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US1837299A - Cleaning device - Google Patents

Cleaning device Download PDF

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US1837299A
US1837299A US23341927A US1837299A US 1837299 A US1837299 A US 1837299A US 23341927 A US23341927 A US 23341927A US 1837299 A US1837299 A US 1837299A
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material
rolls
pressure
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cleaning
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Eugene B Taggart
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Eugene B Taggart
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B03SEPARATION OF SOLID MATERIALS USING LIQUIDS OR USING PNEUMATIC TABLES OR JIGS; MAGNETIC OR ELECTROSTATIC SEPARATION OF SOLID MATERIALS FROM SOLID MATERIALS OR FLUIDS; SEPARATION BY HIGH-VOLTAGE ELECTRIC FIELDS
    • B03BSEPARATING SOLID MATERIALS USING LIQUIDS OR USING PNEUMATIC TABLES OR JIGS
    • B03B4/00Separating by pneumatic tables or by pneumatic jigs
    • B03B4/06Separating by pneumatic tables or by pneumatic jigs using fixed and inclined tables ; using stationary pneumatic tables, e.g. fluidised beds

Description

Dec. 22, 1931. E. B. TAGGAR-r CLEANING VDEVICE Filed Nox/.15. 1927 45 Smets-sheet 1 Dec. 22, 1931. E. B. TAGGART I CLEANINGDEVICE Filed- NOK/.15, 1927 3 Sheets'-Sheec. 2

INVENTOR Dec. 22, l 931.l E. B. TAGGART CLEANING DEVICE Filed Nov. 15, 1927 3 Sheets-Sheet INVENTOR sure from beneath, which 5 which illustrate Patented Dec. 22, 1931 EUGENE B. TAGGART, F INDANA, PENNSYLVANIA CLEANING 'DEV'.[CE

Application med November 15, 1921. serial No. 233,419.

This invention relates broadly to the cleaning and separating of materials, and more particularly to an improved apparatus for cleaning` coal, ore, and various other materials. v

One object of the invention is to provide an improved means whereby the cleaning and separating of materials may be accomplished in a thorough manner and all of the foreign matter removed without the necessity of reworking or subsequent `screening or washing.

A further object is to provide a continuous apparatus, in the operation of which the feeding, `cleaning and separating occur simultaneously, thus providing for rapid operation in the process, with resultant increase oftonnage per cleaning hour.

Another object is to provide means for cleaning coal in such manner that there is little tendency to breaking-up or pulverizing of the coal.

A further object is to provide a means for cleaning and separating, which requires a minimum distance of travel for material operated upon.

With these objects in view, the invention consists, generally stated, in apparatus for moving the material by power and gravitational force in a rectilinear path and subjecting the material while in motion to fluid 4presressure acts to separate the material and to ee it of impurities, 'the Huid pressure carrying away the lighter impurities such as dust.

In lthe present invention, in the cleaningof coal, the fluid pressure is of a character to maintain the coal against gravitational force, permitting it to be advanced in its travel durlng the cleaning operation, while also permitting the heavier particles such as slate to fall beneath the cleaned material.

My invention maybe readily understood by reference to the accompanying drawings,

referred embodiments of my invention, andpwherein .v

Figure 1 is a side elevation, partly in section, of a cleaning and separating apparatus constructed to carry out the method of my invention; Fig. 2 is an end elevational view of Fig. 1, looking from the right of Fig. 1;

the line IV-IV; form of the invention, the View being a trans- 4. Suitable engagement with a motor 6. The rollers Fig. 3 is a sectional plan view of Fig. 1, showing mainly the feed rollers; Fig. 4.- is a transverse sectional view of Fig. 1, taken on Fig. 5 shows a modified verse sectional view throu h the apparatus; Fig. 6 is a view similar to Frig. 5 but showing a further modiiication; Figs. 7 and 8 are plan and longitudinal section views, re-

spectively, mainly diagrammatiaof a further modiication; Fig. 9 is a vertical transverse sectional view, corresponding to Fig. 4, of a modification devised especially for cleaning `and separating ore; Fig. 10 is a diagrammatic plan view of the separating rolls of Fig. 9, showing one manner of magnetizing the rolls; Fig. 11 isa longitudinal sectional view through apparatus comprising still another modiication of the invention; Fig. 12 is an end elevational view, partly in section, taken on the line XII-XII of Fig. 11; Fig. 13 is a transverse section taken on the line XIII-XIII of Fig. 11; and Fig. 14 is a transverse sectional view similar to Fig. 13 of another form of cylinder which may be employed with the form of vinvention illustrated in Fig. 11.

In accordance with the present invention, and as illustrated more particularly in Figs. 1 to 4, there is shown apparatus for carry'- ing out the method, comprising a pair of inclined rollers 2 ,suitably ing 3. These rollers preferably have their peripheral surfaces'ormed of brush-like material 4 and the-rollers are adapted to lie close together so as to form a mat-like wall of their brush surfaces between the roll bodies. The rollers are shown as driven in unison, in the direction of the arrows in Fig. gearing indicated generallyv by the numeral 5 connects the rolls in driving also be driven in directions reverse to those -indicated by the arrows, or the direction of rotation of one roller only` may be reversed, depending upon the character of material being operated upon and the composition of the rolls. Also, the rollersv need not necessarily have brush surfaces. I

The framing 3 of the structure vmay comjourna ed in a fram-- may prise side walls 7 which encase the rollers 2, and which extend above the rollers as at 8 to confine the material on the rolls in the cleaning operation. The framing alsoV includes a compartment 9 arranged beneath the rolls and which serves as a bln for catching and retaining the heavier refuse or waste from the cleaning operation.

Located within the bin 9 is a nozzle 10 projecting upwardly towards a point midway between the rolls.

The nozzle is connected to a source of iiuid pressure, preferably an air line supplied by a blower or other pressure generating source-not shown. The pressure may also be under control for varying the degree of pressure as needed. ,any suitable control may be employed as ili be well understood without the necessity ci illustra-tion here. The air blast is directed upwardly between the rolls through the mat of bristles which form the brush surfaces of the rolls. `When treating damp coal, the air will preferably be heated, to dry it, and facilitate separation. The coal or other material is fed onto the rolls by a chute 1l and after the material has been cleaned, it passes ofi of the rolls into a chute 12 which directs it to a bin or conveyor as desired. The rolls are inclined, and may be spaced apart desired distances according to the character and sizes of the material being operated upon. Thus, if the material contains lumps oit such shape as to roll readily, the inclination of the rolls will not be so great as in the case of materials which do not tend to roll, while the spacing of the rolls will depend somewhat upon the size of the lumps of slate or the like that have to fall between the rolls.

In the operation of the apparatus as above described, the material to be cleaned slides by gravit from chute 11 to the inclined rolls, the rolls, y reason of their inclination, cause the material to advance towards the discharge end, and while the material is moving along the ros it is subjected to fluid pressure from beneath which is directed from the nozzle beneath the rolls through the brush sur- 'faces of the rolls. The materialn advancing' alongthe rolls is a 'tated and stirred thereby, both through t e rubbin action of the brush surfaces of the rolls an by their rotary motion, the material tending to bunch at a point between the rolls creates a tumbling and mixin action in the mass. and in the cleaning o coal the fluid pressure is maintained at such degree that it will support the coal against alling while at the same time perxmtt' the heavier slate to pass between the rolls mto the refuse bin, the lighter particles of the cleaned mass being carried upwardly by the uid pressure to a suction hood from whence it may be conducted to a waste rece tacle (not shown) or recoveredn The coalpn the slate tend to stratify, with neergang the slate in closer contact with the rolls, so that the rolls exert a positive force that supplements the gravitational force in feeding the slate downwardly.

The rolls, when rotated in the directions of the arrows of Fig. 4, serve to keep advancing the mixed material into the rising column of air, thus assisting the air in preventing the coal from falling between the rolls; or in other words, hindering the settling of the coal.

The apparatus as above described may also be employed in the separation and cleaning of ore. By reason of the difference in the specific gravities of coal and ore, the reverse order in disposition of the worked material will take place, the heavy ore falling by gravity to the bin 9, and the lighter refuse passing o at the discharge end of the rolls.

In Fig. there 1s shown a modified form of structure for practising the invention, in which only one roll is employed, the principle of operation being the same as in the former structure. The roll 2 rotates in the direction of the arrow and the material passes along the roll between the roll and a side wall 8 and is operated on by fluid pressure from a nozzle a.

In Fig. 6, a further modification is shown in which the feed means or agitating and advancing the material may be in the form of belts 2b passing around the rollers 2c.

In Figs. 7 and 8 there is shown a modified form of the invention in which the mechanical means for advancing the material while in the process of cleaning and separating comprises rollers 15 which ma have brush surfaces or be otherwise forme to give support to the material while permitting the fiuid pressure to enter into the' mass while being operated upon `by the rolls. The rolls 15, in this instance, are arranged with their axes transverse to or at right angles to the direction in which the material is advanced. By arranging the rolls in this manner, there is provided a positive feeding action 'for advancing the material, by which the mass of material is worked upon in such manner as to cause stirrin thereof or mixing in addition to the action-o the fluid ressure to disrupt the mass. The rollers al turn a counterclockwise direction and it will be seen that as one roll tends to draw the material down, the adjacent rl l1 tends to carry it up, thereby producing a olling-like movement of the material at the points between the rolls and disrupting or stirring the mass at the zones of fluid pressure between the rolls. With this arrangement of rolls, it will also be seen that as the material which is supported against falling passes beyond the zone of direct pressure it is carried into position between the next set of rolls. In the various stages followin be 'nning of theI movement across the ro t e cleaned material is worked up out of the mass and advanced to thel discharge position with a. minimum of breakage. Then the material is passing over the rolls at their highest points, it is not subjected to the agitation that it receives when passing across the spaces between the rolls.

In Figs. 9 and 10,'there is shown another form of structure wherein the principle of gravity and angular feed of rollers, together with fluid pressure for cleaning and separating may be used.

The form of apparatus shown in these figures is particularly suitable for use in separating a magnetizable material such as certain metallic ores from a non-magnetizable material.' The rolls 18 may be positioned and driven in a manner simila-r to the disclosure of Figs. 1 and 3 and are of magnetizable material, such as soft iron. In Fig. 10, each roll is shown as being magnetized by magnet c oils 24 throughelectrical conductors 19 and 20 and brushes 21 and l22. Insulating material 23 may be provided on the neck of each roll, for a distance one-half the .circumference thereof, so that the magnetism of the rolls will be destroyed when such insulated portion moves into contact with the brushes and breaks the circuit.

As the rolls are rotated in the direction indicated by the arrows in F ig.. 4 for instance, each will be magnetized when passing through the plane above the horizontally transverse axes of the rolls, thereby attracting-the magnetizable portion of the material and exerting a positive feeding force thereon.

The energizing circuit is broken through entry of the insulated portions 23 beneath the brushes, thus effecting demagnetization of the rolls and permitting the mechanicallyattracted materiall to fall.

Fluidpressure for supporting the lighter lumps of material above the rolls is supplied from a source A past a rotary valve B that may be continuously operated as by a motor C, if intermittent or pulsating supply of fiuid pressure is desired as hereinafter explained.

In Figs. 11, 12 and 13 a shell or generally cylindrical drum 25 is arranged to rotate on rollers 26 and may be driven by gearing 27.

The cylinder 25 is open at both ends and is inclined, so that as the materialis fed into the upper end thereof, such material will gradually work toward the lower end, through rotationv of the cylinder. The cylinder is provided with perforations of such size that the heavier material may pass therethrough and fall into the bin located vbelow such rolls. Air or other iuid pressure is simultaneously directed upwardly through anelongated orifice 28 that is located within the bin, in the position shown in Fig. 4. The lighter material will be prevented by the fluid pressure from falling and willgradually advance to aV discharge chute 29 at the lower end of the cylinder. The bottom wall of the discharge chute extends into the cylinder for a. short distance'so that the heavier material which has not fallen through the orices will be discharged beneath the bottom of the chute 29 as shown in Fig. 11. As thematenial approaches the discharge end of the cylinder 25, the lighter portions thereof will of course be superposed upon the heavier portions, so that the lighter portions will slide down the chute, and the heavier portions fall beneath the chute. Fluid pressure orifices may be provided in addition to the orifice 28, as shown in Fig. 13.

In Fig. 14, I have shown a cylindrical shell 30 which may be mounted and driven in the same manner as the shell 25 and which is provided with orifices to permit discharge of fluidv pressure therethrough, but which is of slightly modified form, in that instead of being of polygonal form in cross section, it is circular and is provided with perforated plates or baies 31 that serve to cause a tumbling or rolling movement of the material to a greater degree than the fiattened walls of the cylinder 25, thereby more effectively agitating or stirring the material to expose all portions thereof to the action of the airblast.

In case liquid is employed as the fluid pressure medium, it may be desirable under some conditions to apply the pressure intermittently, in order to more effectively expose all portions of the material to the fluid pressure and to overcome any tendency for the materials to strat-ity. .The air pressure could also be applied intermittently, but it would not be so effective as the fluid pressure in agitating the material.

The invention results in the saving of considerable time in the cleaning of coal or other material as with my improved method, the same volume or quantity of coal may be cleaned in half the travel and time required for cleaning by the screening and washing process.

A lfurther advantage arises in the employment of air or other fluid pressure from beneath the mass which insures a better grade of cleaned material without the necessity of Washing.

While I have shown and described preferred embodiments of my invention, it will be understoodl that they are merely illustrative of the invention and that various other changes and modifications may be made therein Without departing from the spirit of my invention' or the scope of the claims.

I claim as my invention 1. Apparatus for separating materials of different character, comprising opposed surfaces moving toward one another and downlwardly, for exerting force on one of said materials to direct it to a lower plane, and up- Wardly directed fluid pressure means for holding the other material above said plane, the said Huid pressure means being directed between the said o posed surfaces.

2. Apparatus or separating materials of 5 fdiferent character', which comprises oppositely moving surfaces for advancing the materials from opposite directions simultaneously to a zone beneath which there is no positive support, and means for directing luid pressure upwardly between said surfaces and through said zone with suiiicient force to prevent the lighter material from falling, out which permits the heavier material to fall. 3. Apparatus for separating materials of .l5 diierent character, comprising oppositely moving surfaces that are simultaneously-operable to advance the materials to a zone beneath which there is no positive support, means for directing Huid pressure upwardly 2 between .said surfacesand through said zone with suiicient force to prevent the lighter material from falling, but which permits the heavier material to fall, and means for simultaneously advancing the materials in a direction horizontally transverse to the first-named direction of advance.

4. Apparatus for separating materials of different weight, comprising material-receiving surfaces, one of which is movable toward 5 the other and downwardly, for exerting force on one of said materials to direct it to a lower plane, and fluid-pressure means for holding the other material above said plane, the said moving surface being of brush-like form and com ressible to permit the passage of larger partlcles between said surfaces.

5. Apparatus for separating materials of different weight, comprising a pair of inclined rollers serving as material-receiving m surfaces and revolvable in opposite directions or the purpose of advancing material toward the space between the same, and means for directing fluid pressure u wardly between the roilers to support the lig ter material and to permit the heavier material to be moved downwardly between the rollers.

In testimony whereof l, vthe said EUGENE B. Tmeaa'r, have hereunto set my hand.

EUGENE B. TAGGART.,

US1837299A 1927-11-15 1927-11-15 Cleaning device Expired - Lifetime US1837299A (en)

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Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2872300A (en) * 1954-10-18 1959-02-03 Phillips Petroleum Co Process and apparatus for simultaneously pelleting powdered materials and classifying same
US2995247A (en) * 1960-03-09 1961-08-08 Herbert C Brauchla Apparatus for separating materials of different specific gravities
US3193096A (en) * 1963-01-07 1965-07-06 Western Electric Co Apparatus for sorting articles having an asymmetrical end
US3443689A (en) * 1968-05-29 1969-05-13 Fmc Corp Aerodynamic separation of smooth,round from rough,irregular objects
US3962072A (en) * 1973-07-20 1976-06-08 Ramacher Manufacturing Company Air separator apparatus
US4402411A (en) * 1981-07-27 1983-09-06 Lafreniere Edgar A Apparatus for separating articles
WO1989001826A1 (en) * 1987-09-01 1989-03-09 World Agrosearch, Ltd. Method and apparatus for separation using fluidized bed
US4861464A (en) * 1987-05-29 1989-08-29 State Of Israel, Ministry Of Agriculture Method and apparatus for separation using fluidized bed
US5048693A (en) * 1989-06-28 1991-09-17 World Agrosearch, Ltd. Method and apparatus for sorting articles with small density differences utilizing a flotation stream
US5118409A (en) * 1989-06-28 1992-06-02 Sddm, Inc. Apparatus and method for improving density uniformity of a fluidized bed medium, and/or for improving material fluidized bed sorting
US5301816A (en) * 1989-07-28 1994-04-12 Buehler Ag Method and apparatus for the separation of a material mixture and use of the apparatus
US20090045104A1 (en) * 2007-08-15 2009-02-19 Kalustyan Corporation Continuously operating machine having magnets

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2872300A (en) * 1954-10-18 1959-02-03 Phillips Petroleum Co Process and apparatus for simultaneously pelleting powdered materials and classifying same
US2995247A (en) * 1960-03-09 1961-08-08 Herbert C Brauchla Apparatus for separating materials of different specific gravities
US3193096A (en) * 1963-01-07 1965-07-06 Western Electric Co Apparatus for sorting articles having an asymmetrical end
US3443689A (en) * 1968-05-29 1969-05-13 Fmc Corp Aerodynamic separation of smooth,round from rough,irregular objects
US3962072A (en) * 1973-07-20 1976-06-08 Ramacher Manufacturing Company Air separator apparatus
US4402411A (en) * 1981-07-27 1983-09-06 Lafreniere Edgar A Apparatus for separating articles
US4861464A (en) * 1987-05-29 1989-08-29 State Of Israel, Ministry Of Agriculture Method and apparatus for separation using fluidized bed
WO1989001826A1 (en) * 1987-09-01 1989-03-09 World Agrosearch, Ltd. Method and apparatus for separation using fluidized bed
US4865722A (en) * 1987-09-01 1989-09-12 Max Ririe Method and apparatus for separation using fluidized bed
US5048693A (en) * 1989-06-28 1991-09-17 World Agrosearch, Ltd. Method and apparatus for sorting articles with small density differences utilizing a flotation stream
US5118409A (en) * 1989-06-28 1992-06-02 Sddm, Inc. Apparatus and method for improving density uniformity of a fluidized bed medium, and/or for improving material fluidized bed sorting
US5301816A (en) * 1989-07-28 1994-04-12 Buehler Ag Method and apparatus for the separation of a material mixture and use of the apparatus
US20090045104A1 (en) * 2007-08-15 2009-02-19 Kalustyan Corporation Continuously operating machine having magnets
US7841475B2 (en) 2007-08-15 2010-11-30 Kalustyan Corporation Continuously operating machine having magnets

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