US1750769A - Insulator pin - Google Patents

Insulator pin Download PDF

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Publication number
US1750769A
US1750769A US57846622A US1750769A US 1750769 A US1750769 A US 1750769A US 57846622 A US57846622 A US 57846622A US 1750769 A US1750769 A US 1750769A
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Prior art keywords
pin
threads
diameter
portion
insulator
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Expired - Lifetime
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Arthur O Austin
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Ohio Brass Co
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Ohio Brass Co
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    • HELECTRICITY
    • H01BASIC ELECTRIC ELEMENTS
    • H01BCABLES; CONDUCTORS; INSULATORS; SELECTION OF MATERIALS FOR THEIR CONDUCTIVE, INSULATING OR DIELECTRIC PROPERTIES
    • H01B17/00Insulators or insulating bodies characterised by their form
    • H01B17/20Pin insulators

Description

Match 18, 1930'. A. o. AUSTIN 1,750,769

INsULAToR PIN Filed July 29. 1922 'ticularly pointed out in the Patented Mar. 18, 1930 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE ARTHUR O. AUSTIN, F BARBERTON, OHI

O, ASSIGNOR, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, TO THE OHIO BRASS COMPANY, OF MANSFIELD, OHIO, A CORPORATION OF NEW JERSEY IN SULATOR PIN Application led July 29, 1922. Serial No. 578,466.

This invention relates to pins for supporting insulators on cross arms or other structures and has for its object the provision of supports of the class named which shall be economical to manufacture and install and in which the material shall be effectively distributed for mechanical strength. Other objects will appear from the following description.

The invention is exemplified in the combination and arrangement of parts shown in the accompanying drawing and described in the following specification and it is more parappended claims. In the drawings:

Fig. 1 is an elevation of one form of insulator pin embodying the present invention yWith the supporting flange in section.

Fig. 2 is a fragmentary view of a portion of the pin in elevation and with the flange in section showing a slightly different construction from that of Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a view similar to another modification.

Where insulator pins are mounted on cross arms or other structures it is desired to support the pin without weakening its resistance to bending, especially at the point where the pin joins the supporting structure. If the pin is reduced to provide a supporting shoulder, its resistance to bending will be correspondingly diminished. In the present invention, this difliculty is obviated by providing a flange shown at in the drawing, which projects from a sleeve 11 connected to the pin 12 by threads 13. The threads 13 are preferably rolled threads so that they are formed without removing any of the stock from pin 12.

In the rolling process the stock is pressed from the grooves so that the tips of the threads have a greater diameter than that of the original bar. This appears clearly from Fig. 2 of the drawing. Threads 14 may be formed on the lower end of the pin by similar Fig. 2 showing Vinsulator may process and any suitable support 15 for an be connected at the upper end of the pin. The internal diameter of the threads in the sleeve 11 is equal to that of the original diameter of the bar 12 so that the sleeve 11 will slide freely over the unthreaded portion of the pin, but will mesh with the threads 18. In assembling the parts, the sleeve 11 may be threaded over the portion 111 and it will move freely along the portion below the threads 13. When the sleeve is properly positioned on the threads 13 it will support the pin in place on the cross arm.

If it is desired to provide a tighter connection, a portion of the upper edge of the sleeve 11 may be left unthreaded as shown at 16 in Fig. 2. After the flange is in place, the upper edge of the sleeve 11 may be forced inwardly as shown in Fig. 1 to bind tightly against the pin and thus lock the flange against further longitudinal movement. This arrangement also encloses the end of the threads concealing tlrem from view and protecting them from entrance of moisture, especially after the parts have been galvanized. This construction will also provide supplementary support for the pin where it joints the flange and where the bending moment is greatest. If the flange is placed upon the pin from above, the upper edge may be originally formed to lit the pin tightly, or the threads may continue to the top of the flange as shown in Fig. 3 so that the flattened tips of the threads in the ange will bear against the outer surface of the pin.

Where the body of the pin 12 is threaded to the base, the depth of the base along the axis of the pin may be relatively short and the pin and base still act as a unit. The upper portion of the pin may be provided with a thread to fit a separable thimble or have a surface suitable for cementing into an insulator. The pin is of small relative diameter and is free from sharp points. This gives a good striking distance between the pin and insulator, thereby developing the maximum insulation in the insulator. As the pin has the saine size of body 12 bearing against the sides of the hole as above the base when used with a Wooden cross arm, a base oinA minimum diameter may be used. This is due to the support provided by the sides of the hole in the arm. in most pins the portion through the arm is so small that it is very ivealr as a beam and must be used as a tension member.

rihe large diameter of the body 12 is an advantage, as little tension in this member is necessary to develop the maximum ultimate strength of the pin when mounted on a Wood `arni. As Wood cross arms shi-ink and loosen the tension produced by the nut attached to th threaded end 14, it will be seen that the strength will not be reduced appreciably as in the ease ot pins which develop a large portion of their ultimate strength due to a large bearing base and tension in the bolt 12. The base 10 may be made of pressed metal, forgings, castings, or any suitable material. it may have a curved base or lips for gripping the cross arm. rlhe base may be provided With teeth for preventing rotation if desired.

I claim:

1. An insulator pin having rolled threads thereon, the points of Which project outwardbeyond the periphery of the unthreaded portion of said pin While the roots of said threads extend inwardly beyond the peripheral surface of the Unthreaded portion of said pin, and a support having a threaded opening meshing with the tips of the threads of said pin but having a minimum diameter large enough to receive the unthreaded portion of said pin.

2. An insulator pin having threads formed thereon and having an unthreaded portion adjacent said threads, the maj or diameter of said threads being greater and the minor diameter less than the diameter of the unthreaded portion of said pin, and a support having a threaded opening therethrough meshing with the threads on said pin, the minor diameter of said threaded opening being substantially equal to the diameter of the unthreaded portion or" said pin.

3. An insulator pin having threads thereon, the major diameter of which is greater than the diameter of the unthreaded portion oi said pin and a support threaded on said pin and having a portion thereof extended inwardly and engaging an unthreaded portion of said pin.

e. An insulator pin having rolled threads thereon, the maior diameter of which is reater than the diameter of the pin adjacent said threaded portion, a support through Which said pin extends, said support having tiiieads meshing with the threads on said pin and having an unthreaded portion extending beyond the threads on said pin and projecting inwardly and engaging the uiithreaded periphery of said pin adjacent the threaded portion thereof.

5. An insulator pin comprising upper and lower sections of equal diameters, threads on said pin intermediate said sections having a major diL meter greater than the unthreaded diameter of said pin and having a minor diameter less than the unthreaded diameter of said pin, a support for said pin having internal threads meshing with the threads on said pin but having a minor diameter substantially equal to the unthreaded diameter of said pin to permit said support to be moved over said unthreaded portion into engagement With the threads on said pin.

' 6. An insulator pin having an upper and lower section of substantially equal diameters, rolled threads on said pin intermediate said upper and lower section and having a major diameter greater than the diameter of said sections, a supporting iange having a sleeve provided with internal threads arranged to mesh With the threads on said pin and having a minor diameter substantially equal to the diameter of said upper and lower sections, said sleeve having a portion thereof projecting above the threads on said pin and engaging the periphery of the upper section above said threads.

7 An insulator pin having threads thereon the major diameter of which is greater than the diameter of the unthreaded portion of said pin, and a support threaded on said pin and having a portion thereof extending inwardly and engaging the unthreaded portion of said pin at points about the periphery thereof beyond the threaded portion.

8.1n combination, a rod having opposite end portions substantially equal in diameter and an intermediate threaded portion, the major diameter of the threads on said threaded portion being greater than the diameter of said rod While the minor diameter of the threads on said threaded portion is less than the diameter of said rod, and a nut having internal threads engaging the threads on said rod, the minor diameter of the threads in said nut being substantially equal to the diameter of said rod while the major diameter of the threads in said nut is substantiall equal to the major diameter of the threa s on said rod.

9. An insulator pin comprising a pin body, threads on said pin body extending outwardly beyond the periphery of the portion of said body immediately above said threads, a flange for said pin body having a threaded opening meshing With the threads on said pin body and having an inwardly extending portion substantially encircling said pin body and overlying the upper end of the threaded portion of said pin body to enclose the end of said threaded portion, thus concealing the

US1750769A 1922-07-29 1922-07-29 Insulator pin Expired - Lifetime US1750769A (en)

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Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2460613A (en) * 1945-04-12 1949-02-01 Ohio Nut & Bolt Company Captive screw assembly
US2577789A (en) * 1944-10-19 1951-12-11 Burtis B Mccarn Hanger for trolley rails
US4790702A (en) * 1986-03-27 1988-12-13 Maganias Nicholas H Nut and bolt assembly
US20080171301A1 (en) * 2007-01-17 2008-07-17 Verban Emil M Depth gauge for use in dental implants
US20080234766A1 (en) * 2007-01-29 2008-09-25 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US20090018584A1 (en) * 2007-01-29 2009-01-15 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Vertebra attachment method and system
US20090036894A1 (en) * 2007-01-29 2009-02-05 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Method of treating a neurological condition through correction and stabilization of the clivo-axial angle
US20090177230A1 (en) * 2008-01-08 2009-07-09 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Osteointegration apparatus
US20100152575A1 (en) * 2008-01-08 2010-06-17 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Mathematical Relationship of Strain, Neurological Dysfunction and Abnormal Behavior Resulting from Neurological Dysfunction of the Brainstem
US20100179597A1 (en) * 2007-01-29 2010-07-15 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US9827023B2 (en) 2007-01-29 2017-11-28 Life Spine, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus

Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2577789A (en) * 1944-10-19 1951-12-11 Burtis B Mccarn Hanger for trolley rails
US2460613A (en) * 1945-04-12 1949-02-01 Ohio Nut & Bolt Company Captive screw assembly
US4790702A (en) * 1986-03-27 1988-12-13 Maganias Nicholas H Nut and bolt assembly
US20080171301A1 (en) * 2007-01-17 2008-07-17 Verban Emil M Depth gauge for use in dental implants
US9827023B2 (en) 2007-01-29 2017-11-28 Life Spine, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US20080234755A1 (en) * 2007-01-29 2008-09-25 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US20090018584A1 (en) * 2007-01-29 2009-01-15 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Vertebra attachment method and system
US20090036894A1 (en) * 2007-01-29 2009-02-05 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Method of treating a neurological condition through correction and stabilization of the clivo-axial angle
US9107717B2 (en) 2007-01-29 2015-08-18 Life Spine, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US20080234766A1 (en) * 2007-01-29 2008-09-25 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US20100179597A1 (en) * 2007-01-29 2010-07-15 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US8043342B2 (en) * 2007-01-29 2011-10-25 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US8083743B2 (en) 2007-01-29 2011-12-27 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US8182511B2 (en) 2007-01-29 2012-05-22 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Craniospinal fusion method and apparatus
US8403965B2 (en) 2007-01-29 2013-03-26 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Vertebra attachment method and system
US8187302B2 (en) 2008-01-08 2012-05-29 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Osteointegration apparatus
US8556939B2 (en) 2008-01-08 2013-10-15 Fraser Cummins Henderson Mathematical relationship of strain, neurological dysfunction and abnormal behavior resulting from neurological dysfunction of the brainstem
US20090177230A1 (en) * 2008-01-08 2009-07-09 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Osteointegration apparatus
US20100152575A1 (en) * 2008-01-08 2010-06-17 Polaris Biotechnology, Inc. Mathematical Relationship of Strain, Neurological Dysfunction and Abnormal Behavior Resulting from Neurological Dysfunction of the Brainstem

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