US1732172A - Tuning peg for violins and other string instruments - Google Patents

Tuning peg for violins and other string instruments Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1732172A
US1732172A US267946A US26794628A US1732172A US 1732172 A US1732172 A US 1732172A US 267946 A US267946 A US 267946A US 26794628 A US26794628 A US 26794628A US 1732172 A US1732172 A US 1732172A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
string
socket
violins
head
peg
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US267946A
Inventor
Edward J Smith
Original Assignee
Edward J Smith
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Edward J Smith filed Critical Edward J Smith
Priority to US267946A priority Critical patent/US1732172A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1732172A publication Critical patent/US1732172A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D3/00Details of, or accessories for, stringed musical instruments, e.g. slide-bars
    • G10D3/14Tuning devices, e.g. pegs, pins, friction discs or worm gears

Description

E. J. SMITH Oct. 15, 1929.
TUNING PEG FOR VIOLINS AND OTHER STRING INSTRUMENTS Filed p l 192a M m A EM MW Patented Oct. 15, 1929 EDWARD J'. SMITH, OF LINCOLN, NEBRASKA TUNING PEG FOR VIOLINS AND OTHER STRING INSTRUMENTS Application filed April 6,
My invent-ion relates to violin tuning pegs and one of its objects is the provision of an improved construction which will have the form and appearance of the pegs now in use.
An important object of my invention 18 the provision of tensioning means for applying a steady increase in tension at a relatively low rate whereby the strings may be tuned with great precision.
Another of my objects is the provision of means for holding the violin strings under tension in such a way that slippage cannot occur as in the case of the pegs now in use.
Still another object of my invention is the provision of a non-winding support for the string whereby the string will be drawn in a straight line.
I also have for one of my objects the provision of a fastening device for firmly securim the end of the string to the drawbar.
TIaving in view these objects and others which will be pointed out in the following description, I will now refer to the drawings, in which- Figure 1 is a plan view of the peg box of a violin showing the application of my tuning pegs to the ordinary violin construction.
Figure 2 is a disassembled view of my tuning peg, the part A being the socket member, the part B being the drawbar and the part C being the head, parts being broken away to disclose the interior construction.
Figure 3 is a face view of the larger end of the socket member A of Figure 2.
Figure 4 is an enlarged view showing my preferred form of fastening member as shown in Figure 2.
Figure 5 is an illustration with parts broken away and showing a modified form of fastening device.
Figure 6 is an illustration showing still another form of fastening device for the end of the string.
The socket member 10 shown at A in Figure 2 is more or less conical in shape and it has the form and size of the pegs used in violins. It may be made from ebony or from any suitable metal which may be coated or enameled or which may be covered with a veneer of ebony or other suitable wood. This 1928. Serial No. 267,946.
socket member is adapted to be thrust into the socket holes of the peg box of the violin so as to be frietionally held therein against turning movement.
The socket member 10 is provided with a channel 11 which terminates short of the smaller end of the socket member. A slit 12 is formed in the socket member to communicate with the channel 11. At the larger end of the socket member is a depression 13 also communicating with the channel 11 and forming a flat, smooth seat adjacent the core. The socket member is also provided with a pulley 14 in the slot 12 and with a pair of longitudinal grooves 15 terminating adjacent the pulley.
The drawbar as shown at B in Figure 2 and as shown in detail in Figure 4 includes a head 16 with a screw threaded member 17. The head 16 is bifurcated for receiving a cam block 18 which is pivotally connected to the head 16 in the manner shown in Figure 4. The pivot connecting the cam block 18 to the headlG projects in bot-h directions at 19 for engaging the grooves 15 of the socket member 10 in a manner such. that the drawbar is effectively prevented from turning within the socket member. As shown in Figure 2 the cam block 18 as well as its seat in the head 16 are roughened or corrugated in such a way as to engage the string 20 so that any increase in tension on the string forces the cam block 18into tighter engagement. The drawbar is inserted into the channel 11 after threading the end of the string 20 in the manner shown in Figure 2 and this drawbar is seated within the channel 11 so that its end is at or near the outer surface of the socket member 10. The head C resembles in every respect the head of the usual tuning peg but it is adapted to seat against the end of the socket member 10, it being provided with a disc-like projection 21 for entering the depression 13 of the socket member. It is also provided with a screw threaded channel 22 for engaging the screw threaded portion 17 of the drawbar. It will be evident that the turning of the head C causes the screw threads 22 to engage the screw threads 17 to apply tension to the string 20. At the beginning only a few threads are in engagement but at this time the string 20 is under little or no tension. With the increase in tension, however, the screw 17 becomes more and more into engagement with the thread 22 so that a powerful pull is exertedby the turning of the head (l. During this drawing of the string 20 the string passes overthepulley 14 and no twisting or kinking can occur because the drawbar is compelled to move in a straight line because of the engagement of the pins 19 in the grooves 15.
The holding means for the string as shown in Figure 4 is very effective for preventing any slippage of the end of the string. It is evident, however, that the construction as shown in Figure 4 could be modified without departing from the principle therein shown. Such a modification is shown in Figure 5 in which two cam blocks 23 are each pivotally secured within the slot of the head 16 to hold the end of the string 20. In this case the roughened end surfaces of the two cam blocks 23 coact to grip the string between them so that the greater the tension the greater the gripping action of the cam blocks. hen this form ofconstruction is used a separate pin 19 must be employed for the purpose of engaging the grooves of the socket member. In Figure 6 I have shown still another form of clamp for holding the end of the string, this form being particularly useful for coarse strings and for strings which are subjected to unusual tension. In this instance the head 16" is provided with a J'- shaped end depression in which is secured a screw member 24. The wedge block 25 is adapted to be seated in the V-shaped depression and it is provided with a central aperture large enough to permit its sliding freely on the screw member 24. The string 20 is positioned as shown in Figure 6 and the wedge block is then forced over it to hold the end of the string in place. The nut 26 is then threaded on to the screw 24 to force the wedge block 25 into its seat to tightly grip the end of the string.
I have shown and described my invention particularly in its relation to violins but it is evident that it is equally applicable to any stringed musical instrument. It possesses several marked advantages over prior constructions when used for tensioning the strings of violins, cellos, banjos, guitars and other instruments of a like nature. The threads on the screw 17 are of low pitch. so that every turn of the head adds a slight tension to the string. By this means it is possible to tune the instrument with extreme prea cision, the advantage over the ordinary friction-held peg being that no sudden increase in tension is possible by the slippage of the P i An important feature to which I wish to call attention is the arrangement of the operative portion of the string in its relation to the pulley 14 and to the drawbar 16. This portion of the string is tangential to the pulley l t and in substantial axial alignment with the drawbar 16 so that no binding can occur in the tensioning mechanism. The drawbar is held against turning in the socket member so that no torsional stresses are set up.
Having thus described my invention in such full, clear, and exact terms that its construction and operation will be readily understood by others skilled in the art to which it pertains, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent of the United States is:
1. A stringed musical instrument having a peg box and a tuning peg therefor, said tuning peg including a socket member in the said peg box, said socket member being provided with an L-shaped passageway extending therethrough, a draw bar secured to a string of said instrument, said draw bar being slidable in the passageway of said socket member and being positioned perpendicularly to the operative portion of said string, a pulley in the corner of said passageway for guiding said string, and means for actuating said draw bar to tension said string.
2. I11 combination with a'musical instrument having a string and having a socket member inserted in the peg box thereof, said socket member being provided with an L-shaped passageway for said string, a draw bar slidable in the passageway of said socket member, said draw bar being secured to said string, a pulley within the passageway in the corner thereof for guiding said string, the operative portion of said string being tangential to said pulley, a head rotatably seated against said socket member, and means on said head for engaging said draw bar for tensioning said string.
3. Astringed musical instrument having a peg box and a tuning peg therefor, said tuning peg including a socket member in said peg box, said socket member being provided with an L-shaped passageway extending therethrough, a draw bar secured to a string of said instrument, said draw bar being slidable in the passageway of said socket member and being positioned perpendicularly to the operative portion of said string, a pinpassing transversely and diametrically through said draw bar and projecting therefrom, said socket member being provided with grooves for engaging the end portions of said pin to prevent the turning of said draw bar, a pulley in the corner of said passagewayfor guiding said string, and means for actuating said draw bar to tension said string.
In testimony whereof I affix my signature.
EDWARD J. SMITH.
US267946A 1928-04-06 1928-04-06 Tuning peg for violins and other string instruments Expired - Lifetime US1732172A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US267946A US1732172A (en) 1928-04-06 1928-04-06 Tuning peg for violins and other string instruments

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US267946A US1732172A (en) 1928-04-06 1928-04-06 Tuning peg for violins and other string instruments

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1732172A true US1732172A (en) 1929-10-15

Family

ID=23020781

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US267946A Expired - Lifetime US1732172A (en) 1928-04-06 1928-04-06 Tuning peg for violins and other string instruments

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1732172A (en)

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4589321A (en) * 1984-06-25 1986-05-20 Paul Reed Smith String attachment means for a tuning machine
US4827825A (en) * 1987-09-02 1989-05-09 Gotoh Gut Yugen Kaisha Tuning peg
WO1993014489A1 (en) * 1992-01-09 1993-07-22 Enserink Innovation Bv Locking apparatus for a string
US5277095A (en) * 1991-05-01 1994-01-11 Steinberger Sound Corp. String tuner

Cited By (4)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4589321A (en) * 1984-06-25 1986-05-20 Paul Reed Smith String attachment means for a tuning machine
US4827825A (en) * 1987-09-02 1989-05-09 Gotoh Gut Yugen Kaisha Tuning peg
US5277095A (en) * 1991-05-01 1994-01-11 Steinberger Sound Corp. String tuner
WO1993014489A1 (en) * 1992-01-09 1993-07-22 Enserink Innovation Bv Locking apparatus for a string

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US4170161A (en) Tuning device for a stringed instrument
US1732172A (en) Tuning peg for violins and other string instruments
US7973227B2 (en) Quick-fix capo having dual adjustability modes for use with a stringed musical instrument, and method of using same
US2812682A (en) Musical instrument string winder
US9190032B2 (en) Guitar string tuning and anchor system
KR20130054251A (en) Tuning peg for a stringed instrument
US1697508A (en) Device for tuning stringed instruments
US31288A (en) Tuning-peg
US554057A (en) Geoege b
US20130139670A1 (en) Adjuster for string instruments
US5081894A (en) Capo
US8093475B1 (en) Tuning device
US8618390B2 (en) Adjustable strap-on capotasto with replaceable strap and method of use
US20170365239A1 (en) Practical solution to the problem of tension equalization in wire tensioned around drums and objects, wire end securing knots and devices, and the protracted time in wire replacement and tensioning.
US9564110B2 (en) String clamping system for musical instruments
US1723751A (en) Stringed musical instrument
US439230A (en) ximenes
US8258387B2 (en) Clamping ball end for musical strings
US4005628A (en) Tuning key for stringed instruments
EP3039670B1 (en) Folding stringed instrument
US1713002A (en) Tension device for musical instruments
US9990907B2 (en) String locking tailpiece for fixed bridge musical instruments
US1579987A (en) Peg for stringed instruments
US9330637B1 (en) Bi-directional loading clamp improvement
US475674A (en) Charles j