US1847436A - Air cooled wall construction - Google Patents

Air cooled wall construction Download PDF

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Publication number
US1847436A
US1847436A US273274A US27327428A US1847436A US 1847436 A US1847436 A US 1847436A US 273274 A US273274 A US 273274A US 27327428 A US27327428 A US 27327428A US 1847436 A US1847436 A US 1847436A
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United States
Prior art keywords
tile
supporting
furnace
units
beams
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Expired - Lifetime
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US273274A
Inventor
Edwin H Mclean
John J Uphues
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Chicago Fire Brick Co
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Chicago Fire Brick Co
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Publication date
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Priority to US273274A priority Critical patent/US1847436A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23MCASINGS, LININGS, WALLS OR DOORS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR COMBUSTION CHAMBERS, e.g. FIREBRIDGES; DEVICES FOR DEFLECTING AIR, FLAMES OR COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN COMBUSTION CHAMBERS; SAFETY ARRANGEMENTS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR COMBUSTION APPARATUS; DETAILS OF COMBUSTION CHAMBERS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F23M5/00Casings; Linings; Walls
    • F23M5/08Cooling thereof; Tube walls
    • F23M5/085Cooling thereof; Tube walls using air or other gas as the cooling medium

Description

March '1, 1932. E. H. M LEAN ET AL AIR COOLED WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed April 27, 1928 3 Sheets-Sheet l @6722; Zdz/U'Z 15. M- Lm/z March 1, 1932. MCLEAN ET AL 1,847,436
AIR COOLED WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed April 27, 1928 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 March 1, 1932. E. H. MOLEAN ET AL 1,847,436
AIR GOOLED WALL CONSTRUCTION Filed April 27, 1928 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 JR M Patented Mar. 1, 1932 iii-airs mm 'eA'raN'r orricn EDWIN H. MCLEAN AND JOHN J. UPHUES, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, ASSIGNORS TO CHICAGO FIRE BRICK COMPANY, OF CHICAGO, ILLINOIS, A CORPORATION OF ILLINOIS AIR COOLEDKVALL CONSTRUCTION Application filed April 27,
i tion of the furnace wall are supported in units from an outer wall structure.
It is a purpose of this invention to provide a wall of this character whichwill relieve the I refractory material forming the fire lining of the extreme weight which occurs in furnace constructions where the walls are of considerable height, and to distribute this Weight in units upon an outside supporting framework in such manner as to make local repairs of the furnace lining easy to accomplish. 7
Another object of this invention isto pro-. vide, in a structure of this character, means whereby air may be circulated behind the refractory elements with sufficient volume to keep that portion of the wall cool and to cool the supporting steel and cast-iron members so that failure from heat maybe avoided.
Another purpose of this invention is to provide, in a furnace Wall of this character, novel means to permit expansion between the various units of refractory elements which form the inner lining.
It is also a purpose of this invention toprovide means in connection with the supporting elements for the refractory liningfor dividing the space between the inner and outer wall structures into a plurality of horizontal zones each of which is maintained separate from the otherthroughout the circumference of the furnace.
It is also a purpose of this invention to pro= vide, in a furnace wall of this character, wherein the inner refractory lining is supported by. an outer framework, novelmeans for anchoring the refractory lining to the supports and for bracing the supporting elements so as to prevent them from giving in dependently of each other.
- Other objects and advantages of the invention will appear as the description proceeds, in connection with the accompanying drawings. However, it is to be distinctly understood that we do not intend to limit 7 ourselves to the exact details shown and described, but that we intend to avail ourselves 192s. Serial No. 273,274.
with our invention;
Fig. 2 is a plan View, partly in section,
showing the corner construction between two ad om ng walls;
Fig. 3 is a vertical section taken transversely through the furnace wall; and v Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 1 of amodified form. p
Referring now in detail to the drawings,
the furnace wall is made up of a series of 'outer uprights indlcated by the numeral 5,
which in the present instance are in the form of I-beams of sufficient size to carry the structure in its entirety. These I-beams, as indicated in Figs. 1 and 2, are installed vertically at regular intervals around the furnace.
-A sealing, metallic plate, indicated at 6, is bolted on to these I-beams around the furnace so asto completely surround it, and
extends upwardly to such a height as it is desired to extend the wall construction. A ser es of ,horlzontal beams 7 are bolted to the I-beams through the plate just referred to,
andalso extend around the circumference of the furnace. These horizontal beams are preferably of substantially H-form and are spaced vertically a distance comparable to forms a protection, keeping the heat from attacking the metallic plate and the supporting I-beams' 5. In order to support the inner wall, the H-beams have secured thereto horizontally-spaced cast-iron brackets 10, which brackets preferably align vertically in rows and are spaced" horizontally along the beams at suitable intervals depending upon the width of the unit to be supported by the bracket.
The casting 10 has a fiat, shelf-like, upper surface, as indicated at 11, and adjacent the free end portion of this shelf there is provided an upstanding flange 13, for a purpose which will presently appear. In applying these brackets and loading them with the refractory tile it is necessary to insure the proper vertical, as well as horizontal, spacing at the free ends, since, if this were not done, one bracket might give sufficiently to communicate its weight to the next unit of refractory material therebelow, and thus subject the tile to a greater pressure than they are. capable of withstanding.
It is. a. well known fact that the. refractor tile used for furnace linings cannot stand any great amount of weight. Inorde-r to 2 overcome, this diihculty, a. plurality of small I-beams 14 have: their lower ends resting upon the brackets and secured thereto. by means of bolts extending through the. flanges of the beams and through the flanges 13 on the brackets. The upper ends of the beams are then bolted to flanges. 15; on the under surfaces of the brackets, and in this manner the vertical rows of bricks are ri idly connected to each other. Since the beams ll are spaced inwardly from the, free ends 12 of the brackets.,.these ends may still be used as shelf portionsf'or supporting, the refractories thereon;
The refractory units supported on the shelves 12 of the brackets 10 consist of supporting, tile 16- which has aT-slot in one side thereof adapted to fit over the front flange of the Lbeam 14-. These supporting tile, are of a width substantially equal to the distance between centers of the shelf brackets 10, in order that when twoof them are. placed on horizontally adjacent beams. 14, to rest, on the corresponding shelves 12, their side faces will be substantially abutting. The upper ends of. the beams 14: are spaced a sufiieient distance below the shelf 12 to permit the insertion of. these supporting tile and the other til-e going to make up the unit.
The supporting tile 16 have their front faces curved, as indicated in Fig; 1, so as to divide the: tile into the wing portions 17 and V 18 and the central, stronger portion 19 directly opposite the T-slot in the tile.-
The regular tile 20" which make up the unit are of substantially the same width as the supporting tile and are provided with the same of T-slot. 'lhe- T-slots in these tile are made somewhat larger than the flange of the Lbeam in. order to make them,
easy to attach and to permit a certain amount of expansion and contraction while they are on the beam. These tile extend a con-. siderable distance farther. from. the I-beams than the supporting tile and have their firereceiving faces substantially in alignment.
otherso that with the exception of the spacebetween the top regular tile of each unit and the shelf 12 a substantially closed wall structure is provided There must be a certain amount of space at this point in order to permit for expansion of the tile when the furnace is heated, and in order to-protect the shelf 12 means are provided to cut off. the direct raysof. heat fromthe furnace and protect the outer-steel work- These means consist of fire-receiving face of this expansion tile.
aligns. vertically with the firereceiving faces of the'rcgnlar tile, and the oposite f'ace thereof is-formed'to co-operate wi ttwo horizontallyadjacent supporting tile, as shown clearly in Fig. I.
In this way the tongue portion 23 of the expansion joint tile fitsbetween two adjacent, forwardly extending portions 19 of the supporting tile and forms a very good. interlock between horizontally adjacent units.
In order to seal the space between the, outer and inner wall structures into a plurality of vertically spaced zones, there are provided partition tile 24. v which have their edges resting upon the flat top surfaces. 11 of the shelf brackets 10 and extend between these brackets so as to form a substantially-closed, horizontally-extending wall between the inner and outer wall sections. In this way the space is divided. into a plurality of zones,
' and air may be circulated through these zones in large quantities to maintain the structural steel work properly cooled.
At the corners where a side wall and end wall of the furnace come together, as shown in Fig. 2, it is necessary, however, to dispense. with the regular shelf brackets because of the overlapping of the adjacent refractories, as indicated at 25 and 26, Fig. To overcome this, we provide special brackets 27 which hook over the top flange of the H- beams 7 and are slidable therealong so as to be adjustable to fit the partition tile 24 necessary to close the space. It is, ofcourse, necessary to leave a small space, as at.28, between thexforward edges of the partition tile and the adjacent refractory tile of the abutting end wall to allow for expansion of the end Cal wall. This space, however, is quite small, and does not permit any great amount of intermingling of the air between the difierent zones.
This construction may, by the use of special shaped tile, be utilized to introduce air into the combustion chamber from between the inner and outer walls after it is heated by contact with the refractory inner wall.
Suitable openings not shown in the outer wall may be provided for introducing air into the several vertically spaced zones and then by utilizing the special tile in the manner illustrated in Fig. 1, ports are provided in the inner wall through which the air enters the combustion chamber.
In Fig. 4 the outer wall and the supporting structure are the same as in Figs. 1-3 inclusive. The same supporting tile 16 are em- 7' ployed and the same tile 21 are also used.
However, in conjunction with the regular tile the special tile 29, 30, and 31 are used to form tortuous passages through the inner wall in such manner as to prevent direct radiation of heat therethrough to the outer wall. Tile and 31 have the same T-shaped slots as the regular tile 20 for engagement with the beams 14.
Tile 30 as shown has one straight side edge 32 which is adapted to abut a vertically extending row of regular tile 20. The opposite side edge of tile 30 is curved as indicated at 33 to cooperate with the adjacent curved side edge 34 of tile 31 and form therebetween a curved passage extending through the inner wall. Side edge 35 of tile 31 is curved in the same manner as side edge 33 of tile 30. Tile 29 has one side edge of the same contour as side edge 34 of tile 31 but has its opposite side 'edge straight to abut an adjacent row of regular tile 20.
The special tile 29, 30, and 31 may be laid in single horizontal rows alternately with regular tile 20 to form small ports or in several adjacent horizontal rows to form larger ports through the inner wall as desired. Also as many of the tile 31 as is desired may be placed between a tile 29 and a tile 30 to determine the distance which the ports will extend along the side or end of a furnace.
The outer wall being insulated by the lining 9 and the common brick 8, prevents the escape of heat from the air zones between the walls so that the air passing through these Zones and into the combustion chamber through the ports in the inner wall takes up the heat and returns it to the combustion chamber. This serves to cut down the loss of heat as well as toaid combustion materially by having the air heated before it passes into the combustion chamber.
It is thought that the above explanation will make the construction and advantages of this invention clear to those skilled in the what we claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. In a furnace wall, a support, a wall unit consisting of a vertical row of refractory tile carried by said support, a tile supporting shelf spaced above said unit and extending over a portion thereof, a supporting tile resting on said shelf and supporting a second wall unit thereon, said wall units projecting into the furnace beyond the supporting tile, and sealing tile resting on said first named wall unit nd extending vertically along the front face of said supporting tile to prevent exposure of said shelf to the heat radiation from the furnace and permit expansion of said units.
2. A furnace wall structure comprising a plurality of vertically spaced and horizontal- 1y abutting wall units each consisting of a plurality of alike refractory tile having their fire receiving faces substantially in alignmcnt, supporting shelves for said units, supporting tile on said shelves upon which said units rest, said supporting tile having their inner faces terminating short ofvsaid fire receiving faces, and sealing tile resting on said units and having fire receiving faces aligning with the fire receiving faces of said units and having their opposite faces abutting the inner faces of said supporting tile.
3. A furnace wall structure comprising a plurality of vertically spaced and horizontally abutting wall units each consisting of a plurality of alike refractory tile having their fire receiving faces substantially in alignment, supporting shelves for said units, supporting tile on said shelves upon which said units rest, said supporting tile having their inner faces terminatin short of said fire receiving faces, and sealing tile resting 1 on said units and having fire receiving faces aligning with the fire receiving faces of said units and having their opposite faces abutting the innerfaces of said supporting tile,
each of said sealing tile resting on a plurality of said units and abutting portions of horizontally adjacent supporting tile;
4i. In a furnace structure consisting of an outer wall and an inner refractory wall made up of units supported by horizontal rows of j brackets projecting from said outer wall, fiat tile members supported on said brackets to divide the space between said walls into horizontally extending zones, and means at the corners of said furnace for preventing communication between. said zones comprising inwardly extending supports carried by said outer wall and slidable horizontally relative thereto, and flat tile members resting on said slidable supports.
5. In a furnace wall, an outer supporting structure having means thereon for support ing an inner wall comprising inwardly, ex-
tending elements and tile supported by said elements, certain of the horizontally adjacent tile being spaced from each other, and having their opposed spaced faces extending in part horizontally in the same general direction as the fire rece'ving face of the wall whereby to provide ports through said inner wall gWl'llCll ports are oilset intermediate their ends to prevent direct radiation of heat there- .through to the outer structure.
6. In a furnace well, an outer supporting structure having means thereon for supporting an inner wall comprising inwardly extending elements provided with vertically extending tile engaging members, and tile" supported by said elements, certain of the horizontally adjacent tile being spaced from each other whereby to provide ports through said inner wall, said ports having one end offset relative to the other to prevent radiation of heat through said ports direct to the outer structure.
7. In a furnace wall, an outer supporting structure having means thereon tor supporting an inner wall comprising inwardly eX tending elements provided with vertically extending tile engaging members and tile supported by said elements, certain of the horizontally adjacent til-e being spaced from each other whereby to provide ports through said inner Wall, said ports having one end horizontally offset relative to the other to prevent radiation of heat through said ports direct to the outer structure.
8. In a furnace wall, an outer supporting structure having means thereon for supportingan inner wall comprising inwardly ex tending elements provided with vertically extending tile engaging members and tile supported by stud elements, certain of the honzontally ad acent tile being spaced from each other and having their opposed spaced faces curved to provide tortuous ports through said inner wall; v I
9. In a furnace wall, an outer supporing structure having means thereon for supporting an inner Wall comprising inwardly extending elements provided with vertically extending tile engaging members and tile supported by said elements, certain of the horizontally adjacent tile being spaced from each other and having their opposed spaced faces curved to provide tortuous ports through said inner wall, said horizontally adjacent til-e being duplicates whereby they are interchangeable one for the other.
10. In a furnace wall, an outer supporting structure having means thereon for supporting an inner wall comprising inwardly extending elements provided with vertically extending tile enga ing members and tile supported by said e lements, certain of the horizontally adjacent tile being spaced and having portions of their opposed faces overlapping in the direction of said inner wall to prevent transmission of heat by radiation between said facesto the outer structure.
outer wall and an inner refractory wall made up. of units supported by horizontal rows of brackets projecting from said outer, wall, flat tile members supported on said brackets to divide therspace between said Walls into horizontally extending zones, and means at the corners of said furnace for preventing communication between said zones comprisir inwardly extending supports carried by EDWIN MoLEAN. JOHN J. UPHUES.
I 11. In a furnace structure consisting of an
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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2551518A (en) * 1945-07-04 1951-05-01 Laclede Christy Company Suspended wall construction
US2660050A (en) * 1947-11-24 1953-11-24 Detrick M H Co Sectionally supported furnace wall

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2551518A (en) * 1945-07-04 1951-05-01 Laclede Christy Company Suspended wall construction
US2660050A (en) * 1947-11-24 1953-11-24 Detrick M H Co Sectionally supported furnace wall

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