US1682344A - lesieur - Google Patents

lesieur Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1682344A
US1682344A US1682344DA US1682344A US 1682344 A US1682344 A US 1682344A US 1682344D A US1682344D A US 1682344DA US 1682344 A US1682344 A US 1682344A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
pressure
gas
reducer
needle
fig
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A61MEDICAL OR VETERINARY SCIENCE; HYGIENE
    • A61MDEVICES FOR INTRODUCING MEDIA INTO, OR ONTO, THE BODY; DEVICES FOR TRANSDUCING BODY MEDIA OR FOR TAKING MEDIA FROM THE BODY; DEVICES FOR PRODUCING OR ENDING SLEEP OR STUPOR
    • A61M5/00Devices for bringing media into the body in a subcutaneous, intra-vascular or intramuscular way; Accessories therefor, e.g. filling or cleaning devices, arm-rests

Description

Aug. 28, 1928.- 1,682,344

, M. LESIE UR APPARATUS FOR m: s BcuTANEous INJECTION OF OXYGEN on OTHER GASES Filed April 5, 4 N Sheets-Sheet 1 flrql. v j;

a 3 2 z i B a I --r fl KITS) I u 35%;.

. I, E I

. ;E v mmzss 3 YIIIVENTOR na/mm Aug. 28, 1928. 1,682,344

M. LESIEUR APPARATUS FOR THE SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTION OF OXYGEN OR OTHER GASES Filed April 5, 1924 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 1mm W A TTOHNEYS Patented Aug. 28, 1928.

* UNITED STATES MAURICE LESIEUR,

on runs, FRANCE.

APPARATUS FOR THE SUBCUTANEOUS INJECTION OF OXYGEN OR OTHER GASES.

Application filed April 5, 1924, Serial .No.

' The principal object of this invention is to provide a new and improved apparatus for the use of physicians and surgeons for subcutaneous injections of oxygen or other gases in measured quantities under compression into the human body. I

A further object is to include in such an apparatus, one or more pressure reducing devices, to reduce the pressure of the gas supplied to the subcutaneous injection needle.

These and such further objects, as the provision of a conipa'ct, portable device, the construction of which will insure safety, reliability and precision in operation will be read ly understood by those skilled in the art to wh ch this invention relates, from the following specification of an illustration orexamnle and by refernece to the accompanying drawing forming a part hereof, and in Which Fig. 1 is a side elevation of an exaniple of an apparatus constructed in accordance with the principles of my invention. 7

Fig. 2 is a plan view of the structure shown in Fig. 1. I

Fig. 8 is a horizontal section through the closure for thegas container.

Figs. 4 and 5 are sections on the lines H and 5-5 ofFig. 2.

Fig. 6 is a section on the line 66 of F g. 4.

Fig. 7 is a section on the line7'7 of Fig. 2, and

Fig. 8 is a section on theline 88 of Fig. 7.

Fig. 9 is a plan view of the lowpressure gauge with the dial removed therefrom and Fig. 10 is a section on the hne 10-10 of Fig. 9.

In the example illustrated. the gas containor or flask A, filled with oxygen orother'gas under high pressure, to be administered, s closed by means of a valved fitting B, and is detachably secured to any suitable base a by means of a strap or collar a, provided with a wing or thumb screw a pivotally secured to the strap and adapted to be moved into or out of the forked end a of said strap. The fitting B is provided with a valve B operated by the knurled nut B and has a laterally extending branch 13? A three way connection C has one of its branches connected to the fitting B by means of a small tube 6; the second branch of said connection leads to a pressure gauge D for registering the pressure in the gas container A; and the third branch OI said connection is connectedwith a first pres- 704,336, and in France August 11, 192B.

sure reducer E. A tube 6 leads the gas from the reducer E to a second pressure reducer F,

from which the gas passes through a connect.

ing tube G to a measuring cock H. A plus and minus pressure recording gauge K is container A, passes into the chamber 16 defined by the casing of the reducer and a diaphragm 1 9. :eated within a suitable recess formed in the lower eiid'of an adjusting screw 3, mounted in a pivoted lever 3, is a small disc 2 of any suitable packing material which is adapted to close the mouth of the conduit 0. the lever 3 is provided with an adjusting I screw 4 to regulate the pressure of a counterspring 18 which serves to normally urge the pivoted lever B in a clockwise direction about a pivot 3, Fig. 4, and hold the disc 2 seated upon the mouth of the'conduit e. The other end of the lever 3 has pivotally' secured thereto the upper'end of a small thrust member 7 the lower pointed end of'which rests upon the widened end of a swinging lever 5. The widened end of the lever 5 is supported upon the base of the reducer E by a pair of spaced pins 6 and is normally urged by the pressure of the thrust member 7, about said pins as a fulcrum, in a clockwise direction to cause the other end of the lever 5 to be normally held with a yielding pressure (due to the spring 18) against a diaphragm 9 secured between the casing of the reducer and a cover 11; said diaphragm and cover being held securely in place by a nut 10. i A spring 1 1 is arranged between the upper face of the diaphragm'Q and the inner face of the cover 11. The tension of the spring 14 is calculated so as to secure an automatic operation ofthe reducer and insure a predetermined pressure, for example, one kilogram pcr square centimetre, within the chamber 16. If the pressure within said chamber falls below the desired amount, the diaphragm 9'will move downwardly and the spring 14% will press the dia- One end of 'hra ma 'ainst the lever 5 causin it to move O b b in a counter clockwise direction upon the pins 6 as a fulcrum, and movlng the lever 3 by 'means of the member 7 against the action of the spring 18, in counter clockwise direction, thus causing the packing d1sc'2 to open the conduit e. An excess of pressure within the chamber 16 will produce a reverse movement of the parts.

The gas passes from the chamber 16 by the small orifice 18 to the tube 6, by which it is conducted to the second reducer F. The reducer F (Fig. 5) serves to further reduce the pressure of the gas and is similar in construction and operation to the reducer E, with the exception that the tension of the spring 14 is less than that of the spring 14 and can be adjusted by means of a screw 12. The screw 12 is mounted in the top of the cover 11 and presses against the upper end of a button 13 to compress the spring 1.4 confined between said button 13 and a circular plate 15 bearing against the upper face of the diaphragm 9. The lower end of a button 17 secured on said diaphragm bears against lever 5. The remainder of the re ducer F is similar in construction and operation to the reducer E and the parts thereof bear similar reference characters. It will be seen that the first reducer E produces a given decrease ofthe gas pressure, whereas the second reducer F allows of the gas pressure being further decreased and finely regulated.

After passing through the second reducer F, the gas passes through the tube G, which is constructed of, flexible material, so that in case of excessive pressure, the tube will burst and thereby act as a safety valve. The'tube G conducts the gas to the measuring cocl: H which consists of a valve casing 19, having a tapered valve plug or key 20 rotatably mounted therein; a graduated disc 21 secured to said valve casing; and a handle 22 and needle 23, secured to the stem of the valve plug by a lock nut 24. a The gas, from the tube G passes into a conduit 25, provided in the valve casing 19, and is led therebyto conduit 27 formed in the valve plug, from which conduit it passes to the annular groove 28 formed in the periphery of said plug and in registry with the exit orifice 29 provided in the valve casing. The annular groove 28 which ends at about three quarters of the circumference of the plug 20 from the conduit 27 is of progressively decreasing depth from said conduit, and the remaining ungrooved quarter circumference of said plug form the closure for the valve H. It will be obvious that the quantity of gas allowed to pass through the cock H in a given time, will depend upon the depth. of that portion of the groove 28 which communicates with the exit orifice 29 therefor; the graduations of the scale 21 being arranged to correspond with the extent of the opening of said valve. The orifice 29 leads to the connection for the tube 54 to which the subcutaneous injunction needle is attached, and a conduit 32, which leadsfrom said connections. connects with a chamber 30 with which the pressure gauge K is connected by the pipe 33. The pressure gauge K is arranged to indicate pressures above or below atmospheric, and is provided with an expanding pressure chamber 34 to which the gas is led by the pipe 33. A lever 35 is pivotally supported upon the under side of a plate 36 and rests upon the upper wall of the diaphragm box 34; said lever is provided wth an upwardly extending finger 37 which engages within an elongated slot 38 of a gear secured 39. The teeth of the gear sector 39 mesh with a small pinion 40 secured upon the shaft 41 which projects through the dial 42 and has secured to its outer end the indicating needle 43, justing screw 44 is threaded into a lug 45 proj ecting upwardly from the base of the casing of the gauge and its inner end is adapted to be engaged with the lower inclined face 46 of a lug 47 which projects downwardly fromthe plate 36, to permit said plate to be raised when I the screw 44 is screwed inwardly, and vice versa, so as to enable the lever 35 to be adjusted relatively to the diaphragm box 34.

The operation and use of the complete apparatus is as follows: If a subcutaneous in- An adjection of oxygen or other gas-is to be adv ministered, the needle 55 is inserted into the patient, at the desired point, as for any other injection; the needle of the measuring cock H being brought to the zero position before the needle is inserted. The valve B of the clo sure B is opened and the cock H is then opened slowly until the desired flow of gas, as indicated by the scale 21 is obtained. The high pressure of the gas Within the container A is automatically reduced to a pressure sufficiently low for safe injections, by the operation of the pressure reducers E and F, and as the quantity of gas flowing through the cock for the difi'erent adjustments of the valve plug in a given time, may be accuratelydetermined, the amount of gas injected is determined by the reading of the needle 23 and the length of time the gas is permitted to flow. The readings of pressure gauge H furnishes a means for determining the presence of obstructions to the flow of the gas such as caused by the insertion of the needle into specially resisting tissue (muscle or aponevrose) or by the presence of a foreign substance, such as a fatty particle, clogging the 7 opening of the needle,

I desire that the foregoing description be understood as illustrative only and not limited to the particular example herein disclosed and that changes, variations and modifications may be resorted to without departing from the spirit of my invention.

Having thus described my invention, I declare that what I claim as new and desire to is: V

1. Man apparatus for the injection of gas, a container adapted to contain a quantity of g s u de p s r El ped fmi n dl 99 secure by Letters Patent of the United States necting means leading from said container to said needle, said connecting means including a pressure reducer, a measuring cock, and a safety device interposed therebetween, said safety device being adapted to break the connection between said pressure reducer and said measuring cock and thereby stop the flow of gas to the measuring cock when the pressure of gas passing to said measuring cock exceeds a predetermined amount.

2. In an apparatus for subcutaneous injection of gas, a container adapted to contain a quantity of said gas under pressure, a hypodermic needle, connecting means leading from said container to said needle, said connecting means including a pressure reducer adapted to reduce the pressure of gas flowing to said needle to a predetermined low pressure, and a flexible tube interposed between said pressure reducer and said needle, the walls of said tube being of such strength that they will burst if the pressure of gas in the tube exceeds a predetermined amount.

3. In an apparatus for the injection of gas,

a container adapted to contain a quantity of gas under pressure, a hypodermic needle, connecting means leading from said container to said needle, said connecting means including a pressure reducer, a measuring cock, and a safety device interposed therebetween, said safety device being adapted to break the connection between said pressure reducer and MAURICE LESIEUR.

US1682344A lesieur Expired - Lifetime US1682344A (en)

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1682344A true US1682344A (en) 1928-08-28

Family

ID=3416054

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US1682344A Expired - Lifetime US1682344A (en) lesieur

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1682344A (en)

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4048992A (en) * 1974-10-26 1977-09-20 Lindemann Hans Joachim Insufflator
US5006109A (en) * 1989-09-12 1991-04-09 Donald D. Douglas Method and device for controlling pressure, volumetric flow rate and temperature during gas insuffication procedures
US5234405A (en) * 1990-10-10 1993-08-10 Klatz Ronald M Brain resuscitation device and method for performing the same
US5584804A (en) * 1990-10-10 1996-12-17 Life Resuscitation Technologies, Inc. Brain resuscitation and organ preservation device and method for performing the same
US5827222A (en) * 1990-10-10 1998-10-27 Life Resuscitation Technologies, Inc. Method of treating at least one of brain and associated nervous tissue injury
US6200289B1 (en) 1998-04-10 2001-03-13 Milestone Scientific, Inc. Pressure/force computer controlled drug delivery system and the like
US20020072700A1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2002-06-13 Mantell Robert R. Method and apparatus for humidification and warming of air
US6485450B1 (en) 1998-03-16 2002-11-26 Life Science Holdings, Inc. Brain resuscitation apparatus and method
US6673594B1 (en) 1998-09-29 2004-01-06 Organ Recovery Systems Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20040224299A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-11 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US20040224298A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2004-11-11 John Brassil Apparatus and method for determining effects of a substance of an organ
US20040221719A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-11 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Device for separating gas from a liquid path
US20050221269A1 (en) * 2004-04-05 2005-10-06 Organ Recovery Systems Apparatus and method for perfusing an organ or tissue for isolating cells from the organ or tissue
US20060063142A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2006-03-23 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20060102174A1 (en) * 1998-04-10 2006-05-18 Mark Hochman Handpiece for fluid administration apparatus
US20110183310A1 (en) * 2000-08-25 2011-07-28 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8211052B1 (en) 2006-07-13 2012-07-03 Lexion Medical Llc Charged hydrator

Cited By (61)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4048992A (en) * 1974-10-26 1977-09-20 Lindemann Hans Joachim Insufflator
US5006109A (en) * 1989-09-12 1991-04-09 Donald D. Douglas Method and device for controlling pressure, volumetric flow rate and temperature during gas insuffication procedures
US5827222A (en) * 1990-10-10 1998-10-27 Life Resuscitation Technologies, Inc. Method of treating at least one of brain and associated nervous tissue injury
US5234405A (en) * 1990-10-10 1993-08-10 Klatz Ronald M Brain resuscitation device and method for performing the same
US5584804A (en) * 1990-10-10 1996-12-17 Life Resuscitation Technologies, Inc. Brain resuscitation and organ preservation device and method for performing the same
US5709654A (en) * 1990-10-10 1998-01-20 Life Resuscitation Technologies, Inc. Apparatus for cooling living tissue
US5752929A (en) * 1990-10-10 1998-05-19 Life Resuscitation Technologies, Inc. Method of preserving organs other than the brain
US6485450B1 (en) 1998-03-16 2002-11-26 Life Science Holdings, Inc. Brain resuscitation apparatus and method
US6887216B2 (en) 1998-04-10 2005-05-03 Milestone Scientific, Inc. Pressure/force computer controlled drug delivery system with automated charging
US6200289B1 (en) 1998-04-10 2001-03-13 Milestone Scientific, Inc. Pressure/force computer controlled drug delivery system and the like
US20020052574A1 (en) * 1998-04-10 2002-05-02 Mark Hochman Pressure/force computer controlled drug delivery system with automated charging
US20030078534A1 (en) * 1998-04-10 2003-04-24 Mark Hochman Drug delivery system with profiles
US7625354B2 (en) 1998-04-10 2009-12-01 Milestone Scientific, Inc. Handpiece for fluid administration apparatus
US6786885B2 (en) 1998-04-10 2004-09-07 Milestone Scientific Inc Pressure/force computer controlled drug delivery system with exit pressure control
US20060102174A1 (en) * 1998-04-10 2006-05-18 Mark Hochman Handpiece for fluid administration apparatus
US6945954B2 (en) 1998-04-10 2005-09-20 Milestone Scientific, Inc. Drug delivery system with profiles
US7749693B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2010-07-06 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method of determining that an organ is not suitable for transplantation and using it for testing substances
US8431385B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-04-30 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8445260B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-05-21 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20040224298A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2004-11-11 John Brassil Apparatus and method for determining effects of a substance of an organ
US8420381B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-04-16 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8349551B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-01-08 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method for controlling perfusion of an organ
US8318415B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2012-11-27 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method of determining transport and/or storage parameters for maintaining viability of an organ
US20060063142A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2006-03-23 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8609400B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2013-12-17 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8268612B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2012-09-18 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8268547B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2012-09-18 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method of transporting and storing a kidney
US6673594B1 (en) 1998-09-29 2004-01-06 Organ Recovery Systems Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20110129908A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2011-06-02 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20110059429A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2011-03-10 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8962303B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2015-02-24 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20110039253A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2011-02-17 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20100221696A1 (en) * 1998-09-29 2010-09-02 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US7824848B2 (en) 1998-09-29 2010-11-02 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20020072700A1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2002-06-13 Mantell Robert R. Method and apparatus for humidification and warming of air
US7762251B2 (en) 2000-06-30 2010-07-27 Northgate Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for humidification and warming of air
US6976489B2 (en) 2000-06-30 2005-12-20 Northgate Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for humidification and warming of air
US8091546B2 (en) 2000-06-30 2012-01-10 Northgate Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for humidification and warming of air
US20060033223A1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2006-02-16 Northgate Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for humidification and warming of air
US8955511B2 (en) 2000-06-30 2015-02-17 Northgate Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for humidification and warming of air
US7647925B2 (en) 2000-06-30 2010-01-19 Northgate Technologies, Inc. Method and apparatus for humidification and warming of air
US20100163044A1 (en) * 2000-06-30 2010-07-01 Mantell Robert R Method and apparatus for humidification and warming of air
US20110183310A1 (en) * 2000-08-25 2011-07-28 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8323954B2 (en) 2000-08-25 2012-12-04 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US20040235142A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-25 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for holding a plurality of tubes connectible to an organ or tissue container
US8128740B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2012-03-06 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Device for separating gas from a liquid path
US8097449B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2012-01-17 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US7998725B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2011-08-16 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for holding a plurality of tubes connectible to an organ or tissue container
US7678563B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2010-03-16 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling air pressure in an organ or tissue container
US20100112542A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2010-05-06 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling air pressure in an organ or tissue container
US7691622B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2010-04-06 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US20100151559A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2010-06-17 Lifeline Scientific, Inc. Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US20040224299A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-11 Organ Recovery Systems Method and apparatus for transferring heat to or from an organ or tissue container
US8389271B2 (en) 2003-04-04 2013-03-05 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Method and apparatus for controlling air pressure in an organ or tissue container
US20040221719A1 (en) * 2003-04-04 2004-11-11 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc. Device for separating gas from a liquid path
US20090226878A1 (en) * 2004-04-05 2009-09-10 Organ Recovery Systems Apparatus and method for perfusing an organ or tissue for isolating cells from the organ or tissue
US20050221269A1 (en) * 2004-04-05 2005-10-06 Organ Recovery Systems Apparatus and method for perfusing an organ or tissue for isolating cells from the organ or tissue
US8389280B2 (en) 2004-04-05 2013-03-05 Organ Recovery Systems Method for perfusing an organ for isolating cells from the organ
US7504201B2 (en) 2004-04-05 2009-03-17 Organ Recovery Systems Method for perfusing an organ and for isolating cells from the organ
US9706769B2 (en) 2004-04-05 2017-07-18 Organ Recovery Systems, Inc Apparatus and method for maintaining and/or restoring viability of organs
US8211052B1 (en) 2006-07-13 2012-07-03 Lexion Medical Llc Charged hydrator

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3557778A (en) Blood specimen collection assembly
US3091239A (en) Apparatus for intravasal injection of gaseous and liquid media
US3690318A (en) Apparatus for parenteral fluid infusion provided with variable flow control means
US4043332A (en) Constant flow rate liquid medicament administering device
US2408672A (en) Apparatus for measuring or checking transverse dimensions
US4654029A (en) Electronic drainage system
US3961624A (en) Method of determining lung pressure of a patient using a positive pressure breathing system
US4648406A (en) Physiological pressure measuring system
US4905505A (en) Method and system for determining vapor pressure of liquid compositions
US4248245A (en) Method and device for determining and separating the alveolar air proportion from the breathing air
US3871371A (en) Respiration supply and control
US3298362A (en) Instrument for use in performing a controlled valsalva maneuver
US2074959A (en) Fuel tank gauge
US3853144A (en) Flowmeter
US3256876A (en) Volume indicator for anesthesia machine system
US3674010A (en) Apparatus for automatic inflation of cavities of the body
US5564306A (en) Density compensated gas flow meter
US4289027A (en) Aircraft fuel tester
US2717100A (en) Gas flow control unit
US3985141A (en) Inflation and pressure relief valve
US3996957A (en) Inflator valve with pressure gauge and safety regulator
US3528418A (en) Anesthetic vaporizing apparatus
US1985576A (en) Measuring apparatus
US2178901A (en) Combination relief valve and tester
US5442948A (en) Apparatus and method for determining amount of gases dissolved in liquids