US1845136A - Airplane engine - Google Patents

Airplane engine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1845136A
US1845136A US48715130A US1845136A US 1845136 A US1845136 A US 1845136A US 48715130 A US48715130 A US 48715130A US 1845136 A US1845136 A US 1845136A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
valve
outlet
gravity
pipe
engine
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Dieter William
Original Assignee
Dieter William
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B64AIRCRAFT; AVIATION; COSMONAUTICS
    • B64DEQUIPMENT FOR FITTING IN OR TO AIRCRAFT; FLYING SUITS; PARACHUTES; ARRANGEMENTS OR MOUNTING OF POWER PLANTS OR PROPULSION TRANSMISSIONS IN AIRCRAFT
    • B64D37/00Arrangements in connection with fuel supply for power plant
    • B64D37/02Tanks
    • B64D37/14Filling or emptying
    • B64D37/20Emptying systems
    • B64D37/22Emptying systems facilitating emptying in any position of tank
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16KVALVES; TAPS; COCKS; ACTUATING-FLOATS; DEVICES FOR VENTING OR AERATING
    • F16K11/00Multiple-way valves, e.g. mixing valves; Pipe fittings incorporating such valves
    • F16K11/02Multiple-way valves, e.g. mixing valves; Pipe fittings incorporating such valves with all movable sealing faces moving as one unit
    • F16K11/04Multiple-way valves, e.g. mixing valves; Pipe fittings incorporating such valves with all movable sealing faces moving as one unit comprising only lift valves
    • F16K11/048Multiple-way valves, e.g. mixing valves; Pipe fittings incorporating such valves with all movable sealing faces moving as one unit comprising only lift valves with valve seats positioned between movable valve members
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16KVALVES; TAPS; COCKS; ACTUATING-FLOATS; DEVICES FOR VENTING OR AERATING
    • F16K11/00Multiple-way valves, e.g. mixing valves; Pipe fittings incorporating such valves
    • F16K11/02Multiple-way valves, e.g. mixing valves; Pipe fittings incorporating such valves with all movable sealing faces moving as one unit
    • F16K11/08Multiple-way valves, e.g. mixing valves; Pipe fittings incorporating such valves with all movable sealing faces moving as one unit comprising only taps or cocks
    • F16K11/085Multiple-way valves, e.g. mixing valves; Pipe fittings incorporating such valves with all movable sealing faces moving as one unit comprising only taps or cocks with cylindrical plug
    • F16K11/0853Multiple-way valves, e.g. mixing valves; Pipe fittings incorporating such valves with all movable sealing faces moving as one unit comprising only taps or cocks with cylindrical plug having all the connecting conduits situated in a single plane perpendicular to the axis of the plug
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F16ENGINEERING ELEMENTS AND UNITS; GENERAL MEASURES FOR PRODUCING AND MAINTAINING EFFECTIVE FUNCTIONING OF MACHINES OR INSTALLATIONS; THERMAL INSULATION IN GENERAL
    • F16KVALVES; TAPS; COCKS; ACTUATING-FLOATS; DEVICES FOR VENTING OR AERATING
    • F16K17/00Safety valves; Equalising valves, e.g. pressure relief valves
    • F16K17/36Safety valves; Equalising valves, e.g. pressure relief valves actuated in consequence of extraneous circumstances, e.g. shock, change of position
    • F16K17/363Safety valves; Equalising valves, e.g. pressure relief valves actuated in consequence of extraneous circumstances, e.g. shock, change of position the closure members being rotatable or pivoting
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/0753Control by change of position or inertia of system
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/0753Control by change of position or inertia of system
    • Y10T137/0923By pendulum or swinging member
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/8593Systems
    • Y10T137/86348Tank with internally extending flow guide, pipe or conduit

Description

w. DIETER AIRPLANE ENGINE Feb. 16, 1932.

Filed Oct. 8, 1950 By Attorneys, G'rmh Patented Feb. 16, 1932 PATENT OFFICE WILLIAM DIETER, OF NEWARK, NEW JERSEY AIRPLANE ENGINE Application filed October 8, 1930. Serial No. 487,151.

This invention relates to internal combustion engines especially adapted for airplanes, and its object is to facilitate the circulation of liquids (liquid fuel and oil) to the engine 6 when the airplane is inverted or flying upside down.

Ordinarily fuel is fed to the carburetor of airplane engines by gravity, and the lubricating oil is fed to the ducts or passages lead- ]0 ing to the various bearings by a pump which draws it from an oil tank and delivers it to said passages, while another pump draws it from the crank-case or sump and returns it to the oil tank. On inversion the suction 35 pipes, which ordinarily lead from the bottoms of the respective tanks, are in connection with the upper parts thereof, so that (except when the tanks are full of liquid) these pipes open above the liquid level and feed air instead of liquid. This condition is not noticeably detrimental upon merely brief inversion, as in looping; but if the pilot continues to fly inverted, the engine will fail to receive its proper supply of fuel and lubricating oil. Flying upside down is not merely an exhibition stunt, but is sometimes,--especially in war,a desirable maneuver.

The present invention provides means whereby the engine may receive its supplies of fuel and oil in a normal manner during a prolonged inverted flight. To this end each of the liquid tanks is provided with a grav ity valve and inlet pi es leading, respectively, from above and slow the level in the tank to such valve, and from the valve an outlet pipe leads to a pump which delivers the liquid drawn from the tank to the engine. The valve is adapted to cut off the upper inlet pipe from the outlet and to connect the lower inlet pipe to the outlet, so that upon inversion the operation of the valve insures that the suction to the pump shall be from the lower part of the liquid in the tank and not from the air space above the liquid level. 7

Further features of the invention will be made apparent as the description proceeds. 50 In the accompanying drawings the invention is shown in its preferred embodiments as adapted to, for example, a multiple ragial cylinder engine of the fixed cylinder ype.

Figurel is a dia rammatic elevation of the engine and fue connections, the fuel I tank being shown in section;

Fig. 2 is a similar view snowing the lubrieating means, the oil tank being shown in 586131011, as well as the normal sump and inversion sump of the crank-case;

Fig. 3 is a vertical mid-section of the preferred form of gravity valve;

Fig. 4 is a transverse section thereof; and

Fig. 5 is a sectional view showing a modi fied construction of gravity valve.

The engine A is of an ordinary and wellknown type and requires no description. The articular engine shown, for simplicity, has ve cylinders, but it is to be understood that any usual number and arrangement of to cylinders may be em loyed. B is the propeller, C the fuel tank, the oil tank, and E, F, and Glgumps for feeding liquids to the engine. is the gravity valve, which is preferably located within the tank C or D; it has two inlet pipes a, a and one outlet 6 to which is connected the pipe leading to the suction of the appropriate pump.

Referring to Fig. 1: The outlet of the valve connects by a tube 0 to the inlet of the pump E, from the delivery of which a ipe d leads to any usual carburetor J, by w ich the fuel is supplied in usual manner to the engine. In this particular construction the fuel and air constituting the combustible mixture are introduced into an annular passage K, from which it is fed through radial pipes,-one of which is shown at L, to the inlet valves of the engine cylinders in well-known manner. The construction shown in Fig. 1 differs from the usual construction in the introduction of the gravity valve H with its pipes a, a and the provision of the pump E for delivering fuel to the carburetor. This ump would be unnecessary if inverted flying were not required, but upon inversion it acts to force the fuel to a higher level to properly feed the carburetor.

Referring to Fig. 2: The outlet b from no the gravity valve connects by a pipe 6 to the inlet of the oil feed pump F, the discharge from which occurs through a {pip i. finto the central bore in the crank-sha t or to any other part requiring lubrication. Ordinarily the oil, after passing through the bearings, collects in the usual sump P, from which leads a pipe g which connects to a gravity valve H, which may be a duplicate of the valve H. The engine is provided with an inversion sump P which, when running inverted, receives the oil from the crankcase, and from this sump leads a pipe h joining the gravity valve H. The pipes g, h enter the inlets of this valve in the same manner as do the pipes a, a within the tanks. From the outlet of the gravity valve H leads a pipe 2' to the suction of the pump G, from the dis charge of which a pipe j leads back to the oil tank D. \Vhen running inverted the gravity valves H,H' insure that the oil shall be drawn through the pipe a, which at that time is wholly immersed in the oil, and through suction ipe e to the pump F and thence into the englne, while the returning oil drains from the crank-case into the inversion sump P and is drawn through pipe hto gravity valve H (its connection with pipe 9 being shut off during inversion), and thence to the pump Gr which pumps it back to the tank D.

The gravity valves are preferably of the construction shown in Figs. 3 and 4. In this construction the valve comprlses a shell or casing Q having in communicatlon with its middle portion an outlet neck 6 and having caps R, R fastened on its opposite ends, to

which caps the inlet pipes a, a (or, in Fig. 2, pipes 72., g) are attached. Vithin the shell is a movable member or drop valve S, which comprises a hollow stem is and two tappets or disk valves m fastened on opposite ends of this stem and seating against valve seats 'n conveniently located, as shown, in the expanded end portions of the casing Q. The

, weight of the drop valve S causes it, when the engine is inverted, to fall so that its upper tappet m is seated and its lower tappet is separated from its seat, as shown in Fig. 3. Thus any suction exerted by the pump at the outlet b draws liquid through the inlet pipe a or a (or g, h), whichever may be the lower one, into the valve chamber 0 within the expanded head of the casing Q, and within the attached cap R, and then between the valve and its seat and around the stem is to the outlet b and thence to the suction of the pump. The stem is suitably guided, for which purpose it may conveniently be formed with flanges and intervening grooves, as shown in cross-section in Fig. 4. Thus, whenever the engine is inverted, the inversion of the valve acts, bythe falling of the drop valve S, to close the upper seat and open the lower seat so as to shut off suction from above and establish suction from beneath.

There is some liability with any valve of this type that the tappet may adhere somewhat to its seat, and this may hold the drop valve from falling after inversion, and to avoid this it is desirable to provide thevalve with means for giving it a jar or shock in the downward direction so as to jar loose the adhering tappet and cause the drop valve to fall. This is conveniently and effectively accomplished by constructing the stem k as a tubular stem and introducing within it a sliding weight T which is capable of moving with practical absence of friction, so that this movement shall be instantaneous upon inversion of the valve. -This sliding weight is most conveniently constituted by a suitable quantity of mercury, which is shown in Fig. 3.

The valve shown in Fig. 3 is provided at each end in chamber 0 with an intercepting plate or bafile 9, preferably ofsheet metal. which in either position of the valve receives the impact of the current entering by the lower pipe a or a and distributes this liquid laterally so that it passes through perforations 1', 9' in preferably a circular series near the outermargin of the baflie. The purpose of this baffle plate is to prevent the upward current of liquid, by its impact on the lower tappet m, from lifting this tappet and closing it to its seat. In the construction shown the margins of the baflie plates are held between the valve shell Q, and the screw caps R, R, so that in the case of a sufficiently soft or yielding metal this serves also the function of a gasket to make a tight joint.

A modified construction of valve is shown in Fig. 5. Here the valve is of the rotary threeway type, comprising a turn plug U turning freely in the valve shell S and fastened to an arm V carrying a weight W. The casing has inlets receiving the respective pipes at, a and an outlet 6, as in the previous construction. The ports 8 in the valve plug are shaped with reference to those in the casing, so that communication is always maintained with the outlet 6 and with the lowermost inlet pipe (1 or a, as the case may be. Upon inversion the parts fall to the position indicated in dotted lines. The weight W may desirably be provided with a minor or auxiliary weight having the function of the mercury T in the first construction described, and it is preferable in this case to make the weight WV tubular and to place within it a suitable quantity of mercury, as indicated at T. Any other kind of auxiliary weight may be substituted for the mercury in either construction.

The liquid pumps E, F, and G are shown diagrammatically as gear pumps, such as are commonly used for lubricating internal combustion engines. These pumps are commonly made with a yielding bypass valve to limit the pressure and bypass any excess of liquid. A suitable construction of such gear pumps with bypass valves is contained in the pendto fall in advance ing application of Alfred H. R. Fedden, Serial No. 380,585, filed July 24, 1929.

The invention is not limited to the precise constructions shown, which are to be treated as examples and which may be varied in accordance with the judgment and skill of the engineer or designer to adapt the valve to any special conditions.

This invention is to be distinguished from those constructions used in airplanes wherein the fuel tank is provided with two outlet pipes leading from its opposite bottom ends to a gravity valve adapted, upon the serious u ward or downward tilting of the airplane 1n landing or diving, to close the outlet from the upper end which is liable, if the fuel runs low, to be left uncovered, whereby to avoid drawing in air from the upper outlet and insure the drawing of fuel through the lower outlet. Such constructions are adapted to serve their intended purpose, but are not operative if the airplane is inverted so as to fly upside down. For the latter purpose it has been proposed to construct the fuel tank with an outlet pipe which has a swiveled mounting within the tank and is weighted so as to cause its lower or induction end to gravitate to the lowest part of the tank, only a single outlet being provided with no valve. The present invention provides for the requirements of inverted flight in a simple and practical manner by the provision of separate outlets for use in normal and inverted flight and a simple gravity valve to control the flow.

I claim as my invention:

and below the lower seat, connected together through said stem, and a mass of mercury enclosed in said tubular stem, free to gravitate to the bottom thereof on inversion.

5. The combination with an airplane engme of a gravity valve comprising a casing having a middle outlet and upper and lower inlets, said casing having seats at its opposite ends and a movable gravity member including a stem and tappets above the upper seat and below the lower seat connected together through said stem, and bafile plates located between the respective inlets and the tappets to intercept the entering current from the lower tappet.

6. The construction of claim 5 further characterized in that the battle plates have orifices near their margins through which the entering current flows around the lower tappe 7 The construction of claim 5 further characterized in that the casing has caps fastened upon its opposite ends throu h which the respective inlets enter and the ba e plates confined between the ends of the casing and said caps.

In witness whereof, I have hereunto signed my name. WILLIAM DIETER.

1. An airplane engine adapted for inversion, comprising a liquid tank, a gravity valve, inlet pipes leading respectively from the top and bottom of said tank to said valve, a pump, and an outlet pipe from the valve to said pump, said valve being adapted to cut off the upper inlet pipe and connect the lower inlet pipe to the outlet pipe, whereby the pump draws liquid from the lower side of the tank and is cut oil from the upper side, and whereby this condition is reversed upon inversion of the airplane.

2. The subject-matter of claim 1, with an auxiliary weight freely movable and adapted on inversion to fall in advance of the movement of the gravity valve andto impart a starting impulse thereto.

3. The subject-matter of claim 1, with an auxiliary weight comprising a mass of mercury freely movable in a tube connected tothe gravity valve, and adapted 0n inversion of the movement of the gravity valve and to impart a starting impulse thereto.

4. The combination with an airplane engine of a gravity valve comprising a casing having a middle outlet and upper and lower inlets, with seats between said inlets and outlet, a movable gravity member including a tubular stem and tappets above the upper seat

US1845136A 1930-10-08 1930-10-08 Airplane engine Expired - Lifetime US1845136A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1845136A US1845136A (en) 1930-10-08 1930-10-08 Airplane engine

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1845136A US1845136A (en) 1930-10-08 1930-10-08 Airplane engine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1845136A true US1845136A (en) 1932-02-16

Family

ID=23934610

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US1845136A Expired - Lifetime US1845136A (en) 1930-10-08 1930-10-08 Airplane engine

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1845136A (en)

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2415972A (en) * 1943-06-25 1947-02-18 Bell Aircraft Corp Aircraft liquid supply means
US2427859A (en) * 1943-08-10 1947-09-23 Jeffrey Mfg Co Valve for mining machines
US2699907A (en) * 1949-02-25 1955-01-18 Thompson Prod Inc Aircraft fuel pump assembly
US2747593A (en) * 1952-07-03 1956-05-29 Gen Motors Corp Valve mechanism
US2829805A (en) * 1955-06-14 1958-04-08 Thompson Prod Inc Apparatus for delivering liquid from an aircraft fuel cell under all flight conditions
US2862651A (en) * 1954-10-14 1958-12-02 Willard P Perry Gravity control apparatus
US2961130A (en) * 1952-02-08 1960-11-22 Nash Engineering Co Fuel booster pumps
US3094251A (en) * 1960-05-27 1963-06-18 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Fuel supply system
US3443778A (en) * 1966-06-06 1969-05-13 Intertechnique Sa Systems for supplying fuel to aircraft engines
US3500750A (en) * 1967-09-27 1970-03-17 Justin Vohl Intake selector system for engine oil circulating pump
US4117907A (en) * 1975-12-22 1978-10-03 Audi Nsu Auto Union Aktiengesellschaft Device for aspiration of lubricating oil from the supply of a combustion engine
US4813445A (en) * 1987-06-04 1989-03-21 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Apparatus for supplying fuel under negative gravity conditions
US5755194A (en) * 1995-07-06 1998-05-26 Tecumseh Products Company Overhead cam engine with dry sump lubrication system
US6012453A (en) * 1995-04-20 2000-01-11 Figgie Inernational Inc. Apparatus for withdrawal of liquid from a container and method
US6223713B1 (en) 1996-07-01 2001-05-01 Tecumseh Products Company Overhead cam engine with cast-in valve seats
US20060090964A1 (en) * 2004-11-04 2006-05-04 Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. Pressure lubrication for inverted flight
WO2017178614A1 (en) * 2016-04-14 2017-10-19 Schwöller Johann Position-independent oil supply system, position-independent oil recirculation system and position-independent oil system for an internal combustion engine

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2415972A (en) * 1943-06-25 1947-02-18 Bell Aircraft Corp Aircraft liquid supply means
US2427859A (en) * 1943-08-10 1947-09-23 Jeffrey Mfg Co Valve for mining machines
US2699907A (en) * 1949-02-25 1955-01-18 Thompson Prod Inc Aircraft fuel pump assembly
US2961130A (en) * 1952-02-08 1960-11-22 Nash Engineering Co Fuel booster pumps
US2747593A (en) * 1952-07-03 1956-05-29 Gen Motors Corp Valve mechanism
US2862651A (en) * 1954-10-14 1958-12-02 Willard P Perry Gravity control apparatus
US2829805A (en) * 1955-06-14 1958-04-08 Thompson Prod Inc Apparatus for delivering liquid from an aircraft fuel cell under all flight conditions
US3094251A (en) * 1960-05-27 1963-06-18 Douglas Aircraft Co Inc Fuel supply system
US3443778A (en) * 1966-06-06 1969-05-13 Intertechnique Sa Systems for supplying fuel to aircraft engines
US3500750A (en) * 1967-09-27 1970-03-17 Justin Vohl Intake selector system for engine oil circulating pump
US4117907A (en) * 1975-12-22 1978-10-03 Audi Nsu Auto Union Aktiengesellschaft Device for aspiration of lubricating oil from the supply of a combustion engine
US4813445A (en) * 1987-06-04 1989-03-21 Parker-Hannifin Corporation Apparatus for supplying fuel under negative gravity conditions
US6012453A (en) * 1995-04-20 2000-01-11 Figgie Inernational Inc. Apparatus for withdrawal of liquid from a container and method
US5755194A (en) * 1995-07-06 1998-05-26 Tecumseh Products Company Overhead cam engine with dry sump lubrication system
US5979392A (en) * 1995-07-06 1999-11-09 Tecumseh Products Company Overhead cam engine with integral head
US5988135A (en) * 1995-07-06 1999-11-23 Tecumseh Products Company Overhead vertical camshaft engine with external camshaft drive
US6032635A (en) * 1995-07-06 2000-03-07 Tecumseh Products Company Overhead cam engine with integral head
US6223713B1 (en) 1996-07-01 2001-05-01 Tecumseh Products Company Overhead cam engine with cast-in valve seats
US20060090964A1 (en) * 2004-11-04 2006-05-04 Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. Pressure lubrication for inverted flight
US7530430B2 (en) 2004-11-04 2009-05-12 Pratt & Whitney Canada Corp. Pressure lubrication for inverted flight
WO2017178614A1 (en) * 2016-04-14 2017-10-19 Schwöller Johann Position-independent oil supply system, position-independent oil recirculation system and position-independent oil system for an internal combustion engine

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US2252974A (en) Crankcase ventilating system
US1871055A (en) Liquid supplying means for aircraft engines
US3472211A (en) Fuel feed system and charge forming apparatus
US5046306A (en) Secondary oil system
US3177920A (en) Priming and venting arrangement for fuel feed system
US2361227A (en) Charge forming device
US2796838A (en) Fuel feed and charge forming apparatus
US2332007A (en) Sump selector valve for fuel tanks
US2160978A (en) Fuel pump
US2752088A (en) Hermetically sealed radial compressor assembly
US1306421A (en) Breathes for internal-combustion engines
US2022898A (en) Internal combustion engine
US4381741A (en) Mechanical fuel pressure operated device for supplying a fuel/oil mixture
US3076639A (en) Carburetor
US2273979A (en) Carburetor
US2874944A (en) Charge forming means
US2377088A (en) Fuel vaporizer
US2775435A (en) Carburetor accelerating pump with gas vent
US2273202A (en) Engine
US2311146A (en) Internal combustion engine for aircraft
US2984465A (en) Carburetor for internal combustion engines
US7530430B2 (en) Pressure lubrication for inverted flight
US3347536A (en) Carburetor
US1512952A (en) Reatomizer
US3313281A (en) Crankcase ventilation system