 77 so that the said strips become bowed as indicated at 89 when inserted into said compartments causing the intervening portions of said strips to extend across the upper end of the dry cells at positions inwardly from the outer edges of the cases 39 of said dry cells. The spacer 85 is so disposed and the negative binding post of the dry cell is so arranged in respect to said spacer that the same lies between the two ends 90 and 91 ofthe spacer so that said binding post is held from movement and rotation of the dry cell prevented thereby precluding the possibility of injuring the dry cell through the contacting of the negative posts of adjacent dry cells.

The method of using the various forms of the invention are all the same. The various partitions are assembled and inserted into the box and the dry cells disposed Within the various compartments with the negative posts in the corners of the compartments. The respective spacers are then placed in the proper positions above the dry cells and the cover of the box sealed.

The advantages of my invention are manifest. The dry cells are firmly and immovably held within the box so that the same cannot strike or contact with one another at easily fragile portions to cause injury thereto. The dry cells contact with the partitions along portions of said dry cells capable of withstanding considerable shock and are free from said partitions and from one another at the more delicate portions thereof. The dry cells are held from movement longitudinally with respect to the box through the spacer strips which at the same time prevent the binding posts of the dry'cells from contacting with the cover of the box. The dry cells are held from rotation so that the negative binding posts,

cannot contact with one another and injure the dry cells, and the portion of the dry cell adjacent the wax cap thereon is entirely free from contact with any portion of the partitions or from contact with one another so that injury to this portion of the dry cell is entirely precluded. The device can be constructed by ordinary means and at a nominal expense.

Changes in the specific form of my invention as herein described may be made within the scope of what is claimed without departing from the spirit of my invention.

Having described my invention what I claim as new and desirel to protect by Letters Patent 1s:

1. A packing structure for a plurality of dry cells adapted to be arranged in a row comprising a box for the reception of the dry cells having a bottom on which the dry cells may rest and a top spaced from the upper ends of the dry cells, a plurality of partitions separating the cells in the row, and an elongated spacer disposed between the upper 'ends of the dry cells and the top of said box, said spacer having a portion extending between the respective binding posts of each of said dry cells.

2. A packing structure for a plurality of dry cells adapted to be arranged in a row comprising a box for the reception of the dry cells having a bottom on which the dry cells may rest and a top spaced from the upper ends of the dry cells, a plurality of partitions separating the cells in the row, and an elongated spacer disposed between the upper ends of the dry cells and the top of said box, said spacer having a portion extending between Athe respective binding posts of each of said' dry cells, and means extending at right partitions within said box disposed between therows of dry cells, other partitions within the box disposed between the individual cells of each row, a spacer strip extending along said rows and disposed between the upper portions of said dry cells and the top of said box, said spacer strip having portions lying between the respective binding posts of each dry cell of a row, and means extending at right angles to said spacer strip,

said means having portions lying between thek binding posts of adjacently lying dry cells of succeeding rows.

4. A packing structure for a plurality of dry cells adapted to be arranged in a row comprising a box for the reception of the dry cells having a bottom on which the dry cells may rest and a top spaced from the upper ends of the dry cells, a

. plurality of partitions separating the cells in the row, and an elongated spacer disposed between the upper ends of the dry cells and the top of said box, said spacer having a portion extending between therespective binding posts of each of said dry cells, said partitions extending from said bottom of said box to the top and having notches therein for the reception of said spacer strip.

5. A packing structure for a plurality of dry cells adapted to be arranged in a row comprising a box for the reception of the dry cells having a bottom on which the dry cells may rest and a top spaced from the upper ends of the dry cells, a plurality kof partitions separating the cells in the row, and an elongated 'spacer disposed between the upper ends of the dry cells and the top of said box, said spacer having a portion extending between the respective binding posts of each of said dry cells, and of a width less than that of said cells, said partitions extending from said bottom of said box to the top, and having notches therein for the reception of said spacer strip, said notches being of a width substantially equal to the width of the spacer strip to retain the spacer strip in position' to separate the binding posts.

6. A packing structure for cylindrical dry cells formed with a wax cap, said structure compris-y ing a box for the reception lof the dry cells, a

partition within the box disposed between the dry cells and contacting with the tangential surfaces thereof, said partition being free from the dry cells at the localities of the wax caps thereof, and means superimposing said partition and disposed Vbetween the binding posts of the dry cells for protecting the dry cells.

7. A packing structure for cylindrical dry cells formed with a wax cap, `said structure comprising a box for the reception of the dry cells, a partition within the box disposed between the dry cells and contacting with the tangential surfaces thereof; said partition being formed with slots extending below the wax caps of the dry cells and Vterminating at lateral localities just clearing the tangent surfaces of the dry cells at the wax caps.

8. A packing structure for cylindrical dry cells formed with a Wax cap and binding posts at the upper ends and with a band encircling the lower end, said structure comprising a box for the re-Y ception of the dry cells, a partition in the box,v

arating adjoining dry cells, said partition having a slot in its upper end along the line oi' tangency of the dry cells on opposite sides of the partition, and means for engagement with the binding posts.

.of the dry cells for restraining movement of the dry cells to prevent entry oi.' the binding posts into said slots.

ifo

` PAUL F. BoEYE.

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2594287A (en) * 1949-01-17 1952-04-29 Pallet Devices Inc Pallet container assembly for shipping articles
US2667995A (en) * 1950-05-31 1954-02-02 Bruce Engineering Corp Combined merchandising package and article carrier
US2743010A (en) * 1951-12-12 1956-04-24 Libbey Owens Ford Glass Co Package of curved glass sheets
US2951624A (en) * 1958-01-10 1960-09-06 Cornell Paperboard Products Co Produce container and tray insert
US3184048A (en) * 1962-08-06 1965-05-18 Verne G Bjerum Packing brace
US8783462B2 (en) * 2011-08-31 2014-07-22 Panasonic Corporation Packaging construction
US20160093850A1 (en) * 2014-09-30 2016-03-31 Johnson Controls Technology Company System for providing structural integrity of a battery module
US20170355506A1 (en) * 2016-06-13 2017-12-14 Michael E. Moeller Packaging and shipping system for a dry charged battery

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2594287A (en) * 1949-01-17 1952-04-29 Pallet Devices Inc Pallet container assembly for shipping articles
US2667995A (en) * 1950-05-31 1954-02-02 Bruce Engineering Corp Combined merchandising package and article carrier
US2743010A (en) * 1951-12-12 1956-04-24 Libbey Owens Ford Glass Co Package of curved glass sheets
US2951624A (en) * 1958-01-10 1960-09-06 Cornell Paperboard Products Co Produce container and tray insert
US3184048A (en) * 1962-08-06 1965-05-18 Verne G Bjerum Packing brace
US8783462B2 (en) * 2011-08-31 2014-07-22 Panasonic Corporation Packaging construction
US20160093850A1 (en) * 2014-09-30 2016-03-31 Johnson Controls Technology Company System for providing structural integrity of a battery module
US9608245B2 (en) * 2014-09-30 2017-03-28 Johnson Controls Technology Company System for providing structural integrity of a battery module
US20170355506A1 (en) * 2016-06-13 2017-12-14 Michael E. Moeller Packaging and shipping system for a dry charged battery

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