US1690696A - Rubber heel - Google Patents

Rubber heel Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1690696A
US1690696A US16734727A US1690696A US 1690696 A US1690696 A US 1690696A US 16734727 A US16734727 A US 16734727A US 1690696 A US1690696 A US 1690696A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
heel
arch
rim
arches
lift
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Harry G Norwood
Original Assignee
A D T Libby
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43BCHARACTERISTIC FEATURES OF FOOTWEAR; PARTS OF FOOTWEAR
    • A43B21/00Heels; Top-pieces, e.g. high heels, heel distinct from the sole, high heels monolithic with the sole
    • A43B21/02Heels; Top-pieces, e.g. high heels, heel distinct from the sole, high heels monolithic with the sole characterised by the material
    • A43B21/06Heels; Top-pieces, e.g. high heels, heel distinct from the sole, high heels monolithic with the sole characterised by the material rubber

Description

Nov. 6, 1928. 1,690,696

H- G. NQRWOOD RUBBER HEEL Filed Feb. 10, 1927 IN VENTOR HARRY 6 N01? W000 grjfw A TTURNEV f Patented Nova. 6, 1928.

u -iiau stares a: e. nonwoon or narrmonn. MARYLAND, assrenon re A.

. NEWARK, NEW masnr.

PATENT orrics.

n. r. LIBBY, or

anemia HEEL.

Application filed February 10, 1827. Serial No. 167,847.

This invention. relates to a resilient heel, for use on boots, shoes and the like. r

In the past many designs of resilient or rubber heels have been proposed, but my present.

invention is directed more to an entirely new design, rather than to improvements on the prior art designs, and the advantages of my present invention may be briefly set forthas follows.

The resilient heel disclosed herein is, directed to one in which a combination of arches have bases which coact to sustain'the adjacent arch or arches, whereby much greater resilience is obtained than in other heels which have been proposed.

' The construction is such that the amount of material used in making the heel is materially reduced, in some cases as much as half. Another object of my invention-is to provide a construction by which the outer cavities produced by the arches act to prevent slipping or skidding to a high degree and due to the arch construction, greater resilience is obtained,'and the wear on the heel is reduced to a minimum.

Referring to the drawing, Figure 1 is a plan view of the bottom of the heel, while Figure 2 is a longitudinal section through the heel. The heel comprises a rim portion 1, having the edge 2 adapted'to 'fit closely againstthe heel lift of the boot or shoe. The heel is provided with the usual holes 3 for nailing the heel to the shoe lift. 4 is the usual metal Washer which acts to limit the driving of the nail onto the lift. Preferably around the hole 3 is a series of slight corrugations 8 which add to the appearance of the heel.

Between the confines of the rim-1, the heel is constructed of a plurality of arches, two being illustrated, the central arch 5 is surrounded by an annular arch 6, the arches having a common abutment 7, which preferably engages the lift of the shoe, when the heel'is put in position thereon.

It will be noted that the arches 5 and 6 are very much thinner than the rim 1, and due to this thinness of the wall and the arch construction, the amount of rubber required in the heel is materially reduced. By making the arches 5 and 6 re atively thin, greater resilience is obtained, yet it will be seen from a study of the drawing sure is applied to e1ther of the arches, the strains applied thereto are conveyed through the common abutment 7 to the other arch or arches so that the equilibrium of the arches is maintained and greater resilience results.

The annular cavity 9 formed on the outer surthat in use when 'presarch and an annular arch between the rim and V the central arch, said central arch being proportioned'so as to have somewhat more resilience than the outer arch.

2. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift and a plurality of arched portions concentrically arranged and. which coact to transmit the applied pressures from one arch to the other.

3. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift, a central arch and an annu-' lar'arch between the central arch and the rim, said central arch being of considerable length and breadth relative to said annular arch.

4. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift, and a plurality of arched portions concentrically arranged and having abutments on theheel lift.

5. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift, a central arch and an annular arch between the rim and the central arch, said arches having a thickness materially less than the thickness of the rim portion.

6. A resilient heel having a rim portion to fit on the heel lift, a centralarch and an annular arch between the rim and the central arch, said central arch having a common abutment with the annular arch.

7. In a flexible heel having a rim to fit the heel lift, means for securing great resilience, and non-skidding characteristics, comprising a plurality of spaced concentric arches forming outer surface suction areas therebetwe'en,

said arches having a thickness of section materially less than the rim.

8. In a flexible heel having a rim to fit the heel lift, means for securing great resilience,

5 and non=skidding characteristics, and minimum of weight comprising, a central arched portion and an annular arched portion having a common abutment with the central arch a ainst the heel lift, the outer convex surface 0 said arches forming an annular suction ring while said arches are of much less thickness than the rim.

In testimony whereof, I afiix my signatui HARRY G. NORWOOD.

US1690696A 1927-02-10 1927-02-10 Rubber heel Expired - Lifetime US1690696A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1690696A US1690696A (en) 1927-02-10 1927-02-10 Rubber heel

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1690696A US1690696A (en) 1927-02-10 1927-02-10 Rubber heel

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1690696A true US1690696A (en) 1928-11-06

Family

ID=22606988

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US1690696A Expired - Lifetime US1690696A (en) 1927-02-10 1927-02-10 Rubber heel

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1690696A (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20030150133A1 (en) * 2002-02-01 2003-08-14 Staffaroni Michael G. Shock absorption system for a sole
US6979003B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2005-12-27 Heeling Sports Limited Heeling apparatus and method
US7032330B2 (en) 2002-02-01 2006-04-25 Heeling Sports Limited Grind rail apparatus
US7063336B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2006-06-20 Heeling Sports Limited External wheeled heeling apparatus and method
US7610972B2 (en) 2004-08-04 2009-11-03 Heeling Sports Limited Motorized transportation apparatus and method

Cited By (12)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US7165773B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2007-01-23 Heeling Sports Limited Heeling apparatus and method
US6979003B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2005-12-27 Heeling Sports Limited Heeling apparatus and method
US8480095B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2013-07-09 Heeling Sports Limited Heeling apparatus wheel assembly
US7063336B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2006-06-20 Heeling Sports Limited External wheeled heeling apparatus and method
US7165774B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2007-01-23 Heeling Sports Limited External wheeled heeling apparatus and method
US7621540B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2009-11-24 Heeling Sports Limited Heeling apparatus and method
US9242169B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2016-01-26 Heeling Sports Limited Heeling apparatus
US9776067B2 (en) 1999-04-01 2017-10-03 Heeling Sports Limited Heeling apparatus
US6848201B2 (en) * 2002-02-01 2005-02-01 Heeling Sports Limited Shock absorption system for a sole
US20030150133A1 (en) * 2002-02-01 2003-08-14 Staffaroni Michael G. Shock absorption system for a sole
US7032330B2 (en) 2002-02-01 2006-04-25 Heeling Sports Limited Grind rail apparatus
US7610972B2 (en) 2004-08-04 2009-11-03 Heeling Sports Limited Motorized transportation apparatus and method

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1214666A (en) Boot and shoe sole.
US3934359A (en) Reinforcing elements for shoe soles and heels
US2124986A (en) Rubber sole and heel
US1650466A (en) Cushion lift for shoes
US1552022A (en) Rubber shoe
US2162912A (en) Rubber sole
US1702591A (en) Arch support
US2408152A (en) Antiskid canvas device
US1021142A (en) Pneumatic walking attachment.
US2062568A (en) Cog belt
US1539283A (en) Shoe heel and sole lift
US1524997A (en) Tread or sole and heel for boots and shoes
US1568064A (en) Antislipping device for shoe soles and heels
US1524782A (en) Footwear
US1261525A (en) Shoe-heel.
US1148584A (en) Method of utilizing scrap pieces of material.
US2393577A (en) Footwear sole
US989894A (en) Pneumatic insole and arch-support.
US592822A (en) parker
US1724349A (en) Cushion for shoe heels
US1167885A (en) Heel and sole blank.
US1754836A (en) Tire
US583641A (en) Rubber sole for boots or shoes
US836364A (en) Detachable tread for boots and shoes.
US369766A (en) Martin v