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Automatically-operated orchestral device

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US1688450A
US1688450A US1688450DA US1688450A US 1688450 A US1688450 A US 1688450A US 1688450D A US1688450D A US 1688450DA US 1688450 A US1688450 A US 1688450A
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10FAUTOMATIC MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
    • G10F1/00Automatic musical instruments
    • G10F1/02Pianofortes with keyboard

Description

Oct. 23, 1928.

W. R. CORBETT AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED ORCHESTRAL DEVICE 12 Shets-Sheet I .gnvma I 0 4 he R C 01 1:2111

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Oct. 23, 1928.

. w. R. CORBETT AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED ORCHESTRAL DEVICE 12 Sheets-$hee 2 Filed Oct. 1, 192} Willi. E 11 Enrhett Am 4 E Oct. 23, 1928. 1,688,450

w. R. CORBETT AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED QRCHESTRAL DEVICE Filed 091:. 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet 3 Oct. 23, 1928. 11588 450 w. R. CORBETT AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED ORCHESTRAL DEVICE Filed Oct. 1, 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet 4 5a Ji :LEJ.

Oct. 23, 1928. 1,688,450

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Oct. 23, 1928.

W. R. CORBETT AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED ORCHESTRAL DEVICE File -V 1 2 12 Sheets-Sheet 7 314mm Willua H. Curb ETT Oct. 23, 1928. 1,688,456

W. R. CORBETT AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED ORCHESTRAL DEVICE Filed Oct. 1. 19:3 1; s t -s t, 8

Oct. 23, 1928.

W. R.CORBETT AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED ORCHESTRAL DEVICE Filed Oct. 1, 1923 I2 Sheets-Sheet 9 NI I l h IWH MI.

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Oct. 23, 1928. I 1,688,450

W. R. CORBETT AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED ORCHESTRAL DEVICE Filed Oct. 1, 1923 12 Sheets-Shq'et 10 |m 1mm...

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Q. iimlillilliiiiiiilii 1 liilllliliiiiiiiliiiiii m W. R. CORBETT Filed Oct- 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet ll gwuc-nkw WLIHER. EEIFEIELT.

Oct. 23, 1928.

w. R. CORBETT AUTOMATICALLY OPERATED ORCHESTRAL DEVICE Filed 0 1 1923 12 sheets -sheet 12 o w A M m A A w A 0. M M m A A /yl- IAN A H 5 A M A .u m Tim D E R .w W z A,

Patented Oct. 23, 1928.

WILLIE R. CORBETT, OF PADUCAH, KENTUCKY.

AUTOMATICALLY-OPERATED ORCHESTRAL.DEVICE.

Application filed October 1928. Serial No. 665,991.

This invention relates to improvements in used in connection with the keys of the piano.

apparatus for producing music.

The primary object of this invention is the provision of musical apparatus which embodies a plurality of automatically controlled musical instruments, which may be arranged in a desired orchestral relation.

A further object of this invention is the provision of an orchestral apparatus which embodies a plurality of musical instruments of any approved selection whose playing may be controlled by means of the playing apparatus of an automatic piano or the like.

A further object of this invention is the provision of an orchestral apparatus of the above described character which is preferably operated by electrical power, and embodying a novel means by which the instruments may render soundsof desired amplitude independent of the number or character of instruments playing, at any one time;

A further object of this invention is the provision of an orchestral apparatus of the above mentioned character which embodies an] approved selection of instruments with electrically controlled operating apparatus associated therewith, and a key board for controlling the orchestral apparatus.

Other objects and advantages of this invention will appear during the course of the. following detailed description.

' In the drawings, wherein similar reference characters designate corresponding parts throughout, the several views.

I Figure 1 is a diagrammatic view illustrating a preferred arrangement of instruments for the automatic orchestral device, showing their operating means and control therefor.

Fig. 2 is a transverse cross sectional view taken through an automatic piano, showing improved means associated therewith by which the orchestral device may be controlled from the action of the piano.

Fig. 3 is a fragmentary cross sectional view taken through a key of the piano illustrated in Figure 2, showing the manner in which the same is equipped with control switches for the various instruments and operating means of the orchestral device.

Fig. 4 is a bottom plan view of the key illustrated in Figure 3.

Figs. 5 and 6 are transverse cross sectional views taken on their respective lines in F igure 3 of the drawings.

Fig. 7 is a perspective view of a novel typeof contact uiein'li er which is resiliently Fig. 8 is a resilient arm which is cooperatively used in connection with the contact illustrated in Figure 7.

Fig. 9 is a side elevation of a device which may be used for either connecting the operating mechanism of an automatic piano to a motor so that the music roller may be operated thereby, or by means of which the operating means may be disconnected with respect to a motor so that the sheet operating means may be manually operated.

Fig. 10 IS an enlarged cross sectional view taken through an adjusting portion of th mechanism illustrated in Figure 9. 4

Fig. 11 is a plan view-of the apparatus illustrated in Figure 9.

Figure 12 is a plan viewof a violin with novel operating meansjassociated' therewith.

Fig. 13 is a side elevation of'the vioIin and operating means illustratedin Figure 12.

Fig. 14.- is an enlarged fragmentaryview, partly in cross section; showinga fingering device which may housed in connection with the opera ting mechanism-for. the violin. Y

Fig. 15 is a pl'ainvi'w of, a-supporting frame work which may lie'used for th fingering mechani'sin o'f the violin. if.

Fig. 16 isa'side elevationof'theframe work illustrated'in Figure 151 5 "5" Fig. 17 "is detail "of the frame-W rk illustrated inFigures-lfi and 16. I

Fig. 18 is a side elevation, partly in'cross section. of a reed horn instrumentshowing the electromagnetic operating means which may be used in connection therewith.

Fig. 19 isxa fragmentary cross sectional view of certain valve 'c'ontrol 'means for regulating the flow'of air 'to the horn instrument of'Fi'g. 18. Fig. 20 is a'side elevationof the valve apparatus illustrated in'Figure19.

Fig. 21' is a side elevation showing a partof the supporting means for the instrument ofFig.1.

Fig. 22 is a front elevation ofa novel type of fingeringdevice which may be used in connection with mandolins and guitars.

F ig. 23 is a fragmentary plan view of a mandolin or guitar, showing the novel fingering devices as used in connection therewith. p

Fig. 24 is a cross. sectional view taken substantially 'on the line 24%24 of Figure 22.

Fig. -25 shows an arrangement of? parts which may be used in connection with a pipe organ or the like and the electrical operating means therefor.

Fig. 26 is avertical cross sectional view taken through one of the pipes illustrated in Figure 25.

Fig. 27 is a perspective view of a novel type of electrically operated valve for pneumatic control of a pipe organ pipe.

Fig. 28 is a transverse cross sectional view taken substantially on the line 28-28 of Figure 25.

Fig. 29 is a side elevation, partly in cross section, of an arrangement of pneumatic horns and the electrical operating means therefor.

Fig. 30 is a cross sectional view taken through one of the horns illustrated in F igure 29.

Fig. 31 is a cross sectional view taken substantially on the line 31-31 of Figure 30.

Fig. 32 is a perspective view of a-brac-kct which may be used for supporting the valve of one of the horns illustrated in Figure 29.

Fig. 33 is a plan iew of a Xylophone and the operating means therefor.

Fig. 34 is an end elevation of the apparatus illustrated in Figure 33.

Fig. 35 is a perspective view of a bracket which may be used in connection witlrthe electrical operating means for the Xylophone. Fig. 36 is'a side elevation of a drum and the operating means therefor.

Figs. 37 and 38 are views illustrating the mounting :of hammers which may be used in connection with the'c ymbals and drums. Fig. .39 is a frontelevation of the apparatiis illustrated inFigure 36.

Fig. 40 is a cross-sectional view taken through the armature portion of an electromagnet, used in connection with the operatingwmeans for the hammers of the drum and cymbals.

In the draw-ings, wherein for the purpose of illustration is shown the preferred embodiment of the orchestral apparatus and the parts thereof, the letter A may generally designate the orchestral apparatus which may include an automatically operated piano B; violin device D; horn E; pipe organ G;.pneumatic-horn device H; electrical horn device K; Xylophone L; trap drum device M; and any other approved instrument such as a mandolin N.

Referring to the automatic .piano B, the same may be of any approved construction, including a housing 10, within which the piano action 11 is carried in any approved arrangement, The piano action 11, of course. includes the hammers 12, and the rods 13 which connects the wippens of the piano action to the rear ends of the operatingkeys 14. The piano is preferably pneumatically operated, and is preferably provided with bellows 15, 16 and l'iwvhich are operatively connected to a crank shaft or analogous device 18. The bellows 15 and 16 which are exhaust bellows supply air to a tank 19 which is connected by means of a conduit 20 with the bellows device 21. The device 21,'as is 'wellknown, includes a crank shaft 22 connected by means of a chain 23 lo the winding'sha'ft 24 which is adapted to receive the music roller 25 for drive of the latter. A tracker bar 26 is preferably .provided, of conventional construction, over which the sheet of music 27 travels, as the same is wound by the shaft 24 upon the roller 25; the sheet 27 preferably being supported by an idling roller 28, as' is well known, so that the perforations of the same may travel over the perforations of the tracker bar 26.

The bellows 17 may be utilized for supplying compressed air to a tank 30 from which conduits 32 extend upon opposite sides thereof, adapted to receiveair therethrough to operate the various horn and reed instrumcnts of the orchestral device, and as will be subsequently described.

In connection with the operation of the bellows 15, 16 and 17, a motor may be provided for operating the-crankshaft '18, or it may be manually operated in 'the well known manner. Referring to the mechanism which will ,permit of "motor or riianu'al operation of 'the automatic .pia'no bellows, it is preferred to :provide a cantilever supporting shaft 47, see Fig. 11, connected at one end, as at 48, to any approved'su ortin wdll, and -at its free end rot'atabjly-receiving a pulley '49 andafgearwheelg thereon; the pulley 49 and j gear 'whel 50 being connected for rotation wgether. A f arrwheeltr is also carried by the shaft52-of the motor 15, and thetendency of'the supporting rod 47 is to normally urgetlie gears. 50 and '51 into intermes'hing relation, 'The pulley 49 y of the shaft 47 is preferably connected in driving relation to a p'ulley or wheel 53 of the crank shaft 18,-as by means'of a belt 54 trained over the pulleys 49 and '53. At a distance from the supportingrod 47, an internally screw threaded s'lee've'55 is preferably supported'upon a horizontal axis'by means of a standard 56, being adjustable. in the standard 56, sothat av set screw 57 may 'retain it in a desired'ad'justment. An externally screw threaded cylindrical s'ha ed member '58 is adjustalily positioned wit in the/tap of the Sleeve'55, -'having'a connecting'rod 59 hearing in "one end thereof, and which rod 59 at its other end connects with a ring 60 loosely fitted at the free end of the rod 47. A linger adjusting wheel 61 is rigid with the screw threaded member 58, so that said member 58 may b'e'rotated thereby. As the threaded 'mcmber 58 is 'fed along the Sleeve incidental to rotation thereof within said sleeve, the gear wheel 50 may be moved into or out'ofmeshing relation with the gear wheel 51, as can readily be understood.

In connection with the operation of various musical instruments used in connection with the orchestral device, a circuit B may be used, which has positioned therein a generator or other source of electrical energy 65; a rheostat 66; and a main control switch (37. Bus bars (58 and 69, of any approved formation, may be provided, which are respectively connected in the positive and negative wires 70 and 71 of the circuit R, and affords a practical and convenient means of attaching the various lead wires of the orchestral device in the circuit R and to the keys of the piano B.

As above mentioned, it is preferred to op erate the various musical instruments of the orchestral device A by .means of the keys of the piano B. The rods 18 connecting the piano actions with the keys 14 are of course connected with said keys 14, so that automatic operation of the piano action will also depress the various keys 14 as the notes represented by them are played or sounded. Referring to the manner of connecting the keys 14 to effect the playing of the various instruments, each key 14 is preferably connected in circuit with the bus bar 68, and of course thus in connection with the positive wire 70 of the circuit R by means of a lead wire 7 3 which may be detachably connected to a binding or terminal screw 74, which is a part of the key structure, as is illustrated in Figure 3 of the drawings. The key 14 is of novel construction, including the main body portion 76, which has a central pocket 77 beneath the same into which the conducting strip 78 may fit and be secured therein as by means of a block 79 which fits within the pocket 77, and substantially as is illustrated in Figure 3 of the drawings. The terminal or binding post 74 is disposed between the ends of the conducting strip 78, preferably adjacent the bar or member 80 upon which the keys 14 rock. At its rearmost end, the conducting strip 78 is in conducting relation with a terminal 82 which furnishes one contact of a switch 83. The other contact 84 of the switch 83 preferably is in direct current conducting relation with the bus bar 69; a resistance unit 85 preferably being disposed in the line 86 which leads from the contact 84 to the bus bar 69. The resistance unit 85 may be of any of the improved units now on the market, and may be variable as to resistance to effect a purpose which will be subsequently set forth.

At the opposite end of the conducting strip 7 8 from the terminal 82, and, of course, upon the opposite side of the rocker axis, the key 14 is preferably provided with a binding post or terminal 90 which has one end of a resilient contact arm 91 connected thereto. The contact arm 91 arcuates down wardly from the bottom of the key 14, and is provided with an elongated slot 93 therein through which the shank of a screw 94 extends; the screw 94 being rigid in the key 14, and extending below the bottom thereof. This screw 94 has a head 95 thereon which engages the lower surface of the contact arm 91 to limit the amplitude of movement of the same away from the key 14. At its free end the contact arm 91 arcuates and has the convex side therof disposed in cooperating facing relation with a contact 97; the contacts 91 and 97 forming a switch structure 98 which directly controls the musical instrument or instruments adapted to be operated by the key 14. The contact 97 has a conducting wire 100 which leads therefromto the instrument or operating part thereof to which the current is to be conveyed. In connection with the switch 98, a spring arm 99 is preferably carried by the key 14, depending so that the free springim end thereof is in overlapping relation with the free end of the contact arm 91. Thus, when the key 14 is depressed the contact arm 91 will be sprung, as will also the arm 99; the latter tending to hold the arm 91 into engagement with the contact 97 for a predetermined interval of time.

This interval of time during which theswitch 98 is closed is greater than the interval of time during which the hammer op erated by the key 14 is in engagement with its string upon the piano. This maintenance of the switch 98 in a closed relation for a definite time is provided in order to insure that the operating means of reed instruments, such as horns will continue for the full-length of time, so that such instruments will give off notes the sound of which continue as long as the sound which is given off by vibrating cords of the piano.

Referring to the provision of the resistance unit 85, it is to be noted that during inactive position of the key 14, that the 2 switch 83 is closed, thus placing the resistance unit 85 in closed relation within the circuit R. As soon as the key 14 is depressed, the switch 83 will open, while the switch 98 will be closed to operate a musical instrument. The voltage in the circuit R will thus be substantially constant independent of the position of the key, so that no eccentric loads will be placed on the operating motor. erably variable. If this were not so, the strength of the current flowing in the circuit would be materially reduced when a greater number of musical instruments were being played at one time than at another, so that the magnitude of sound would vary considerably. \Vith the provision of the resistance units 85, as above described, it is obvious that the same will keep the current flowing substantially constant in the circuit Each resistance unit 85 is preffor each key at the same voltage and amperage during active or inactive positioning of the key.

With respect to the application of the violin D in automatic playing relation as a part of the orchestral device A, sounder-s 101 are positioned at the free ends of rotatable shafts 102 in cooperating relation with the strings 103 of the violin. The shafts 102 are rotatably supported by a bracket -struc ture 104 carried as a part of the violin 'frame, and electromagnets 105 are provided for each of the sounder rods or shafts 102 adapted to oscillate the same upon energiza- 7 'tion of the electromagnet to move the sounderelement 101 thereof into engagement with a violin string 103. The shafts 102 are preferably rotated continuously by means of a belt-107 which is trained over suitable'pulleys on the shafts 102 and connectedto'a Qpu'lley 108 upon the motor 45. This sounder arrangement is preferably identical with the arrangement illustrated and described in Patent No. 807,871,-granted Decembei"19,'1905. The electromagnets 105 are, of-course, in thecircuit R, being connected'so that the same will only 0 erate when'the switches 98 o'f'suitable piano keys 14 are closed. It is preferred to provide an auxiliary'sw'iteh 1'10 inthe local circuit for the electromagnets 105, so that control of the same 'may be effected without distrupting the'control of any of the other portions 'of the circuit R.

'A novel fingering apparatus 112' is pro vided in c'onnection'with the violin D. This fingering device preferably includes insulating supports 1 13 which are mounted at op- "positesi'des of the frame ofthevio'lin, and which are} provided with numerous "recesses 1 14 in'wardly of the top ther'eof {to receive electromagnets 115 instaggered relation 'there'alon'g. Arm'atures' 117 are provided {for each of the ele'troma'gnets 115. These arma'tures 'are'bell crank shaped in formation, each "ineluding'an armature portion 118, and a lever portion '1 19 at its free end being recessed in "Vshaped manner for engagement with astring 103 of the violin. -G)n*opposite"sides of the fingerbo'ard 120 of the violin, suitable straight rods 121 are positioned, carried upwardly of the "sup ports 1 13, as by substantially J-shaped brackets 122, which may be-attached to the supports 113, as is illustrated in Figure 17 of the drawings. Suitable L-shaped stems 123 are carried by the supports 113, about the 'arcuate portion of the violin frame adjacent the neck thereof, the horizontal ou'tturned ends atthe top of which oscillatively support the bell-crank armatures 117, sub stantially as is illustrated in the drawings. At-opposite sides of the main body of'th'e violin, straight shafts 125'may be employed,

:supported by brackets 126 analogous to the 'to act as armatures therefor.

brackets 122 above described. This is a practical provision of fingering means -for the violin strings, as the armatures 115 need but little electromotive force therein to attract portions 118 of the armatures 117, so that the bell crank armatures may be thrown through a proper distance to engage their respective violin strings, and at the appropriate points thereon. It'is-to be noted that the outer ends of the lever portions 119 of certain of the bell crank shaped armatures are :laterally turned to properly engage the intermediate strings of the violin. The electromagnets 115 are, of course, in the circuit R and are operated by means of the keys 14.

Referring-to the hornor reed instrument the same may be of the type illustrated in Figure 18 of the drawings, which includes eight sliding pistons, although more than eight sliding pistons may be used with the comet, as will'be shown in aseparate application attachment for "pianos and horns; and I desire to have theserial number given in this application, when'said application is placed on file. It is preferred to place a stopper member 130in 'flarin g'exit 131 of the same, so that the wind'will pass through the tubes. The mouthend 4133 preferab1y has a conduit 134' c0nnected :thereto, which is 'in communication with the conduit 32 above mentioned so that thesaime may receive compressed air for operation of the various reeds-135 which are positioned in ithetiibes 1'32. Avalve'box137 maybe detachably connec'te'd,as by clamping nuts 138 inthe con'duitsl34 which is provided with a slide 'valve 139 therein, h'aving a valve; head l4O Whie1i is normally urged by 'means of-a spring 141 into the way 143 through the valve'box 137 to close said Waysothat'wind 'or compressed-air-may not enter'the mouth of the instrument E. 'The valve 139 is-electro-magnetically operated, having an armature head 144 thereonv in operating relation with the electromagnet 145, so tha't-upon-the -energization of the. 'lectromagnet 145 the =arm'ature will be attracted thereby to open the valve '140 to permit the passage-of air=into the instrument E. The electromagnet 145 is in'the circuit Ryand is'in circuit with-one of the switches 98 of an appropriate key '14, substantially as is illustrated in Figure 1 of the drawings.

-A support may be provided, having therebelow standards 151 and 152 'aliixed thereto, which are appropriately connected to a bar o'f-the instrument E, substantially as is illustrated in Figure/18 and 21- of the drawings. Below-the support150 electromagnets 154 are positioned, in juxtaposition to the keys or pistons 155 which are slidably disposed in the tubes 132, and the outer ends of which are exposed to the electromagnets 154, The sliding I'll pistons 155 are normally of sufficient weight to prevent air pressure from lifting them to expose the lateral openings 157 which are provided in each of the tubes 132. However, upon energization of the electromagnets 154 respective pistons 155 cooperating therewith will be lifted so that wind or air may pass the reeds in the tubes 132, and pass out of the tubes 132 through the exposed openings or ports 157. This will, of course, vibrate the reeds 135 toproduce the appropriate notes. The electromagnets 154 are disposed in the circuit R and are operated by means of appropriate keys 14 upon the piano B. An auxiliary switch 158 is preferably positioned in the local circuit which leads to the electromagnets and 154, so that operation of the instrument E may be cut off with respect to the rest of the musical instruments of the orchestral device A.

The pipe organ structure G may be somewhat of conventional design, fundamental sound production is concerned, and includes a compressed air chest which receives air from the conduit 32 which communicates in one end thereof. The various pipes 176, which are of course of various sizes, are supported at their lower externally screw threaded tube portions 177 in the top wall 178 of the chest 175 and receive air from the chest. The pipes 176 may be of approved it is preferred to provide valve devices 180,

which at their upper ends provide the valve disc 181, and are pivotally mounted, as at 182, adjacent their valve discs 181. Each valve 'disc 181 operates over the inlet end 183 of a pipe 176, substantially as is illusstrated in Figure 25 of the drawings. The lower laterally offset disc portion 184 forms an armature for cooperation with an electromagnet 185 which is mounted within' the compartment 179 of the chest 175. The electromagnets 185 are each in circuit with a key of the piano B, and are controlled by means of the switch structures 98 of the keys, so that upon energization of the electromagnets the armatures 184 will be attracted thereby to open thevalve discs 181 to permit escape of "air from the chest 175 into the various pipes 176 which are opened by energization of said electromagnets. If desired, switches 187 may be provided for local circuits of the eletromagnets 185, substantially as is illus trated in Figure 1 of the drawings, so that the pipe organ structure G may be cut off from operation with the orchestral device.

It may be desirable to use a pneumatic horn structure in connection with the orchestral device. This pneumatic horn structure, is illustrated in Figures 29 to 32 inclusive of the drawings, and includes a chest- 190 the compartment 191 of which is in communication with the air supply conduit 32 by means of a branch 192. The trumpets or horns 193 are preferably of the reed type, having reeds 194 therein substantially as is illustrated in Figure 30 of the drawings; the lower tubular ends 195 of the trumpets 193 being supported in the chest 190 for communication with the compartment 191 thereof. Valve devices 195, of analogous formation with the valve structures 180 described for the pipe organ G are preferably pivotally connected as at 196 to brackets 196 within the chest 190 for each of the horns or trumpets 193; and adapted to be attracted by means of electro-magnets 197 which are mounted within the chest 190. Electromagnets 197 are, of course, operable by means of keys 14 of the piano structure, and in each local line from the armatures 197 it is preferred to place switches 198 for selective control of the trumpets of the pneumatic horn structure H.

The Xylophone structure -L includes the sound bars 200 of different lengths; appro-- priately mounted by any approved construction. Substantially L-shaped hammers 201 are pivotally mounted upon a bar 202 which is longitudinally supported along the flush ends of the sound bar 200, asby the L-shaped brackets 203. Each of the hammers. 201 ina ball 206 on the end thereof and the armature lever 207. A spring 208 is provided-for cooperation with each armature lever 207, to normally urge the same toward the sound-bar 200, so that the hammer. 206 is normally lifted off the sound bar'200, as is illustrated in dotted lines in Figure 34 of the drawings. The electromagnet 209,- which is provided for each of the armature levers 207 is pref erably connected, as is illustrated in diagrammatic view in Figure 1 of the drawings, for operation by a switch structure 98 upon a key of the piano; the various electromagnets 209 of the Xylophone being operated by various keys 14 of the piano. Local switches 210 may control these electromagnets of the Xylophone operating structure.

The drum structure M may include the l drum 215 and the operating means 216 therefor. The means 216 preferably includes a shaft 217 mounted upon a horizontal axis as by standards 218. A dmm stick 219 preferably with a ball head 220 may be carried in any suitable manner by the shaft 217 so that the same may oscillate therewith. A lever arm 221 with an armature disc 222 at the free end thereof is also connected to the shaft 217, in cooperating relation with an electromagnet 224, which is suitable supported by a standard 225 adjacent the driun 215. The electro-magnet 224 is preferably controlled by a circuit 226 which may be shunted in on the circuit R, and controlled by' air independent switch 228, substantially as is illustrated in Figure 1 of the drawings. Although the switch 228 is the only one which is shown as being used for energizing -the electromagnet 224, yet a key 14 of the piano structure may be used for this purpose, if desired. A- cymbal disc 230 may be supported by the drum structure M, as is illustrated in Figure 39 of the drawings, having a suitable hammer 231 supported by the shaft 21% instriking relation therewith; It is obvious that uponenergization of the electromagnet 224, that the armature 2221will-be attracted thereby. This w-illrock the sh'aft2lfiso. that the-hammers 219 and 231 will; respectively hit the drum 215 and cymbaLdisc 230 to: sound the same. As is illustrated in Figure 37 of the drawings the cymbaliliammeu 231 may be connected by screw. element- 233 tothe shaft 21 throughan elongated slot 234, and by reason ofi. which elongated. slot the position of the hammer 231 may be adjusted for acertain degree of: movement-about the shaft 217. Likewise, the drum: hammer 219 is provided with. an. elongated slut; 236 therein through which: the securing: element- 237 extends sothatthe; hammer-219 may be adjusted for a certain degree-of? movement about the shaft 21%- The-arm 221; which=supports the armature -2221of the: end thereof is preferably insulated as by sleeve 238 from the shaft 217i, and aminsulated screw 239 isused for connecting the. armatureofthe supporting armi221: througlnanelongated: slot 240,- and reasorn ofl which-the arm 221;- may, have a=- certain-.degree-oimovement about; the axisof the. shaft 217-: for; the. proper: adjustment illustrated'in Figure 1 various types Offlinstruments maybeoperabl'y disposal inthe'ci'rcuit R: For instance, the

electrio;liorni structure K which includes-a series of'electric horns- 243 may be provided, each of which includes'a suitable operatin mechanism,.e1ectricallyoperated, as would be understoodiby those-skilled the art to which thisinventionirelates. A local switch 244 may be provided to= selectively-cut off the electric. horn: structure K, if desired.

Iniconnection with the playing 'of 'stringed instruments-such as mandolins, guitars, and ukeleles a novel sounder device 245 may be provided, which is.illustrated inFigure 22 andi24,.and in Figure 23 asused in connection'with a mandolin or guitar structure I. This sounder 245 may include-a hub structure 246 provided upon its periphery with series: of. grooves 247 adapted toreceive a series-:of resilientarms 248. The arms 248 areconcave-convexv in formation, preferably being formed of spring metal and-arc each preferably of the same length. The hub 246 is detachably secured to a screw threaded end. 249- of: a. shaft 250;. shaft 250 being rotatably. mounted uponany approved portion of the musical instrument. N. This sounder 245, as to mounting may be similar to the mounting and operation of the sounder set forth in patent N 0. 807,871, granted December; 19, 1905, and may have its shafts 250 operated in the assemblagesimilar to the violin shafts 102, as illustrated in Figure 1 of. the drawings.

Any approved type of instruments may be used: in connection with the orchestral device A, such asillustrated in the drawings: It is preferred that cut out switches be provided for the various instruments, so that; the orchestral device may be used with any approved selection of instruments. This cut. out arrangement ofswitches is set forth in the diagrammatidillustrationin: Figure l of the drawings. piano may be-motonor foot operated, it ispreferred to= motor operatethe: same,-. as; the

motor plays an important part. in operating the sounders-of certain. stringedinstrumentssuch as violins, guitars-and theklike;

An important feature-off the, invention-is. the operation of: thezvarious. instruments. from the key boardof the-pianm I- am preparing an applicationishowing the extra keyboard more-- clearly,. italso. shows. the extra .-pneumatics,-. with tihesefi'it wilL be possible toplay the instrumentsin different voices; that is-,. one or. more: of. the. instruments may be played-tenor andone on more may be played-.soprano .amd some may" be placedbass and. Ldesirej'. lad-have the serial number. mentioned in. this; application as soon as itisiplaced-onvfile 5 WVhile: the drum structure M- -has I been h w l c i la p rated in swamplated to. provide pneumatically,- operated means therefonf 1'1; mostiinstanceszelectro magnetshave been shiiwmbut-stilerioids array; be substituted for theisamer whenever it is desired. I

Various changes-l in the. shape,, size,,and arrangement of parts. may. .be- .made-to the forms. of! invention herein, shown. and; de-. scribed,. without departing, nonmhe spirit. of the invention or; the scope of. the claim s I'claim: p

1'. In a music device oftheclas's'described; the combination of. a piano includingqkeg rockably supported intermediate their en an electric circuit, a sound producing in strument in said circuit, operating meansin said. circuit forsaid sound producing. instrument, a resistance unit insaid'cii'cuit, a switch for controlling operative or inoperative positioning of the resistance unit in said circuit including a movable contact carried by a piano key on one side of the rockingaxis of said key, and a; switch for conitrolling operative or inoperative positioning of the-sound producing.- operation means in said circuit including a. contact carried by said key at the other side of the rocking axis thereof.

2. In combination with a piano including strings, piano actions including hammers for the strings, and keys for operating the piano actions, a musical instrument, and means for electrically operating the musical instrument including piano key operated switches, said switches including. means to maintain the electric circuit in which said musical instrument is disposed in closed operating condition for a greater interval of time than the hammer of the key is in engagement with its respective string on the piano.

3. In a piano operated music producing apparatus the combination of a piano including strings, piano actions therefor, and keys for the piano actions, other musical instruments, and electric operating means for the other musical instruments, including circuits having switches carried by the piano keys, said switches each including a fixed contact and a resilient contact adapted to be main tained in engagement with its fixed contact to hold the circuit closed for a longer period of time than the time during which the hammer remains in engagement with the respective string of the respective piano keys.

WILLIE R. CORBETT.

US1688450A Automatically-operated orchestral device Expired - Lifetime US1688450A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2475168A (en) * 1943-01-28 1949-07-05 Workman Ernest Robert Musical instrument
US2541051A (en) * 1945-11-01 1951-02-13 Hammond Instr Co Apparatus for automatic production of music
US2605557A (en) * 1944-04-18 1952-08-05 Harry R Van Deventer Method of and apparatus for teaching dancing
US2912894A (en) * 1957-05-20 1959-11-17 Hess Frank Multiple instrument playing device
US3571480A (en) * 1967-07-05 1971-03-16 Warwick Electronics Inc Feedback loop for musical instruments
US3967523A (en) * 1975-06-03 1976-07-06 Currier George T Power driven drum beater
WO1991006941A1 (en) * 1989-11-07 1991-05-16 Fred Paroutaud Method and apparatus for stimulation of acoustic musical instruments
US20080053292A1 (en) * 2006-09-06 2008-03-06 Claude Fournier System for the Controlled Hitting of a Percussion Instrument

Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2475168A (en) * 1943-01-28 1949-07-05 Workman Ernest Robert Musical instrument
US2605557A (en) * 1944-04-18 1952-08-05 Harry R Van Deventer Method of and apparatus for teaching dancing
US2541051A (en) * 1945-11-01 1951-02-13 Hammond Instr Co Apparatus for automatic production of music
US2912894A (en) * 1957-05-20 1959-11-17 Hess Frank Multiple instrument playing device
US3571480A (en) * 1967-07-05 1971-03-16 Warwick Electronics Inc Feedback loop for musical instruments
US3967523A (en) * 1975-06-03 1976-07-06 Currier George T Power driven drum beater
WO1991006941A1 (en) * 1989-11-07 1991-05-16 Fred Paroutaud Method and apparatus for stimulation of acoustic musical instruments
US5142961A (en) * 1989-11-07 1992-09-01 Fred Paroutaud Method and apparatus for stimulation of acoustic musical instruments
US20080053292A1 (en) * 2006-09-06 2008-03-06 Claude Fournier System for the Controlled Hitting of a Percussion Instrument
US7608771B2 (en) * 2006-09-06 2009-10-27 Claude Fournier System for the controlled hitting of a percussion instrument

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