US1699931A - Ship's rudder - Google Patents

Ship's rudder Download PDF

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Publication number
US1699931A
US1699931A US220783A US22078327A US1699931A US 1699931 A US1699931 A US 1699931A US 220783 A US220783 A US 220783A US 22078327 A US22078327 A US 22078327A US 1699931 A US1699931 A US 1699931A
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rudder
balanced
plates
main piece
ship
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US220783A
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Tutin John
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63HMARINE PROPULSION OR STEERING
    • B63H25/00Steering; Slowing-down otherwise than by use of propulsive elements; Dynamic anchoring, i.e. positioning vessels by means of main or auxiliary propulsive elements
    • B63H25/06Steering by rudders
    • B63H25/38Rudders
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B63SHIPS OR OTHER WATERBORNE VESSELS; RELATED EQUIPMENT
    • B63HMARINE PROPULSION OR STEERING
    • B63H25/00Steering; Slowing-down otherwise than by use of propulsive elements; Dynamic anchoring, i.e. positioning vessels by means of main or auxiliary propulsive elements
    • B63H25/06Steering by rudders
    • B63H25/38Rudders
    • B63H2025/388Rudders with varying angle of attack over the height of the rudder blade, e.g. twisted rudders

Definitions

  • This invention relates to rudders of the balanced or semi balanced type, in assoclation with open stern frames, and the object of the invention is to eifect certain improve- 5 ments in such rudders.
  • a balanced or semi balanced rudder is constructed in such a manner that that portion of the rudder Whichlies within the screw race has horizontal sections of com- ).0 plete aerofoil or streamline form, totally enclosing the corresponding portion of the main piece, said sections comprising a rudder plate, displaced laterally to one side of the main piece, to which plate is secured a suit- 1 ably shaped sheathing of timber or other appropriate material.
  • a rudder constructed according to the present invention is relatively light and inexpensive, easily repaired, and does not involve electric welding, whilst the sheathing, which may take various forms, including that of an aerofoil, may be readily removed at any point for inspection, repair, renewal, and the treatment of the enclosed metal surfaces to prevent corrosion. It will be understood, of course, that whilst as far as possible a smooth and regular contour of 80 such horizontal sections is proposed, a contour which, for constructural reasons, is not perfectly smooth, will nevertheless come within the scope of the invention.
  • the horizontal sections may be symmetrical about a vertical longitudinal central plane, in which case the resistance of the rudder is relatively less than for an ordinary rudder; or they may be non-symmetrical about a vertical longitudinal central plane in such a manner as to utilize the rotational velocity of the race abaft the propeller to impart a contributory propulsive thrust to the vessel as described in the specification of my application Serial No. 99537 /1926. In this latter case therefore, the resistance of the rudder is relatively less than an ordinary rudder and in addition it develops an auxiliary propulsive thrust.
  • Fig. 1, 2 representing a series of sections des- 1 ignated A, B, G, D, E, F, G and H, to correspond to the lines similarly designated in Fig. 1.
  • Fig. 3 shows the fore and after ends, to a larger scale, of a specific constructional detail of aerofoil form of rudder.
  • Fig. i is a view of a modification to the sections shown in Fig. 2.
  • the rudder comprises two plates 1, 2 secured to a main piece 3, the uppermost arms 4 of which serve to effect pintle connection with the head piece or arch 5 of a stern frame of the open type.
  • the upper part of plate 1 may coincide with the central longitundinal plane of the vessel, when in normal position, as indicated in the section A Fig. 2, but is gradually displaced, corresponding to the section B, C, D until section E is reached where the aftermost corner of the plate coincides with the aftermost corner of the lower plate 2.
  • Such a construction differs only slightly from that of my earlier application Serial No. 99537/1926 already referred to the coincidence of the aftermost corners of the plates in line with the axis of the propeller shaft however avoiding the necessity of rope guards such as are desirable or necessary whenthe after edge of the rudder plates is discontinuous.
  • the rudder plates are in this instance slotted over the arms where these enclose the main piece, and they may also if desired be slotted over the tips of the arms forward and aft or elsewhere where it may be desirable, 19 representing the points at which such holes are formed in the, rudder plates in the example illustrated.
  • Wood members, atattached to the plates secure the desired aerofoil formation.
  • the baulks thus constituted, of which one is shown at 6 in Fig. 3 may be equipped with protector plates 7, at the nose and tail, such plates being attached by studs 8.
  • the connection of the baulk 6 in the example illustrated is eifected primarily 100 by means of through-bolts 9, 10 being a dowel or plug employed to protect the nut 11.
  • Fig. 4 represents in horizontal section a stream line balanced rudder, the sheathing being attached substantially in the way illus- 105 trated in Fig. 3 and the rudder being constructed and mounted substantially in the way illustrated in Fig. 1.
  • a rudder constructed according to the, invention may, if desired, be pivotally sup- 110 ported by bearings enclosing the mainpiece itself, in lieu of the pintle attachment shown in the examples.
  • a balanced rudder for screw propelled ships comprising a main piece, plating dis placed laterally to one side of the main piece and a non-metallic sheathing applied to the said plating and enclosing the main piece.
  • a balanced rudder for screw propelled ships comprising a main piece, plating dis- 15 Signed at NGWOQStlQ-OH-TYIIO this 7th day 20 of September, 1927.

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  • Chemical & Material Sciences (AREA)
  • Engineering & Computer Science (AREA)
  • Combustion & Propulsion (AREA)
  • Mechanical Engineering (AREA)
  • Ocean & Marine Engineering (AREA)
  • Structures Of Non-Positive Displacement Pumps (AREA)

Description

Jan. 22, 1929. 1,699,931
J. TUTIN SHIP S RUDDER Filed Sept; 20, 1927 In Ventor 1.70/7 72mm \flttorneys Patented Jan. 22, 1929.
UNITED STATES I 1,999,931 PATENT OFFICE.
JOHN TUTIFT, OF SUNDERLAND, ENGLA1\TD.'
SHIPS RUDDER.
Application filed September 20, 1927, Serial No. 220,783, and in Great Britain September 25, 1926.
This invention relates to rudders of the balanced or semi balanced type, in assoclation with open stern frames, and the object of the invention is to eifect certain improve- 5 ments in such rudders.
To this end a balanced or semi balanced rudder is constructed in such a manner that that portion of the rudder Whichlies within the screw race has horizontal sections of com- ).0 plete aerofoil or streamline form, totally enclosing the corresponding portion of the main piece, said sections comprising a rudder plate, displaced laterally to one side of the main piece, to which plate is secured a suit- 1 ably shaped sheathing of timber or other appropriate material. By this means certain difliculties in the construction and use of known types of stream lined balanced rudders are overcome. A rudder constructed according to the present invention is relatively light and inexpensive, easily repaired, and does not involve electric welding, whilst the sheathing, which may take various forms, including that of an aerofoil, may be readily removed at any point for inspection, repair, renewal, and the treatment of the enclosed metal surfaces to prevent corrosion. It will be understood, of course, that whilst as far as possible a smooth and regular contour of 80 such horizontal sections is proposed, a contour which, for constructural reasons, is not perfectly smooth, will nevertheless come within the scope of the invention.
The horizontal sections, neglecting the aforesaid purely constructural departures from a smooth form, may be symmetrical about a vertical longitudinal central plane, in which case the resistance of the rudder is relatively less than for an ordinary rudder; or they may be non-symmetrical about a vertical longitudinal central plane in such a manner as to utilize the rotational velocity of the race abaft the propeller to impart a contributory propulsive thrust to the vessel as described in the specification of my application Serial No. 99537 /1926. In this latter case therefore, the resistance of the rudder is relatively less than an ordinary rudder and in addition it develops an auxiliary propulsive thrust.
But in order that the invention may be more readily understood and easily carried into effect it will now be further described with the aid of the accompanying drawings in which one example is semi-diagrammatically illustrated in side elevation by Fig. 1, 2 representing a series of sections des- 1 ignated A, B, G, D, E, F, G and H, to correspond to the lines similarly designated in Fig. 1. Fig. 3 shows the fore and after ends, to a larger scale, of a specific constructional detail of aerofoil form of rudder. Fig. i is a view of a modification to the sections shown in Fig. 2.
As shown in Figs. 1 and 2 the rudder comprises two plates 1, 2 secured to a main piece 3, the uppermost arms 4 of which serve to effect pintle connection with the head piece or arch 5 of a stern frame of the open type. The upper part of plate 1 may coincide with the central longitundinal plane of the vessel, when in normal position, as indicated in the section A Fig. 2, but is gradually displaced, corresponding to the section B, C, D until section E is reached where the aftermost corner of the plate coincides with the aftermost corner of the lower plate 2. Such a construction differs only slightly from that of my earlier application Serial No. 99537/1926 already referred to the coincidence of the aftermost corners of the plates in line with the axis of the propeller shaft however avoiding the necessity of rope guards such as are desirable or necessary whenthe after edge of the rudder plates is discontinuous.
The rudder plates are in this instance slotted over the arms where these enclose the main piece, and they may also if desired be slotted over the tips of the arms forward and aft or elsewhere where it may be desirable, 19 representing the points at which such holes are formed in the, rudder plates in the example illustrated. Wood members, atattached to the plates secure the desired aerofoil formation. The baulks thus constituted, of which one is shown at 6 in Fig. 3 may be equipped with protector plates 7, at the nose and tail, such plates being attached by studs 8. The connection of the baulk 6 in the example illustrated is eifected primarily 100 by means of through- bolts 9, 10 being a dowel or plug employed to protect the nut 11.
Fig. 4 represents in horizontal section a stream line balanced rudder, the sheathing being attached substantially in the way illus- 105 trated in Fig. 3 and the rudder being constructed and mounted substantially in the way illustrated in Fig. 1.
A rudder constructed according to the, invention may, if desired, be pivotally sup- 110 ported by bearings enclosing the mainpiece itself, in lieu of the pintle attachment shown in the examples.
What I claim is 1. A balanced rudder for screw propelled ships, comprising a main piece, plating dis placed laterally to one side of the main piece and a non-metallic sheathing applied to the said plating and enclosing the main piece.
2. A balanced rudder according to claim 1 wherein the sheathing imparts to the rudder horizontal sections which are aerofoil in shape.
3. A balanced rudder for screw propelled ships, comprising a main piece, plating dis- 15 Signed at NGWOQStlQ-OH-TYIIO this 7th day 20 of September, 1927.
' JOHN TUTIN.
US220783A 1926-09-25 1927-09-20 Ship's rudder Expired - Lifetime US1699931A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5415122A (en) * 1993-10-13 1995-05-16 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Twisted rudder for a vessel
US5456200A (en) * 1993-10-13 1995-10-10 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Rudder for reduced cavitation

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US5415122A (en) * 1993-10-13 1995-05-16 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Twisted rudder for a vessel
US5456200A (en) * 1993-10-13 1995-10-10 The United States Of America As Represented By The Secretary Of The Navy Rudder for reduced cavitation

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