US1748309A - Elevated railroad - Google Patents

Elevated railroad Download PDF

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US1748309A
US1748309A US250587A US25058728A US1748309A US 1748309 A US1748309 A US 1748309A US 250587 A US250587 A US 250587A US 25058728 A US25058728 A US 25058728A US 1748309 A US1748309 A US 1748309A
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tracks
arranged
elevated
cars
wheels
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US250587A
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James M Rose
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James M Rose
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B61RAILWAYS
    • B61FRAIL VEHICLE SUSPENSIONS, e.g. UNDERFRAMES, BOGIES OR ARRANGEMENTS OF WHEEL AXLES; RAIL VEHICLES FOR USE ON TRACKS OF DIFFERENT WIDTH; PREVENTING DERAILING OF RAIL VEHICLES; WHEEL GUARDS, OBSTRUCTION REMOVERS OR THE LIKE FOR RAIL VEHICLES
    • B61F9/00Rail vehicles characterised by means for preventing derailing, e.g. by use of guide wheels
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B61RAILWAYS
    • B61BRAILWAY SYSTEMS; EQUIPMENT THEREFOR NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B61B1/00General arrangement of stations, platforms, or sidings; Railway networks; Rail vehicle marshalling systems
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B61RAILWAYS
    • B61BRAILWAY SYSTEMS; EQUIPMENT THEREFOR NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • B61B1/00General arrangement of stations, platforms, or sidings; Railway networks; Rail vehicle marshalling systems
    • B61B1/02General arrangement of stations and platforms including protection devices for the passengers
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B61RAILWAYS
    • B61CLOCOMOTIVES; MOTOR RAILCARS
    • B61C13/00Locomotives or motor railcars characterised by their application to special systems or purposes
    • B61C13/04Locomotives or motor railcars characterised by their application to special systems or purposes for elevated railways with rigid rails

Description

Feb; 25, 193%. -.n. M. ROSE 1,748,309

ELEVATED RAILROAD Filed Jan. 30. 1928 6 Sheets-Sheet l Feb. 25, 1930. J. M. ROSE 1,748,309

ELEVATED RAILROAD Filed Jan. 30. 1928 v6 Sheets-Sheet 2 22v 0:". James M. R006.

lilornea Feb. 25, 1930. .1. M. ROSE ELEVATED RAILROAD Filed Jan. 30. 1928 6 Sheets-Sheet Invenzar. James MEOJ'flfliforney Feb. 25, 1930.

J. M. ROSE ELEVATED RAILROAD Filed Jan. 50. 1928 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 a 9 w a M WI v 4, 6 f. U MP F 7w v 6 (a 47 WW y Inventor. (James 1%. 308a- Feb. 25, 1930.

Filed Jan. 30. 1928 v J. M. ROSE ELEVATED RA ILRQAD 6 Sheets-Sheet lave 21750 2".

mes M. Ease Feb. 25, 1930. J. M. ROSE ELEVATED RAILROAD 6 Sheets-Sheet Filed Jan. 30, 1928 Invezzior. fa 22286 MJ? 066i.

His

Fatented Feb. 25, l dfi U N E r araaaee r @FFEQE.

JAMES 1H. ROSE, OF CORONA, CALIFORNIA.

ELEVATED RAILROAD Application filed January 30, 1928. Serial No. 250,587.

This invention relates to an elevated railroad for passenger service and means for operating it, and an object is to save time in transporting passengers from place to place 5 and to accomplish such transportation more economically and conveniently to the passengers. y 7

Another object is to deliver passengers directly to their destination. To this end I 1 provide an elevated railroad that is adapted to transport passengers to their ofiice or factory buildings at a terminal elevation at which they labor. In other words the distributing lines of the railroad are arranged to take on or discharge passengers at the floor level'on which they labor or-engage in business. and these elevated lines are reached throughtransfer depots that can be arranged adjacent the centralized section of a large city, and here it is possible these points are prefera ly arranged to the north, south,

east and west of the principal business districts of a city. These depots can be arranged to receive passengers from outlying districts, who when arriving at the depots either by bus or car lines can be transferred to the elevated cars, and are then carried directly to and from their destinations, thereby saving considerable time as well as avoiding grade crossings and usual traitic jams at street level intersections.

Another object is to avoid collision of elevated trains by arranging the lines so that trains going north, south, east and west are arranged at difierent floor levels; that is, tracks crossing at right angles are arranged at difi'ereht elevations Another object is to provide means for eliminating excessive noise in the main business districts of a city, and to that end I provide cars with rubber tires that run on smooth unbroken tracks; with the wheels on axles controlled. by differentials that eliminate the slipping of the Wheels on the track. By the foregoing means the grade crossing noises and grinding of slipping. wheels are entirely eliminated.

Another object is to provide means for increasing the speed of the elevated trains which is consummated by eliminating all invention may appear from the accompanyto effect a stop; or in an emergency both brakes can function to accomplish a quick stop.

Another object is to provide means for enabling passengers to reach their destinations Without crossing the streets as pedestrians in the main business district of the city.

Features of invention are shown in the construction, combination and arrangement of parts wherebya passenger transporting system is provided that is efi'ective in increased speed and safe transportation of passengers as Well as eliminating excessive noise in operation.

Other objects, advantages and features of ing drawings, the subjoined detailed description and the appended claims.

The accompanying drawings illustrate the invention in which:

Fig. 1 is a fragmental semi-diagrammatic perspective view of the elevated railroad as it'would appear when thelines are extended through buildings and arranged to cross at diiierent elevations.

Fig. 2 is a, fragmental diagrammatic plan view of the railroad as adapted to a business district of a city, showing the lines crossing at the mid-center of the business blocks.

Fig. 3 is a fragmental semi-diagrammatical view of the elevated railroad as it would appear when arranged in a. cross alley central-in a city block or arranged outside of the buildings.

Fig. 4 is a plan view of one of the trucks for supporting the elevated high speed cars showing the king pin in cross section and also diagrammatically indicating side rails as related to the guide wheels.

Fig. 5 is a side view oi? the truck shown. in Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a fragmental section of the truck frame on line 66, Fig. 5, showing the differentials that are arranged to drive all the wheels in the same direction and also showing the means for driving the differentials.

Fig. 7 is'an enlarged fragmental view of the left hand differential shown in Fig. 4.

Fig. 8 is a semi-diagrammatic side view of a pair of truck wheels showing a detailof the brake drums with their internal and external brake bands and means for operating them.

Fig. 9 is an enlarged fragmental section on line 99, Fig. 8, showing a detail of the wheel, brake and track rail construction.

Fig. 10 is a section on the line 1010, Fig. 9, with thetrack rail omitted.

Fig. 11 is a fragmental semi-diagrammatic side view of the elevated tracks, showing by full and dotted lines an inclined elevator for transferring cars from one track to another.

Fig. 12 is a section on the line 12-12, Fig. 11, showing the elevator inposition to transfer cars from the lower to the intermediate track and vice versa, and

- Fig. 2, so that bus or railroad lines from outlying districts can converge in the depot most easily reached by them.

as indicated in Fig.

The depots can-be arranged to include a large or small territory of a city as may be desired; but for the purpose of illustration a relatively small central portion of a city is shown in Fig. 2 with the elevated lines a extending from the stations N to S, and the cross lines b extending from the stations E to W, and running directly through the city blocks. The stations N. S. E. V. can be located as far from the center of the city as may be desired, as indicated fragmentally in Fig. 2.

Preferably the cars running north and south are arranged adjacent the floor levels of city buildings having even numbers such as 2. 4, 6, 8, etc., and those running east and west at elevations opposite the floor levels having odd numbers as 3. 5. 7, 9, etc., so that l while'the north and south lines cross the east and west lines they do not intersect or cross at the same elevation. In other words the cars traveling'nort'h and south at the second floor level cross under the cars moving east and west at the third floor level.

Preferably the elevated lines are arranged to extend centrally through the city blocks or through alleys, at the mid center of blocks, 2; or where a building covers an entire block the lines are extended centrally through the building as illustrated in Fig. 1.

By this arrangement of the car tracks of the elevated railroad all danger of intersecting collisions are avoided, and it is possible for passengers to reach their destination with a single transfer, a limited amount of foot travel, and without crossing any streets as pedestrians. In other words passengers can reach their destination without walking through the heavy traffic of automobiles and other vehicles at street levels.

It is also understood that the elevated railroad can use transfers so that the passengers from the north and south can transfer east and west and vice versa, as maybe desired without passengers moving any great distance as pedestrians.

As fragmentarily and semi-diagrammatically illustrated in Fig. 3. the tracks 16, 17 and 18 of the elevated railroad are arranged to cross one above the other at various floor levels. That is the tracks 16 and 18 run north and south at the second and fourth floor level and the track 17 runs east and West at the third floor level., I

The tracks of the elevated railroad can be arranged on a structural iron track frame 19 supported by bolts 20 arranged on the sidewalks 21 adjacent the edges of the alley 22 so that the frame structure does not materially affect the alley view or the post obstruct pedestrian traffic at street level.

The track frame 19 above the alley level can be properly braced, as indicated at 23, and connected to the buildings 24 by the frame structure and also by platform 25, and these platforms enable passengers to leave and enter the cars at practically the same floor level in which they are engaged in business.

The iron frame for supporting the tracks and cars can be formed of any structural iron suitable for such purposes. but in the draw-' ings the frame is simply shown for the purpose of illustration.

If desired the tracks outside of the buildings can be enclosed by walls 26 and roofs 27, the roofs being arranged to support the electric wires 28 by which the current is supplied to the car motors through the usual trolley poles. However, it is understood that the walls and roof can be omitted when desired and the electric wires supported in the usual way.

The cars 130 are mounted on four wheel trucks with means for driving all of the wheels 30. Each truck comprises a frame 31 that is supported on springs that are connected to the split housings 33 and 34 in which the differentials 35. 36 and the wheel axles 37 are mounted: and preferably the housings 33 and 34 are connected by a motor casing 38 in which an electric motor is mounted and arranged to drive the differentials 35, 36,.it becombustion engine instead of the motor if I so desire.

The frame 31 is provided with a centrally arranged socket 39 for a king pin 40, one of which is secured to the underside of each car a proper distance from its ends to balance and carry it, it being understood that there are two trucks for each car.

Each king pin 40 rests on a rubber cushion 41 and side rubber bumper 140 that aid in preventing noise when the cars are consummating a turn.

The frame 31 carries extensions 42 that have rubber-tired wheels 43 that are arranged transversely of the drive wheels 30. These wheels are arranged to occasionally engage side rails 44 that are supported by the frame 19 to stabilize the cars especially in turning curves in the tracks. As best shown in Fig.

v4, there is ,a slight clearance between the wheels 43 and side rails 44 so that these wheels do not actually engage the side rails until the car tilts to one side or the other of the track. Then the wheels 43 to one side or the other of the track engage the rails 44 and stabilize the car and the rubber tread to these wheels prevents excessive noise when the wheelsare active.

In order to reduce friction and also aid in making the wheels 43 noiseless they can be mounted on roller bearings not shown but well understood in the art.

The wheels are preferably constructed as best shown in Figs. 9 and 10. As seen there in each wheel is provided with a hub 45 having a center web 46 and rim 47 that are integral.

The rim 47 has a flange 48 at its outer edge that aids in retaining the demountable rubber tire 49 in place. The tire 49 is securedin place by means of a flange ring 50 secured to the rim 47 by bolts 51. a

The flange ring 50 in addition to holding the tire in place also functions to hold the wheel on the track rail 52 as best shown in Fig. 9. In other words the wheels 30 are prevented from leaving the rail inwardly by the axles 37 and they are prevented from spreading outwardly by the flange rings 50.

An additional means is provided for centralizing the wheels 30 on the track rails. The rails 52 are provided with central upwardly extending inverted V-shaped beads 53, and the rubber treads 49 are provided with a central annular if-shaped socket 54 that lit the beads on the rails and aid in holding the wheels on the track. Also this construction of wheel tread and track rail gives the wheels much more traction than ordinarily as there are four traction or tread faces to each rail so that the cars can be started quicker.

The hub 45 is provided with a socket 55 in which the squared end portion 56 of the I axle 37 is fitted and secured therein by the look not 57 that forces the hub against a shoulder 58 on the axle, see Figs. 9 and 10.

The inner and outer ends of the axles 3? are supported in roller bearings 59, 60 so as to leave a clearance 61 around the main portions of the axles that fill with oil from the differential housings 62, it being understood that these housings arelilled with oil. a

The differentials 35, 36 are driven by a pair of gears 63, 64 on the motor shaft 65 of a motor, not shown, it being understood that any suitable motor can be used to drive the shaft 65. The master wheels 135 and 136 of the diflerentials are arranged to engage their respective bevel gears and drive all of the wheels 30 in the same direction and normally at the same speed, except when it is necessary to compensate for curves in the tracks.

The axle housings 33, 34 are preferably connected by adjustable links 66 that have their ends pivotally connected by pins 67 to bearing lugs 68 integral with the axle housing 33. Preferably the pins 67 are in the form of bolts as shown in the drawings.

The construction of each wheel 30 and its pair of brakes is substantially alike, and the operation of the brakes is alike, except that they are linked together in pairs; and operate in sets of fours. That is, there are four outer brakes to each truck that operate as a set and also four inner brakes that operate as a set so that a description of one wheel and its brakes will describe all of them, except as to their operation in sets of four.

Each wheel 30 is provided with an annular brake hub 69 that is integral with the web 46; and the hub extends inwardly a sufficient distance to receive an outer brake band 70 and an inner band 71. These brakes and their operation is best shown in Figs. 8, 9 and 10.

Adjacent the hubs 69 and extending out to their peripheral edges are stationary disks 72 that are integral with the outer end of the axle housings 33.

The outer bands 70 are arranged as a pair on each side of the truck and adapted to be actuated in sets of tours, and also the pair on each side of the truck are operated in unison; that is all four of the outer bands of a truck are simultaneously set and released.

Preferably they are mounted and operated as best shown in Fig. 8. As seen therein each band of the outer pair is oppositely arranged and provided with slotted extensions 73 that are loosely mounted on pin supports 74 that are secured in the stationary disks 7 2, and opposite to the pin supports are the toggle levers 75 that are connected to the grip ends 76, of the band and adapted to draw the ends together or spread them apart to grip or release the bands to or from their respective brake hubs 69. a

When the toggle lovers are actuated to engage the bands 7 0 with the brake hubs 69 the extensions 73 slide toward the axes of the Wheels and vice versa. In other words the extensions 73 and pins 74 aid in normally carrying the bands 7 0 in disengaged or idle positions.

The toggles 7 5 are actuated by a bell crank 78 pivotally connected by a pin 79 to the frame 31; and the crank 7 8 is connected to a draw bar 80-that can be actuated manually, or by means of air cylinders well understood in the art; it being understood that there is a draw bar 80 for each side of the truck and these bars are operated in exact unison to set or release all of the outer brake bands of a truck simultaneously. The connection of the draw bars 80 and their operation is well understood in the art and for the sake of brevity is not described or shown in the draw- Ihe inner brake bands 71 are also provided with slotted extensions 81 through which supporting pins 82 are extended that are secured in the flange 72. The bands are split and have ends 83, 84 that normally en- T gage the narrowest part of the cams 85 so that a major portion of the time they are disengaged from the brake flanges 69.

The cams 85 are mounted on shaft 86 that is mounted in and extends through the stationary disks 72. The outer ends of the shafts 86 are secured to arms 87 that are connected to an equalizer 88 by links 89, 90. The equalizer 88 is connected by a link 91 to one arm of a bell crank 92 pivotally connected to a bearing on the frame 31 by a pin 93.

The other arm of the bell crank 92 is con nected by a drawbar 94 with a brake operating means that can be either manual or automatic.

It is to be understood thatthere are-two draw bars 94 for each truck that are, connected and operated in unison, as are draw bars 80.

From the foregoing ,it can be readily seen that I provide a double braking means for all the drive wheels, each set of which can be operated independently of the other, or

which can be actuated together if so desired. It is preferred that the outer bands be utilized for ordinary stops or slowing down of the cars and that the inner bands be used only for emergency or vice'versa.

In Figs'll, 12 and 13 an inclined'elevator is semi-diagrammatically illustrated that can be utilized to transfer cars from track to track. In other words I provide asection of track that is pivotally connected at 96 to the frame 20 so that its free end 97 can be lowered to the next track below it so that cars can be run up or down the incline. The sections can be raised or lowered by compressed air power as indicated by the cylinders 98, one of which is shown in detail in Fig. 13. The cylinders 96 are secured to the frame adjacent each side of the elevator track or section 95 and are connected thereto by the cylinder rods 99 and the rods are connected their upper ends connected to cables 101. that have counter-weights 102 on their other ends.

The cables 101 run over pulleys 103 secured to the upper part of the frame 20 so that when compressed air is exhausted from under the pistons and compressed air driven into the cylinders above them the track section 95 will be lowered and will be elevated when compressed air isdriven into the cylinder -under the piston and the air exhausted above them. The maj or portion of the weight of the incline section of track 95 can be supported on angle irons 104 when in lowered position, as indicated in Fig. 12. I

It is understood that I may here employ any well known type of elevators now in common use for transferring the cars from elevation to elevation.

In operation cars and buses running in outlying districts deliver their passengers to the nearest terminal station where they are transferred to the elevated cars, each passenger taking the car that will deliver him nearest to or at his designation.

,The elevated trains are practically noiseless and are arranged to travel at high speed so that they can deliver passengers to their destinations in much less time than means heretofore employed and wthout the excessive noise now so common in traflic, also greatly reducing the pedestrian traffic at street level, consequently avoiding many unnecessary accidents and trafiic ams, and also enabling surface cars such as automobiles to travel at greater speed in the main business district of a city. I

Iclaim as my invention:

1. In an elevated railroad including terminal stations adapted tov receive passengers at the usual street elevation in combination with tracks arranged to cross centrally through business blocks of a city at various elevations and at floor levels above the first floor, and high speed cars adapted to transport passengers on said tracks.

2. In an elevated railroad including terminal stations adapted to receive'passengers at the usual street elevation in combination with elevated tracks arranged to pass centrally through city business buildings at various floor levels, means for connecting said tracks to buildings at various fioor levels and arranged to cross one above another, and high speed cars on said tracks for transporting passengers.

3. In an elevated railroad including terminal stations adapted to receive passengers at the usual street elevation in combination with tracks arranged to pass centrally through city blocks at different elevations, platforms connecting said tracks with; buildings at floor levels above the first floor, and high speed cars on said tracks for transporting passengers.

4. In an elevated railroad having terminal stations; the combination of tracks arranged one above another, and extended centrally through the business blocks of a city, platforms connecting said tracks with buildings atfloor levels above the first floor, and high speed cars on said tracks for'transporting passengers to and from the terminal stations. 5. In an elevated railroad, the combination of a plurality of tracks arran ed opposite the second, fourth, sixth and eig th floor levels of buildings in the business district of a city 7 and extended centrally through the blocks thereof, other tracks arranged opposite the third, fifth, seventh and ninth floor levels of said buildings and arranged to cross over the first mentioned tracks at right angles, passenger landing platforms connecting said tracks, and buildings, and high speed cars on said tracks.

-6. In an elevated railroad the combination of a plurality of parallel tracks arranged opposite the second, fourth, sixth and eighth floor levels of buildings in the business district of a city, other arallel tracks arranged opposite the third, fth, seventh and ninth floor levels of said buildings and arranged to cross over the first mentioned tracks at riglis angles, a frame for su porting said trac passenger landing platfbrms connecting said tracks and buildings, and high speed cars on said tracks for the purpose specified. In witness whereof I have hereunto aflixed my signature.

JAMES M. ROSE.

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Cited By (19)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2493033A (en) * 1946-02-08 1950-01-03 Russell Mark Attachment for metal cutting machines
US2669394A (en) * 1949-09-19 1954-02-16 Poebing Oskar Device for removing shocks of railroad rails
US2750897A (en) * 1956-06-19 Loading and unloading apparatus
US3084637A (en) * 1961-03-08 1963-04-09 Daniel Safety derail preventer
US3115101A (en) * 1960-03-07 1963-12-24 Cleve F Shaffer Passenger cars in transportation systems
US3122105A (en) * 1962-05-28 1964-02-25 Lester G Scherer Monorail system
US3167024A (en) * 1960-05-16 1965-01-26 Walt Disney Prod Bobsled amusement ride
US3198137A (en) * 1963-02-07 1965-08-03 Whiting Corp Traction vehicle
US3244116A (en) * 1965-04-27 1966-04-05 Letourneau Westinghouse Compan Vehicle axle
US3244117A (en) * 1964-09-30 1966-04-05 Westinghouse Electric Corp Parallel drive traction system with differential speed mechanism
US3801176A (en) * 1972-04-19 1974-04-02 American Hospital Supply Corp Moveable storage cart system
US3850111A (en) * 1973-10-23 1974-11-26 Clark Equipment Co Vehicle mounted plate having guide rollers
US3854419A (en) * 1973-04-09 1974-12-17 Skytram Syst Inc Aerial tramway drive assembly
US3896739A (en) * 1973-12-10 1975-07-29 Cummins Engine Co Inc Frangible resilient engine mounting
US4723807A (en) * 1986-04-25 1988-02-09 Portec, Inc. Wheel and track system
US20070180635A1 (en) * 2006-02-04 2007-08-09 Qinetiq Limited Modular-bridge construction
US20070189851A1 (en) * 2003-09-28 2007-08-16 Dong Guoliang Full interchange urban road system and the traffic method of using it
US20140352229A1 (en) * 2013-05-31 2014-12-04 Thomas F. Gustafson Cross street transit and multimodal multi-level station and pedestrian-oriented interchange
US10159258B1 (en) 2015-04-16 2018-12-25 Automated Systems & Solutions, Inc. Folding apparatus and partial press for submarine sandwiches

Cited By (21)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2750897A (en) * 1956-06-19 Loading and unloading apparatus
US2493033A (en) * 1946-02-08 1950-01-03 Russell Mark Attachment for metal cutting machines
US2669394A (en) * 1949-09-19 1954-02-16 Poebing Oskar Device for removing shocks of railroad rails
US3115101A (en) * 1960-03-07 1963-12-24 Cleve F Shaffer Passenger cars in transportation systems
US3167024A (en) * 1960-05-16 1965-01-26 Walt Disney Prod Bobsled amusement ride
US3084637A (en) * 1961-03-08 1963-04-09 Daniel Safety derail preventer
US3122105A (en) * 1962-05-28 1964-02-25 Lester G Scherer Monorail system
US3198137A (en) * 1963-02-07 1965-08-03 Whiting Corp Traction vehicle
US3244117A (en) * 1964-09-30 1966-04-05 Westinghouse Electric Corp Parallel drive traction system with differential speed mechanism
US3244116A (en) * 1965-04-27 1966-04-05 Letourneau Westinghouse Compan Vehicle axle
US3801176A (en) * 1972-04-19 1974-04-02 American Hospital Supply Corp Moveable storage cart system
US3854419A (en) * 1973-04-09 1974-12-17 Skytram Syst Inc Aerial tramway drive assembly
US3850111A (en) * 1973-10-23 1974-11-26 Clark Equipment Co Vehicle mounted plate having guide rollers
US3896739A (en) * 1973-12-10 1975-07-29 Cummins Engine Co Inc Frangible resilient engine mounting
US4723807A (en) * 1986-04-25 1988-02-09 Portec, Inc. Wheel and track system
US20070189851A1 (en) * 2003-09-28 2007-08-16 Dong Guoliang Full interchange urban road system and the traffic method of using it
US20070180635A1 (en) * 2006-02-04 2007-08-09 Qinetiq Limited Modular-bridge construction
US7694374B2 (en) * 2006-02-04 2010-04-13 Qinetiq Limited Modular-bridge construction
US20140352229A1 (en) * 2013-05-31 2014-12-04 Thomas F. Gustafson Cross street transit and multimodal multi-level station and pedestrian-oriented interchange
US8915669B1 (en) * 2013-05-31 2014-12-23 Thomas F. Gustafson Cross street transit and multimodal multi-level station and pedestrian-oriented interchange
US10159258B1 (en) 2015-04-16 2018-12-25 Automated Systems & Solutions, Inc. Folding apparatus and partial press for submarine sandwiches

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