US1737942A - Rotary fluid pump or motor - Google Patents

Rotary fluid pump or motor Download PDF

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US1737942A
US1737942A US140130A US14013026A US1737942A US 1737942 A US1737942 A US 1737942A US 140130 A US140130 A US 140130A US 14013026 A US14013026 A US 14013026A US 1737942 A US1737942 A US 1737942A
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cylinder
piston
blades
fluid
pump
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Theodore J Pagel
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Pagel Rotarypump Mfg Company
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04CROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; ROTARY-PISTON, OR OSCILLATING-PISTON, POSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT PUMPS
    • F04C2/00Rotary-piston machines or pumps
    • F04C2/30Rotary-piston machines or pumps having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F04C2/02, F04C2/08, F04C2/22, F04C2/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members
    • F04C2/34Rotary-piston machines or pumps having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F04C2/02, F04C2/08, F04C2/22, F04C2/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members having the movement defined in groups F04C2/08 or F04C2/22 and relative reciprocation between the co-operating members
    • F04C2/344Rotary-piston machines or pumps having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F04C2/02, F04C2/08, F04C2/22, F04C2/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members having the movement defined in groups F04C2/08 or F04C2/22 and relative reciprocation between the co-operating members with vanes reciprocating with respect to the inner member
    • F04C2/3441Rotary-piston machines or pumps having the characteristics covered by two or more groups F04C2/02, F04C2/08, F04C2/22, F04C2/24 or having the characteristics covered by one of these groups together with some other type of movement between co-operating members having the movement defined in groups F04C2/08 or F04C2/22 and relative reciprocation between the co-operating members with vanes reciprocating with respect to the inner member the inner and outer member being in contact along one line or continuous surface substantially parallel to the axis of rotation

Description

Dec. 3, 1929. 1 PAGEL 1,737,942

ROTARY FLUID PUMP OR MOTOR Filed Nov. 18, 1926 '6 Sheets-:Sheet 1 24 5 Dec. 3, 1929. T. J. PAGEL 1,737,942 VRO'IARY FLUID PUMP on MOTOR Filed Nov. 18, 1926 e Sheets-Sheet 2 g? a 7 WW Dec. 3, 1929. I 12.1. PAGEL 942 ROTARY FLUID PUMP OR MoToR Filed Nov. 18, 1926 s Sheets-Sheet 5 1929- T. J. PAGEL ROTARY FLUID PUMP 0R MOTOR 6 Sheets-Sheet 4 Filed Nov. 18, 1926 EEEE:

Dec. 3, 1929. 'r. J. PAGEL 1,737,942

ROTARY FLUID PUMP on MQTOR Filed Nov. 18, 1926 6 Sheets-Sheet 5 Dec. 3, 1929. T. J. PAGEL ROTARY FLUID PUMP OR MOTOR 6 Sheets-Sheet Filed NOV. 18, 1.926

Patented Dec. 3, 1929 UNITED sr'A'ra eai'raur oFFi-ca THEODORE J. PAGEL, MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA, ASSIGNOB TO ?A.GEL ROTARY- PUMP MANUFACTURING COMPANY, OF MINNEAPOLIS, MINNESOTA, A CORPORA- TION OF MINNESOTA.

ROTARY FLUID PUMlP B. MOTOR Application filed November 18, 1926. Serial No. 148,130.

My lnvention has for its object to provide an improved rotary fluid pump or motor; and to this end, my invention consists of a rotary fluid pump or motor having embodied therein the novel devices and combinations of devation of the complete pump, or motor, do

vices hereinafter described and pointed out in the claims.

My invention, in its preferred form is illustra'ted in the accompanying drawings,

wherein like notations refer to like parts throughout the several views. 4

In the said drawings Fig. 1 is a front ele- Fig. 4, is a vertical longitudinal section on the irregular line l-r-l; of Fig. 3. 4 Fig. 5 is a'vertical cross section on the line 5-5 of Fig. 4.

Fig. 6 is a View, partly in plan and partly Fig. 3. Fig. 7 is a vertical cross section on the line 7-7 of Fig. 1.

' Fig. 8 is a detail, showing one of the piston' 9 blades detached, in end elevation.

Fig. 9 isa plan view of one of the piston blades detached. Fig. 10 is a view, in side elevation, looking at one of the end liner plates of the cylinder detached. i

Fig. 11 is an end view of the same. Fig. 12 is an end elevation of the cylinder liner detached. 5 Fig. 13 is a side elevation of the same.

Fig. 14 is a left end elevation of the piston 4 body detached.

Fig. 15 is a front elevation of the same.- Fig. 16 is a View similar to Fig. 3, showing a modification in respect to the arcuate length of the concentric loaded chamber of the pump or motor. v

Figs. 17 and 18 are assembled views, illustrating a modified form of structureof the rotary fluid pump or motor, said Figure 17 being a central cross section on the line 1717 in horizontal section, on the line 6-6 of" of Fig.18, and Fig. 18 being a vertical longitudinal sectlon on the line 18-18 of Fig. 17.

Fig. 19 is a side elevation of one ofthe end I liner plates, employed in the pump shown in Figs. 17 and 18, detached.

, ig. 20 is a detail in section, showing one of the valves for controlling the waste. ducts of the pump illustrated in Figs. 17 and 18.

, The chief features of-novelty embodied in my improved pump or motor reside in the special form of the cylinder bore, the structure and relations of the piston to said bore, and the especial relations of the piston blades to the supply and discharge passages of the cylinder; but these special features can be most conveniently pointed out after the elements of the general structure have first been identified.

" General stmotwr'e The numeral 21 represents a flanged .cyl-

'inder casting or housing of such structure, at

its base, as to adapt the same to be bolted fast to a suitable supporting bed not shown. This cylinder casting 21 has a suitable intake pipe coupling nipple 22 and a suitable discharge pipe coupling nipple 23 properly spaced apart from each other. The numerals 24 represent a pair of reciprocally similar flanged end castings, adapted to be bolted fast to the flanged cylinder casting 21. The numeral 25 represents the iston shaft, and the numeral 26 the piston ody rigidly secured thereto. The clinder end castings 24 are provided with tlnnged hubs 27, through which the shaft 25 passes, at which points it is packed by suitable stufling boxes 28. The said cylinder end cast ings 24 are provided with outwardly pro ecting spider-like arms 29, adapted to hold and support, between the same suitable ball-bearing devices 30 for the'outer end portions of the piston shaft 25. To prevent endwise movement of'the piston and its supporting shaft 25, there is applied thereto what may be termed a piston stabilizer. As illustrated, this includes the following details to-wit:-

One end of the piston shaft 25 is reduced to Y adapted to be bolted to the ends of the hearing arms 29 of the adjacent cylinder end casting. 24. The sections of the divided bearing block 32 are keyed fast toathe housing 33 and are adapted to be clamped tightly together, by the bolts 34, as best shown in Fig. 5. Inasmuch as the housing 33 is bolted fast to the bearing ends of the arms 29 of the cylinder casting 24, it, of course, cannot move laterally, or lengthwise of the piston shaft; and inasmuch as the sections of the divided bearing block 32 are rigidly secured in this housing 33, as just last above noted, it follows that they cannot move lengthwise of the piston shaft; and inasmuch as these grooved sections of said bearing block 32 embrace the collar 31 of the piston shaft 25, said shaft and the piston fixed thereto are positively held from any endwise motion. This stabilizer, therefore, keeps the piston in its proper working position within the cylinder.

As shown, the said housing 33 of the stabilizer serves as the outer retaining plate for the adjacent ball bearing devices 30, on which the adjacent end of thepiston shaft 25 rotates. The housing 33 is,.of course, properly constructed for the application of lubrication. The said housing 33 has an opening in line with the axis of the piston shaft 25, adapted to be closed by a plug 35, as shown in Fig. 4, which affords access to the interior of said housing 33 and the adjacent end of the piston shaft 25, for applying a suitable device, to determine the rotary speed of the piston, whenever so desired.

The piston body 26 is provided with a series of equally spaced slot-like seats 36, extending inward from its periphery, for seating a corresponding series of blades 37 ada ted to move gugward beyond the periphery 0 said piston The numeral 38 represents a cylinder'liner or bushing, adapted to closely fit the interior of the cylinder casting 21, being applied thereto with a driving fit, and which is rigidly secured thereto, by means which will be present- I ly noted, to prevent rotation thereof in respect to said cylinder casting. The numerals 39 represent a pair. of end wall liners for the cylinder, having therein apertures 40 properly located for adapting the liners to be slipped over the piston shaft 25. Each of said end liners 39 has a diameter equal to the interior diameter of the cylinder casting 21, and the peripheral edges of said liners 39 are adapted to be clamped between the cylinder casting 21 and said cylinder end castings 24, when said parts are properly bolted together, as best shown in Fig. 4. A locking key 41 longer than the cylinderliner 38, is provided, and this key is adapted to be seated in keyways formed one-half of each thereof in the cylinder casting 21 and the other halvesflin the cylinder liner 38 and the end liners 39. The half key slot of the cylinder casting 21 is marked with the numeral 42; the half key slot in the cylinder lining 38 is marked with the numeral 43 and the two half key slots in the end liners 39 are marked with thenumeral 44. In addition to locking the said three liners together and to the cylinder casting, the key 41 also serves as a convenient means for properly positioning said three liners in respect to the cylinder casting, when assembling the parts into their proper working positions. The cylinder end castings 24 are of such structure, on their inner rofile faces, as to afford, on each thereof, a uid or supply passage 45 communicating with the intake nipple 22 of the cylinder and a fluid discharge passage 46 communicating with the discharge nipple of the cylinder; and these said.passages 45 and 46 are separated, at their opposite ends, by bridge walls marked with reference letters A and B, said bridge wall A being between the ending of the discharge passages 46 and the beginning of the supply passages 45 and said bridge wall B being between the ending of the supply passages 45 and the beginning of the discharge passages 46.

Because of the fact that the said fluid supply passages 45 and discharge passages 46, formed in the cylinder end castings 24 by recessing their profile faces, as best shown in Figs. 4, 6 and 7, it follows that the respective co-operative pairs of these passages communicate with each other over the peripheries of the cylinder castings 21 and c linder liners 38 in position to afford a latera delivery of the fluid to the cylinder and a lateral discharge of the fluid from the cylinder of the pump or motor, at

points inward of the peripheries of the cyl-- inder casting 21 and the cylinder liner 38 and outward of the piston body 26. Because of these relations of these parts, it follows that no openings need to be provided in the peripheral walls of the cylinder castings .21 or the peripheral walls of the cylinder 38; and, because of these last named facts it further follows that the outer ends of the piston blades 37 will always contact with a continuous unbroken bore wall, thereby minimizing the wear and tear on the outer end of said piston blades and on the bore wall of the cylinder.

The cylinder end liners 39, in the portions .thereof opposite said supply and discharge cavities 45 and 46 of the end castings24, are provided with perforations to permit the fluid to pass through said liners, in its flowage into and out from the chambers between the walls of the cylinder and the piston body. The particular perforations of said liners 39 which permit the inward passage of the fluid from said supply cavities 45 are marked with the reference numeral 47, as shown in Figs. 3, 4, 6, 1'0 and 16; and the particular perforations of said liners 39 which permit the outward passage of the fluid into the discharge cavities 46 are marked with the numeral 48, as shown in the same views. In other words, the porstruction and so positioned that they will tended functions.

tions of said liners 39 having the said perforations 47' and 48, whenthe parts are assembled, stand located directly opposite to and in communication with their respective co-operating supply cavities 45 and discharge cavities 46 formed in the cylinder end castings 24, and said perforations 47 and 48 are separated by bridge walls marked with the reference letters A1 and B, Said bridge walls A and B on the lines 39 correspond to the bridge walls A and B on the cylinder end castings 24, and are similarly located when the parts are assembled, to-wit, the bridge wall A is directly aligned with the bridge wall A and the bridge wall B is directly aligned with the bridge wall B.

The said end liners 39 are also eachprovided, on their inner profile faces, with two ducts which, on account of their function,

(later to be noted) may be called equalizing ducts, one of which is marked with the numeral 49 and the other thereof with'the numeral. 50, as best shown in Fig. 10. These equalizing ducts 49 and 50 are of such concommunicate with the inner ends of the pistons blade seats 36, throughout certain portions of the pistons travel, as will hereafter be more particularly pointed out, for purposes which will then more fully appear. The said equalizing ducts markedv 49 communicate constantly with the intake fluid passages 45 of the cylinder end castings 24by means of special perforations 51 in the end liners 39; and the ducts 5O communicate con-' stantly with the discharge cavities 46 of the cylinder end castings 24 by means of special perforations 52 in the end liners 39, as shown in Figs. 4, 6, and 10. Said equalizing ducts 49 and 50 of the liners 39 are separated by bridge walls marked C and D, as best shown in Fig. 10, so as to prevent intercommunication thereof. If the liners 39 were dispensed with, then these equalizing ducts 49 and 50 would be formed in the cylinder end castings 24, in proper positions to perform their in- The blade seats 36 of the piston body 26 are rabbeted, at their forward parts of this motor or pump which are subect to the greatest wear or tear, or the greatest deterioration from other causes such as the corrosive character of the fluid which may be handled by the pump or motor.

For the purposes of considering the most vital features of the invention, however, the

pump or motor may be treated ,as if these liners were absent, assuming that the cylinder end castings thereof should have formed thereon the said equalizing ducts 49 and 50. For example, in the structure illustrated, the cylinder bore is afforded by the inner wall of the cylinder liner 38, but, if that liner was abderstood that the expression cylinder bore and the expression cylinder walls are used in a broad sense so as to apply equally .well whether the said liners 38 and 39 are present or absent.

Special features of the cylinder and piston measured on a straight line drawn through the piston center; and the axis of the piston body occupies such a position that the pe riphery of the body will approximately contactwith the bore of the cylinder, at a place intermediate the ending of the discharge passages and thebeginningof the intake passages of the pump. In the structures illustrated, this place of approximate contact between the piston body and the cylinder bore is located between the cylinder nipples 22 and 23, and is marked on .the cylinder bore with the letter X. At this place X of approximate contact between the piston body and the cylinder bore, the piston body itself may afiord the needed seal between the discharge and intake sides of the pump, or reliance may be placed on the piston bladesto effect this seal, depending upon the kind of fluid being handled by the pump. At this same place X of the cylinder bore, the end walls of the piston or the end walls of the piston blades, or both together, afford theineeded seal between the said parts and the. end walls of the cylinder. The bridge walls A between the fluid supply ports 45 and discharge ports 46 of the cylinder end castings 24 are located opposite to'and in proper alignment with this place X of the cylinder bore, and the same remarks apply with respect to the coresponding bridge wallsA of the end liners 39.

The cylinder bore of this improved pump or motor is made up. of two surfaces, one or which is concentric to the piston center, and the other of which is non-concentric to the piston center. The concentric portion of said bore is formed on an are generated from the piston center with a radius equal to the radius of the piston body plus the extreme outer throw of the piston blades,

'ton.

and this concentric arc is of a length equal to, or greater, than the arcuate distance between any two successive blades of the piston. The opposite arcuate extremities of the concentric arc of the cylinder bore are indi cated on the drawings by the reference letters Y and Z. This concentric arc YZ of the cylinder bore is located so as to be between the delivery end portions of the fluid supply cavities of the cylinder end castings 24, and the receiving end portions of-the fluid discharge cavities 46 of said cylinder castings in proper alignment with the bridge walls 13 of the liners 39, or the bridge walls B, of the cylinder castings 24 (if the liners are absent), which'bridge walls form the side walls to the space or chamber between the piston body and the cylinder bore spanned by this concentric arc of the bore, and the arcuate length of these bridge walls B or B is of'a length equal to or greater than the arcuate distance between successive blades of the pis- The said bridge walls B or B co-operate with the piston body and blades toalford the needed seal in the travel of the piston through this concentric are Y4-Z of the cylinder bore. Because of its function, this said chamber spanned by said concentric are YZ of the cylinder bore may be called for convenience of distinction, the concentric loaded chamber of the pump.,

The non-concentric portion of the cylinder bore extends from and joins the opposite extremities of the said concentric arc YZ; and no point of the said non-concentric part of the bore is at a greater distance from the center of the piston than the radius of the concentric arc, and no point thereof is at a less distance from the piston center than the radius of the piston body; or, in other words, this non-concentric portion of the cylinder bore extends from the point Z to the point Y and passes through the point X of the cylinder bore, and the portion thereof extending from the point X to the point Y diverges outward from the piston body and the portion thereof extending fromthe point Z to the point X converges inward towards the piston body. The said place X may be said to divide the said non-concentric portion of the cylinder bore into two sections, one of which spans what may be called the non-concentric loading chamber of the pump, extending from X to Y, and the other of which may be called the non-concentric unloading chamber of the pump extending from Z to X. The end walls of these non-concentric loadingand unload,- ing chambers are afforded by the perforated portions '47 and 48 of the end liners 39, when said liners are present, and by the portions of the cylinder castings 24 having therein the fluid intake and fluid discharge passages 45 and 46, if said liners 39 are absent, and, hence it follows that the said loading chamber is always in lateral communication with the fluid supply passages and that the said unloading chamber is always in lateral communication with the fluid discharge passages of the pump. The said s-o-called loaded chamber spanned by the concentric arc YZ of the cylinder bore communicates with the said loading and unloading chambers only under the control of the piston blades; and, in View of the number and disposition of said piston blades and the arcuate length of said concentric portion of said cylinder bore, above noted, one or more of the piston blades will always operate to efiect a seal between the receiving and discharge sides of the said loaded chamber YZ and will receive no motion 'relativeto the piston body while traveling through the major part of said loaded chamber and none whatever, at any part of said arc, unless it be at the single instant when the blades enter that arc and the blade seats 36 begin to communicate with the equalizing ducts 50.

In the foregoing, it has been assumed that the piston blades 37 will take their outermost position under the effect of centrifugal force arising from the rotation of the piston. After said piston blades pass beyond the point Z of the concentric are YZ, their outer ends will ride in contact with the non-concentric part of the cylinder bore, extending from Z to X and which converges toward the periphery of the piston body, and hence the blades will, under the'piston travel, be cammed inward thereby to their inward camming limit,

on reaching the point of the cylinder bore.

movement of the piston blades 37, the equalizing ducts 49 and 50 have been provided in the end liners 39 (and which might be on the end castings 24, if the liners 39 were absent) As hitherto stated, the equalizing ducts 49 are in constant communication with the intake passages 45 of the cylinder and castings 24 and the other equalizingducts 50 are in constant communication with the discharge passages 46 in the cylinder end castings. During the travel of the piston blades 37, from the point X to the point Y, the inner ends of the blade seats 36, formed in the piston body 26, will travel by and communicate with these equalizing ducts 49 and 50 in succession. More specifically stated, while the as of shorter length than in the other views,

point Y the inner ends of said blade seats 36 will be in communication with the ducts 49, thereby rendering the intake fluid pressure available on the inner ends of said blades, and, as their outer ends communicate with the fluid intake passages 45 at this time, the pressures are equalized on all surfaces of these blades and the blades are balanced. Then under the continued travel of the piston, as soon as the inner ends of the blade seats pass the bridges D of the liners 39, they will begin to communicate with the equalizing ducts 50, thereby rendering discharge fluid pressure available on the inner ends of the blades, while the blades are passing through the loaded chamber or from Y to Z, which pressure will hold the blades in their outermost position, and, if any of the blades are not in their outermost position, when they enter this loading chamber, the said fluid pressure available from the discharge side of the pump through the duct 50, will immediately force the same into their outermost position. Then, under the continued travel of the piston, the inner ends of the blade seats 36 will keep in communication with the duct 50 approximately" until they reach the point X, and bridges C, of the liners 39; and, it follows that, as soon as said blades pass the point Z or the concentric are or from the loaded to the unloading chamber of the cylinder, the fluid pressures on all surfaces thereof will be equal, or in other words the said blades will be balanced and the (Jamming-surface of the non-concentric part of the cylinder bore, in the unloading chamber ZX will only be calledupon go move the blades inward against centrifugal 'orce. Y

It has already been stated that the length of the concentric are YZ of the cylinder bore and the bridge walls B and B must be equal to or greater than the arcuate distance between successive blades of the piston, The reason for this limitation is-that, otherwise, it would not necessarily follow that at least one of the piston blades would be available in the loaded chamber to afford a seal between the loading and unloading chamber. There may be more than one of these blades so act ing in the loaded chamber, at the same time, but there must be at least one so available, or otherwise there would be a time when the loading and unloading chambers would directly communicate with each other, through the concentric loaded chamber. In the main views, the concentric arc Y-Z is of such length that there will be, at times, more than one of the said piston bladesacting as a seal in the loaded chamber YZ; but,in the slight modification illustrated in Fig. 16, the can centric arc Y--Z ofthe cylinder bore is shown but nevertheless is of a length equal to the distance between the successive blades of the piston there illustrated; and, in that modification there will always be one of said blades acting in said loaded chamber to afford the needed seal between the loading and the unloading, chambers. Of course, the bridge Walls B of the end castings 24 and the bridge Walls B of the cylinder liners 39, will be of corresponding arcuate length equal to the concentric arc of the cylinder bore in this modification shown in Fig. 16. This modification has'been illustrated simply to make clear the minimum length of said concentric arc portion of .any cylinder bore, that might be employed in a pump or motor having a piston with eight blades spaced apart v:trom each other, as illustrated in the drawings. In the foregoing description, the cylinde bore has been stated to be made up of a portion, which is concentric to the center of the piston generated with a radius equal to the radius of the piston body plus the extreme throw of the piston blades, and a portion non- ,concentric to the piston center with all surfaces thereof at no greater distance from the center of the piston than the radius of the concentric arc and no portion thereof at a less distance from the piston center than the radius of the piston body; and that statement was correct, but was used simply to get the essentials of that part of said bore expressed in the most generalized form of statement. Having regard, however, to the particular structure illustrated in the drawings, a simpler statement can be made.

Assuming that the concentric are Y-Z of the cylinder here has been determined in the inanner heretofore described, then, ifthat concentric arcbe bisected by a straight line which, when extended, will pass through the center of the piston, and, being further extended will pass through the periphery of the pistons body, it will determine the point X of the bore and there will be three determined points available, to-wit, X, Y and Z, through which a circle can be drawn; and, if a point be then selected on said arc-bimeting line equi-dist'ant from said three points X, Y and Z, itwill be a point eccentric to the piston center and the distance thereof from any of the points X, Y and Z may be used as a radius for generating a circle which will pass through said three points and afford an eccentric contour to the non-concentric part of the cylinder bore. It will follow, of course, that the portions of the eccentric part of the cylinder bore extending from X to Y and from X to Z, respectively, will be equal to each'other'in arcuate length and that the spaces between the walls of the piston body the cylinder end walls and the cy 1- inder bore spanned by said eccentric arcs 'X-Y and XZ will beef equal "volume capacity and will diverge away from the piston body equally in opposite directions from the said point X, This simple plan was followed .in generating thef'non-concentricportion of the cylinder bore of the pump illustrated. It will, however, be understood that the said non-concentric part of the cylinder bore does not need to be generated in that particular way, and this is the reason that the more generalized form of statement has been employed in the foregoing portions of the general description and will be employed in the claims or some thereof.

So far as I know, I am the first to have provided in any rotary fluid pump or motor a loaded chamber concentric to the piston center of rotation, and I also believe that I am the first to have provided any means for rendering fluid pressure available to balance the piston blades or to hold the same in their outermost positions while traveling through said loaded chamber. The presence of these new features afford a pump of great efi'iciency and economy of operation. The pis-' ton blades, when traveling through the loaded chamber or under loads, receive, practically, no motion in respect to the piston body, and, at all other times, when they do receive any motion in respect to the piston body,.they are balanced, and it follows that they are easy to move, and that the wear and tear on the piston blades, so far as that, depends on,

the sliding motion in their seats, is reduced to a minimum. Itis also obvious that .less driving power is needed to rotate the piston than would be required, if the piston blades were not balanced. The presence of said concentric loaded chamber, with a concentric arc of proper length, in combination with the piston having blades of the proper number and properly spaced, relative to the length of this concentric are, also enable a much more reliable seal to be procured between the loading and unloading chambers of the pump or motor.

Having regard to the capacity of the pump, for any predetermined speed of the rotary piston, in a given unit of time, that depends upon the cubical interior capacity of the concentric loaded chamber, which, of course, is determined by the dimensions of the cooperating parts of the cylinder and the piston. The desired capacity is taken as the starting or fixed factor in the designing of the pump.

In the structure illustrated in Fig. 16 there is neither lap nor lead, in the relations of the loaded to the loading and unloading chambers, but in the structure shown in Figs. 1 to 15, inclusive, lap and lead are present.

Some further'details as to the general structare It may first be noted that, in the structure illustrated in Figs. -1 to 16 inclusive, the pisating parts of the cylinder and the piston. center but are approximately tangential to a circle generated from the pistons center with a radius equal to the distance between the piston center and the oilset or eccentric center from which the non-concentric part of the cylinder bore is generated. The reason why the said seats 36 are so formed is that it is thought the centrifugal force will be more effective on the blades, for forcing them .into their outermost position, than if the traveling through the loaded chamber.

As another detail, it may be noted that the cylinder end castings 24 are provided with waste ducts 54 leading from the space be tween the piston shaft 25 and the hubs 27 of the cylinder end castings to the fluid intake passages 45 formed in said cylinder end castings, as best shown in Fig. 7 of the drawings. The purpose of these waste ducts 54 is to provide a means which will draw oif any fluid which leaks through from the fluid passages of the pump into the space around the shaft between the liners and the cylinder end castings adjacent to the stufling boxes 28. It is obvious that, due to the presence which the piston shaft 25 passes, thus being in a position to catch any fluid which may leak through said stuffing boxes and direct the same to off-leading pockets 55 formed in the base portions of the cylinder end castings 24, as best shown in Fig. 4.

Modification Referring now to the modification illustrated in *Figs. 17 to 19 inclusive, thevnumeral 56 represents the cylinder casting and this is provided with intake coupling nipple 57 and discharge coupling nipple 58. The

numerals 59 represent the cylinder end cast- 63 the piston body. The piston body is provided with radial seats- 64 for the piston blades 65. The outer contacting ends of these piston blades are rounded instead of being beveled as in the main structures shown in the other views. The cylinder casting 56 is so constructed as to aflord fluid supply passages 66 in'communication with the intake coupling nipple 57, and so as to afford fluid discharge passages 67 in communication with the outlet or discharge nipple 58, as best shown in Fig. 17. For this purpose the cylinder casting 56 is enlarged outward, at the proper places to afford these fluid passages 66 and 67. The cylinder liner-60 is provided, on its exterior or periphery, with two corresponding sets of fluid passages afi'orded by pairs of slots in the periphery of said liner, the supply members of which are marked with the numeral 68 and the discharge members of which are marked with the numeral 69. I The said sup ply slots 68 are in constant communication with the supply passages 66 of the cylinder casting, and the discharge slots 69 are in constant communication with the discharge passage 67 of the cylinder casting; and these slots 68 and 69 are located so as to be in registering alinement with said passages 66 and 67 of said cylinder casting, as best shown in Fig. 17. The said pair of'slots 68 are.

convergent from about the point X to the point Y of the cylinder bore, and the pair of slots 69 are so formed as to be convergent from the point X to the point Z of the cylinder bore. This special arrangement of said slots 68 and 69 is made so as to secure more uniform wear on the outer ends of the piston blades 65, for one thing, and, for another to I secure a better distribution of the fluid passing therethrough. 4

The cylinder bore of this modification is formed in the same way as the bore of the cylinder in the inain views, and the piston body is related to the cylinder bore in the same way. The cylinder liners 61 are provided with equalizing ducts 70 and 71, which correspond in function to the equalizing ducts 49 and 50 of the cylinder liners 39 of the structure shown in the main views The ducts 70 are in constant communication, the slots 68 of the cylinder liner, with the fluid supply passage 66 of the cylinder casting; and the ducts 71 are in constant communication, through the slots 69 of said liner, with the discharge passage 67 of the cylin- (lcr casting. The said ducts 70 and 71 have the same relation to the seats 64 of the piston blades as do the ducts 49 and 50 of the cylinder liner 39 to the blade seats of the piston shown in the main views. These parts all co-operate in the same way as set forth in respect to the structure of the main Views. The chief difl'erence is that, this modified structure affords a radial intake and discharge of the fluid instead of-a lateral intake and discharge, as provided in the structure of the main views. The piston blade seats also differ slightly from the blade seats shown ceiving and discharge ends of said ducts, and I by the use thereof the said ducts may be entirely closed or opened to their largest extent. If these ducts are open, they will be subject tothe pumping action of the piston blades available from the supply passage 66, and,

hence, anyfiuid which seeps through to the stufling boxes 7 3 will be drawn into the receiving or loading chamber of the pump.

Hence, it is possible to prevent the accumulation of undesired seepage pressure, at the stufling boxes 7 3. or.to regulate the same to any desired pressure.

Having regard to the equalizing ducts 49 and 50 on the end liners 39, and and 71 on.

the end liners 61, it should be noted-that the respective members of the co-operating pairs of these ducts should have a volumetric content or capacity equal to that of the space in blades, at the time when the blades are in their outermost position.

Having regard to said cylinder liners 39, it should be noted that inasmuch as the fluid can only get into andnut of the cylinder through the perforations 47 and 48 of these liners, and into and out of the equalizing ducts 49 and 50, through the perforations 51 and 52 of these liners, it :tollows that the said perforated liners operate as strainers for the fluid and thereby exclude from the cylinder injurious materials, such as pieces of metal or stones, which might otherwise break the pump or motor.

Having regard to the sediment trapping grooves 53 of the piston body, formed by rabbeting the outer edges of the blade seats 36, as hitherto stated, it is obvious that, under the travel of the piston, these grooves will catch or trap any sand, grit or other sediment, which-may get into the cylinder and carry the same forward past the point X of the cylinder bore and ultimately to the discharge side of the pump or motor. i

In the stated description of the operation of the illusttated structures so far given, they have been treated as pumps; but, it is obvious any of the piston blade seats 36, inward of the that said illustrated structures are all capable of use as motors. They could be used as motors with the piston turning in the same direction as it turns when used'asa pump, but the structures will be more efficient as motors, if

the intake and discharge sides for the fluid shouldv be reversed. In other words, if these illustrated structures should be used for a motor the intake for the fluid should be where the discharge appears for the pump and the discharge where the intake appears for the pump. Of course, when any of these structures illustrated are used as a fluid motor,

then the coupling end of the piston shaft 25 would be properly coupled to the mechanism intended to be driven by the motor.

Having regard to the structure illustrated in the main views Figs. 1 to 16 inclusive, attention has already been called to the fact 4 that the cylinder. end castings 24 are reciprocally alike, or rights and lefts. This same remark applies with equal force to the cylinder end liners 89, which carry the equalizing ducts l9 and 50. It follows that, if the two cylinder end liners 39 should be interchanged, or shifted to opposite ends of the cylinder, then, the direction of rotation of the ployed when used as a pump. If the cylinder liners 39 were dispensed with and the end castings 24 provided with equalizing ducts 49 and 50, then the end castings could be shifted to the opposite ends of the cylinder, and the same remarks would apply as last above made in respect to the effect of shifting said end liners 39. t

The same remarks apply, in substance, to the pair of end liners 61 employed in the modification shown in Figs. 17 to 19, and to v the cylinder end castings 59 there illustrated.

In the structures here illustrated, the cylinders are stationary and the pistons rotated; but it will be understood, of course, that the pistons might be stationary and the cylinders made to rotate.

It will also be understood that many other minor changes might be made within the scope of my invention herein disclosed and pointed out in the claims.

Because of the new features embodied in my improved pump or. motor, it is highly efficient. If used as a pump, it will require less power to drive it than other pumps of equal capacity, and, if used as a motor, it will deliver'more power from a given head of fluid than other motors.

It is also obvious that its parts are all extremely simple, and hence the pump or motor is cheap to make. It is also cheap to maintain in working condition, due to the fact that all the parts subject to wear and-tear or to corrosion can be so easily made and replaced;

and, the durable.

What I claim is: v

1. In a rotary fluid pump or motor, the combination with a cylinder having fluid supply and discharge passages, of a piston having blades movable outwardly beyond its body, one of which two elements is stationary and the other rotative, and which two elements afford, between their walls, a loaded chamber concentric to the piston center which loaded chamber communicates with said fluid supply and discharge passages of the cylinder only underthe control of the piston blades, and which concentric loaded chamber has a radial depth, outward of the pistons body, equal to the extreme outward throw of the piston blades and has an arcuate length equal to or greater than the arcuate distance between successive piston blades, whereby there will always be at least one of said blades operating in said loaded chamber to efiect a seal between said fluid supply and discharge passages and while so operating, or under load, will receive no motion relative to the piston body, and which said cylinder has a continuous bore wall affording a continuous unbroken surface with which the outer ends of the piston blades contact full length throughout the entire revolution of the rotating part of the .pump or motor.

2-. In a rotary fluid pump or motor, the combination with a cylinder having fluid supply and discharge passages, of a piston pump or motor, is therefore very having blades movable outward beyond its periphery, one of which two elements is sta tionary and the other is rotative, and which two elements-afford, between their walls, a loading chamber constantly in communication' with said fluid supply passages of the cylinder, an unloading chamber constantly in communication with said fluid discharge passages of the cylinder, both of which said chambers are non-concentric tothe piston center and a loaded chamber located between said loading and unloading chambers and communicating therewith only under the control of the piston blades, which loaded chamher is concentric to the pistons center and has a radial depth, outward of the pistons body, equal to the extreme outward throw of the piston blades and an arcuate length equal to or greater than the arcuate distance between successive piston blades whereby there will always be at least one of said blades operating in said loaded chamber to seal the same from the loading and 'unloading chambers and while so operating, or under load, will receive no motion relative to the piston body, and which said cylinder has a continuous bore wall affording a continuous unbroken surface with which the outer ends of the piston blades .-contact full length throughout the entire revolution of the rotating part of the pump or motor.

'3. In a rotary fluid pump or motor, the

combination w1th a cylinder having fluid 5 periphery, one of which two elements is stationary and the other is rotative, and which two elements afiord, between their walls, a loading chamber constantly in communication with said fluid supply passages of the cylinder and an unloading chamber constantly in communication withesaid fluid discharge passages of the cylinder, both of said chambers being eccentric to the pistons center, and a loaded chamber located between said loading and unloading chambers and communicating therewith only under the control of the piston blades, which loaded chamber-is concentric to the piston center and has a radial depth outward of the istons body Q equal to the extreme throw of the pistons blades and an arcuate length equal to or greater than. the arcuate distance between successive piston blades, and which said cyl- ,inder has a continuous bore wall aifording a continuous unbroken surface with which the outer ends of the iston blades contact full length throughout he entirerrevolution of the rotating part of the pump or motor.

' 4. In a rotary fluid pump or motor, the 3 combination with a cylinder having fluid supply and discharge passages, of a piston having blades movable outward beyond its periphery, one of'whichtwo elements is sta' tionary and the other is rotative, and which 5 two elements, afford between their walls, a loading chamber constantly in communication with said fluid supply passages of the cylinder and an unloading chamber constantly in communication with said fluid discharge passa es oi the cylinder, both of which said chem cars are eccentric to the pistons center and sealed from interbommunication by the piston, and a loaded chamber located between said eccentric loading and unloading cham- .-bers, and communicating therewith only un der the control of the piston blades, which loaded chamber is concentric to the pistons center and has a radial depth, outward of the pistons 'body, equal to the extreme outward throw of the piston blades and an arcuate length equal to or greater than the arcuate distance between successive piston blades, substantially as described and for the purposes set fortln-and which. said cylinder has a continuous bore wall affording a continuous unbroken surface with which the outer ends of the piston blades contact full length throughout the entire/revolution of the rotati'ng part of the pump or motor. 5,-In a rotary fluid pump or motor, the combination with a cylinder having fluid sup ply and discharge passages, ofa'piston having blades movable outwardly beyond its body, one of which two elements is stationcry and the other rotative, and which two elements afiord, between their walls, a loadedchamber concentric to the piston center which loaded chamber communicates with said fluid supply and discharge passages of the cylinder only under the control of the piston blades, and which concentric loaded chamber has a radial depth, outward of the pistons body, equal to the extreme outward throw of the piston blades and has arcuate length equal to or greater than the arcuate distance between successive piston blades, whereby there will always be at least one of said blades operatingin .saidloaded chamber to efiect a seal between said fluid supply and discharge passages and, while so operating or under load, will receive no motion relative to the piston body and means for equalizing the fluid pressure on all surfaces of said piston blades while moving relative to the piston body.

6. In a fluid pressure pump or motor, the combination with a cylinder having fluid supply and discharge passages, loading and unloading chambers and a loaded chamber concentric with the rotor of a piston having blades seated in its body with freedom for movement outward beyond said bodys periphery, and which cylinder has'fluid ducts with which the inner ends of the piston blade seatscommunicate, in certain portions of the pistons' travel, for rendering fluid pressure available to balance said blades when traveling through the loading and unloading chambers of the pump or motor and to hold the blades in their outermost position, when traveling through the concentric loaded chamber of the pump or motor.

7. In a rotary fluid pump or motor, the combination with a piston, of a cylinder having end castings provided, on their inner profile faces, with fluid supply and discharge passages and end liners with perforations through which the fluid must pass in entering or leaving said cylinder, whereby said perforated liners will act as screens to exclude foreign materials which might otherwise break or injure the pump.

8. In a. rotary pump or motor, the combination with a piston, of a cylinder having end castings provided with fluid supply and dischargev passages on their inner profile faces an hich end ca'stingsare reciprocally alike on I ir said inner profile faces, whereby they can be shifted or interchangeably used at opposite ends of said cylinder, for permittingthe rotary part o figthe motor to turn in opposite directions without change in the supply inlet or the dischargeoutlet of p profile faces, with fluid supply andidischarge passages and having endliners provided with right and left perforations and right and left fluid pressure equalizing ducts on their inner outermost position while moving through profile faces" and which end liners are resaid concentric loaded chamber of the pump ciprocally alike on their said inner profile or motor, substantially as described.

faces, whereby they can be interchanged and In tBStim I Y wh e f I ifiX my Signature- 5 used at opposite ends of the cylinder, for per- THEODORE J. PAGEL. I 70 mitting therotary part of the motor to turn in opposite directions without change in the fluid supply inlet or the fluid discharge outlet of the cylinder. 10. In a rotary fluid pump ormotor, the 75 combination with a cylinder and piston of waste ducts leading from the annular spaces around the piston shaft, adjacent to its stuffing boxes, to the fluid supply passages of the cylinder whereby that annular space will 3a be subject to the pumping action and seepage pressure cannot accumulate at those points;

11. In a rotary fluid pump or motor, the combination with a piston having blades,

movable outwardly beyond its body, of, a 36 cylinder having a continuous bore wall aflording a continuous unbroken surface with which'the outer ends of the piston blades contact full length throughout an entire revolution of the rotating part of the pump or to motor, and which cylinder is provided with lateral fluid supply and discharge passages in both of its end walls which only communicate with the interior of the cylinder through the end walls of the same, under the control W of said blades.

12. In a rotary fluid pump or motor, the combination with a cylinder having fluid supply and discharge passages, of a piston having blades movable outwardly beyond its 1% body, one of which of said two elements is stationary'and the other rotative and which two elements afi'ord, between their walls, a loaded chamber concentric to the piston 40 center, which loaded chamber communicates with said fluid supply and discharge passages of the cylinder only under the control of the piston blades, and means for rendering discharge fluid pressure available on said blades 45 to hold the same in their outermost position while moving through said concentric loaded chamber of the pump or motor.

v 13. In a rotary-fluid pump or motor, the combination with a cylinder having fluid supply and discharge passages, of a piston having blades movable outwardly beyond its body, one of which said two elementsis stationary and the other rotative and which two 55 elements afford,'between their walls, a loaded chamber concentric to the piston center, which loaded chamber communicates with said'fluid supply and discharge passages of the cylinder only under the control of the piston blades, and means for rendering equal fluid pressure available on all surfaces of said blades to balance the same while receiving I any movement relative to the piston body, 65 and means for rendering discharge fluid pres- 7 sure available to hold said blades in their

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Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2511573A (en) * 1946-03-29 1950-06-13 Vickers Inc Vane pump construction
US2512593A (en) * 1943-12-27 1950-06-27 Philip S Mclean Rotary vane fluid pressure machine
US2586964A (en) * 1946-09-24 1952-02-26 Jr Frederick Kraissl Rotary pump
US2588342A (en) * 1943-01-02 1952-03-11 Walter P Innes Jr Fluid engine
US2623470A (en) * 1950-08-28 1952-12-30 Hartmann Mfg Company Vane type pump or motor
US2650754A (en) * 1949-01-12 1953-09-01 Ronnoco Exp Dev Company Ltd Compressor
US2672100A (en) * 1949-07-01 1954-03-16 United States Steel Corp Construction for rotary pumps
US2674953A (en) * 1950-03-18 1954-04-13 Lyall T Conde Rotary pump
US2677330A (en) * 1950-03-15 1954-05-04 New York Air Brake Co Vane pump
US2702509A (en) * 1951-04-06 1955-02-22 Air Equipment Rotary pump
US2705459A (en) * 1950-11-09 1955-04-05 Wilsons Sons Inc William M Pump
US2708884A (en) * 1949-12-12 1955-05-24 Desier J Deschamps High speed and pressure vane pump
US2714856A (en) * 1950-01-18 1955-08-09 Commercial Shearing Rotary pump or motor
US2745356A (en) * 1950-06-16 1956-05-15 Borg Warner Pressure loaded pump
US2762312A (en) * 1951-05-17 1956-09-11 Denison Eng Co Vane type pump
US2764941A (en) * 1953-08-21 1956-10-02 Racine Hydraulics And Machiner Multiple pump
US2827858A (en) * 1956-07-09 1958-03-25 Cardox Corp Foam-making pump
US2921530A (en) * 1956-12-14 1960-01-19 Bendix Aviat Corp Rotary positive displacement pump
US2925786A (en) * 1956-11-23 1960-02-23 Procon Pump & Engineering Co Pump
US2955542A (en) * 1959-09-23 1960-10-11 Gen Motors Corp Vane pump
US3187678A (en) * 1959-05-19 1965-06-08 Sperry Rand Corp Power transmission
US3194168A (en) * 1958-10-06 1965-07-13 Rosaen Borje O Fluid pumps
US3238885A (en) * 1964-02-10 1966-03-08 Ford Motor Co Positive displacement fluid pump
US4328824A (en) * 1979-12-10 1982-05-11 General Electric Company Flow divider with plural metering gears, unrestrained spacers there-between and lubricated end roller bearings
US6368086B1 (en) * 2001-01-22 2002-04-09 Tuthill Corporation Universal pump bracket

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2588342A (en) * 1943-01-02 1952-03-11 Walter P Innes Jr Fluid engine
US2512593A (en) * 1943-12-27 1950-06-27 Philip S Mclean Rotary vane fluid pressure machine
US2511573A (en) * 1946-03-29 1950-06-13 Vickers Inc Vane pump construction
US2586964A (en) * 1946-09-24 1952-02-26 Jr Frederick Kraissl Rotary pump
US2650754A (en) * 1949-01-12 1953-09-01 Ronnoco Exp Dev Company Ltd Compressor
US2672100A (en) * 1949-07-01 1954-03-16 United States Steel Corp Construction for rotary pumps
US2708884A (en) * 1949-12-12 1955-05-24 Desier J Deschamps High speed and pressure vane pump
US2714856A (en) * 1950-01-18 1955-08-09 Commercial Shearing Rotary pump or motor
US2677330A (en) * 1950-03-15 1954-05-04 New York Air Brake Co Vane pump
US2674953A (en) * 1950-03-18 1954-04-13 Lyall T Conde Rotary pump
US2745356A (en) * 1950-06-16 1956-05-15 Borg Warner Pressure loaded pump
US2623470A (en) * 1950-08-28 1952-12-30 Hartmann Mfg Company Vane type pump or motor
US2705459A (en) * 1950-11-09 1955-04-05 Wilsons Sons Inc William M Pump
US2702509A (en) * 1951-04-06 1955-02-22 Air Equipment Rotary pump
US2762312A (en) * 1951-05-17 1956-09-11 Denison Eng Co Vane type pump
US2764941A (en) * 1953-08-21 1956-10-02 Racine Hydraulics And Machiner Multiple pump
US2827858A (en) * 1956-07-09 1958-03-25 Cardox Corp Foam-making pump
US2925786A (en) * 1956-11-23 1960-02-23 Procon Pump & Engineering Co Pump
US2921530A (en) * 1956-12-14 1960-01-19 Bendix Aviat Corp Rotary positive displacement pump
US3194168A (en) * 1958-10-06 1965-07-13 Rosaen Borje O Fluid pumps
US3187678A (en) * 1959-05-19 1965-06-08 Sperry Rand Corp Power transmission
US2955542A (en) * 1959-09-23 1960-10-11 Gen Motors Corp Vane pump
US3238885A (en) * 1964-02-10 1966-03-08 Ford Motor Co Positive displacement fluid pump
US4328824A (en) * 1979-12-10 1982-05-11 General Electric Company Flow divider with plural metering gears, unrestrained spacers there-between and lubricated end roller bearings
US6368086B1 (en) * 2001-01-22 2002-04-09 Tuthill Corporation Universal pump bracket

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