US1735633A - Apparatus for operating suction-actuated devices in connection with the suction passage of an internal-combustion engine - Google Patents

Apparatus for operating suction-actuated devices in connection with the suction passage of an internal-combustion engine Download PDF

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US1735633A
US1735633A US11516426A US1735633A US 1735633 A US1735633 A US 1735633A US 11516426 A US11516426 A US 11516426A US 1735633 A US1735633 A US 1735633A
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suction
valve
engine
passage
air
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Caleb S Bragg
Victor W Kliesrath
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BRAGG KLIESRATH CORP
BRAGG-KLIESRATH Corp
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BRAGG KLIESRATH CORP
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Priority to US11516426 priority patent/US1735633A/en
Priority to US11516526 priority patent/US1735634A/en
Priority claimed from US11516326 external-priority patent/US1735632A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M33/00Other apparatus for treating combustion-air, fuel or fuel-air mixture
    • F02M33/02Other apparatus for treating combustion-air, fuel or fuel-air mixture for collecting and returning condensed fuel
    • F02M33/04Other apparatus for treating combustion-air, fuel or fuel-air mixture for collecting and returning condensed fuel returning to the intake passage
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B60VEHICLES IN GENERAL
    • B60TVEHICLE BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF; BRAKE CONTROL SYSTEMS OR PARTS THEREOF, IN GENERAL; ARRANGEMENT OF BRAKING ELEMENTS ON VEHICLES IN GENERAL; PORTABLE DEVICES FOR PREVENTING UNWANTED MOVEMENT OF VEHICLES; VEHICLE MODIFICATIONS TO FACILITATE COOLING OF BRAKES
    • B60T17/00Component parts, details, or accessories of power brake systems not covered by groups B60T8/00, B60T13/00 or B60T15/00, or presenting other characteristic features
    • B60T17/02Arrangements of pumps or compressors, or control devices therefor
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M13/00Arrangements of two or more separate carburettors; Carburettors using more than one fuel
    • F02M13/02Separate carburettors
    • F02M13/04Separate carburettors structurally united
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M17/00Carburettors having pertinent characteristics not provided for in, or of interest apart from, the apparatus of preceding main groups F02M1/00 - F02M15/00
    • F02M17/52Use of cold, produced by carburettors, for other purposes
    • F02M17/525Use of the intake conduit vacuum
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M7/00Carburettors with means for influencing, e.g. enriching or keeping constant, fuel/air ratio of charge under varying conditions
    • F02M7/10Other installations, without moving parts, for influencing fuel/air ratio, e.g. electrical means
    • F02M7/11Altering float-chamber pressure
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M7/00Carburettors with means for influencing, e.g. enriching or keeping constant, fuel/air ratio of charge under varying conditions
    • F02M7/12Other installations, with moving parts, for influencing fuel/air ratio, e.g. having valves
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M7/00Carburettors with means for influencing, e.g. enriching or keeping constant, fuel/air ratio of charge under varying conditions
    • F02M7/12Other installations, with moving parts, for influencing fuel/air ratio, e.g. having valves
    • F02M7/14Other installations, with moving parts, for influencing fuel/air ratio, e.g. having valves with means for controlling cross-sectional area of fuel spray nozzle
    • F02M7/16Other installations, with moving parts, for influencing fuel/air ratio, e.g. having valves with means for controlling cross-sectional area of fuel spray nozzle operated automatically, e.g. dependent on exhaust-gas analysis
    • F02M7/17Other installations, with moving parts, for influencing fuel/air ratio, e.g. having valves with means for controlling cross-sectional area of fuel spray nozzle operated automatically, e.g. dependent on exhaust-gas analysis by a pneumatically adjustable piston-like element, e.g. constant depression carburettors
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02MSUPPLYING COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL WITH COMBUSTIBLE MIXTURES OR CONSTITUENTS THEREOF
    • F02M2700/00Supplying, feeding or preparing air, fuel, fuel air mixtures or auxiliary fluids for a combustion engine; Use of exhaust gas; Compressors for piston engines
    • F02M2700/05Miscellaneous constructional elements; Leakage detection
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10TTECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER US CLASSIFICATION
    • Y10T137/00Fluid handling
    • Y10T137/7722Line condition change responsive valves
    • Y10T137/7781With separate connected fluid reactor surface
    • Y10T137/7793With opening bias [e.g., pressure regulator]
    • Y10T137/7796Senses inlet pressure

Description

Nov. 12, 1929.

C. S. BRAGG E AL APPARATUS FOR OPERATING SUCTION ACTUATED DEVICES IN CONNECTION WITH THE SUCTION PASSAGE OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Original Filed Feb. 26, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 up i id M w W W 276 lljlllr mum 53-9! 266 a "2% j E 22 Z67 3 mi 277a E i.-

K QSINVENTORj ATFORW Nov. 12, 1929. c. s. BRAGG ET AL 1,735,633

APPARATUS FOR OPERATING SUCTION ACTUATED DEVICES IN CONNECTION WITH THE SUCTION PASSAGE OF AN INTERNAL COMBUSTION ENGINE Original Filed Feb. 26, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 ATTORNEY Patented Nov. 12, 1929 UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE CALEB S. BRAGG, OF PAIJVI BEACH, FLORIDA, AND VICTOR W. KLIESRATH, OF PORT WASHINGTON, NEW YORK, ASSIGNORS T0. BRAGG-KLIESRATH CORPORATION, OF LONG ISLAND CITY, NEW YORK, A CORPORATION OF NEW YORK APPARATUS FOR OPERATING SUCTION-ACTUATED DEVICES IN CONNECTION THE SUCTION PASSAGE OF AN IN TERNAL-COMBUSTION ENGINE Original application filed February 26, 1925, Serial No. 11,683. Divided and this application filed June 11,

1926, Serial No. 115,164.

Our invention consists in the novel features hereinafter described, reference being bad to the accompanying drawings which illustrate several embodiments of the same, selected by us for purposes of illustration and the said invention is fully. disclosed. in the following description and claims.

This application is a division of our former application filed in the United States Patent Othce, February 26, 1925, and given Serial N 0. 11,683.

In the operation of vacuum brakes for auto motive vehicles, it is extremely convenient to obtain the necessary suction, or partial vacuum from a suction passageof the internal combustion engine, ordinarily employed for the propulsion of the vehicle, and located between the throttle valve for controlling the supply of'mixture, andthe cylinder. T 0 this end, it is. convenient and desirable to connect the vacuum brake mechanism with the intake manifold of the engine. It will be understood, further, that all the air exhausted from the brake actuating mechanism and deliver-ed into the intake manifold of the engine necessarily has a tendency to either prevent the drawing in of theproper quantity of liquid fuel from the atomizer by reduction of the partial vacuum in the suction passage,

or to dilute the explosive mixture passing through the suction passage, and such dilution may in some instances bring about a mixture which will not readily ignite in the engine. In either case, the engine, if turning over idly, would be likely to stall'and the admission of air into the manifold in this manner, may also materially delay the starting of the engine. v For the proper operation of the vacuum brake mechanism of the vehicle, it is desirable that the air exhausted into the manifoldshall be withdrawn from the brake actuating mechanism as rapidly as possible, in order to insure quick operation of the brake mechanism, and if the connection between the brake actuating mechanism and the intake manifold is restricted, for the purpose of avoiding the stalling of the engine, and delay in starting, the result will materially retard the operation of the brake mechanism.

Renewed June 20, 1929.

According to our 1 present invention, we provide the suction pipe or passage leading from the suction actuated device to the suction passage of the engine and connected thereto between the throttle valve and the engme cylinders, with a fuelizing or carburets ing means located between the valve mechanism of the actuator and the suction passage, and entirely separate in its operation from the mam or engine carburetor, which furnishes explosive charges to the cylinders under normal operation at all speeds and under the control of the throttle valve. This separate fuelizing or ca-rbureting'means is automatically responsive only to conditions arising in thesuction pipe or passage, due to the operative or inoperative conditions of the suction actuated device, andis in no sense a part of or adj unctof the main or engine carburetor, although it may in some instances be supplied with liquid fuel therefrom, orfrom the same source of supply, and although it may in some instances be structurally combined with the main or engine carburetor, and we further provide automatic means operated by the passage of air through the suction pipe from the suction actuated device to the suction passage of the engine, and preferably an air inlet valve controlling a fuel Valve for preventing fuel from being discharged into the suction pipe or passage, except when air is actually passing therethrough, the said air valve being normally held in a partly open position to permit small quantities of air insuflicient to materially affect the operation of the engine to pass through without operating the air valve or opening the fuel valve and preventing the air valve and fuel valve from being opened by the pulsations of air from the suction actuated device in quantities sufficiently large to materially affect the operation of the engine or stall it if idling, if admitted in an unfuelized condition to the suction passage, will operate the air valve to further open it and open the fuel valve to affect the fuelization of such a larger quantity of air and prevent interference with the operation of the engine by the operation of the suction actuated device.

Referringto the accompanying drawings,

in which we have shown several embodiments of our invention, selected by us for purposes of illustration,

Fig. 1 is a diagrammatic view showing an installation in an automotive vehicle, comprising an internal combustion engine, brake mechanism for the vehicle, and a vacuum actuated power actuator for the brake mechanism, and having our present invention embodied therein.

Fig. 2 is an enlarged view of certain parts illustrated in Fig. 1, showing the intake manifold, the main carburetor connected therewith, and the separate carburetor in the suction line from the intake manifold to the power actuator. l

Fig. 3 is an enlarged sectional view of the separate carburetor shown in Fig.

Fig. 4 is a view similar to Fig. 3, showing a slight modification of the separate carburetor.

Fig. 5 represents another slight modification of our invention, in which the means for supplying liquid fuel to the air withdrawn from the brake actuating mechanism isformed as apart of the main carburetor, and supplied with liquid fuel from the fluid chamber thereof.

In Fig. 1, we have illustrated our invention applied in connection with an automotive vehicle propelled by an internal combustion engine, and having a vacuum or suction op erated device for operating the brake mechanism of the vehicle. In this figure, 1, represents a power actuator of the kind illustrated in our former application for Letters Patent of the United States filed January 5, 1925, and given Serial No. 506, and in our former application for Letters Patent of the United States, filed Februar 26, 1925, and given Serial No. 11,683, of w ich this application is a division. The cylinder is provided with a piston (in this instance a double acting piston) provided with a" piston rod, 5,

' connected by a link, 73, to a brake lever, 72,

for'operating an ordinary brake mechanism, diagrammatically indicated in Fig. 1, and comprising in this. instance a brake band, 71, and brake drum, 70, so that the movement of the piston in one direction applies the brake, and in the opposite direction, releases the brake. ,It will also be understood that the actuator is provided with reversing valve mechanism, which may be conveniently located in the hub of the piston, and operated by longitudinally movable valve actuating rod, 20, extending therethrough and projecting from the opposite end of the cylinder, from the piston rod, through a suitable stuffing box, said valve mechanism being so constructed as to place one end of the cylinder in communication with a suction line 226 to the intake manifold of the engine, and the other end of the cylinder in communication with the atmosphere, and vice versa, accordsents the engine carburetor therefor, having The details of the main air intake, 267, and gasoline supply pipe, 268. 269 represents the usual throttle valve of the engine.

In Fig. 2 we have illustrated an enlarged view of the intake manifold, 261, and adj acent parts, and have shown one embodiment of our "manifold, for the purpose of preventing the dilution of the explosive charge and interfer gb" ence with the operation of the engine, as before set forth. As shown in Figs. 1 and 2, 226 indicates the suction pipe, which is connected at one end with the actuator, being in this instance connected with the hollow'valve actuating slieve, 20, by a'flexible portion, 226, the other end of the pipe, 226, being connected with the intake manifold of-the engine between the usual throttle valve, 269, and the cylinders of the engine. In this suction pipe, 226, is located a separate carburetor, indicated at 276, provided with a fuel injecting nozzle, 279, connected with a supply of'liquid fuel. In this instance itis shown connected by a pipe, 277, with a float chamber of the engine carburetor, but it may obviously have a sepapipes, 226 and 226, communicatingwith the intake manifold, 261, on opposite sides of the central, vertical pipe, leading from the main carburetor, although this is not essential, and the suction pipe, 226, is provided with a check valve, 265, which is preferably located be tween the separate carburetor, 276, and the intake manifold. The chamber of the separate carburetor is provided with a valve seat 27 6 through the opening in which the air withdrawn from the suction actuated device must pass, on its way to the manifold, and above this seat is located a disc valve, 276, provided with a guiding stem, 276, mounted in a suitable guide, in this instance secured to the top of the separate carburetor and carrying a needle valve, 276", normally held in engage ment with a valve seat in-the nozzle, 279, by a spring, 276, and also by the weight of the valve or disc, 27 6, when the parts are mounted in horizontal position, as indicated in Figs. 1, 2 and 3. We prefer to have the nozzle, 279,

adjustable longitudinally of its axis in the carbureting device, and it is shown as threaded and screwed into a threaded aperture in the bottom of the separate carbureting device, and held in adjusted position by a set nut, 280. This nozzle is preferably adjusted to such a position that when the needle valve, 276 is in closed position, the air valve, or disc, 276", will be held slightly off of its seat, as indicated in Fig. 3, and in fact is never permitted to directly engage its seat. The position of the jet or nozzle, 279, is so adjusted as to permit the amount of air to pass through, which can be assimilated in the intake manifold without stalling the motor while idling, without admitting liquid fuel from the nozzle, 279. If more than this amount of air is passed into the manifold, the disc or valve, 276", will be raised, with the needle valve, opening the jet and permitting the air to pick up suflicient fuel from the nozzle to form an explosive mixture. The space, which is always maintained between the metal disc or air valve, 276, and its seat, also permits of a certain amount of pulsation of the air in either direction, without opening the jet valve, 27 6. Experiments have shown that such pulsations take place in the intake manifold and in the pipe, 226, and are specially noticeable in a four cylinder motor when fully throttled, and without this provision for holding the disc or valve at all times slightly off of its seat, a vibration of the valve and the consequent opening and closing of the needle valve would result.

In Fig. 4 we have illustrated another slightly modified form of the separate carbureting device similar to that shown in Fig. 3, and comprising a chamber, or casing, 376, provided with a pivoted valve, 376", having pivoted thereto a gasoline valve, 376, engaging a seat in the upper end of an adjustable nozzle, 379, connected 'by a pipe, 377", with the float chamber of the engine carburetor, or other liquid fuel supply. The gasoline valve, 376, is provided with a pivoted depending stem, 376, for insuring the seating of said gasoline valve. This device operates in exactly the same manner as the device illustrated in Figs. 1. 2, and 3. The nozzle, 379, is so adjusted to hold the pivoted air valve, 376", in such position that it does not completely prevent the passage of air through the chamber, 376, thus permitting the passage of a small quantity of air t-herethrough, insuflicient to stall the engine, while idling, without opening the gasoline valve. \Vhen. larger amounts of air are passed through the casing, 376, the valve, 376", will be opened, thereby opening the gasoline valve, 376, and permitting the air to take up sufficient amount of fuel to form an explosive mixture. It will be understod that this device illustrated in Fig. 4. will be used in conjunction with an ordinary check valve similar to that illustrated in Figs. 1 and 2.

In Fig. 5 we have illustrated another slight modification of our invention, in which the separate carbureting device is constructed as an integral part of the engine carburetor while operating independently thereof. In this figure'the engine carburetor body is indicated at 466, provided with the usual Venturi tube, 466 float chamber, 466", gasoline feed pipe, 468,connected therewith,and having the usual atomizing nozzle, 466, connected by passage, 466", with the float chamber. At one side of the carburetor is a separate carbureting chamber, indicated at 476, having a partition there in, provided with an aperture, indicated at 476*, the said chamber being provided with a. separate nozzle, 479, connected by a passage 479, with the passage, 466", leading from the float chamber, the said nozzle being provided with a seat for a needle valve, 476, on a longitudinally movable stem, 476, working in a guide in a removable cap, 476, and carrying a disc or valve,,476", which is acted upon by a spring, 476, in a direction to close the needle valve. The valve, 476*, is held slightly off of its seat in the partition in said chamber, so as not to completely close the aperture, 476*, by the engagement of the needle valve with its seat. 426 represents the suction pipe from the actuator or other vacuum operated device, which is connected with the chamber, 476, on the side of the partition opposite that occupied by the disc or valve, 476", and the upper portion of the chamber, 476, is provided with an aperture, 462*, communicating with the discharge passage,446 ,of the engine carburetor, between the throttle valve, here indicated .at 469, and the cylinder ports or valves, said passage communicating directly with the intake manifold of the engine. The operation of the device illustrated in Fig. 5 is exactly the same as that previously described with reference to Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 4, and need not be repeated.

It will be seen that in all the forms of our present invention, we employ in the connecting passage, or suction line, between the suction actuated device and the intake manifold of the internal combustion engine with which it is connected, a separate carburetor supplied with liquid fuel, in this instance from the float chamber of the main carburetor and provided with an injector nozzle nor mally closed by a needle valve operatively connected with an automatic air valve for controlling the needle valve, the said air valve being normally held partly open so that the passage ofsmall quantities of air through the suction pipe, from the suction actuated device to the intake manifold of the engine, which would not materially disturb tlre proportions of the explosive mixture passingfrom the engine carburetor to the engine, will not cause the separate carburetor to function. \Vhen, however, any

material quantity of air is withdrawn from supply.

the suction actuated device by the suction in the manifold, which would have the effect, if admitted to the manifold, of materially altering the composition of the explosive mixture passing therethrough from the engine carburetor, and affect the operation of the engine or stall it if idling, or delay the starting of the engine, the automatic air valve will be opened, thereby atthe same time opening the fuel control needle valve and permitting this larger quantity of air to take up liquid fuel from the nozzle of the automatic carburetor, carbureting the air so that it is admitted into the intake manifold as explosive mixture, and mixes with the explosive mixture passing therethrough from the engine carburetor with the result that the operation of the engine is not interfered with. This effectively prevents the slowing down of the engine, the stallingof the engine if idling, and delay in starting the engine, which might otherwise result from the operation of the suction actuated device. It will also be seen that in all the forms shown there is no danger of flooding the separate carburetor as the needle valve is normally held in closed position when the suction actuated device is not in operation or when such small quantities of air are being withdrawn therefrom can be readily assimilated into the explosive mixture passin from the engine carburetor without affecting the normal operation of the engine.

e prefer to arrange the separate carburetor, as shown, so that the discharge orifice of its liquid injector nozzle will be slightly above the liquid level of the fuel In the drawings. for example, Figs. 1, 2 and 5, in which the separate carburetor derives its supply from the float chamber of the engine carbm'etor. the separate carburetor is preferably located as shown, so that its discharge nozzle is above the level of the liquid in the float chamber of the engine carburetor. This prevents the flow of fuel through the nozzle at any time when the motor is not running, or in case the needle valve should be held open improperly at any time.

'hile we have shown our invention applied in connection with a suction actuated device for operating brake mechanism, it is to be understood that it is applicable to-the operation of a suction actuated device in connection with the intake manifold of an internal combustion engine as the source of suction for operating other mechanisms.

"hat we claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is 1. The combination with an internal combustion engine provided with a suction passage, an engine carburetor connected therewith, for normally supplying the explosive charges to the engine at all speeds, and a throttle valve controlling said passage located between the carburetor and the engine cylinders, of a suction actuated device, a suction connection therefrom connected to said suction passage between the throttle valve and the engine cylinders and subjected at all times to the maximum rarification in the suction passage, means for introducing fuel into said suction connection between the valve mechanism of the suction actuated device and .the suction passage of the engine, operating independently of the engine carburetor, and provided with a normally closed valve, and automatic regulating means operated by the passage of air through said suction connection from the suction actuated device and attached to said fuel valve for opening said valve when air is passing from the suction actuated device through said suction connection in sufficient quantities to materially effect the operation of the engine if not fuelized, and to maintain said valve in closed position at all other times when the engine is in operation. 2. The combination with an internal combustion engine provided with a suction passage, an engine carburetor connected therewith for normally supplying the explosive charges to the engine at all speeds, and a throttle valve controlling said passage and located between the carburetor and the engine cylinders, of a suction actuated device, a suction connection therefrom connected to said suction passage between the throttle valve and the engine cylinder and subjected at all times to the maximum rarification within the suction passage, means for introducing fuel into said suction connection operating independently of the engine carburetor, located between the valve mechanism of the suction actuated device and the suction passage of the engine, and comprising among its members a fuel nozzle, a needle valve therefor, and a movable air valve opera'tively connected with said needle valve and adapted to be opened by the passage of air from the suction actuated device and constructed to hold said needle valve normally closed when the engine is running and the suction actuated device is inoperative, to prevent the discharge of fuel from said nozzle, and to effect the opening of said needle valve when air is passing through said suction connection from the suction actuated device to the suction passage of the engine in sufficient quantities to materially interfere with the operation of the engine if not fuelized, to fuelize said air and prevent interference with the operation of the engine or stalling it if idling by the operation of the suction actuated device.

3. The combination with an internal combustion engine provided with a suction passage, an engine carburetor connected therewith for normally supplying the explosive charges to the engine at all speeds, and a throttle valve controlling said passage and locatedbetween the carburetor and the suction passage, of a suction actuated device, a suction connection therefrom connected to said suction passage between the throttle valve and the engine cylinders and subjected at all times to the maximum rarification in the suction passage, means for introducing fuel into said suction connection operating independently of the carburetor between the valve mechanism of the suction actuated device and the suction passage of the engine,

and comprising among its members a fuel nozzle, a needle valve therefor, an air inlet valve in said suction connection operatively connected with the fuel valve and holding it in closed position to normally prevent the discharge of fuel from said nozzle, said air valve being normally maintained in a partially open position to permit the passage of small quantities of air through said suction connection and to accommodate pulsations in the suction passage without opening said fuel valve and adapted to be operated by the passage of air through said suction connection from the suction actuated device to the suction passage, in sufficient quantities to materially interfere with the operation of the engine if not fuelized, to open said fuel valve and effect the fuelization of said air to prevent interference with the operation of the engine or stalling it if idling by the operation of the suction actuated device.

4. The combination with an internal combustion engine provided with a suction passage, an engine carburetor connected therewith for normally supplying the explosive charges to the engine at all speeds, and a throttle valve controlling said passage, and located between the carburetor and the suction passage, of a suction actuated device, a suction connection therefrom connected to said suction passage, between the throttle valve and the engine cylinders and subjected at all times to the maximum rarification in the suction passage, means for introducing fuel into said suction connection operating independently of the carburetor, between the valve mechanism of the suction actuated device and the suction passage of the engine, and comprising among its members a fuel nozzle, a needle valve therefor, an air inlet valve in said suction connection operatively connected with the fuel valve and holding it in closed position to normally prevent the discharge of fuel from said nozzle, said air valve being normally maintained in a partially open position to permit the passage of small. quantities of air through said suction connection and to accommodate pulsations in the suction passage without opening said fuel valve and adapted to .be operated by the passage of air through said suction connection from the suction actuated device to the suction passage in sufficient quantities to materially interfere with the operation of the en'- gine if not fuelized, to open said fuel valve and effect the fuelizing of said air to prevent interference with the operation of the engine or stalling it if idling by the operation of the suction actuated device, and means for regulating the extent of opening of said air valve in the normal position thereof, to regulate the quantity of air which will be allowed to pass through said suction connection without being fuelized.

The combination with an internal combustion engine provided with a suction passage, an engine carburetor connected therewith for normally supplying the explosive charges to the engine at all speeds, and a throttle valve controlling'said passage, and located between the carburetor and the suction passage, of a suction actuated device, a suction connection therefrom connected to said suction passage,between the throttle valve and the engine cylinders, and subjected at all times to the maximum rarification in the suction passage, means for introducing fuel into said suction connection operating independently of the carburetor, between the valve mechanism of the suction actuated device and the suction passage of the engine, and comprising among its members a fuel nozzle. a needle valve therefor, an air inlet valve in said suction connection operatively connected with the fuel valve and holding it in closed position to normally prevent the discharge of fuel from said nozzle, said air valve being normally maintained in a partially open position to permit the passage of small quantities of air through said suction connection and to accommodate pulsations in the suction passage without opening said fuel valve and adapted to be operated by the passage of air through said suction connec-' tion from the suction actuated device to the suction passage in sufficient quantities to materially interfere with the operation of the engine if not fuelized, to open said valve and effect the fuelizing of said air to prevent'interference with the operation of the engine or stalling it if idling by the operation of the suction actuated device, and means for adjusting the needle valve seat longitudinally with respect to the needle valve to adjust the. extent of opening of the said air valve when the latter is in its normal position, and the v needle valve is closed.

'6. The combination with an internal combustion engine provided with a suction passage, an engine carburetor connected therewith for normally supplying the explosive charges to the engine at all speeds, and a throttle valve controlling said passage and located between the carburetor and the suction passage, of a suction actuated device, a suction connection therefrom connected to said suction passage between the throttle valve and the engine cylinders and subjected at all times to the maximum rarification in the suction passage, means for introducing fuel into said suction connection operating independently of the carburetor, between the valve mechanism of the suction actuated device and the suction passage of the engine, and comprising a separate carburetor provided with a fuel nozzle, a normally closed needle "alve therefor, an air valve for throttling the passage of air through said suction connection and said separate carburetorattached to the needle valve and normally maintained in partly opened position, yielding means for maintaining said air valve and fuel needle valve in their respective normal positions, said air valve operating automatically to normally prevent the admission of fuel into said suction connection, and permitting the passage of air therethrough in small quantities insufficient to effect the operation of the engine and to accommodate pulsations in the suction passage without opening said fuel valve and to open said fuel valve and effect the fuelization of larger quantities of air passing from the suction actuated device to the suction passage of the engine to prevent interference with the operation of the engine or stalling it if idling, by the operation of the suction actuated device.

7. A vacuum control system for motor vehicles including an internal combustion engine having an intake manifold, a fuel mixing val-ve closed to the atmosphere and open to the intake manifold, a vacuum actuated power device connected thereto, and valve mechanism for establishing and maintaining a predetermined vacuum in said power device by means of the vacuum in said manifold.

8. A vacuum control system for motor vehicles including an internal combustion enine havin an intake manifold, a fuel mixing valve 0 osed to the atmosphere and open to the intake manifold, a vacuum actuated power device connected thereto having a movable member, and valve mechanism for moving said member a predetermined distance and maintaining it in saidpositioia by means of the vacuum in said manifold.

9. A vacuum control system for motor vehicles ineludingan internal combustion engine having an intakemanifold, a fuel mixing valve closed to the atmosphere and open to the intake manifold, a vacuum actuated power device and a valve mechanism connected thereto, the latter placing the vacuum actuated power device in communication with the said fuel mixing valve or with the atmosphere.

10. A vacuum control system for motor vehicles including an internal combustion engine having an intake manifold, a fuel mixing valve closed to the atmosphere and open to the intake manifold, a vacuum actuated power device connected thereto having a moving said member a predetermined distance and maintaining it in said position by means of the vacuum in said manifold, said valve mechanism including means for permitting said member to return to its normal position through the medium of atmospheric pressure.

11. A vacuum control system for motor vehicles including an internal combustion engine having an intake manifold, brakes, a fuel mixing valve closed to the atmosphere and open to the intake manifold, a vacuum actuated power device connected thereto having a movable member mechanically connected to said brakes, and valve mechanism for moving said member a predetermined distance and maintaining it in said position by means of the vacuum in said manifold, said valve mechanism including means for permitting said member to be returned to its normal position through the medium of atmospheric pressure.

12. A vacuum system for motor vehicles including an internal combustion engine having an intake manifold, a fuel mixing valve closed to the atmosphere and open to the intake manifold, a vacuum actuated power device connected to said mixingvalve, and valve mechanism in the connections be tween the vacuum actuated power device and said mixing valve for establishing and maintaining a predetermined vacuum in said power device by means of the vacuum in the manifold.

13- A vacuum system for motor vehicles including an internal combustion engine having an intake manifold, a fuel mixing valve closed to-the atmosphere and open to the intake manifold, a vacuum actuated power device, means for operatively connecting said vacuum actuated power device with said mixing valve and through the mixing valve with said intake manifold, said means including valve mechanism, and an operator operated part for said valve mechanism.

In testimony whereof we affix our signatures.

CALEB S. BRAGG. V UTOR W. KLIESRATH.

US11516426 1925-02-26 1926-06-11 Apparatus for operating suction-actuated devices in connection with the suction passage of an internal-combustion engine Expired - Lifetime US1735633A (en)

Priority Applications (3)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1168325 US1735630A (en) 1925-02-26 1925-02-26 Method of and apparatus for operating suction-actuated devices in connection with the suction passage of an internal-combustion engine
US11516426 US1735633A (en) 1925-02-26 1926-06-11 Apparatus for operating suction-actuated devices in connection with the suction passage of an internal-combustion engine
US11516526 US1735634A (en) 1925-02-26 1926-06-11 Fuelizer for internal-combustion engines operating power actuators

Applications Claiming Priority (4)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1735631D US1735631A (en) 1925-02-26 Caleb s
US11516426 US1735633A (en) 1925-02-26 1926-06-11 Apparatus for operating suction-actuated devices in connection with the suction passage of an internal-combustion engine
US11516326 US1735632A (en) 1925-02-26 1926-06-11 Apparatus for operating suction-actuated devices in connection with the suction passage of an internal-combustion engine
US11516526 US1735634A (en) 1925-02-26 1926-06-11 Fuelizer for internal-combustion engines operating power actuators

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US11516426 Expired - Lifetime US1735633A (en) 1925-02-26 1926-06-11 Apparatus for operating suction-actuated devices in connection with the suction passage of an internal-combustion engine
US11516526 Expired - Lifetime US1735634A (en) 1925-02-26 1926-06-11 Fuelizer for internal-combustion engines operating power actuators

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2428889A (en) * 1945-08-20 1947-10-14 Nutter Irvin Earl Bubble cap
US2824726A (en) * 1955-11-08 1958-02-25 Gen Motors Corp Degasser attachment for internal combustion engines
US2879756A (en) * 1955-12-02 1959-03-31 Holley Carburetor Co Fuel shut-off apparatus

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2428889A (en) * 1945-08-20 1947-10-14 Nutter Irvin Earl Bubble cap
US2824726A (en) * 1955-11-08 1958-02-25 Gen Motors Corp Degasser attachment for internal combustion engines
US2879756A (en) * 1955-12-02 1959-03-31 Holley Carburetor Co Fuel shut-off apparatus

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US1735634A (en) 1929-11-12
US1735631A (en) 1929-11-12

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