US1719475A - Furnace - Google Patents

Furnace Download PDF

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Publication number
US1719475A
US1719475A US62513A US6251325A US1719475A US 1719475 A US1719475 A US 1719475A US 62513 A US62513 A US 62513A US 6251325 A US6251325 A US 6251325A US 1719475 A US1719475 A US 1719475A
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United States
Prior art keywords
tile
plates
lining
furnace
air
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Expired - Lifetime
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US62513A
Inventor
David S Jacobus
Nathan E Lewis
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FULLER LEHIGH Co
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FULLER LEHIGH CO
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Priority to US62513A priority Critical patent/US1719475A/en
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23MCASINGS, LININGS, WALLS OR DOORS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR COMBUSTION CHAMBERS, e.g. FIREBRIDGES; DEVICES FOR DEFLECTING AIR, FLAMES OR COMBUSTION PRODUCTS IN COMBUSTION CHAMBERS; SAFETY ARRANGEMENTS SPECIALLY ADAPTED FOR COMBUSTION APPARATUS; DETAILS OF COMBUSTION CHAMBERS, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • F23M5/00Casings; Linings; Walls
    • F23M5/08Cooling thereof; Tube walls
    • F23M5/085Cooling thereof; Tube walls using air or other gas as the cooling medium

Description

July 2, 1929. D. s. JAcoBUs ET A1. 1,719.475
FURNAGE l Filed oct.- 15," 1925 4 Shasta-sheet i tez l l l :Hsin
lad/ MM .l mvsn'rpns ATTQRNEYS Patented July 2, 1929.
UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.
DAVID S. JACOBUS, OF MONTCLAIR, AND NATHAN E. LEWIS, 0F PLAINFIELD, NEW JERSEY; ASSIGNORS, BY MESNE ASSIGNMENTS, T0 FULLER LEHIGH COMPANY, A
CORPORATION 0F DELAWARE.
FURNACE.
Appli-cation med october 15, 1925. serial No. 62,513.
Our present invention relates to improvements in furnaces, and particularly the Walls thereof, and willbe best understood from the following description and the annexed drawings, in "which Fig. 1 is a vert-ical longitudinal section of a typical form of furnace chamber for a steam boiler which we have chosen for purposes of illustration of our invention; Fig. 2 is a vertical section on a larger scale of a portion of the wall shown in Flg. 1; Fig. 3 is a section on the line 3 3 of Fig. 2; Fig. 4 is a front view of a pair of ad3acent tile of one of the courses shown in Fig. 1;.Fig. 5 is a front view of a pair of adjacent tile in another of the courses shown in Fig. 1, the tile in Figs. 4 and 5 being separated laterally for purposes of illustration; Fig. 6 is a view similar to Fig. 2, but showing a modification; Fig. 7 is a section on-the line 7-7 of Fig. 6; Fig. 8 is a front view of a portion of the sealing device used in each of the forms of our invention which we have illustrated; Fig. 9 is a section on the line 9-9 of Fig. 8; Fig. 10 is a front view of a portion of the wall, showing a different arrangement of tile from that shown in Fig. 1; Figs. 11, 12, 13 and 14 are front views respectivelyof individual tile used in the arrangement shown .in Fig. 10; Fig. 15 is a side view of Fig..14; Fig. 16
shows the front view of another arrangement V parts in the several views.
` One of the objects ofxour invention is to provide a wall which, when used in an aircooled furnace, will provide ducts for the air under pressure so that such air may flow along the outer face of the wall to cool it without danger of excessive infiltration of such air through the refractory wall, provision being made, in some embodiments, to cause the air to be distributed more or less evenly over the entire outer face of the wall.
Another of the objects of our invention is to provide a furnace wall in which the refractory tile may be formed in anels, each panel being made up of a metallic plate to which some of the tile are attached, this vmetallic plate, in turn, being supported on fixed members.
In the arrangement shown in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the furnace chamber has vertical Walls which may be substantially the same in construction and a description of one of which, therefore, will suliice for the entire furnace.
In the illustrative embodiment, the exterlor of the wall is provided with vertical channels 1U and 11 spaced apart and held in such spaced relation by spacing members 12. The outer channels 10, in the arrangement shown, are fastened to transverse channels 13, which, in turn, are fastened to I-beams 11. It will be understood that the channels 13 and I-beams 14 are part of the. furnace setting and are rigidly held at their ends so that the vertical channels 10 and 11 are also` fixed members by being attached in the manner shown.
Attached to the channels 11 are plates 15, these plates being, in the form illustrated, rectangular and substantially s uare. The edges of each adjacent pair of p ates 15 are spaced apart a sufficient distance to take care of any expansion of the plates due to the heat of the furnace. The refractory tile 16, 16, 17 and 17 are connected to the plates 15 by shouldered studs'lS, each stud having an enlarged head which enters a ver tical T-shaped slot 19 in the tile, so that when the stud is drawn up by the nut 20 until its shoulder is against the plate 15, the tile are connected to and suspended from the plate 15, the shoulder on the stud bein long enough` preferably, so that the tile is not clamped to the plate 15 but merely hangs on the stud 18.
The vertical edge portions of the plates 15 have special studs 21 which are like the studs 18, except that they are made long enough to extend through the web of the channel 11,.
the hole in the channel 11 preferably being made large enough so that as the plate 15 expands, the studs 21 can move laterally a sufficient distance either horizontally or vertically to accommodate such expansion. A suitable washer will be provided beneath the nut 20 on studs 21 to s an this enlarged hole. As many of the studps 21 may be provided along the edge of each late 15 as desired, and )referably each o the studs entering the c annels 11 will be made with an enlarged hole to permit the desired freedom of motion of the plate 15.
Between the channels 11 we provide, in the form shown in Figs. 2 and 3, angled plates 22 with the studs 18 entering holes in one ot the angled flanges of these plates, 'the angles 22 extending horizontally along the wall for the purpose of forming separate air ducts, or at least to divide the air flow horizontally into parallel streams, the plates 22 for this purpose extending adjacent to the outer casing which is carried on and between the outer channels 10. The angled plates 22 assist in holding the studs 18 which support the tile andl also prevent the plates from buckling by acting as stiffening members. The angled plates 22 also assist in preventing overheating of the plates 15 by acting as cooling fins. Preferably the outer channels 10 are arrangedin pairs, as shown best in Fig. 3, and a plate 23 is held between each pair of channels. This plate extends toward the web of channel 11 so as to force any air flowing horizontally through the space between the inner and outer walls to contact with the web 11 to cool the same. The outer casing, in the illustrative form, is provided with removable panels 24 by which access to the nuts of studs 18 may be had.
The tile 16 and 17 in the form shown in Figs. 2 and 3 are arranged with their adjacent edges so that. radiant heat from the furnace cannot contact with the plate 15 even though a rather wide crack or joint is left between such adjacent edges to permit each individual tile to expand with the heat without contacting with its neighbor. In the arrangement shown in Figs. l, 2, and 8, the tile are arranged in horizontal courses with the joints broken between each pair of courses. For instance, the lowerinost course in Fig. 1 is made up of tiles 17 and 17 (Fig. 5) arranged alternately and the course above is made up of tiles 16 and 16 arranged alternately but with their vertical line of contact out of vertical alinement with vthe corresponding line in the courses above and below.
Instead of the tile formed and arranged as in Figs. 1, 2, 3 and 19, they may be formed as in Figs. 1() to 15, inclusive. In this arrangement, the joints between the tile are not broken either horizontally or vertically in the ordinary sense, but somewhat of the same effect is obtained as if both horizontal and vertical joints were broken. The upper course in Fig. 10 is formed of tiles 25, 2G, alternating in the course. In the. next lower course, tile 27 and 28 are correspondingly alternated, the curved `tops and bottoms of these tile being formed to conform to the top and bottom curves of the tile 25, 2G, particularly at the corners of the tile.
In order to seal the joints between the edges of the plates 15, we have provided sealing devices, one form of which is illustrated in Figs. 2, 8 and-9. A plate 29 having two of its opposite edges 30 outwardly curved to form a kind of pocket, is held against the plates 15 by the studs 18 passioni' through holes in plates 15 and 29, the plaie 29 extending across the joint between plates 15, and the hole in one ot the platesl being large enough to permit relative movement between the plates, as best shown in Fig. 9. The pockets of plates 29 may be filled with a soft packing material 31, such as asbestos fiber. The vertical joints between plates 15, in the form illustrated, are covered by the webs of the channels 11, so that no further seal is required.
In Figs. G and 7, the wall is made up much as in Figs. 2 and 3. vThe vertical channels 32 and $8 are held spaced apart by bars 3G, .l
Vvertical joints being covered by the webs of channels 33.
The tile, in this illustrative form, are arranged with broken horizontal joints, as best shown in Fig. 1G. The tile 37' and 3S are arranged in vertical rows, with the tile in each such row all alike. The positions of the studs 18 on the plates 15 are staggered, so that the horizontal joints between the tile are broken. It will be noted that, in this form of wall, only two tile shapes are required. 'lhis is due to the making of two opposite sides of the tile (in this case, the top and bottom, Fig. 6) parallel to each other.
In the form of Figs. 6 and 7, no attempt. is made to direct the air flow between the walls. Since the casing is permanently.' closed, the space between the walls is mmh` large enough so that a workman can get between them to remove nuls 20, the bars 36 serving as ladders by whichthe workmancan reach any part of the wall. A convenient door will be provided for access to this interwall space.
It will he understood that any of the several tile arrangements which we have shown may be used with any form of wall in which the wall is divided into separately supported panels and that the several parts of our invention may be used independently of other parts thereof. For instance, the panel-supported tile may be used in a simple furnace wall not provided with means to direct cooling air along the exterior of the wall.
In the arrangement we have described, a wall is provided which is particularly useful in air-cooled furnaces in which air under pressulre is caused to flow along the exterior lltl I no Considerable quantity of air will flow into the furnace chamber through such joints.
At the saine time, the metallic lining is ,ar,
ranged so that it can expandl and contract under varying temperatures, withoutbreaking the lining or opening up joints therein to periiiitair to infiltrate into the furnace. The wall and the lining may be repaired in sections without distiiibing the remainder of the wall.
We claim:
1. In a furnace Wall, a refractory wall comprisingr a plurality of tiles placed edge to edge with the edges spaced, means supporting each tile so that each tile is permitted to expand without contacting with an adjacent tile, a substantially air-tiglit metallic lining over the exterior of said refractory wall, and a casing spaced from said lining and forming an air passage between said lining and said casing.
2. In a fiiinace wall, a refractory wall comprising a plurality of tiles placed edge to edge. and spaced'from each other to form wide joints therebetween, a substantially airtight metallic lining over the exterior of said refractory wall, and a casing spaced from said lining. and forming an air passage between said lining and said casing.
3L In a furnace wall, a refractory wall ycomprising a plurality of tiles laced edge to edge and spaced from each ot er to form wide joints therebetween, a substantially airi ltight metallic lining over the exterior of said refractory wall and a casing spaced from saidlining and forming an airpassage betweenV said.. lining and said easing, the
`edges of thel tiles being constructed and arranged to preclude radiant heat from the furnace passing through the joints between adjacent tiles and reaching said metallic lining.4
4. In a fu'rnaee'wall, a refractory wall, a
.. substantially air-tiglit metallic lining over the exterior thereof, a casing spaced from said lining to form an air passage therebetween, afplurality of substantiallyparallel members spaced apart and extending partially across said passage to divide the flow of air therethrough, and a plurality of other members also extending partially across said passage and disposed at an angle to said first named members, for the purpose set* forth. p
5. In a furnace wall, a refractory wall, a substantially air-tight metallic lining over ythe exterior thereof, a casing spacedfrom said lining to form an -aii passage therebe- '.tween, a plurality of substantially parallel members spaced 'apart and extending into said passage from one side thereof and extending partiallj; across said passage, and a plurality of ot er members disposed at an angle to said first named members and exacross the same fioni the other side thereof.
G. In a furnace wall, a refractory wall comprising a plurality of tiles placed edge to edge with the edges spaced, means supporting each` tile so that each tile is pei'- niitted to expand without contacting with an adjacent tile, a substantially air-tight lining over the exterior of said refractory wall and comprising a pluralityof plates with expansion joints therebetween Whereb the plates may expand relatively to eac other, and a casing spaced from said lining and forming an air passage between said lining and casing. l
7. In a furnace wall, a refractory wall having a substantially air-tiglit metallic lining over the exterior thereof, said lining comprising a plurality of plates overlapping at their edges, packed joints at the overlapping parts of said plates, attachments holding said plates together and passing through holes in said overlapping parts, said holes being so constructed and arranged as to allow said plates to lexpand and contract rela-tively to each other.
8. In" a furnace wall', a refractory wall having a substantially air-tight metallic lining over the exterior thereof, said lining comprising a plurality of plates overlapping `at their edges, packed joints at the overlaps ping parts of said plates, attachments holding said plates together and passing through holes in said overlappingparts, said holes being so constructed and arranged as to lallow said plates to expand and contra-ct relatively toeach other, and a casing spaced from said lining and forming an air passage between said lining and casing. c,
9. In a furnace wall, a refractory wall, a
substantially air-tight metallic lining made in overlapping sections on the exterior in overlapping vsections on the l exterior thereof, a casing spaced from said lining to form an air passage therebetween, a plu- .rality of substantially parallel cooling and vstflening members attached to said sections,
said cooling and stifening members being spaced apartjand extending -intothe passage from one side thereof and extending partially across said passage.
DAVID S. JACOBUS.` NATHAN E. LEIVIS.
US62513A 1925-10-15 1925-10-15 Furnace Expired - Lifetime US1719475A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2491899A (en) * 1943-09-01 1949-12-20 Jeffrey Mfg Co Elevator
US2581989A (en) * 1946-07-01 1952-01-08 Laclede Christy Company Furnace wall structure
US2618961A (en) * 1946-08-29 1952-11-25 Laclede Christy Clay Products Furnace wall
US2756701A (en) * 1952-11-17 1956-07-31 Detrick M H Co Soaking pit coping
US2788753A (en) * 1950-11-30 1957-04-16 Bernitz Furnace Appliance Comp Furnace wall construction
US2847849A (en) * 1955-11-28 1958-08-19 Georges P Reintjes Modular suspended wall
US4112648A (en) * 1976-11-08 1978-09-12 The President Of The Agency Of Industrial Science And Technology Wall structure of hot fluid chamber
WO2014008575A1 (en) * 2012-07-10 2014-01-16 Hatch Ltd. Furnace air cooling system

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2491899A (en) * 1943-09-01 1949-12-20 Jeffrey Mfg Co Elevator
US2581989A (en) * 1946-07-01 1952-01-08 Laclede Christy Company Furnace wall structure
US2618961A (en) * 1946-08-29 1952-11-25 Laclede Christy Clay Products Furnace wall
US2788753A (en) * 1950-11-30 1957-04-16 Bernitz Furnace Appliance Comp Furnace wall construction
US2756701A (en) * 1952-11-17 1956-07-31 Detrick M H Co Soaking pit coping
US2847849A (en) * 1955-11-28 1958-08-19 Georges P Reintjes Modular suspended wall
US4112648A (en) * 1976-11-08 1978-09-12 The President Of The Agency Of Industrial Science And Technology Wall structure of hot fluid chamber
WO2014008575A1 (en) * 2012-07-10 2014-01-16 Hatch Ltd. Furnace air cooling system

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