US1780038A - Game - Google Patents

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US1780038A
US1780038A US424005A US42400530A US1780038A US 1780038 A US1780038 A US 1780038A US 424005 A US424005 A US 424005A US 42400530 A US42400530 A US 42400530A US 1780038 A US1780038 A US 1780038A
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board
pieces
areas
end
game
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US424005A
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George S Parker
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George S Parker
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F3/00Board games; Raffle games
    • A63F3/00173Characteristics of game boards, alone or in relation to supporting structures or playing piece
    • A63F3/00176Boards having particular shapes, e.g. hexagonal, triangular, circular, irregular

Description

G. s. PARKER 1,780,038

GAME I Filed Jan. 28, 1930 3 Sheets-Sheet l 7/ l A W 9 Oct. 28, 1930.

j Invenior:

George dPar-ier a) by dU BM Q Va/wu YWHAA v I n/iiiiqa Oct. 28, 1930. G. s. PARKER 1,780,033

GAME

Filed J an. 2a, 1930 I 5-Sheets-Sheet 2 9 9 llliiiillh illiiiilll "J0 'lmiiiilw Invenior: 61-20299 dimmer G. s. PARKER 1,780,038

GAME

Filed Jan. 28, 1950 5 Sheets-Sheet 3 Oct. 28,1930.

Patented Oct. 28, 1930 NrrEo STATES PATENT OFFICE GAME Application filed January 28, 1930. Serial No. 424,005.

This invention relates to games of the general type of chess and checkers, in so far as it is a game of skill played by two persons upon a marked board with pieces adapted to be moved in accordance with certain fixed rules. The game of this invention is the result of many years experience in the production and manufacture and study of games. My object in making the present invention has been to produce a game representing a freedom of action based on a simplicity not presented in chess and aifording a new type of problems for adult and bright minded young people. A further object of the invention has been the production of a game that represents in its elfect the freedom of the hand to hand encounter of medieval armies with ability to advance, retract, move sideways or diagonally in any direction. Unlike any other game known to me, the contesting forces are arranged in the center of the field, in the disclosed embodiment of the invention far in advance of each of the fortresses which they respectively defend, with troops consisting of.

2 knights and men, whose basic characteristics in play actually present those of medieval combatants.

In order that the principle of the invention may be readily understood I have illustrated the preferred embodiment of the invention and shall describe the same with particularity and explain the different moves of the pieces and the object of the game, and will make clear by reference to suitable figures of" the drawings the greatopportunity for surprising moves and combinations whereby the game may be won.

Referring to the drawings:

Fig. 1 is a plan view of the board and the preferred markings thereon;

Fig. 1 is a side elevation of one of the pieces of the lower order;

Fig. 1 is a similar view of one'of the pieces of the higher order or power;

Fig. 2 is a view similar to Fig. 1 but representing the pieces in position for beginning the game; and

Fig. 3 is a view similar to Figs. 1 and 2 but representing a game that has been partly played.

In the ensuing description I shall employ specific terms, but" it is to be understood that numerous changes may be made both in the board and the markings thereof and in the pieces, within the scope of my invention.

The board is indicated generally at 1. It may be formed of any suitable material, and may be a folding board such ascommonly used in chess or checkers or it may bea non-folding board. The board is marked into a relatively large number of areas, which for convenience I shall refer to as squares, although it is to be understood that the term squares is one of broad description and includes any suitable areas whether they be square, circular or of other desired form or size. In the disclosed construction of board I have represented a number of squares 2 of two contrasting colors in alternation, as in chess or checkers. The total number of squares in the-present embodiment of my invention is 160. Not only is the number of squares or areas greater than in chess or checkers, but there is a certain symmetrical irregularity in the arrangement of certain marginal squares or areas. What maybe referred to as the central portion 3 of the board (considered lengthwise) consists of ten transverse rows of twelve squares each; the said rows are supplemented at each end by one row 4 of teh squares and one row 5 of eight squares and a single short row 6 of two squares only, preferably at midlength of the board. The said rows 4 and 5 are symmetrically positioned so as to furnish a stepped formation and the short rows 6 of two squares each, constitutes the two goals to occupy which with two piecesvfrom the opposite side of the board is the object of the game (or as an alternative the capture of all the opposing pieces). v Desirably the two goals are marked with some suitable designation such-as stars 7. Any other suitable marking such as flourde-lis or a castle or other attractive marking may be employed. Preferably the same markings are provided for the opposing goals, though my invention is not limited in this respect.

The game differs markedly from chess or checkers in that the pieces do not commence their movements from the end rows of the board, but are at the outset positioned upon indicated squares represented in Fig. 1. A very important object of the invention is to provide for and simulate in play the bpen battlefields of the times of knighthood and chivalry in which the opposing forces engaged in hand to hand combat, advancing .or retiring as the fortunes of war changed,

with individual combats occurring throughout the field. Just as in medieval times when the opposing armies were made up of yeomen or foot soldiers and mounted knights who, being mounted, were capable of making fierce charges into the opposing ranks and riding down or capturing the footmen of the other army, so I provide a number of pieces of a low order such as indicated at 8 in Fig. 1 and which for convenience of description I shall refer to as men and an-.

.other set of pieces 9, shown in Fig. 1 of a high order, and which for convenience of.

departing from the spirit of the invention. I-

prefer, however, not to employ pieces of other powers than those herein illustrated, because it complicates the game and detracts from the simplicity thereof, which. is acharacteristic of the present invention.

In the disclosed embodiment thereof I have represented ten men and four knights on each side, and have contrasted the knights with the men by providing the former with a projection or head such as 10 and which desirably is of a color contrasting with that of the knight. For example, the men and the knights on one side may be colored red, the heads of the red knights being colored blue and the men and knights on the other side may be colored yellow, the yellow knights having blue heads. The two forces are vformed in opposing battle lines, as indicated -in- Fig. 2, and in order that the pieces may be readily set up to commence the game, I preferably, though not necessarily, mark the board 1 with indicating dots or spots as shown at 11 and 12 in Fig. 1 and in part in Fig. 3. Desirably the four, knights on each side are at the outset positioned at the flanks of the two lines of men and thereforeI have as indicated at 13, 14L,v marked the appro- -priate spots with a circle and a K rather than in a solid color. It will be understood that any desired markings may be employed. The two lines of pieces are drawn up in battle array at any suitable distance apart but preferably with two transverse rows of squares between them. It will be observed that the opposing forces do not, in the disclosed embodiment of the invention, occupy the entire width of the field, and moreover that each force as originally positioned is well in advance of its own goals. This prevents what might otherwise be tiresome opening moves, which would occur when the pieces are approaching each other.

An exceedingly important feature of the game are the peculiar character of the moves which are permitted. x

Assuming that a piece, whether it be a man or a knight, is entirely surrounded by vacant squares, such piece may be moved one square in any direction. This move corresponds to that of the king in chess. When, however, one or more of the adjacent squares is or are occupied, the following movements are possible.

Each man, or piece of the lower order, may jump in any direction over one opposing piece whether ordinary man or knight prodirect line of the jump immediately behind the piece jumped, and thereby capture that piece, which is removed from'the board, and may, and in fact must, if the opposing pieces happen to be so positioned, continue the jumping in any direction, capturing the opposing pieces so jumped.

Each man, or piece of the lower order, may make what is termed a canter or overpass over one piece of his own si-de onto a vacant square next beyond the said friendly piece in direct line of the Canter and he. may continue such canter in a similar manner over any piece of his own side which is on a next adjacent square to the one on which he lands when making his described canter,thou'gh "he is not compelled to continue the canter over other possible friendly pieces. The friendly piece or pieces which is or are thus leaped over are not removed from the board, and the purpose of the canter is to advance the said man into a position of advantage for a further attack or to withdraw him if he is threatened or to use him to support some other piece that may be. threatened, or to move a piece rapidly toward the opponents goal.

Each knight, or piece of the high order, may make all moves possible for a man or piece of the low order and can either jump and thus capture an opponents piece or pieces, or he is empowered to make (as a man cannot) what is known as a knights charge which combines the canter and the jump. That is to say, any knight, or piece of the higher vided there be an unoccupied square in the order, can leap over '(canter over) in any directionone of his own men or over a friendly knight onto the vacant square just beyond said man or knight (and if the piecesare so positioned he can continue this movement over other friendly pieces), and if this part of the move brings him next to an opposing piece and there is a vacant square next beof the pieces permit, and he must jump and.

capture opposing pieces when brought into juxtaposition allowing a jump in the course of a charge. He cannot, however, make the characteristic knights'move of chess.

It is to be understoodthat the canter and the jump of the men, or-pieces of the lower order. can be in any direction whether forward or back or sideways, and this simulates the frequent hand to hand combats of the broken battlefields of olden times. Similarly the knights, or pieces of the higher order, can make their charges first by jumping in any direction over their own men and then over one or more of the opposing men or knights, thereby capturing the same.

To illustrate the movements by two examples only, reference is made to Fig. 3 from which it will be understood that five of the men from each side have been captured. It being assumed that it is reds turn to move, red will move the knight 15 as follows: Said knight 15 will leap (canter) diagonally over the friendly knight 16, onto the vacant square 17, then will leap over the friendly man 18 laterally onto the vacant square 19, then will jump diagonally over the opposing man 20, capturing him and removing him from the board, onto the vacant square 21, thenwill' jump forward toward the opposing goals over and capture the man 22. landing on the vacant square 23 from which he will jump p, diagonally backward over the opposing knight 24 landing on the vacant square 25, and then he will jump diagonally backward over the opposing knight 26 capturing him and land on the unoccupied square 27, thus ending his knights charge.

It is now yellows turn, and he will move his knight marked 28 at the extreme left hand side of the board in the rear line of battle. That knight 28 will leap (canter) over the friendly knight 28 landing on the un'occupied'square 30 and then he will jump over and capture the red man 18 landing on the unoccupied square 31 and then will jump over and capture the red man 32 landing on the unoccupied square 33, and then jump over and capture the red knight 16, landing on the unoccupied square 34, and

then jumping diagonally over and capturing the red man 35, landing on the unoccupied square 36, then jumping over and capturing the red man 37 and concluding yellows move by again landing on the unoccupied square The goal areas 6 are represented as two in number at each end of the board. It is to be understood that the invention is not limited to the number of goal areas 01' to their location, but I have found two goal areas adjoining each other, midwidth the board, at the opposite ends of the board,to be the most desired arrangement.

As stated, the object of the game is to get two pieces, whether knights or men, onto the two opposing goal spaces or areas. Even though a player finds himself approaching the end of the game with a substantially less number of pieces than his own, he can frequently-prevent his opponentfrom getting two pieces onto his own goal areas and may eventually win the game through fortunate capture of some of his opponents pieces,

*while' the opponent is maneuvering to getonto the desired goal areas. The player so capturing some of his opponents pieces may then be able tobreak through his opponents remaining forces and get two of his own pieces onto the goal areas of his opponent while, of course, keeping a sufficient number of pieces near his own goal areas to prevent his opponent getting two pieces onto said goal areas.

A player cannot. however, move his'own pieces onto his own goal areas for the purpose of keeping his opponent out of them, but a player can in making a jump or canter or knights charge, land 011 one of his own goal areas, though he must move therefrom promptly thereafter. It is to be understood that the areas of the board. while desirably squares, may be circles or other geometrical figures. or spots connected or not by lines or the like.

While the number of squares, circles. spots or the like for play is preferably 156, for the purpose of a larger contending force. more numerous in moving pieces, the board would preferably be enlarged by an increase in the number of squares, and this would be done without departing from the'spirit of my invention.

In the disclosed embodiment of the invention. the respective goals project toward the edge of the board away from the main bod) of the field. This is an exceedingly important feature of my invention, and I belieie thesame to be broadlynew. The board provided, as it is, with squares, spots or other spaces allows for lateral and diagonal play as well as for forward and back movements with goal locations at either end projected toward the margin of the board away from the main body of the field.

Having thus described one illustrative embodiment of the invention, it is to be understood that although specific terms are employed. they are used in a-gen eric and (lescripti've sense and not for purposes of limitation. the scope of the invention being set forth in the following claims.

-' lavers onlv com risin a board marked Claims: 7 1. A game adapted to be played by two with playing areas arranged in transversely and longitudinally extending rows, all of said playing areas being available for the resting place of any piece, said board at each end, outside of the end transverse row of playing areas, having two only indicated goal areas in juxtaposition side by side, arranged symmetrically of the board at each end.

2. A game adapted to be played by two players only, comprising a board marked with playing areas arranged in transversely andlongitudinally extending rows, all of said playing areas being available for the resting place of any piece, said board at each end, midwidth thereof, and adjoining the two endmost, transversely extending rows of playing areas having two indicated goal areas in lateral juxtaposition, a. plurality of the transverse rows at each end of the board being anterior to the goal areas and being progressively and symmetrically shorter than the next transverse rows, and therefore capableof containing fewer playing pieces.

3. A game adapted to be played by two 1 players only, comprising a board marked with playing areas arranged in transvsersely and longitudinally extending rows, all of said playing areas being available for the resting place of any piece, a plurality of the said transverse rows at each end of the board being progressively and symmetrically shorter and therefore containing fewer playing areas, there being at each end of the board beyond and adjoining the shortest transverse row a plurality of marked goal areas.

4. A game adapted to be played by two players only, comprising a board marked with playing areas arranged-in transversely and longitudinally extending rows, all of said playing areas being available for the resting place of any piece, a plurality of the said transverse rows at each end of the board being progressively and symmetrically shorter and therefore containing fewer playing areas, at least one transverse row at each end of the board having a lesser number of playing areas than thereare in those parts of the board which are of the full'width, and there also being at each end of the boardone or more marked goal areas longitudinally outside and adjoining the shortest transversely arranged end row.

5. A game apparatus comprising a checkered board divided into one hundred and fifty-six squares arranged in transverse rows of twelve squares, two transverse rows of ten squares each symmetrically arranged at each end of the said longer transverse rows, and two final transverse rows of eight squares each also symmetrically arranged at the two ends of the board respectively, said board at each end midwidth thereof and adjoining the two endmost transversely extending rows of playing areas having two indicated goal areas in lateral juxtaposition in combination with two contrasting sets of pieces.

6. A game apparatus comprising a check ered board divided into one hundred and fifty-six squares arranged in transverse rows of twelve squares, two transverse rows of ten squares each symmetrically arranged at each end of the said longer transverse rows, and two final transverse rows of eight squares each also symmetrically arranged at the two ends of the board respectively, said board also having two marked goal areas in adjoining side by side relationship symmetrically arranged at each end of the board, in combination with two contrasting sets of pieces.

7 A game adapted to be played by two players only, comprising a board marked with playing areas arranged in transversely and longitudinally extending rows, all of said playing areas being available for the resting place of any piece, and two contrasting sets of playing pieces, sald board at a distance of a I plurality of transverse rows from each end iaving marks arranged transversely of the board upon playing areas, said marks being totally equal to the entire number of playing pieces, a plurality of the transverse rows of playing areas at each end being symmetrically shorter than the others, there being also two marked areas longitudinally beyond but adjoining the shortest transverse end rows and symmetrically arranged with respect thereto. 1

8. A game apparatus comprising a checkered board divided into at least one hundred and fifty-six .squares arranged in transverse rows of at least twelve squares,

two shorter transverse rows of at least ten squares, each symmetrically arranged at each end of said longer transverse rows and two final still shorter transverse rows of at least eight squares each, also symmetrically ar ranged at the two ends of the board respectively, the two shorter rows of each end of the board being progressively shorter than the longest transverse rows, there being at each end of the board two marked goal areas in adjoining side by side relationship symmetrically arranged; said goal areas being in addition to and located beyond the plurality of progressively shortened rows in combination with at least two contrasting sets of pieces.

9. A game adapted to be played by two players only, comprising a checkered board whose playing areas are arranged in longitudinally extending, adjoining lines. of which the two median lines are the longest, each of said two longest-lines having a goal area at each end, there being at each side of said two median lines a plurality of longi- 4 and knights, said board having at each side thereof playing areas marked for the opening placement of all the pieces, said marked areas at each side of the board being removed by a plurality of transverse rows from the goal areas at that side, and being arranged inga plurality of transverse rows flanked at each end of each row by unmarked playing areas whereby pieces of each set at the game opening are necessarily assembled near the middle of the board in a plurality of rows each shorter than the playing width of the board.

10. A game adapted to be played by two players only, comprising a board marked with playing areas arranged in transversely and longitudinally extending rows, all of said playing areas being available for the resting place of any piece, said board at each end, outside of the end transverse row of playing areas, having two indicated goal areas in juxtaposition side by side, said board at a distance of a plurality of transverse rows from each end having marks arranged transversely of the board upon playing areas, said marks being totally equal to the entire number of playing pieces for each side and indicating the initial position of all of said pieces, said board having a plurality of the transverse rows of playing areas at each end symmetrically shorter than the others. a

11. A game apparatus comprising a checkered board divided into one hundred and fifty-six squares arranged in transverse rows of twelve squares, two transverse rows of ten squares each symmetrically arranged at each end of the said longer transverse rows, and two final transverse rows of eight squares each also symmetrically arranged at the two ends of the board respectively, said board also having two marked goal areas in adjoining side by side relationship symmetrically arranged at each end of the board, said board at a distance of a plurality of transverse rows from each end having marks arranged transversely of the board upon playing areas, said marks being initially equal to the entire number of playing pieces and indicating the initial position of all of said 7 pieces, in combination with two contrasting sets of pieces.

12. A game adapted to be played by two players only, comprising a board marked with playing areas arranged in transversely and longitudinally extending rows, all of said playing areas beingavailable for the resting place of any piece, a plurality of the said transverse rows at each end of the board being progressively and symmetrically shorter and therefore containing fewer playing areas, there'being at each'end of the board 'beyond'and adjoining the shortest row two "goalareas only, in side by side juxtaposition.

v 13. A game adapted to be played by two players f only, comprising a board marked with playing areas arranged in transversely and longitudinally extending rows, all of 'said playing areas being available for the resting place of any piece, and two contrastingfsets of playing pieces, said board at a distance of a plurality of transverse rows from each end having marks arranged transversely of the board upon playing areas, said marks being totally equal to the entire number of playing pieces, said board having at each end two goalareas in sideby side j uxtaposition, said two goal areas at each end being in addition to and located beyond the plurality of progressively shortened rows.

14. A game adapted to be played by two players only, comprising a board marked with playing areas arranged in transversely and longitudinally extending rows, all of said playing areas being available for the resting place of any piece, and two contrasting sets of playing pieces, said board at a distance of a plurality of transverse rows from each end having marks arranged transversely 'of the board upon playing areas, said marks being totally equal to the entire number of playing pieces, a plurality of the transverse rows of playing areas at each end being symmetrically and progressively shorter than the others, said board having at least one marked goal area longitudinally beyond but adjoining the shortest transverse end row i at each end.

15. A game adapted to be played by two, players only comprising a board marked with the playing areas arranged in transversely and longitudinally extending rows, in combination with two contrasting sets of pieces each set consisting of two powers such as knights and men, playing areas being marked for the'initial positions of allthe pieces wholly near the center of the board both transversely and lengthwise thereof, playing areas being left wholly unmarked throughout at least two transverse rows between the opposing pieces in their initial positions, and also throughout at least three transverse rows in the rear of the initial position of each set of pieces, and also throughfee out at least one longitudinal row at each side said playmg areas being available for the resting and longitudinally extending rows, all of lace of any piece, said board at each emf outside of the end transverse row of playing areas, having two only indicated goal areas in juxta osition side y side arranged symmetrica y ofthe board at each end in combination with two contrasting sets of playing pieces, each said set being composed of at least two powers or types of pieces such as knights and men, one only of said powers or types permitted in one and the same move, to use a combination of two different types of moves permitted to pieces of another power or type.

17. A game adapted to be layed by two pla ers only, comprising a wit playing areas arranged in transversely and longitudinally extending rows, all of said playing areas being available for the resting place of any piece, a plurality of the said transverse rows at each end of the board being rogressively and symmetricallyshorter and therefore containing fewer playin areas, there bein at each end of the boar beyond and adjoining the shortest row two oal areas only, in side by side juxtaposition in combination with two contrasting sets of playing pieces, each said set being composed of at least two powers or types of pieces, such as knights and men, one only of said powers or types permitted .in one and the same move, to use a combination of two different types of moves permitted to pieces of another power or t In testimony w ereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

GEORGE S. PARKER.

ard marked

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4191379A (en) * 1977-06-16 1980-03-04 Davia Louis Board game
US4478419A (en) * 1982-06-17 1984-10-23 Maiers Richard D Football type board game
US4506893A (en) * 1983-03-28 1985-03-26 Perry Mark E Method of playing a game in which playing pieces are inverted
US20080048395A1 (en) * 2006-08-25 2008-02-28 Rutherford Cindy Z Board game
US20140333023A1 (en) * 2011-12-19 2014-11-13 Jason Bennett Board game
USD814574S1 (en) * 2017-03-16 2018-04-03 John Joseph Navin Four person chess board

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4191379A (en) * 1977-06-16 1980-03-04 Davia Louis Board game
US4478419A (en) * 1982-06-17 1984-10-23 Maiers Richard D Football type board game
US4506893A (en) * 1983-03-28 1985-03-26 Perry Mark E Method of playing a game in which playing pieces are inverted
US20080048395A1 (en) * 2006-08-25 2008-02-28 Rutherford Cindy Z Board game
US20140333023A1 (en) * 2011-12-19 2014-11-13 Jason Bennett Board game
USD814574S1 (en) * 2017-03-16 2018-04-03 John Joseph Navin Four person chess board

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