US1898085A - Production of artificial filaments, yarns, or threads - Google Patents

Production of artificial filaments, yarns, or threads Download PDF

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US1898085A
US1898085A US389412A US38941229A US1898085A US 1898085 A US1898085 A US 1898085A US 389412 A US389412 A US 389412A US 38941229 A US38941229 A US 38941229A US 1898085 A US1898085 A US 1898085A
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Prior art keywords
filaments
roller
denier
production
threads
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US389412A
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Dreyfus Henry
Dickie William Alexander
Taylor William Ivan
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Celanese Corp
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Celanese Corp
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Priority to GB2635028A priority Critical patent/GB321762A/en
Application filed by Celanese Corp filed Critical Celanese Corp
Priority to GB75330A priority patent/GB346354A/en
Priority to GB427531A priority patent/GB372778A/en
Priority to GB3245332A priority patent/GB410511A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1898085A publication Critical patent/US1898085A/en
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01FCHEMICAL FEATURES IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS; APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF CARBON FILAMENTS
    • D01F2/00Monocomponent artificial filaments or the like of cellulose or cellulose derivatives; Manufacture thereof
    • D01F2/24Monocomponent artificial filaments or the like of cellulose or cellulose derivatives; Manufacture thereof from cellulose derivatives
    • D01F2/28Monocomponent artificial filaments or the like of cellulose or cellulose derivatives; Manufacture thereof from cellulose derivatives from organic cellulose esters or ethers, e.g. cellulose acetate
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A47FURNITURE; DOMESTIC ARTICLES OR APPLIANCES; COFFEE MILLS; SPICE MILLS; SUCTION CLEANERS IN GENERAL
    • A47CCHAIRS; SOFAS; BEDS
    • A47C23/00Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases
    • A47C23/30Spring mattresses with rigid frame or forming part of the bedstead, e.g. box springs; Divan bases; Slatted bed bases using combinations of springs covered by more than one of the groups A47C23/04, A47C23/06 and A47C23/12; Frames therefor
    • A47C23/32Combinations of nets with springs in compression; Frames therefor
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01DMECHANICAL METHODS OR APPARATUS IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS
    • D01D5/00Formation of filaments, threads, or the like
    • D01D5/20Formation of filaments, threads, or the like with varying denier along their length
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR MAN-MADE THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01FCHEMICAL FEATURES IN THE MANUFACTURE OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, THREADS, FIBRES, BRISTLES OR RIBBONS; APPARATUS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR THE MANUFACTURE OF CARBON FILAMENTS
    • D01F2/00Monocomponent artificial filaments or the like of cellulose or cellulose derivatives; Manufacture thereof
    • D01F2/24Monocomponent artificial filaments or the like of cellulose or cellulose derivatives; Manufacture thereof from cellulose derivatives
    • D01F2/28Monocomponent artificial filaments or the like of cellulose or cellulose derivatives; Manufacture thereof from cellulose derivatives from organic cellulose esters or ethers, e.g. cellulose acetate
    • D01F2/30Monocomponent artificial filaments or the like of cellulose or cellulose derivatives; Manufacture thereof from cellulose derivatives from organic cellulose esters or ethers, e.g. cellulose acetate by the dry spinning process
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T428/00Stock material or miscellaneous articles
    • Y10T428/29Coated or structually defined flake, particle, cell, strand, strand portion, rod, filament, macroscopic fiber or mass thereof
    • Y10T428/2913Rod, strand, filament or fiber
    • Y10T428/2973Particular cross section
    • Y10T428/2976Longitudinally varying

Description

Feb. 21, 1933. DREYFUS ET L 1,898,085
PRODUCTION OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, YARNS, OR THREADS Filed Aug. 30, 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet l HENRY DREYFU WILUAM A. DICKiE WILLIAM I TAYLOR Inventors.
Feb. 21, 1933. H. DREYFUS ET AL 1,898,085
PRODUCTION OF ARTIFICIAL FILAMENTS, YARNS, OR THREADS Filed Aug. 30. 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 11,11,111 n VI'IIIIIIII'IIII'IA I i i i i i R HENRY DREYFUS WILLIAM A. mama wmmm I-TAYLOR Inventors.
Patented Feb. 21, 1933 remit STATES PATENT OFFICE E" "RY DREYF'US, OF LONDON, AND WILLIAM ALEXANDER DICKIE AND WILLIAM IVAN TAYLOR, OF SPONDON, NEAR DERBY, ENGLAND, ASSIGNORS TO CORPORATION OF AMERICA, A CORPORATION OF DELAWARE f A PRODUCTION OF ARTIFICIAL FILAIMZENTS, YARNS, OR THREADS Application filed'August 30, 1929, Serial No. 389,412, and in Great Britain September 13, 1928.
T his invention relates to artificial filaments, yarns, or threads, and to their production by the extrusion of spinning solutions through jets, nozzles, or other spinning orifices.
According to the invention, filaments or threads of artificial silk or the like are given a regular or systematic irregularity in denler by drawing them at varying linear speeds in the course of their production so as to stretch them at any desired intervals. The varying stretch imparted to the filaments or threads results in a correspondingly varying denler, the variations occurring at any desired intervals and to any desired degree, while extending any desired amount along the length of the filaments or threads (hereafter referred to as filaments).
. Numerous methods may be employed for stretching or drawing or variably stretching or drawing the filaments to impart the desired alternating or periodically recurring irregularities. For instance, the filaments may be caused to pass to a roller of circular cross-section whose speed, which may normally be the same or greater than the speed of extrusion of the filaments, is varied at intervals and to amounts and for periods corresponding to the frequency and degree and length of the predetermined irregularity required to be imparted to the filaments.
According to a further method of imparting the stretch, the filaments may be caused to pass round a roller or the like so mounted and/or of such cross-section as to vary the linearspeed of the filaments. For example, rollers of elliptical or other non-circular cross-section may be employed, or rollers of circular or other cross-section may be eccentrically mounted. Further, such rollers may be arranged to rotate at a constant speed, or by varying their speed of rotation, further irregularities may be imparted to the filaments over and above those impart-ed owing to the form or mounting of the roller.
A roller of irregular cross-section for use according to the invention may be constituted by a pair of flanges each having a number of radial or other slots adapted to receive bars which extend between the flanges, ad-
justment of the bars along the length of the slots or removal of some of the bars enabling a variety of cross-sections to be obtained.
Moreover, a roller having any of the forms described above, and rotating with either constant or varying peripheral speeds, may be caused to move bodily e. g. to and fro, while rotating, either continuously or intermittently, the movement causing the filaments to be stretched irregularly and thus to 1receive a reduced denier at desired interva s.
A still further method of carrying out the invention consists in leading the filaments over or round a rotating roller or drum whose diameter varies along its length, the filaments being engaged at successive parts of their length by parts of the roller or drum of different diameters. As the linear speed imparted to the filaments varies in accordance with the diameter of the drawing roller or drum, the length of the filaments between the spinning orifices and the roller or drum is stretched to varying" extents, with the production of corresponding variations in denier.
The filaments may be caused to be engaged by the different diameters by traversing the filaments along the roller or drum or by traversing the drum itself, as by moving a guide for the filaments or mounting the drum on an axially slidable shaft. Any predetermined frequency of variation may be obtained by adjusting the rate of traverse of the filaments relative to the roller or drum, and, of course, by varying the length of the traverse, the effect of the roller or drum on the filaments may be modified.
The roller or drum may have any suitable form, depending on the nature of the variations to be produced, for instance, it may be arranged as a truncated cone by means of which a maximum variation in denier may be obtained corresponding to the difference between the diameters of the two ends of the cone. The roller or drum may, moreover, have a non-circular cross-section and be driven at varying speeds.
The filaments may be wound, or twisted and wound, after passing round the stretching roller or the like, or they may be collected on the roller or the like itself.
Yet a further method consists in drawing the filaments at varying linear speeds by eriodically lengthening the path followed y the filaments to a winding or twisting and winding device, the lengthening being efi'ected by one or more bars or rollers (driven or idle) which are moved across the path of the filaments at a frequency and to an extent adjusted in accordance with the variations in denier to be imparted. For instance, the filaments may pass over and under a pair of bars or rollers arranged for oscillation across the direction of feed of the filaments.
Any suitable means may be employed for controlling the speed of operation of the stretching devices, and the devices may be arranged to give a gradual or more or less abrupt change from one denier to another, as desired. The driving of the devices may be by means of electric motors whose speed is controlled in accordance with the variations in denier required. Further,elliptical or other irregular gears may be employed for driving the elements of the stretching devices.
All the jets or nozzles whether in a single metier or machine or in a series of such which are required to produce the same quality of filament have associated therewith devices which are driven or controlled in such a manner as to exert the same stretching action on all the filaments extruded from the jets or nozzles.
The variations in denier produced according to the invention may appear at' regular short or regular long intervals of length or at regularly varying intervals, and variations of different degree or extent, or both, may appear at any desired intervals. Or one or more groups of irregularities may appear in regular sequence or in any desired order or at any desired intervals. Thus, for example, one or more short variations may alternate with one or more longer variations, or groups of short and long variations may alternate with short or long variations or with other groups of short and long variations, always with the object of producing a regular or systematic effect from the alternating or periodically recurring irregularities of denier of the filaments, yarns,orthreads. Orperiodiealirregularities forming groups of, for example, 2, 3, 4, 6 or 10 or more variations may occur on the filaments, yarns, or threads, the groups alternating with each other or appearing in any desired order according to the effect to be produced.
It will be understood that where yarn or thread is formed by the association of a number of filaments all of which have a regular irregularity in denier which is the same for all the filaments, the variations in the in-- dividual filaments may be arranged to produce by a cumulative effect a similar regular irregularity in the denier of the yarn or thread formed therefrom.
The yarns or threads which have received the regular irregularities as above described may be wound or twisted and wound for example, by means of cap-spinning devlces, or centrifugal boxes.
The filaments of varying denier may be formed into yarns, either alone or twisted or doubled with threads of other natural or artificial filaments or fibres. Or they may be cut or reduced to staple lengths, either continuously with their production or subsequently thereto, and spun into yarns, either alone or mixed or blended with other natural or artificial filaments or fibres, and such spun yarns may, if desired, be twisted or doubled with the same or other yarns to form any desired type of thread.
Yarns or threads with irregular denier according to the invention impart a novel effect to fabrics or articles wholly or partly formed from them, by reason of the differential effect produced by the variations, and this efi'ect may, moreover, be enhanced when the fabrics or articles are dyed, printed, or otherwise coloured, because of the regular irregularity of denier of the yarns or threads causing different penetration of the dyestufi or other colouring matter to be efi'ected, a great variety of colour efi'ects thereby being produced.
The, yarns or threads of varying denier may be applied to the production of fabrics or articles, either alone or in association with yarns or threads of regular artificial silk or of other natural or artificial filaments or fibres, and may be utilized to give any desired design or pattern. They may be used, for example, in the warp and /or weft in weaving operations; in knitting operations, for 'example in the production of warp-knitted fabrics; in circular hosiery or other knitting machines; in braiding or cording operations; in net or lace-making operations; or in any other fabric-forming or textile operations.
While the invention applies particularly to filaments or threads of varying or irregular denier, produced by the dry or evaporative method, and especially filaments or threads having as a base cellulose acetate or other cellulose derivatives. such as cellulose formate, propionate, or butyrate, thiocarbamic or alkoxy-alkacyl esters of cellulose, methyl, ethyl or benzyl cellulose, or the condensation products of cellulose and glycols or other polyhydric alcohols, it applies likewise to filaments or threads of varying or irregular denier produced by the wet or coagulation method, whether having a base of cellulose acetate or other organic derivatives of cellulose, or composed of a reconstituted cellulose. such as viscose, cuprammonium, or nitrocellulose silk.
Various forms of apparatus which may be employed in carrying the invention into effeet are illustrated in the accompanying drawings, it being understood that the following description is given by way of example only and is in no way limitative.
Fig. 1 is a side elevation of one form of apparatus;
Fig. 2 is a side elevation of a further form of apparatus;
Fig. 3 shows examples of stretching rollers which may be employed;
Fig. 4 is a perspective view of an apparatus in which filaments are traversed along the length of a stretching roller;
Fig. 5 is a side-elevation of a detail of a further form of apparatus;
Fig. 6 is a side elevation of another form of apparatus;
Fig. 7 is a plan view of Fig. 6; and
Figs. 8. 9, and 10 are views of a further form of device, Fig. 8 being an elevation of Fig. 9, and Fig. 10 a sectional view taken on the line 1010 of Fig. 9, and illustrating a modified arrangement.
Referring to Fig. 1, the filaments 5 are shown emerging from a spinning cell 6, the filaments being caused to pass round a roller 7 of elliptical section mounted for rotation on a shaft 8. On leaving the roller 7, the filaments pass to a thread guide 9 and to a capspinning device 10. It will be seen that as the filaments are engaged by the roller 7 in the position shown in full lines, the filaments will be drawn from the .cell 6 at a speed equal to the peripheral speed of the roller at the ends of its major axis, this speed being greater than the speed of extrusion of the filaments.
As the roller moves to the position shown in broken lines, the filaments are drawn from the cell at a speed corresponding to the peripheral speed of the roller at the ends of its minor axis. The filaments are thus stretched to different extents depending on the part of the roller with which they are engaged, the stretch varying from a maximum when the engagement is at the end of the major axis to a minimum at the end of the minor axis. At each revolution of the roller of elliptical cross-section, two variations in the amount of stretch, and, therefore, in the denier of the filaments, are imparted to the length of filaments drawn from the cell during the revolution. By employing rollers of other crosssection, different numbers of variations of stretch at each revolution may be obtained.
In Fig. 2. the filaments 5 on leaving the cell 6 are caused to pass round a roller 11 mounted on a shaft 12 carried by the upper end of an arm 13. the lower end of the arm being pivoted about a shaft 14. Pivoted at 15 on the arm 13 is an eccentric rod 16 driven bv means of an eccentric 17 the arrangement being such that the arm 13 and the roller 11 are caused to oscillate about the shaft 14 to an extent and at a rate dependent on the throw of the eccentric 17 and the speed at which the eccentric is driven. The roller 11 is rotated by means of a pulley 18 connected by a belt 19 to a pulley 20 freely mounted on the shaft 14. The pulley 20 is in turn driven by a belt 21. The roller 11 by its rotation, draws the filaments 5 from the cell 6 and variations in the length thus drawn are effected by the oscillatory motion of the roller. By varying the rate at which the eccentric 17 is driven with respect to the peripheral speed of the roller 11, e. g. by the use of elliptical gears, varying amounts of stretch and consequent variations in the denier of the filaments may be effected.
If desired, the variable stretch imparted to the filaments may be confined to a particular length of the filaments being produced, such an arrangement being shown in Fig. 2. At some distance from the spinning jet 22 a roller 23 is arranged. The filaments are caused to pass round the roller 23 which is driven at a rate equal to or exceeding the rate of extrusion of the filaments, so that the stretch imparted according to the invention is confined to the length of filaments between the roller 23 and the stretching apparatus, the length 24 of the filaments between the jet 22 and the roller 23 being free from such stretching.
Fig. 3 illustrates at (a) a stretching roller of roughly square cross-section but having rounded corners, and at b) an approximately triangular section roller. A roller of circular cross-section but mounted eccentrically for rotation is shown at (c) Fig. 3, and at (d) a roller of similar cross-section to (b) is shown also mounted eccentrically. It will be seen that by the employment of rollers of such cross-section, many variations in the amount and frequency of the variation in denier may be imparted. Moreover, by using such rollers in conjunction with apparatus such as that illustrated in Fig. 2, the variations may be produced in groups on the filaments, the recurrence of the groups to form a pattern depending on the form of the roller and the manner in which it is driven or moved. 7
In Fig. 4, the filaments 5 are shown passing round a conical roller 25 mounted on a shaft 26. A thread guide 27 is carried by a longitudinally movable bar 28, the bar being given a to and fro motion in any suitable way, e. g. by means of a cam, or by a crank disc 29. a pin 30 of which works in a fork 31 carried by the bar 28. The filaments are caused to engage parts of the roller 25 which move at different peripheral speeds, and the consequent variations of stretch imparted to the filaments result in corresponding variations in denier. The roller 25, which may be driven at a varying speed, may have an ir-- regular cross-section such as is indicated at (a) and (b) of Fig. 3, or it may be eccentrically mounted as shown at ('0) and (d) of Fig. 3.
The employment of irregular gearing for driving a stretching roller is illustrated in Fig. 5, elliptical gears 31 being shown in connection with a roller 32 of circular crosssection, though other cross-sections, such as those shown in Fig. 3, may be employed. This form of drive causes the roller to rotate with an irregularly peripheral speed during each revolution, thus producing a variation in the denier of the filaments 5.
In Fig. 6, filaments 33 on withdrawal from the spinning cell 34 are led to a device comprising an arm 35 mounted for oscillation on a shaft 36. Bars 37 project from the arm 35 in a direction parallel to the shaft 36, a bar 37 being arranged on each side of the shaft. An eccentric 38 driven in any suitable manner is connected by an eccentric rod 39 to an arm 40 fixed to the shaft 36. The arm 35 is thus caused to perform an oscillatory motion with an ampliture governed by the throw of the eccentric 38 and the position of the connection 41 between the eccentric rod 39 and the arm 40, a series of holes 42 being provided on the arm 40 to permit of the connection being adjusted. The bars 37 are preferably adjustably mounted on the arm 35, a series of holes 43 being provided on each half of the arm. On leaving this device the filaments 33 pass round. a feed roller 44 and are collected in any suitable manner. It Wlll be seen that as the filaments pass first over one bar 37 and then under the other before reaching the roller 44, the oscillation of the arm 35 causes a variable pull to be imparted to the filaments which are thereby stretched to a varying extent, with the consequence that they receive variations in denier along their length. Instead of the arms 35 and 40 being secured to the shaft 36. they may be arranged to oscillate freelv thereon, the arm 40 being connected directly to the arm 35 to 1mpart its movement thereto.
The device shown in Figs. 8-10 1s adapted to receive the filaments either in a manner similar to that of the roller 7 shown in Fig. 1 while the filaments are on their way to a winding device, or alternatively, the device itself may serve as a winding device. Two flanges 45 are connected by a hub 46 which is mounted on a shaft 47. Slots 48 are formed in each flange, and they are arranged to receive bars 49 which extend from one flange to the other and may be secured in any desired position in the slots 48 by means of nuts 50. The rods constitute a roller-like surface, the periphery of the roller depending on the positions of the rods in the slots. Thus, Fig. 8 shows four of the rods arranged to form a square 51, the remaining rods being held out of position near the hub. Fig. 10 shows two diametrically opposed rods mounted in the slots, all the remaining rods being removed.
As shown in Fig. 8, the device may operate as a roller of non-circular periphery which, by reason of the varying peripheral speed of the roller, imparts a variable denier to the filaments passing over the roller to a winding device. Instead, however, of the filaments proceeding to a further winding device, they may be collected on the bars in the form of a hank, and in Fig. 10 a hank 52 is shown in the course of formation on the single pair of rods 49.
By means of devices such as those above described, the irregularity of denier may be caused to appear in a great variety of arrangements on the filaments, varying from a simple alteration in denier occurring at regular intervals of any extent along the length of the filaments to a grouping of alterations in denler occurring at regular or irregular intervals.
It will be understood that any desired number of devices may be arranged for multaneous operation on the filaments or threads produced by a plurality of jets or nozzles in a single metier or machine, common actuation being provided for such parts as the oscillating rollers 11 shown in Fig. 2, the traversing guides 27 shown in Fig. 4 used for the several filaments or threads, or the oscillating arms 35 shown in Fig. 6. Thus. the shaft 12 may extend across the length of the metier or machine occupied by several Jets or nozzles, a single eccentric 17 or the like, or a pair of such, being employed to oscillate the shaft. Similarly, the bar 28 may extend over the length of the metier or machine and carry a suitable number of guides 27 for operation with the rollers 25, which are preferably mounted on a common shaft 26. Likewise, any desired number of eccentrics 38 may be carried by the shaft 53.
The foregoing apparatus may be applied to the treatment of artificial filaments produced by the dry or evaporative method, as 1s lndlcated in Figs. 1, 2, and 6, or by the wet or coagulation method. It is to be understood that the expression artificial filaments used hereafter in the claims. includes yarns or threads consisting of artificial filaments as well as the filaments themselves.
What we claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. Process for the production of artificial filaments, said process comprising drawing the filaments at varying linear speeds in the course of their production, thereby imparting a systematic variation in denier to the filaments.
2. Process for the production of artificial filaments from solutions of organic derivatives of cellulose, said process comprising drawing the filaments at varying linear speeds in the course of their production,
thereby imparting a systematic variation in denier to the filaments.
3. Process for the production of artificial filaments from solutions of cellulose acetate, said process comprising drawing the filaments at varying linear speeds in the course of their production, thereby impartin a systematic variation in denier to the laments.
4. Process for the production of artificial filaments, comprising extruding the filaments by the dr or evaporative method, and drawing the laments at varying linear speeds in the course of their production, thereby imparting systematic variation in denier to the filaments.
5. Process for the production of artificial filaments from solutions containing cellulose acetate, said process comprising extruding the filaments by the dry or evaporative method and drawing the filaments at varying linear speeds in the course of their production, thereby implarting a systematic variation in denier to t e filaments.
6. Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments comprising a filament-engaging member, and means for actuating said member in such a manner that its motion in engagement with the filaments causes the filaments to be drawn at systematically varying linear speeds, whereby corresponding systematic variations in denier are imparted to the filaments.
7 Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments com rising a rotating member round which the fi aments are caused to pass, and means for causing the said member to rotate with a varying peripheral speed, whereby a systematic variation in denier is imparted to the filaments.
8. Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments comprising a collecting device adapted to collect the filaments continuously with their production, a rotating member round which the filaments are caused to pass on their way to the collecting device, and means for causing the said member to rotate with a varying peripheral speed, whereby a systematic variation in denier is imparted to the filaments.
9. Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments, comprising a rotating member round which the filaments are caused to pass, the said member being so mounted for rotation and having such cross-section that the peripheral speed of its point of engagement,
of the filaments is caused tov vary, whereby a systematic variation in denier is imparted to the filaments.
10. Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments comprising a rotating member round which the filaments are caused to pass, and means for rotating the said member with a varying angular speed, whereby a systemleast one bar adapted to contact with the atic variation in denier is imparted to the fila ments.
11. Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments comprising a collecting device ada ted to collect the filaments continuously with their production, and a rotatin member round which the filaments are cause to pass on their way to the collectin the said member being so mounted %or rotation and havin such cross-section that the peripheral spec of its point of enga ement with the filaments is caused to vary, w ereby a systematic variation in denier is imparted to the filaments.
12. Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments, comprising a collecting device adapted to collect the filaments continuously with their production, a rotating member round which the filaments are caused to pass on their way to the collecting device, and means for rotating the said member with a varying angular speed, whereby a systematic variation in denier is imparted to the filaments.
13. Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments, comprising a rotating member round which the filaments are caused to ass, the diameter of'said member varyin a ong its length, and means for causing t e filaments to be engaged by successive arts of difierent diameters along the lengt of the said member, whereby a systematic variation in denier is imparted to the filaments.
14. Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments, comprising a collecting device adapted to collect the filaments continuously with their production, a rotating member round which the filaments are caused to pass on their way to the collecting device, the diameter of said member varyin along its length, and means for causing t e filaments to be e aged by successive parts having difierent iameters along the length of the said member, whereby a systematic variation in denier is imparted to the filaments.
15. Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments, said apparatus comprisin a collector device adapted to collect the h laments continuously with their productiorglat aments and means for reciprocating said bar periodically across the path of the filaments to the collector device, whereby a systematic variation in denier is imparted to the filaments.
In testimony whereof we have hereunto subscribed our names.
HENRY DREYFUS. WILLIAM ALEXANDER DICKIE.
WILLIAM IVAN TAYLOR.
device,
VII 10
US389412A 1928-09-13 1929-08-30 Production of artificial filaments, yarns, or threads Expired - Lifetime US1898085A (en)

Priority Applications (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
GB2635028A GB321762A (en) 1930-01-08 1928-09-13 Improvements in or relating to the production of artificial filaments, yarns or threads
GB75330A GB346354A (en) 1928-09-13 1930-01-08 Improvements relating to the production of artificial filaments, yarns, or threads
GB427531A GB372778A (en) 1931-02-11 1931-02-11 Improvements in spring seats
GB3245332A GB410511A (en) 1932-11-17 1932-11-17 Improvements in or relating to the production of artificial filaments, yarns or threads

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US390401A Expired - Lifetime US2065124A (en) 1928-09-13 1929-09-04 Production of artificial filaments, yarns, or threads
US496798A Expired - Lifetime US2038722A (en) 1928-09-13 1930-11-19 Production of textile materials

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US496798A Expired - Lifetime US2038722A (en) 1928-09-13 1930-11-19 Production of textile materials

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Cited By (34)

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US2635295A (en) * 1951-08-23 1953-04-21 Const Mecanique De Stains Soc Apparatus for converting tow to top
US2685497A (en) * 1948-05-12 1954-08-03 Celanese Corp Treatment of polymeric materials
US2745136A (en) * 1951-03-14 1956-05-15 Deboutteville Marcel Delamare Apparatus and method for making wool-like artificial fibres
US2746839A (en) * 1953-06-26 1956-05-22 Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co Method of spinning shaped filaments of plastic materials
US2876616A (en) * 1956-01-09 1959-03-10 Lees & Sons Co James Variable twist yarn forming apparatus
US2932850A (en) * 1955-08-01 1960-04-19 Celanese Corp Production of filaments of uneven denier
US2941259A (en) * 1956-09-18 1960-06-21 Jr James L Lohrke Filament processing
US2975474A (en) * 1958-06-11 1961-03-21 Du Pont Process and apparatus for preparing novelty yarns
US2990575A (en) * 1955-09-30 1961-07-04 British Celanese Apparatus for production of varying denier filaments
US3017737A (en) * 1958-06-25 1962-01-23 Du Pont Method and apparatus for producing bulky continuous filament yarn
US3025563A (en) * 1958-05-15 1962-03-20 Celanese Corp Manufacture of filaments of varying denier
US3048000A (en) * 1960-08-01 1962-08-07 Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co Method and apparatus for twisting and plying yarn
US3069747A (en) * 1958-03-04 1962-12-25 Du Pont Shaped products
US3086347A (en) * 1961-08-21 1963-04-23 Collins & Aiken Corp Method and means for producing variable yarn
US3105349A (en) * 1954-05-28 1963-10-01 Celanese Corp Method and apparatus for producing novelty yarn
US3113413A (en) * 1959-06-08 1963-12-10 Eastman Kodak Co Apparatus and method for producing volumized slub yarn
US3144747A (en) * 1959-05-05 1964-08-18 Celanese Corp Apparatus for producing a composite novelty slub yarn
US3194276A (en) * 1963-09-20 1965-07-13 Crompton & Knowles Corp Metering device for weft in looms
US3301204A (en) * 1964-01-31 1967-01-31 Bell Ind Inc Mechanism for forming a scallop fringe
US3302385A (en) * 1961-08-26 1967-02-07 Ruddell James Nelson Modification of filaments
US4214508A (en) * 1977-10-13 1980-07-29 Philip Morris Incorporated Method and apparatus for making cigarette filters of filamentary material
US4650451A (en) * 1985-10-18 1987-03-17 Mobil Oil Corporation Intermittently translating draw tape stretched between nip rolls
US4959044A (en) * 1988-05-02 1990-09-25 The Dow Chemical Company Film tension compensation device for bag making machine
US4998942A (en) * 1989-12-27 1991-03-12 Milliken Research Corporation Snubber profile
US5311650A (en) * 1990-12-24 1994-05-17 Milliken Research Corporation Texturizing system and apparatus
US5317791A (en) * 1993-03-24 1994-06-07 Adolf Adam Apparatus for producing slub effects in yarn strands
US20060010667A1 (en) * 2003-01-24 2006-01-19 Saurer Gmbh & Co. Kg Apparatus and method for texturing a plurality of blended synthetic multifilament yarns
US20120321804A1 (en) * 2011-04-29 2012-12-20 Ticona Llc Die and Method for Impregnating Fiber Rovings
US9346222B2 (en) 2011-04-12 2016-05-24 Ticona Llc Die and method for impregnating fiber rovings
US9410644B2 (en) 2012-06-15 2016-08-09 Ticona Llc Subsea pipe section with reinforcement layer
US9624350B2 (en) 2011-12-09 2017-04-18 Ticona Llc Asymmetric fiber reinforced polymer tape
US9623437B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2017-04-18 Ticona Llc Die with flow diffusing gate passage and method for impregnating same fiber rovings
US10336016B2 (en) 2011-07-22 2019-07-02 Ticona Llc Extruder and method for producing high fiber density resin structures
US11118292B2 (en) 2011-04-12 2021-09-14 Ticona Llc Impregnation section of die and method for impregnating fiber rovings

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BE449344A (en) * 1942-03-27
US2455509A (en) * 1943-05-26 1948-12-07 Chemical Developments Corp Method of extruding irregularly shaped carbon rods
US2455530A (en) * 1944-05-10 1948-12-07 American Viscose Corp Apparatus for the production of artificial filaments
US2497510A (en) * 1946-06-13 1950-02-14 Miller Pottery Engineering Co Apparatus for feeding plastic ceramic material to molds
US2507561A (en) * 1946-12-11 1950-05-16 Celanese Corp Method of producing differential color effects in fabrics, and the fabric
DE926269C (en) * 1950-08-25 1955-04-14 Degussa Device for the production of artificial threads with changing cross-sections
US2703172A (en) * 1951-02-28 1955-03-01 American Viscose Corp Variable feeder for staple cutters
BE530111A (en) * 1953-09-04
DE1114002B (en) * 1953-10-16 1961-09-21 Glanzstoff Courtaulds Gmbh Gear for the production of rayon threads with aperiodic thickening
US2782741A (en) * 1954-10-25 1957-02-26 Lees & Sons Co James Individual pile yarn control apparatus for pile fabrics
US2940405A (en) * 1954-10-28 1960-06-14 Bigelow Sanford Carpet Co Machine for producing drawn loop pile fabric
US2960121A (en) * 1955-04-28 1960-11-15 Western Electric Co Apparatus for untangling wires secured to an article
US2920345A (en) * 1955-06-03 1960-01-12 Eastman Kodak Co Method and apparatus for producing variable denier yarn
US2931067A (en) * 1955-10-14 1960-04-05 Phillips Petroleum Co Method and apparatus for producing granulated ammonium nitrate
US2931090A (en) * 1956-09-18 1960-04-05 Du Pont Textile apparatus
DD25290A (en) * 1957-03-14
US3193442A (en) * 1961-12-26 1965-07-06 Ici Ltd Non-woven products composed of nonuniformly drawn staple fibers
US3241339A (en) * 1963-10-08 1966-03-22 Fried Benjamin Yarn tensioning device for knitting machines
GB1095489A (en) * 1964-08-25
US3422491A (en) * 1964-09-09 1969-01-21 Asahi Chemical Ind Apparatus for stretching synthetic fibers
US3319411A (en) * 1965-03-31 1967-05-16 American Enka Corp Apparatus for treating yarn
EP0036025B1 (en) * 1980-03-06 1984-06-06 Philip Morris Incorporated Method for providing an article of manufacture comprised of elongate filamentary material and apparatus for carrying out this method
US4654180A (en) * 1985-10-18 1987-03-31 Mobil Oil Corporation Intermittently stretching thermoplastic with nip rolls
US5811178A (en) * 1995-08-02 1998-09-22 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. High bulk nonwoven sorbent with fiber density gradient
US5667749A (en) * 1995-08-02 1997-09-16 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method for the production of fibers and materials having enhanced characteristics
US5711970A (en) * 1995-08-02 1998-01-27 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Apparatus for the production of fibers and materials having enhanced characteristics
AU1022397A (en) * 1995-12-15 1997-07-14 Kimberly-Clark Corporation High temperature, high speed rotary valve

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US2685497A (en) * 1948-05-12 1954-08-03 Celanese Corp Treatment of polymeric materials
US2745136A (en) * 1951-03-14 1956-05-15 Deboutteville Marcel Delamare Apparatus and method for making wool-like artificial fibres
US2635295A (en) * 1951-08-23 1953-04-21 Const Mecanique De Stains Soc Apparatus for converting tow to top
US2746839A (en) * 1953-06-26 1956-05-22 Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co Method of spinning shaped filaments of plastic materials
US3105349A (en) * 1954-05-28 1963-10-01 Celanese Corp Method and apparatus for producing novelty yarn
US2932850A (en) * 1955-08-01 1960-04-19 Celanese Corp Production of filaments of uneven denier
US2990575A (en) * 1955-09-30 1961-07-04 British Celanese Apparatus for production of varying denier filaments
US2876616A (en) * 1956-01-09 1959-03-10 Lees & Sons Co James Variable twist yarn forming apparatus
US2941259A (en) * 1956-09-18 1960-06-21 Jr James L Lohrke Filament processing
US3069747A (en) * 1958-03-04 1962-12-25 Du Pont Shaped products
US3025563A (en) * 1958-05-15 1962-03-20 Celanese Corp Manufacture of filaments of varying denier
US2975474A (en) * 1958-06-11 1961-03-21 Du Pont Process and apparatus for preparing novelty yarns
US3017737A (en) * 1958-06-25 1962-01-23 Du Pont Method and apparatus for producing bulky continuous filament yarn
US3144747A (en) * 1959-05-05 1964-08-18 Celanese Corp Apparatus for producing a composite novelty slub yarn
US3113413A (en) * 1959-06-08 1963-12-10 Eastman Kodak Co Apparatus and method for producing volumized slub yarn
US3048000A (en) * 1960-08-01 1962-08-07 Pittsburgh Plate Glass Co Method and apparatus for twisting and plying yarn
US3086347A (en) * 1961-08-21 1963-04-23 Collins & Aiken Corp Method and means for producing variable yarn
US3302385A (en) * 1961-08-26 1967-02-07 Ruddell James Nelson Modification of filaments
US3194276A (en) * 1963-09-20 1965-07-13 Crompton & Knowles Corp Metering device for weft in looms
US3301204A (en) * 1964-01-31 1967-01-31 Bell Ind Inc Mechanism for forming a scallop fringe
US4214508A (en) * 1977-10-13 1980-07-29 Philip Morris Incorporated Method and apparatus for making cigarette filters of filamentary material
US4650451A (en) * 1985-10-18 1987-03-17 Mobil Oil Corporation Intermittently translating draw tape stretched between nip rolls
US4959044A (en) * 1988-05-02 1990-09-25 The Dow Chemical Company Film tension compensation device for bag making machine
US4998942A (en) * 1989-12-27 1991-03-12 Milliken Research Corporation Snubber profile
US5311650A (en) * 1990-12-24 1994-05-17 Milliken Research Corporation Texturizing system and apparatus
US5317791A (en) * 1993-03-24 1994-06-07 Adolf Adam Apparatus for producing slub effects in yarn strands
US20060010667A1 (en) * 2003-01-24 2006-01-19 Saurer Gmbh & Co. Kg Apparatus and method for texturing a plurality of blended synthetic multifilament yarns
US7086130B2 (en) * 2003-01-24 2006-08-08 Saurer Gmbh & Co. Kg Apparatus and method for texturing a plurality of blended synthetic multifilament yarns
US9346222B2 (en) 2011-04-12 2016-05-24 Ticona Llc Die and method for impregnating fiber rovings
US11118292B2 (en) 2011-04-12 2021-09-14 Ticona Llc Impregnation section of die and method for impregnating fiber rovings
US9233486B2 (en) * 2011-04-29 2016-01-12 Ticona Llc Die and method for impregnating fiber rovings
US9623437B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2017-04-18 Ticona Llc Die with flow diffusing gate passage and method for impregnating same fiber rovings
US9757874B2 (en) 2011-04-29 2017-09-12 Ticona Llc Die and method for impregnating fiber rovings
US20120321804A1 (en) * 2011-04-29 2012-12-20 Ticona Llc Die and Method for Impregnating Fiber Rovings
US10336016B2 (en) 2011-07-22 2019-07-02 Ticona Llc Extruder and method for producing high fiber density resin structures
US9624350B2 (en) 2011-12-09 2017-04-18 Ticona Llc Asymmetric fiber reinforced polymer tape
US9410644B2 (en) 2012-06-15 2016-08-09 Ticona Llc Subsea pipe section with reinforcement layer

Also Published As

Publication number Publication date
FR681317A (en) 1930-05-13
GB326778A (en) 1930-03-13
GB326777A (en) 1930-03-13
FR681529A (en) 1930-05-15
US2038722A (en) 1936-04-28
BE363568A (en) 1929-10-31
US2065124A (en) 1936-12-22
FR39410E (en) 1931-10-19

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