US1745201A - Golf game - Google Patents

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US1745201A
US1745201A US332507A US33250729A US1745201A US 1745201 A US1745201 A US 1745201A US 332507 A US332507 A US 332507A US 33250729 A US33250729 A US 33250729A US 1745201 A US1745201 A US 1745201A
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screen
front
sloping
posts
aperture
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Expired - Lifetime
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US332507A
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Henry C Alston
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Henry C Alston
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63BAPPARATUS FOR PHYSICAL TRAINING, GYMNASTICS, SWIMMING, CLIMBING, OR FENCING; BALL GAMES; TRAINING EQUIPMENT
    • A63B69/00Training appliances or apparatus for special sports
    • A63B69/36Training appliances or apparatus for special sports for golf

Description

Jan. 28, 1930. I H. CFALSTQN 1,745,201

GOLF GAME Fil a 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Jan. .28, 1930. c, ALSTON 1,745,201

GOLF GAME Filed Jan. 14. 1929 2 Sheets-Sheet Patented Jan. 28, 1930 PATENT OFFICE HENRY C. ALSTON, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA sorry em Application filed Ianuaryfl, 1939. swarm. 332,507.

This invention relates to games and more especially to that type of game, the playing of which involves t e attempt on the part of the player to direct an object such as a ball, '5 through an aperture. in a screen spaced at some distance from the player.

An object of the invention is the provision. of a game comprising a screen having an aperture therethrough throu h which the player endeavors to drive a gol' ball by means of any selected t pe of golf club.

Another objec is the provision ofa olf game as described, which may be playe by any number of persons, and which, when utilized by a plurality of players, is highly competitive, tending to add to the interest and enjoyment of'playing the game.

A further object is the provlslon of a game of the general class described, which is not 1 29 only entertaining in itself, but which is also adapted for use in practicing golf strokes so that the player may attain greater skill in playing golf.

A further object is the rovision of a ame of the general class descri ed, which is a apted to return the balls to a position closely adjacent the player after they have passed through the aperture. 3

A still further object is the provision of a 39 golf game having a vertically disposed apertured screen as described, and which also has a sloping back screen therebehind, with a a smaller aperture therein through which the most accurately directed balls will pass after passing through the aperture in the forward screen.

Another object is the] provision of means for returning balls which have passed through the aperture intheback screen.

A still further object is the provision of a golf game as described, in which the screens are supported upon a suitable knock-down frame of such construction that it may be con veniently assembled and disassembled, and

;which, when knocked down, occupies a minimum of space.

, .The invention possesses other objects and .jl'advantageous features, some of whlch, with those enumerated, will be set forth in the following description of the inventions particular' embodiment which is illustrated in the drawings accompanying and forming a part of the specification.

Referrin to the drawings: t

Figure 1 1s a perspective view of ap aratus employed in a game incorporating t e features of my invention.

Fig. 2 is a longitudinal, vertical, medial sectional view of the cage of Fig. 1. The plane of section is indicated by the line 2 -2 of Fig. 3, and the direction of view by the alI'OlVS.

- Fig. 3 is a horizontal sectional view, the plane of section being taken upon the line 3-3 of Fig. 2, and the direction of view beingrindicated by the arrows.

ig. 4 is an enlarged plan view showing the method of attaching the screens to the framework.

Fig. 5 is an end elevation of the structure shown in Fig. 4, the direction of 'view being indicated by the arrow 5 of that figure.

Specifically describing the preferred embodiment of the invention, the apparatus employed in playing the game of my invent1on, includes a cage indicated in its entirety at 6. In its preferred form, this cage is of' knock-down construction. It is shown as being supported upon a pair of sills 7, extend-v ing longitudinally of the cage and having a front corner post 8 supported uponone end thereof, and a rear corner post 9 upon the other end. Flanges '11 provide convenient means forremovably attaching the posts to the sills. It is to be understood that there 35 are two of the sills 7 extending in parallelism, the distance therebetween being determined bya front top rail 12 and a rear top rail 13, D connecting the upper ends of the front corner posts 8 and rear corner osts 9, respectively. Side top rails 14 exten betweenthe upper ends of the front and rear corner posts 8 and 9, as shown. A side outlet elbow 16 at each of the top corners of the cage, provides con veniently disengageable means for connecting each of the corner posts to the associated top rails 14, and 12 or 13 as the case may be. In addition, each of the posts and rails is formed of a plurality, preferably a pair, of sections; and any convenient coupling means may be em loyed for optionally assembling or disassem ling them. For example, unions 17, 18, 19, and 22, are provided in the side, front, andrear top rails, and in the rear corner posts, respectively. Slo ing rails 23 are provided upon the sides 0 the cage 6, extending from adjacent the top of the rear corner posts 9, downwards to the front corner posts 8. Angle Ts 24 and 26, in the front and rear corner posts 8 and 9, respectively, provide means for mounting the sloping rails 23; and preferably the front angle Ts 24 are spaced above the bottom of the cage 6, so that the forward ends of the side rails 23 are spaced at some distance above the ground or other supporting structure. Furthermore, the side rails are also composed of preferably a pair of sections 'removably joined as by unions 27.

The front of the cage is also provided with a frame 31, composed of vertical bars 32 depending from the front top rail 12, to which it is joined by Ts 33 and a bottom horizontal rail 34. The vertical rails 32 and the horizontal rail 34, are provided with coupling means such as unions 36 and 37 respectively, and Ts 38 joining the rail 34 to the front bars 8.

The framework thus described, supports screens 41 which form the walls of the cage. These screens may be of any suitable material such as wire mesh or canvas, the latter probably being preferable because of the reduced tendency thereof to mar a ball forcibly striking it, and also on account of the reduced tendency of the canvas to cause such a ball to rebound. I do not wish to be limited how- Y ever, to any precise material; in fact, it may be desirable to form certain of the screens of one material, and others of the screen of other material, depending upon the positioning of the screens and the velocity with which the balls will strike the articular screens under certain conditions 0 use. Figs. 4 and 5 disclose a convenient means for removably and securely attaching the screens 41 to the respective members of the frame 6. Each of the edges of each of the screens. 41, are securely attached to a rod or heavy wire 42, and each of the rods 42 has mounted thereon, a plurality of books 43 engageable with the proper member of the frame 6, the parts being so proportioned and arranged that when the hooks are so engaged, the associated screen will be stretched taut in position.

The front screen 44 is attached to the two front corner osts 8, the front top rail 12, the two depending rods 32 and the horizontal rod 34, so that the frame 31 defines an aperao ture 45 in preferably the center of the upper portion of the front screen 44. A top screen 46 is attached to the front and rear top rails 12 and 13 respectively and the two side top rails 14, so as to close the top of the cage. as A side screen 47 is attached to each of the top side rails 14, the associated sloping side rail 23, and the associated front corner post 8, with the result that each of the side screens 47 is of triangular configuration. A sloping back screen 48 is attached to the rear top rail 13 and the two sloping side rails 23. with the result that a wedge-shaped enclosure is formed, having the apreture 45 in the base of the Wedge.

The forward lower edge of the sloping back screen 48 is disposed above a laterally sloping trough 51, the lower end 52 of which extends through a side of the cage, and has leading from the bottom thereof, a ball return 53 preferably in the form of a tube. This ball return terminates in an open-topped receiver 54, which is disposed at a lower elevation than the end 52 of the trough 51, so that balls deposited into the ball return from the trough, will roll into the receiver 54. Here they are conveniently accessible from a players stand or driving-area 56.

This driving area 56 may be of any suitable nature such as a smooth area of turf, a cocoa fibre mat or merely a smooth portion of the ground. A tee 57 of any suitable nature, may be positioned upon the driving area 56, so'that a golf ball 58 may be driven therefrom as by the conventional golf club.

Disposed substantially in the center of the sloping back screen 48 and in alignment with the aperture 45 in the front screen, is a second and smaller aperture 61. A receptacle 62 depends from the edge of the aperture 61, and its bottom 63 slopes downward toward the front of the cage 6, but at a lesser inclination than the back screen 48, so that the mouth 64 of the receptacle 62, discharges through the back screen 48 onto the upper surface thereof, as clearly shown upon Fig. 2.

Moreover, an upstanding flange 66 en-' circles the aperture 61, this flange 66 preferably being of suflicient rigidity to prevent a ball from rolling into the aperture 61, from the screen48. Consequently, the balls can pass through the aperture 61 only by being driven directly therethrough after passing through the aperture 45 in the front screen H Means for indicating the passage of a ball through the aperture 61 into the receptacle 62, are provided. A switch composed of upper and lower contacts 71 and 72 respectively, carried by plates 73 and 74 respectively, are normallyheld separated as by a spring 76 disposed between the plates 73 and 74. These plates are pivotally joined as at 77 at the ends thereof, remote from the contacts 71 and 72; and the spring 76 is possessed of such a degree of resilience that when a ball falls upon the upper plate 73, the switch contacts 71 and 72 are brought together, closing the switch. Electrical conductors 78 lead to any suitable source of energy and any suitable indicating device such as gong or electric light, so that the player and others may be informed whenevera ball passes through the smaller aperture 61.

To play the game of my invention, the player takes his position or stance, adjacent or upon the driving area 56, after properly teeing agolf ball 58 thereupon. He then endeavors to drive the ball 58 into the cage 6, using a conventional golf club, preferably a driver. The object is to make the ball pass through both apertures and 61, in which event a certain score will be accredited to the player. If the ball passes through the front aperture 45 only, the player will be accredited with a lesser score. i

It is obvious that the game may be played by one or more players, and that if a plurality of players participate in the game, each player may be given a certain number of balls, say twenty, and his score totalled for comparison with the scores attained by v the other players, in which event the game becomes ighly competitive in nature. Consequently, the game is interesting and enjoyable in itself, and moreover, is adapted I to develop skill in playing golf, because of '11- 1. In a game, a cage comprising a the practice attained in endeavoring to accurately drive the ball from the driving area in a predetermined direction.

When a ball enters a large aperture 45 and strikes the rear screen 48, its flight will be stopped by engaging others of-the screens, so that it ultimately rolls into the trough 51 and thence throu h the ball return 53 into the receiver 54, w ere it is readily accessible for a subsequent drive. If a ball enters a smaller aperture 61,.it is entrapped by the receptacle 62 and returned through the mouth 64 thereof, to the top of the'screen 48, whence it rolls into the trough 51 and through the ball return 53 into the receiver 54.

When it is desired to trans ort or stow the apparatus, it may be knoc ed down by disconnecting the variousunions a'nd disengaging the various'rails and posts from each other, it being understood-of course, that the screens 41 have first been removed by disenga ing the hooks 43. The screens may all be olded, and the rails and posts laid in parallelism and bound together to occupy a minimum of space. 7

It is to beunderstood that the details of the invention as herein disclosed, are sub ject to. alteration within the spirit or scope of the appended claims.

I claim:

screen and a rear screen sloping downwards theretowards,said screens having apertures therein through which balls may be directed from a remote oint, and means for collectin balls from botii sides of said rear screen an I returning them to a position adjacentsaid remote point.

2. Agame comprisir", in combination a front teeing area and a cage spaced therefrom, said cage including a vertically disposed front screen and a rear screen having therein registering apertures through which a ball may be driven from said teeing area, and means for collecting balls from both sides of said rear screen.

3. A game comprising in combination a teeing area and a cage spaced therefrom, said cage including a vertically disposed front screen and a rear screen having therein registering apertures through which a ball may be driven from said teeing area, means for collecting balls from both sides of said rear screen, and means for returning collected balls to a point adjacent said teeing area.

4. In a game, a cage comprising a front screen and a'rear screen sloping downwards theretowards, said screens having aligned apertures therein. a I

5. In a game, a cage comprising a front screen, a rear screen sloping downwards theretowards, said screens having aligned apertures therein,'and a flange extending up wards from the edge of the aperture in said rear screen.

6. In a game, a cage comprising a front screen, a rear screen sloping. downwards theretowards, said screens having aligned apertures therein, and an upstanding flange encircling the aperture in the rear screen.

7. In a game, a cage comprising a front screen, a rear screen sloping downwards theretowards, said front screen having an aperture therethrough higher than the lower edge of said rear screen, and a sloping trough disposed under the lower edge of said rear screen.

I 8. In a game, a cage COIIIPIISIIIg a front screen, a rear screen sloping downwards 9. In a game, arage comprising a front screen, a rear screen -sloping downwards theretowards, said front screen having an;

aperture therethrough higher than the lower edge of said rear screen, and said rear screen having an aperture therethrough in alignment with the aperture 1n said front screen, a sloping trough disposed under the lower edge of said rear screen, and means for roll-' ing into said trough, balls passing through the aperture in said rear screen.

10. In a game, a cage comprising a knockdown frame including spaced front and back corner posts, top rails joining said posts, side rails sloping downwards from said back posts to said front posts, a front screen having an aperture therein and removably attached to said front posts and a top rail, and a sloping back screen removably attached to said side rails.

11. In a game, a cage comprising a knockdown frame including spaced front and back corner posts, top rails joining said posts, side rails sloping downwards from said back posts to said front posts, each of said rails being composed of a plurality of sections, coupling means for optionally connecting or disconnecting said sections, a front screen having an aperture therein and removably attached to said front posts and a top rail, and a sloping back screen removably attached to said side rails.

12. In a game, a cage comprising a knock down frame including spaced front and back corner posts, top rails joining said posts, side rails sloping downwards from said back posts to said front posts, each of said posts and rails being composed of a plurality of sections, coupling means for optionally connecting or disconnecting said sections, a front screen having an aperture therein and removabl attached to said front posts and a top rai and a slopin back screen removably attached to said si e rails.

13. In a game, a cagecomprising a knock down frame including spaced front and back corner posts, top rails joining said osts, side rails sloping downwards from said ack posts to said front posts, a front screen having an aperture therein and removably attached to said front posts and a top rail, a sloping back screen removably attached to said side rails and havin an aperture therethrough, and an upstan ing flange encircling the aperture in said sloping screen;

14. In a game, a cage com rising a knockdown frame including space front and back corner posts, top rails joining said posts, side rails sloping downwards from said back posts to said front posts, a front screen having an aperture therein and removablyattached to said front posts and a top rail, a sloping back .screen removably attached to said side rails and having an aperture therethrough, an upstanding flange encircling the aperture in said slop-ing screen, and a receptacle depending from the edge of said aperture in the sloping screen, said receptacle also sloping downwards toward the front screen at a lesser inclination than the back screen and having a mouth discharging through the sloping screen; v

15. In a game, a cage comprising a knock down frame including spaced front and back corner posts, top rails joining said osts, side rails sloping downwards from said ack posts to said front posts, a front screen having an aperture therein and removably attached to said front posts and a top rail, a sloping back screen removably attached to said side rails and having an aperture therethrough, an upstanding fiange encircling the aperture in said sloping screen, a receptacle dependmg from the edge of said aperture in the sloping screen, said receptacle also sloping downwards toward the front screen at a lesser inclination than the back screen and having a mouth discharging through the sloping screen, and a sloping trough disposed below the lower edge of said sloping screen.

16. In a game, a cage comprising a knockdown frame including spaced front and back corner posts, top rails joining said osts, side rails sloping downwards from said ack posts to said front posts, a front-screen having an aperture therein and removably attached to said front posts and a top rail, a sloping back screen removably attached to said side rails and having an aperture therethrough, an upstanding flange encircling the aperture in said sloping screen, a receptacle depending from the edge of said aperture in the sloping screen, said receptacle also sloping downwards toward the front screen at a lesser inclination than the back screen and having a mouth discharging through the sloping screen, a sloping trough disposed below the lower edge of said sloping screen, and a ball return sloping downwards from the lower end of said trough to a remote point in front of said cage.

17. In a game, a cage comprising a knock down frame including spaced front and back corner posts, top rails joining said posts, side rails sloping downwards from said back posts to said front posts, each of said posts and rails being composed of a plurality of sections, coupling means for optionally connecting or disconnecting said sections, a front screen having an aperture therein and removably attached to said front posts and a top rail bars depending from the front top rail defining said aperture, and a sloping baclk screen removably attached to said side rai s.

18. In a game,a cage having an opening in the front thereof, a sloping back screen having a smaller opening in alignment with said first mentioned opening, and means associated with said smaller-opening for indicating the passage of an object therethrough.

19. In a game, a cage having an opening in the front thereof, a sloping back screen having a smaller opening in alignment with said first mentioned opening, a receptacle depending from said back screen about the associated opening, the bottom of said receptacle sloping downwards in the same direction as said back screen but at a lesser inclination and having a mouth discharging through said screen to the upper surface thereof, and a resiliently o n switch disposed within said receptacle an adapted to be closed when an object falls hereon through the opening in said screen.

r In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification.

H. O. ALTON.

US332507A 1929-01-14 1929-01-14 Golf game Expired - Lifetime US1745201A (en)

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Cited By (23)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2453745A (en) * 1945-03-22 1948-11-16 Dunfee Hod Clarence Golf game and instructional apparatus
US2458105A (en) * 1946-04-08 1949-01-04 Vernon D Sell Golf practice device
US3202429A (en) * 1962-04-11 1965-08-24 Albert S Richman Golf chipping and putting target including ball return means
US4303245A (en) * 1980-04-22 1981-12-01 Brockett Charles V Golf swing teaching aid
US4417728A (en) * 1979-02-15 1983-11-29 Esselte Studium Ab Training apparatus for racket sports
WO1985002549A1 (en) * 1983-12-13 1985-06-20 Dudley Darell Pettersen A golf practice net
AU568178B2 (en) * 1983-12-13 1987-12-17 Pettersen, D.D. A golf practice net
US4978121A (en) * 1990-04-23 1990-12-18 Roger Larkey Portable pitching practice system
US5042820A (en) * 1987-05-26 1991-08-27 Ford James M Soccerball returner
US5271616A (en) * 1992-09-28 1993-12-21 Grimaldi Anthony J Pitching target apparatus
US5690555A (en) * 1996-08-30 1997-11-25 Lay; William C. Automatic teeing device and cage for catching golf balls hit toward the cage
US5823885A (en) * 1996-11-25 1998-10-20 Stempfer; Frank N. Portable personal driving range and all purpose sporting net
US6325726B2 (en) 1999-04-23 2001-12-04 Jeffrey C. Helstrom Winter golf driving range
US6592464B1 (en) 1999-04-23 2003-07-15 Jeffrey C. Helstrom Winter golf driving range
US20050176518A1 (en) * 2004-02-11 2005-08-11 Doherty Thomas M. Practice golf cage with a golf ball gathering central location
US20050200079A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2005-09-15 Barber Gregory W. Mobile practice target
US20060072647A1 (en) * 2004-10-05 2006-04-06 Kamilo Feher Hybrid communication and broadcast systems
US20080214164A1 (en) * 2004-12-28 2008-09-04 Kamilo Feher Transmission of Signals in Cellular Systems and in Mobile Networks
US20080268973A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2008-10-30 Jay Hicks Golf Practice System
US20090062028A1 (en) * 2007-09-05 2009-03-05 Victor Wu Directional practice device
US20090092114A1 (en) * 2005-08-03 2009-04-09 Kamilo Feher Wlan and wired mobile communication and location finding system
US20090280931A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2009-11-12 Aim, Llc Mobile Practice Targets
US9192841B1 (en) * 2012-03-28 2015-11-24 Neil E. Montgomery Portable golf game practice device

Cited By (27)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2453745A (en) * 1945-03-22 1948-11-16 Dunfee Hod Clarence Golf game and instructional apparatus
US2458105A (en) * 1946-04-08 1949-01-04 Vernon D Sell Golf practice device
US3202429A (en) * 1962-04-11 1965-08-24 Albert S Richman Golf chipping and putting target including ball return means
US4417728A (en) * 1979-02-15 1983-11-29 Esselte Studium Ab Training apparatus for racket sports
US4303245A (en) * 1980-04-22 1981-12-01 Brockett Charles V Golf swing teaching aid
AU568178B2 (en) * 1983-12-13 1987-12-17 Pettersen, D.D. A golf practice net
WO1985002549A1 (en) * 1983-12-13 1985-06-20 Dudley Darell Pettersen A golf practice net
US5042820A (en) * 1987-05-26 1991-08-27 Ford James M Soccerball returner
US4978121A (en) * 1990-04-23 1990-12-18 Roger Larkey Portable pitching practice system
WO1991016110A1 (en) * 1990-04-23 1991-10-31 Roger Larkey Portable pitching practice system
US5271616A (en) * 1992-09-28 1993-12-21 Grimaldi Anthony J Pitching target apparatus
US5690555A (en) * 1996-08-30 1997-11-25 Lay; William C. Automatic teeing device and cage for catching golf balls hit toward the cage
US5823885A (en) * 1996-11-25 1998-10-20 Stempfer; Frank N. Portable personal driving range and all purpose sporting net
US6592464B1 (en) 1999-04-23 2003-07-15 Jeffrey C. Helstrom Winter golf driving range
US6325726B2 (en) 1999-04-23 2001-12-04 Jeffrey C. Helstrom Winter golf driving range
US20050176518A1 (en) * 2004-02-11 2005-08-11 Doherty Thomas M. Practice golf cage with a golf ball gathering central location
US20050200079A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2005-09-15 Barber Gregory W. Mobile practice target
US7850551B2 (en) 2004-03-12 2010-12-14 Athletic Instructional Methods, Llc Mobile practice targets
US20090280931A1 (en) * 2004-03-12 2009-11-12 Aim, Llc Mobile Practice Targets
US20060072647A1 (en) * 2004-10-05 2006-04-06 Kamilo Feher Hybrid communication and broadcast systems
US20080214164A1 (en) * 2004-12-28 2008-09-04 Kamilo Feher Transmission of Signals in Cellular Systems and in Mobile Networks
US20090092114A1 (en) * 2005-08-03 2009-04-09 Kamilo Feher Wlan and wired mobile communication and location finding system
US7645197B2 (en) * 2007-04-27 2010-01-12 Jay Hicks Golf practice system
US20080268973A1 (en) * 2007-04-27 2008-10-30 Jay Hicks Golf Practice System
US20090062028A1 (en) * 2007-09-05 2009-03-05 Victor Wu Directional practice device
US7625296B2 (en) * 2007-09-05 2009-12-01 Victor Wu Directional practice device
US9192841B1 (en) * 2012-03-28 2015-11-24 Neil E. Montgomery Portable golf game practice device

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