US1839397A - Apparatus for and method of applying designs on textiles - Google Patents

Apparatus for and method of applying designs on textiles Download PDF

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Publication number
US1839397A
US1839397A US323839A US32883928A US1839397A US 1839397 A US1839397 A US 1839397A US 323839 A US323839 A US 323839A US 32883928 A US32883928 A US 32883928A US 1839397 A US1839397 A US 1839397A
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design
frame
stenciled
over
stenciling
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US323839A
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William J Kunedt
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Emerson Manufacturing Co
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Emerson Manufacturing Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B41PRINTING; LINING MACHINES; TYPEWRITERS; STAMPS
    • B41FPRINTING MACHINES OR PRESSES
    • B41F15/00Screen printers
    • B41F15/08Machines
    • B41F15/0831Machines for printing webs
    • B41F15/0845Machines for printing webs with flat screens
    • B41F15/085Machines for printing webs with flat screens with a stationary screen and a moving squeegee

Description

w. J. KUNEDT 1,839,397
AND IETHOD 0F APPLYING DESIGNS 0N TEXTIQES Jan. 5, 1932.
APPARATUS FOR Filed Dec. 3, .1928
INVENTOR. w/LL/flM J Kumepr Patented Jan. 5, 193.
wdlblldllfif J. RUE E331, OF SAN 3PM {11560, CALHORNEA, ASSIGNOE OF FIFTY FEB a;
-'1( LMERSIGN MANUFACTURING (30., OF SAN FRANCISCO, CAIMTFOBNIA, A. C0320 man" or csnrronrne .QPPARATUS F R AND METHOD 913 AFELYUTG DE$IGNS 0N TEXTILES Application filed December 3, 1928. Serial R0. 323,889.
This invention relates particularly to an apparatus for and a process of applying designs on textiles, fabrics, and other materials. An object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for, and a process of, applying designs on textiies, fabrics, or the like, by dyes of different colors, so that the textile, fabric or the like will have a predetermined design permanently dyed thereon.
A further object of the invention is to provide an apparatus for use in accordance with my process, whereby dyes of difi'erent colors may be expeditiously applied to the material to receive the design, by the successive operation of a series of patterns or stencils, each. embodying a part of the design, and through which one color of dye is adapt-ed to be passed, the various patterns or stencils being normally held out of the way and adapted to bebrought into matching relation over the work before the various dyes are applied to the work-through the pattern or stencil.
A still further object of the invention is to provide a process of permanently dyeing designs on textiles, fabrics or the like in a single color or a plurality of different colors.
Other objects of the invention are to provide an apparatus for and a method of a plying designs on textiles, fabrics and t e like that will be superior in point of simplicity, inexpensivcness of construction, positiveness of operation, and facility and convenience in use and general elliciency.
In this specification and the annexed draw ings, the invention is illustrated in the form considered to be the best, but it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to such form, because it be embodied in other forms, and it is also to be understood that'in and by the claims following the description, it is desired to cover the invention in whatsoever form it may be embodied.
In the accompanying one sheet of draw- .Fig. i represents a perspective view of an apparatus for applying designs on textiles, fabrics and the like, constructed in accordance with my invention.
Fig. 2 is an enlarged cross section taken through Fig.1 on the line 2-2.
Fig. 3 is a fragmentar v view showing the stencil or pattern applie in operative position over the textile, fabric, or the like, to which the design is to be applied.
In detail, the apparatus to be used in the practice of my process consists of a table 1 having a planar top surface 2 over which a resilient padding 3 is placed. A. slot 4 is cut, laterally, across one end of the table top 2, and a riser strip 5 is arranged along one side of the slot 4. A roll of absorbent material 6 such as cloth paper, or the like, is rotatably mounted on the legs of the table 1, adjacent an end thereof. The material on the roll is adapted to pass upwardly through the slot 4 in the end of the table top, and over the riser strip 5. The material 6 is ada ted to be extended over the entire length 0 the upper surface of the table, and to pass between a pair of tighter-er rollers, 8 and 9, respectivel journaled in a dryer housing 10 arranged cuntiguous to an end of the table 1. The material 6 within the housing 10 then passes around the periphery of a beater roller 7, having a corrugated exterior, to provide suficient friction when contacted with the absorbent material 6 to draw the said material lengthwise over the table. After leaving the beater roller the material 6 either drops onto the floor in a loose condition or is passed around a roller for further treatment.
The textile 12, or the fabric, or such other material as is'suitable to have the design dyed thereon, is arran ed in stacked relation adjacent the end of t e table in a location near to that of the roll of absorbent material 6. The material 12 is adapted to pass up over the end of the table, and over the upper surface of the length of the absorbent material 6, and to enter the dryer compartment 10. The design material 12 passes around a horizontal roller 13 which has the upper side of its circumference substantially parallel to the upper surface of the riser strip 5. By having the upper circumference of the roller 13 in the same plane as that of the upper surface of the riser strip 5, the design material 12 can be stretched taut, in spaced relation, above the upper surface of the padded table top. The material 12 passes around the roller 13, thence around a roller 14. in the bottom of the dryer compartment 10 and thence upwardly around a roller 15 and outwardly through the container to a roller or spool 16 onto which the material 12 with the design thereon is wound. I have provided a pulley 17 on the end of the roller 16 and a hand operated pulley 18 on the side of the table 1. A belt 19 connects the pulleys 17 and 18 so that by rotating the pulley 18 in the direction of the arrow A, it is possible to draw the cloth ormaterial 12 having the design thereon over the upper surface of the table, as well as to draw said material through the dryin compartment 10. A pulley 20 is also provi ed on the end of the beater roller 7, and a belt 21 connects the pulley 20 to a pulley 22 that is secured on the roller 16 whereby the absorbent under material 6 is moved in unison with the material 12on which the design has been applied. I have found that the d e passes through the material 12 and is a sorbed by the under cloth 6 and by reason of the process of absorption the upper sheet sticks to the under cloth with sufiicienttenacity to move both sheets of material simultaneously. A heating element 23 of any desirable character is arranged under the bottom of the drying compart 10, to supply a drying heat to the in terior of said compartment to dry the design which has been dyed into the material 12 The u per side of the drying compartment provided with a door 24 thereon and a door 25 is also provided on one sideof the drying compartment to facilitate the passing of the material 12 around the various rollers within the said compartment.
A rectangular frame 26 having a width substantially the same as that of the table top, is provided with a screen 27 over the bottom side thereof, on which a predetermined design or pattern is arran 'ed. The material 27 on which the design is placed is of any suitable reticulated character, and either the design on the screen or the portion of material around the design is imperforate so that the dye material can only be passed through the open interstices of the said screen. A lower end 28 of the frame is pivotally mounted at its opposite sides on a pair of pivots 29 and 30, each of which are vertically slidable at 31 on the table 1. Expansion springs 32 are arranged around each of the frame pivots 29 and 30 on the opposite sides of the table, to elevate the frame 26 above the upper surface of the table and above the upper surface of the material 12 to'which the design is to be applied. A projecting shoulder 33 is secured to the frame pivot 29 on one side of the table to be engaged either by the hand or foot to force the frame pivots 29 and, 30 and frame 26 vertically downward into engagement with the upper surface of the table.
The expansion springs 32 return the frame 26 to the elevated, inoperative position when the hand or foot pressure is released. A stop bar 3 1 is provided on the frame pivot 29 on one side of the machine, and a coacting pin 35 is provided on the frame 26 to engage the stop ar 34 for the purpose of holding the frame in the vertical position shown in Fig. 1.
In practicing my process of applying designs onto textiles, fabrics, or the like, I arrange the material to receive the design 12 on the upper surface 2 of the table, over the absorbent mc'xrial 6 which is stretched tightly thereunder. The ends of the material 12 to receive the design, as well as the absorbent material 6, is passed through and around the various rollers in the drying compartment 10, as in the manner heretofore described. The screen frame 26 with the design thereon is next swung down from the vertical inoperative position shown by full lines in Fig. 1, into the horizontal operative position shown by dotted lines in the same figure. The screen surfac i the said frame thus lies parallel to, and in contact with, the up er surface of the material 12 which is to receive the design. The operator next depresses the foot pivot 29 downwardly until the screen frame 26, the material 12 to receive the design, and the absorbent material 6, is placed in bearing contact with the u per surface of the table.
I have found that it is very. desirable to paint the desi n on the screen surface 27 with a water proof paint, or one which has a paraffin base, or one comprised of a paint that has therein one part of camphor and from one to twelve arts of shellac, or a water proof paper 0 the desired desi n that is attached to the screen 27 by wetting it into the interstices of the said screen.
The dye that is placed over the screen surface 27 is thickened with gum tragacanth, starch, or moss, or any other gum combined with a suitable mordant. The dye is scraped or brushed over the inside surface of the screen 27 to force it through the interstices of the screen, which comprises the design thereon, onto any textile, fabric, or other material which may be directly under the said frame 26. The dye will, of course, enter into the body of the material to which it is applied, and will dye said material with the same design as that on the screen 27 on the frame 26. The dye is forced either through or around the interstices of the design in the screen 27 by means of a scraper or a stiff brush. The dye that passes through the design cloth 12 that is to have the design dyed thereon is absorbed by the material 6 beneath the upper-cloth. After the desired design has been applied or dyed onto the material 12. the screen frame 26 is progressively separated from the material and elevated into a vertical position and the material 12 with the design dyed thereon is advanced into the drying compartment. Where a design is being dyed onto a relatively large piece of material 12 the under cloth 6 may be pulled by hand to pull it and the over cloth 12 over the work table. A fresh piece of material 12 to have a design dyed thereon, is thus placed in registry with the screen frame 26, and the operation of dyeing the desi onto the fresh piece of material is repeate As fast as the material with the design dyed thereon is advanced into the drying compartment, the material is dried therein and removed for usage. Although Ihave shown the material with the design dyed thereon passed into a drying compartment, I do not wish to be limited exclusively thereto, as it would be clearly within the purview of the invention to cut off the material with the designs .d ed thereon after each dyeing operation, an the cut 05 sheets of the design dried or cared for in some suitable manner. After the material has been suitably dried with the designs thereon, it is steamed or aged, to properly fasten the dye color into the textile, fabric, or the like, and afterwards, the thickening material in the dyed design, as well as the thickening material in the textile, fabric, or the like is washed or rinsed out.
It is to be understood that either a design of single color could be dyed onto the material, or a design of a plurality of colors could be dyed onto said material, either in separate and independent operations or in a series of successive operations.
Having thus described this invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
1. In a stenciling machine having a table over which a material to be stenciled is movable and having a heated compartment related thereto to receive the stenciled material; a frame having thereon the design to be stenciled positionable longitudinally over the said material; means to support an end of the frame above said material adapt-.
ed to lower the longitudinally positioned frame to a plane substantially parallel to the table and into contact with the said material during the stenciling operation, and to raise the longitudinally positioned frame from the stenciling operation to permit movement of the material with the stenciled design thereon away from beneath the frame; and moving means on the table adhering to the underside of said material to advance the same away from beneath the frame.
2. A stenciling machine comprising a table over which a material to be stenciled is movable; an absorbent sheet movable on the table interposed between the table and material to be stenciled to absorb the excess d e that permeates the said material during t 1e stenoiling operation; a frame having thereon the design to be stenciled positionable longitudinally over the said material; and'means to able; an absorbent sheet movable on the table interposed between the table and material to be stenciled to absorb the excess dye that permea-tes the said material during the stenciling operation; a frame havin the design'to be stenciled positionable longitudinally over the said material; means tolower an end of the Ion itudinally positioned frame onto the tab e into-contact with the said material during the stenciling o eration and to raise the end of the'longltu 'nally posit-ionedframe after the stenciling operation to permit movement of the material with the stenciled design thereon away from beneath the frame; and means to advance the absorbent sheet on the table with the material away from beneath the frame.
4. A stenciling machine comprising a table over which a material to be stenciled is movable; an absorbent sheet interposed between the table and material to be stenciled to absorb the excess dye that permeates the said material during the stenciling operation; means to move the stenciled material and absorbent sheet in unison; a frame having thereon the design to be stenciled positionable longitu dinally over the said material; and means to lower the longitudinally positioned frame onto the table into contact with the said mate rial during the stenciling operation and to raise the longitudinally positioned frame after the stencilin operation to permit movement of the material with the stenciled design thereon away from beneath the frame.
5. In a stenciling machine havin a table over which a material to be stenciled is movable and having a heated compartment related thereto to receive the stenciled material; an absorbent sheet interposed between the table and the material to be'st-enciled, to absorb the excess dye that permeates the said material during the stenciling operation; means to move the stenciled material and the absorbent sheet in unison; a frame having thereon a design to be stenciled positionable longitudinally over the said material; means to lower the longitudinally positioned frame onto the table and into contact with the said material during the stenciling operation and to raise the longitudinally positioned frame after the stenciling operation, to permit movement of the material with the table to pivotally support an end ofthefsten' M cil adapted to first raisehsaidlpivoted end whenthe'stencilislifted thereby-to-separate" i stencil bodily movable into pl-anar'eontaet the ,material 'act io n.=, U i 1, v 1 8, In a stenciling maching a table; 8. 0011? 7 v absorbent material movablewith saidfirst the stencil fromthematerial with e fi .r 15 sive strippi H 'end oi the stencil adapted to automatic all g 7. In a stenciling"'maehinerartable-bierZ which amate'rial to be stenciled'is plaee,d,"a
withthe material 0131' j the table; wesilieht @[T meanson the tablelto pivotallyrsupport "an first raise said pivoted end when the stenci is lifted, thereby to separate the steneil iron; i LP e eerie t-inuous stri'p of -ma.teri al to be stenciled ew-1 able lengthwise over said table; list/131p of mentioned material andinterposed between v k 1 I 1 the table and material; aframe-havin there-J r on the desi to be stenciled positiona he ever said material on said table, said frame having one side thereof related to the table;
1 means to lower the frame into contact with the said material, whereby the planeof the frame is parallel to the plane Of'the table during the stenciling operation, and'to raise one end of the frame to effect a progressive separation of the frame from the material,
- after the stenciling operation; and means to advance the stenciled material and absorbent material away frombeneath the frame.
In testimon whereof I have hereunto set my hand at an Francisco, California, this 8th day of March, 1927.
WILLIAM KUNEDT;
US323839A 1928-12-03 1928-12-03 Apparatus for and method of applying designs on textiles Expired - Lifetime US1839397A (en)

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2452339A (en) * 1946-02-14 1948-10-26 Uhlig William Frank Apparatus for printing and drying of textile fabrics
US2485289A (en) * 1945-09-12 1949-10-18 Jane Frantisek Apparatus for printing on fabrics, paper, or the like
US2646749A (en) * 1947-02-05 1953-07-28 Roto Matic Screen Printer Ltd Stencil printing apparatus
US2655865A (en) * 1946-12-24 1953-10-20 Geiringer Walter Apparatus for affixing fabric to printing tables
US2708575A (en) * 1950-11-17 1955-05-17 Edwin G Oliphant Web-feeding mechanism for platen printing press
US3513775A (en) * 1963-10-28 1970-05-26 Lyle D Guthrie Process for registering and silk screening both sides of a sheet

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2485289A (en) * 1945-09-12 1949-10-18 Jane Frantisek Apparatus for printing on fabrics, paper, or the like
US2452339A (en) * 1946-02-14 1948-10-26 Uhlig William Frank Apparatus for printing and drying of textile fabrics
US2655865A (en) * 1946-12-24 1953-10-20 Geiringer Walter Apparatus for affixing fabric to printing tables
US2646749A (en) * 1947-02-05 1953-07-28 Roto Matic Screen Printer Ltd Stencil printing apparatus
US2708575A (en) * 1950-11-17 1955-05-17 Edwin G Oliphant Web-feeding mechanism for platen printing press
US3513775A (en) * 1963-10-28 1970-05-26 Lyle D Guthrie Process for registering and silk screening both sides of a sheet

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