US1933237A - Monolithic wall structure - Google Patents

Monolithic wall structure Download PDF

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US1933237A
US1933237A US380795A US38079529A US1933237A US 1933237 A US1933237 A US 1933237A US 380795 A US380795 A US 380795A US 38079529 A US38079529 A US 38079529A US 1933237 A US1933237 A US 1933237A
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plastic
brick
bricks
coat
standard
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US380795A
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Nathaniel L Aberson
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Nathaniel L Aberson
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E04BUILDING
    • E04BGENERAL BUILDING CONSTRUCTIONS; WALLS, e.g. PARTITIONS; ROOFS; FLOORS; CEILINGS; INSULATION OR OTHER PROTECTION OF BUILDINGS
    • E04B2/00Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls
    • E04B2/02Walls, e.g. partitions, for buildings; Wall construction with regard to insulation; Connections specially adapted to walls built-up from layers of building elements
    • E04B2/04Walls having neither cavities between, nor in, the solid elements

Description

0a, 31', 1933. N ABERSON 1,933,237
MONOLITHIC WALL STRUCTURE Filed July 25; 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 7 U U QHUUU .4 TTORNE Y.
Oct. 31, 1933. N. L. ABERSON MONOLITHIC WALL STRUCTURE Filed July 25, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 I N VENTOR Mfldmdl 1454/4501? Patented Get. 31, 1933 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE 12 Claims.
This invention relates to monolithic wall structure, and has to do particularly with a simple, compact wall structure of the monolithic stucco type, which will give the outward ornamental appearance of standard ornamental brick wall construction.
Many attempts have been made to design wall structure in which the base foundation is formed of wood, the outer ornamental wall of stone or tile, and lath for keying the plastic material next to the stone or tile. However, such structures have not gone into practical use and are open to the objection of weight and thickness as to be excluded by the usual building restrictions for veneer type walls.
This invention contemplates a Wall structure adapted to be applied to Wooden buildings already erected, or to new buildings with a wooden base structure, wherein the finished wall gives an outward appearance of solid standard ornamental brick construction but which is secured directly to the wooden base structure and which has a thickness and weight which comes well within standard building restrictions.
Another feature of the present invention resides in the method of building up the wall structure which includes the steps of applying thin metallic reinforcing means to the wooden base, applying a thin coat of plastic material to embed the metallic reinforcing means, applying a second coat of colored plastic material for receiving the novel bricks or what might be termed briquets and the manner of inserting the bricks into position within the second layer of plastic material whereby to provide an outer wall structure exactly simulating a solid brick self-supporting structure.
Other features of the invention reside in the novel form of brick which makes possible the fabrication of a wall structure which will come within the standard building restrictions for veneer or stucco walls of the present type.
In the drawings:
Fig. 1 is a perspective view partly in section illustrating my novel wall structure and the progressive steps in the fabrication of the same.
Fig. 2 is a fragmentary cross sectional view illustrating the first step of forming my wall 0 structure wherein the reinforcing means is secured to and spaced from the wooden base and surrounded with the initial plastically applied coat.
Fig. 3 is a sectional view similar to Fig. 2 but 5 illustrating the second step wherein the second layer of plastic material or mortar applied to the first layer.
Fig. 4 is a similar view illustrating the next step which is the inserting of the novel briquets into the second layer of plastic material whereby such bricks are securely embedded in the second layer of plastic material and are spaced by the plastic material itself.
Fig. 5 is a view similar to Fig. 4 and illustrates the P ing up or filling up of the entire space 5 between the adjacent briquets.
Fig. 6 is a perspective view of a relatively thin briquet of the type used in forming my wall structure.
In some localities the demand for houses of brick construction has almost entirely supplanted those of frame construction. In order to remodel the walls of such frame houses to simulate other types of wall construction, it is either necessary to add a complete outer wall with a separate foundation, at considerable expense, or to remodel such frame houses to simulate those of the stucco type. In remodeling frame houses along the latter line, the additional wall structure is secured directly to the wooden frame base structure with the result that certain building restrictions have been imposed on walls of this structure, so as to limit the weight and thickness of the material going to form the wall, which must be supported by the base structure of wood. 35
Standard building restrictions limit this thickness of added wall structure to approximately 1 inches or less. I have found that it is possible to construct a wall along the stucco type by exactly simulating a wall of standard brick construction and still stay within this limit of 1 inches.
The complete wall structure as shown in Fig. 1 may be best explained by the method of building up the same. As shown in both Figs. 1 and 2, I preferably secure a suitable reinforcing material 1 to the outer walls 2 of a frame building structure. Such wooden outer walls may, of course, be arranged in any manner desired and may form a part of a new structure or of an old structure. The main point is that the reinforcing material of relatively thin wire is secured to and spaced from the outer surface of such wall.
After the securing of the reinforcing means in place, I preferably apply a first coat or what might be termed a scratch coat of plastic mortar of cement or gypsum composition or any other well-known composition, as best shown in Fig. 2, and wherein this first coat is designated 3. This first coat is preferably such as to cover the reinforcing material 1 so that it surrounds the reinforcing strands on all sides.
The second and final coat 4 may then be applied, as shown in Fig. 3 and this may consist of a plastic mortar similar to that used for preparing the first coat but suitably colored in accordance with the desired ornamental appearance of the finished brick wall. This second coat is preferably applied to the first coat at a time when such first coat is almost dry or set, but of course, it may be applied at other times without materially affecting the strength of the wall. By applying the first coat in the manner stated and by then applying the second coat I find that I am able to build up a very strong monolithic structure.
The wall is next completed by inserting my novel briquet directly into the plastic material formed by the second coat. These novel briquets which may be designated 5, are preferably formed of the same composition and fabricated in the same manner as the standard brick. The front surface 6 of this briquet may be wire cut or given any suitable ornamentation comparable to standard ornamental fired bricks. The side walls or edges of the brick may take the form comparable to the side walls of the standard brick with the result that the briquet has standard face dimensions of approximately 2% inches by 8 inches, comparable to a standard brick, but with a depth less than 2 inches and preferably substantially t; inches.
Each separate briquet is then forced into the plastic second coat, as shown in Fig. 4, and. of course, lined up in a suitable manner with the result that the colored plastic material of the second coat will be forced in between the bricks as at 7 to form a typical mortar joint. Such mortar joints may be finished by using a. suitable pointing up" tool, and if desired the joints between the bricks may be completely filled up with additional'mortar as shown at 8 in Fig. 5. The bricks are thus securely held and embedded in the second plastic coating to form a monolithic wall structure having a complete thickness of 1 inches or less from the board base 2 to the surface of the bricks 5.
It will thus be seen that I have provided a wall structure which when applied to old frame structure will completely transform the wall structure into one having the outward appearance of a standard brick wall, but which at the same time will remain within the restrictions required of stucco buildings and the like, and which in view of the fact that the bricks have substantially the same specific gravity as mortar, will present a comparatively light wall structure so as to place substantially the same strain upon the wooden base structure as the ordinary stucco wall. It wil further be obvious that in the case of new buildings that I have not only provided a very desirable wall structure in that it provides a combined wood and brick wall, with the advantages of both, but have provided a wall structure which will give the ornamental appearance of any solid brick structure but which will be much cheaper to build in addition'to the lower transportation costs of the brick.
It will also be seen that I may obtain a very desirable wall structure by applying two or more thin layers of plastic mortar, as shown in Fig. 5, and then adding a colored mortar merely to fill up the spaces between adjacent bricks. This makes it possible to use different grades of mortar or plastic materials for building up the wall and for securely holding the bricks in place and then using a fairly cheap grade of mortar to which to add the color.
The standard brick as referred to in the specification and claims is intended to come under the present A. S. T. M. definition and classification which is as follows: The standard size of brick shall be 2 x 3 x 8", with permissible variations of A in breadth or depth and A in length. It will also be understood that while the preferred exposed surface dimensions of my veneer brick units 3 are substantially those of the standard brick, the materials for making said veneer units 3 may vary considerably and still come within the scope of the present invention.
What I claim is:
1. The steps of forming a monolithic wall structure, simulating ornamental brick wall structure, which comprise securing reinforcing means to a base wall of wood, applying a relatively thin coat of plastic material to said reinforcing means, and then pressing a plurality of bricks into said plastic material, and spaced from each other whereby said plastic material forms a mortar joint between the brick.
2. The steps of forming a monolithic wall structure, simulating ornamental brick wall structure, which comprise applying a layer of plastic material to a base wall of wood, applying a second coat of colored plastic material over said first coat, and then pressing a plurality of brick into said second coat of plastic material, said brick being spaced from each other, whereby said plastic material forms a colored mortar joint between the spaced brick.
3. The steps of forming a monolithic wall structure, simulating ornamental brick wall structure, which comprise applying a relatively thin layer of plastic material to a base wall of wood, applying a relatively thin second coat of colored plastic material over said first coat, and then pressing a plurality of brick into said second coat of plastic material to form a complete wall of 1 inches or less, said brick being spaced from each other whereby said plastic material forms a 001- ored mortar joint between the spaced brick.
4. The steps of forming a monolithic wall structure simulating ornamental brick wall structure, which comprise applying supporting means to a main wall of wood, applying a coat of colored plastic mortar to said means and then pressing a plurality of bricks having face dimensions comparable to standard bricks but a thickness less than two inches into said colored plastic material and spacing said bricks from each other whereby said plastic material is forced between and forms. a mortar joint between the spaced bricks.
5. The steps ,of forming a monolithic wall structure, simulating ornamental brick wall structure, which comprise applying relatively thin supporting means to but spaced from a main wall of wood, applying a coat of plastic mortar to said supporting means and then pressing a plurality of bricks having face dimensions comparable to standard bricks but a thickness less than two inches into said still plastic material and spacing said bricks from each other whereby said plastic material is extended, and forms a mortar joint, between the spaced bricks.
6. The steps of forming a monolithic wall structure, simulating ornamental brick wall structure, which comprise permanently securing relatively thin reinforcing means to, a main wall of wood, applying a coat of binding material to said reinforcing means, applying a coat of colored binding material to said first coat, and pressing a plurality of bricks having face dimensions comparable to standard bricks but a thickness less than two inches into said material while still plastic and spacing said bricks from each other whereby said plastic material is extended, and forms a mortar joint, between the spaced bricks.
7. The method of forming a monolithic brick wall, which comprises applying a layer of plastic material on a vertically positioned base wall and then pressing a series of relatively thin bricks into said plastic material and spacing the brick one from the other whereby a part of said plastic material is forced in between the spaced bricks as a mortar joint.
8. The method of forming a brick veneer wall structure, which comprises permanently securing supporting means to a vertically positioned base wall, applying a plastic binder to said supporting means and pressing a series of relatively thin bricks into said binder while still plastic, spacing the bricks one from the other and filling in said spaces with mortar.
9. The method of forming a brick veneer wall structure, which comprises permanently securing supporting means to a vertically positioned base wall, independently securing a series of relatively thin bricks to the supporting means by means of plastic material, spacing the relatively thin bricks one from the other, said plastic material surrounding the supporting means and contacting with the surface of the base wall and with the surface of the individual bricks.
10. The method of forming a brick veneer wall structure, which comprises permanently securing supporting means to a vertically positioned base wall, independently securing a series of relatively thin bricks to the supporting means by means of plastic material, spacing the relatively thin bricks one from the other, and pressing the spaced bricks into position while said material is still plastic whereby a part of said plastic material is forced in between the spaced bricks as a mortar joint.
11. An exterior brick veneer wall for covering buildings, comprising lathe supporting means permanently secured to the wall of the building, a plurality of bricks rigidly secured to and supported by said supporting means, said bricks being spaced one from the other and each brick being relatively thin as compared to a standard brick but having the exposed surfaces thereof of substantially the same facial characteristics and the same dimensions as the exposed surfaces of a standard brick, and all the spaces between the bricks being closed with a sealing filler, the total thickness of the complete brick veneer wall being not over two inches.
12. A foundationless brick veneer wall for covering buildings, comprising a lath supporting means fastened directly to and slightly spaced from the base wall of the building, a plurality of bricks secured to this lath supporting means individually supported by said means and rigidly secured to said means by plastically applied material allowed to set, said material substantially surrounding the lath supporting means. said bricks being spaced one from the other and being relatively thin as compared to standard bricks but having the exposed surfaces thereof of substantially the same facial characteristics and the same dimensions as the exposed surfaces of a standard brick, all the spaces between the bricks being closed with a sealing filler, the complete thickness of said foundationless brick veneer wall including the lath supporting means being not over two inches.
NATHANIEL L. ABERSON.
US380795A 1929-07-25 1929-07-25 Monolithic wall structure Expired - Lifetime US1933237A (en)

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Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2810180A (en) * 1954-06-25 1957-10-22 Henry C Barnack Stone mold
US3327442A (en) * 1964-06-23 1967-06-27 Gail Internat Prefabricated synthetic resin bonded tile wall unit
US3775916A (en) * 1972-03-20 1973-12-04 Dev Co America Prefabricated wall panel
US4642960A (en) * 1984-12-12 1987-02-17 Wallover Iii Edwin M Prefabricated building panel and method of making the same
US6412244B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2002-07-02 Edward Nolan Modular wall element
US20040261345A1 (en) * 2003-06-24 2004-12-30 Mcgrath John Rock facade panel and methods of manufacturing a rock facade panel
US6869553B1 (en) * 2002-07-12 2005-03-22 John D. Gentile Method for forming a precast brick riser

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2810180A (en) * 1954-06-25 1957-10-22 Henry C Barnack Stone mold
US3327442A (en) * 1964-06-23 1967-06-27 Gail Internat Prefabricated synthetic resin bonded tile wall unit
US3775916A (en) * 1972-03-20 1973-12-04 Dev Co America Prefabricated wall panel
US4642960A (en) * 1984-12-12 1987-02-17 Wallover Iii Edwin M Prefabricated building panel and method of making the same
US6412244B2 (en) * 1998-09-03 2002-07-02 Edward Nolan Modular wall element
US6869553B1 (en) * 2002-07-12 2005-03-22 John D. Gentile Method for forming a precast brick riser
US20040261345A1 (en) * 2003-06-24 2004-12-30 Mcgrath John Rock facade panel and methods of manufacturing a rock facade panel
US20050188643A1 (en) * 2003-06-24 2005-09-01 Mcgrath John Rock facade panel and methods of manufacturing a rock facade panel

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