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Illuminating appliance

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US1680633A
US1680633A US24816328A US1680633A US 1680633 A US1680633 A US 1680633A US 24816328 A US24816328 A US 24816328A US 1680633 A US1680633 A US 1680633A
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tubes
portions
grid
tube
luminous
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Thomas K Peters
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Color Ray Holding Corp
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G09EDUCATION; CRYPTOGRAPHY; DISPLAY; ADVERTISING; SEALS
    • G09FDISPLAYING; ADVERTISING; SIGNS; LABELS OR NAME-PLATES; SEALS
    • G09F13/00Illuminated signs; Luminous advertising
    • G09F13/26Signs formed by electric discharge tubes

Description

Aug. 14, 192 1,680,633

T. K. PETERS ILLUIINATING APPLIANCE Filed Jan. 20, 1928 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 5 -L/ L J L l INVENTOR. THOMAS K. PETERS ATTORNEY Patented Aug. 14, 1928.

UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

THOMAS E. PETERS, OF LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TO THE COLOR RAY HOI DING CORPORATION, OF DENVER, COLORADQ'A CORPORATION OF COLORADO.

' ILLUMINATING APPLIANCE.

Application filed January 20, 1928. Serial No. 248,163.

My invention relates to improvements in illuminating appliances in which luminous tubes are employed as the light sources.

An important object is to provide a new and improved arrangement of such tubes 111 the form of a luminous grid or background composed of one or more bent or contorted tubes the -principal portions of which are spaced, in approximately parallel relation, to provide a substantially close banded 1llumination of the entire area .of the background or grid. Such a luminous grid or background is useful for many purposes, especially in appliances of the character usually called illuminated signs A further object of the invention is to utilize such a luminous grid or background in. an appliance of that class by providing arfront plate or screen which is relatively 0 opaque, and provided with relatively translucent or transparent areas constituting a design illuminated by the grid or background; -or as otherwise stated, through which the grid or background is visible, thus presenting design areas illuminated by more or less closely spaced bands of light emitted from the luminous tubing.

plate or screen in the form of separate, changeable or interchangeable sections, each ofwhich bears a portion ofa design so. "-t

hat for; example when the design consis I ters 61' other indicia, anydesiredfwords or T I indicia may be set up by positioning proper screen sections in the sign casing.

While such appliances are conveniently designated as signs, theyneed not have a utilitarian character but may be fordecora; tive or scientific purposes, in which case the -40 .relatively transparent areas (on the front plate or screen may constitute a decorativedesign in the nature of a picture.

A further important objectfis. to provide y or..utilize iapluralitv-of luminous tubes of "viously mentioned, such as the front plate or screen bearing a design to be illuminated by the multiple color grid or background, with any of the other variations mentioned above or hereinafter.

For the sake of simplicity, I refer above to luminous tubes. The well known neon tube is an example, consisting of a relatively long cylindrical tube having bulbous 'ends containing electrodes, and supplied with neon gas at suitable pressure, the electrodes being in circuit with a high potential transformer, whereby the, gas is energized or ionized and light of a characteristic orangepink color is emitted. Other gases includ-' ing active diatomic gases such as nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, etc., and other inert, monatomic gases such as helium, argon. Xenon and krypton (besides neon) are used in similar tubes. Such. tubesare analogous to Geisseler tubes, and the particular charthey maybefproduced by the different color A further object is to provide a frontcharacteristics ofdiiferent gases used in the respectivej tubes, by tintingthe tubes themglasswith various metallic elements, or in 4b'difierlent "color ch'aracteristicsfin asingle luminous grid or background, with'suitable "means for selectively or snnultaneou'sly elec-' trically energizing thefdiiferent tubes, wherebya plurality of simple orblende'd ,50 color effects are obtained- Thus, using two tubes, one of which emitsblue and the other red luminosity, three color, effects are ob.- tained with the two tubes, namely, the simple or primary colors red and blue. and the blended or complex color lilac. This tea? other known-or suit-able ways. V

',Th e' characteristics and advantages of the invention'are furthcrsufiiciently explained Y inconnection with the following detail description of the accompanying drawings, which illustrate certainyrepresentative embodiments. After considering these examples, skilled persons will understand that many variations may be made without departing from the principles involved, and I contemplate the employment of any structures that are properly within the scope of the appended claims. 1 I

In the drawing: ,7 j Fig. 1 is a front elevation, with some parts in section, .of apparatus embodying the invention in one form.

Fig. 2 isa section at 22 Fig. 1.

Fig. 3 is a section at 33,; Fig. 1.

,Fig. 4 is a similar section showing. a modified form of color background or grid,employing a single tube.

Fig. 5 is an elevation of a modified tube arrangement or assembly. constituting an T other form of color background or grid,-

using three tubes.

Fig. 6 is a bottom plan of the same.

Fig. 7 is an elevation of another tubearrangement or assembly.

Fig. 8 is a bottom plan of the same.

Fig. 9 is a'view, similar to Fi s. 6 or 8, of another modified tube or gri arrange ment.

Fig. 10 is an elevation of still another tube arrangement or assembly.

Fig. 11 is a top plan of the same.

Fig. 12 is a perspectiveview showing a theatre marquee. r

The principal feature of the invention is what I call a color background or composite grid consisting of one or more tubes which are practically Geisseler tubes curved, bent or contorted to produce approximately parallel portions, arranged nearly or. exactly in one plane, so that the area of the background is well covered with the moderately spaced tube portions; or in other words, the grid area is composed of approximately parallel or moderately spaced bands of light emitted by the luminous medium within the tube. Thus, in Figs. 1, 2 and 3, the com osite id element or color backgroun 1 consists oftwo grid tubes 2 and 3, each of'which has bulb'ous end ortions 4 and 5, respectively. In each bulb is an electrode having an outside terminal 6. Each tube is filled with a suitable gaseous medium such as one of those above mentioned, and when the two terminals are connected to the terminals of a high frequency or high-potential transformer, the contents is ionized and emits light of characteristic color, depend ing upon the nature of the gas, or characteristics of the glass in the tube itself. Figs. 1' to 3 illustrate one characteristic way in which the grid element is substantially covered with the illuminated bands, namely, by forming or bending grid tube 2- so that it consists of a plurality of spaced parallel main portions 7 connected by end bends 8 which/may be in the plans of the main portions. The other grid tube consists of spaced parallel main portions 9 interspaced with the main portions of grid tube 2', and

in the same plane, and the main portions of grid tube 3 are connected by bends or bridge portions 10, bent or offset substantially at right angles to the plane of the grid so as to pass over or bridge the intermediate portions of the other tube. As will be observed (Figures 2 and 3), the background or grid is arranged relatively close to the screen, i. e., the screen and tubes are so spaced as to obtain upon the screen the visually distinguishable bands or striped effect desired.

I have found that the best results are obtained by spacing the tubes in close proximity to the screen or stencil, say within approximately one and one-half inches therefrom. H

When two or any other plurality of tubes are used, they are usually arranged to emit light of different colors either by chargin the tubes, comprising the grids, with di ferent gases or by treating the glass of the tubes themselves in ways above mentioned to provide the different colors or tints. Thus,in Figs. 1 to 3, tube 2 may be a neon tube and will in that case emit the characteristic orange-pink color, and tube 3 may be charged with gas or otherwise provided with means by which it emits blue light. When either tube is separately energized the illuminated background or grid therefor consists principally of parallel bands of a single simple light, either orange-pink or blue, and when both are simultaneousl energized there is produced practically a lend of the simple colors, or an approximately lilac illumination of the background area.

Such luminous backgrounds or grids are useful for many purposes, a suflicient example of utility being given in Figs. 1 to 3, in which a composite grid is arranged in a sign box 15. The straight tube portions are supported in properly spaced relations by vertical racks 16. In the rear of the box is a high-potential transformer 17 the secondary leads 18 of which are in circuit with contacts 19 of a rotary flasher 20. Brushes 21 are connected to the respective tube terminals 6 and the contacts are arranged so that the tubes are energized singly or simultaneously, the order of energizing being, of course, variable-by suitable rearrangement .of the contacts on the flasher drum. The flasher is driven by a motor 22, and the transformer and motor are supplied with current from any suitable power line 23 under the control of a switch 24. Instead of such automatic controlling means, hand control by individual switches may in some cases be provided.

The housing 15 is provided along its upper and lower front edges with channels 25 to slidably receive changeable or interchangeable sign sections 26 of any suitable sheet material, and generally relatively opa ue. Thus, if the sign sections are of metal trey are naturally completely opaque, while if of glass or analogous material they may be rendered approximately or completely opaque by coating withpaint or other material, in all their areas except the design areas presently referred to. Each screen section includes a design area 27 which may be a letter or other character, or a part of a complete decorative design, this being provided, in the case of a sheet of opaque material, by cutting out the material to form a stencil opening, or in the case of material which is coated, by leaving the design area uacoated. so thatit is translucent or tran8- parent, depending for example upon whether it is made of clear, or opalescent pebbled or frosted glass. It is evident,-without elaborate explanation, that by the described means areas are not transparent, buttranslucent,

the light emitted by the separate tubes of the grid will be more or less blended, and diffused, and in this way different color etfectsmay be produced.

In some cases a partition such as a sheet i of transparent or translucent glass 28 may be inserted in vertical guide channels 29 between the design or screen and the color background or grid. This provides for sub- 4 stantially complete closure of the sign box,

whether ornot the sign sections are in posi tion. Additionally, a light reflecting member 29' may be arranged in the rear of the background-or grid, and preferably has the exposed face thereof suitably treated or finished to produce in conjunction with the tubes any desired color or pattern efi'ect.

Fig. 12 shows a changeable or interchangeable sign structure, of the character just described, incorporated in the front of a theatre marquee 30. Either side of the canopy may have a stenciled screen 31 provided with stencil or design areas 32 analogous to those already described, but arranged as a changeable or nonchangeable sign or design. The foregoing are only two examples of the many adaptations or uses of the color grid or background. M

Fig 4 illustrates a grid consisting of a single tube 2 which may be substantially the same as the tube 2 of the previous example,

, ex-ceptqthat its main portions 7 may be, if

desired, more closely spaced than in the pre- =vi0us instance. Such a single tube grid gives only a single color elfect, but provides a distlnctly new and improved s gn. or illuminated design in combination with a front or screen having characteristics of the previous examples, and as sufiiciently illustrated in Fig. 4.

Figs. '5 and 6 show a grid composed of three tubes, of which tubes 2 and 3 may be substantially the same as in Figs. 1 to 3.

The additional tube 40 has its straight parallel portions interspaced with those of the other two tubes, and also has bends or bridge portions 41 to pass over the straight sections ofthe other. tubes, as in the case of tube 8 of this and the previous examples. There is thus provided a color background or composite grid 45 composed of relatively closely spaced parallel tube portions consisting of parts of three distinct luminous tubes.

Each of the'tubes is desirably designed to emit light of a different color, and suitable control means may be provided on the general plan of Fig. 2, but with suitable contacts on the d'stributor arranged to control the three tubes so that they are energized singly or in any com ination, thus giving a total of seven color effects by the use of onlyv three tubes. When the straight tube portions are properly spaced and any two of them are simultaneously energized, the resulting color effect is substantially a blend of the component colors. Figs. 5 and 6 also illustrate that the straight tube portions may, if desired, be arranged, vertically instead of horizontally, as in the previous instance.

Fig. 7 shows a grid arrangement substantially similar to Figs. 1 to 3, except that the straight tube portions are arranged vertically instead of horizontally.

Fig. 9 shows a modification in which the straight portions of each tube are connected by bends or bridging members 50, all of which are bent at right angles to the planes of the respective straight portions; thus bridging members of grid tubes 2 and 3 are bent outwardly in opposite directions from the plane ofthe straight portions, al-

' though the straight portions all lie in the same plane. i

Figs. 10 and 11 illustrate a modification 111 which two tubes and 61 have their straight portions 62 and 63, respectively, arranged at right angles to each other, forming in eifect a checkerboard color background or grid. In this arrangement it is practically impossible to have the straight tube portions in one plane, but they may be, as clearly shown:

in Fig. 11, very nearly in one plane. When two luminous tubes, arranged as shown in thcsefigures, emit light of different colors, the effect whenxcither tube is illuminated singly is substan ally like that of the previous examples, but when the tubes are energized simultaneously, the simple colors blend at each crossing or intersection of the different tube portions while the intermediate straight portions of the respective tubes emit simple or unblended l ht, thus providing a distinctly novel color effect, different from the effects produced in the previous examples wherein the principal tube portions are substantially paralleh It is to be understood that the terms .baekground or grid are employed in a generic sense and include any arrangement of the tubes which will produce the efiects desired. It is obvious that the forms illustrated in Figures 5 to 11 inclusive all have a common characteristic, namely a plurality of gas containing chambers or passages, which are non-communicating. In other words, these forms illustrate the generic idea of providing a background embodying a multiplicity of gas containing passages or chambers closed from one another. As has been explained, a very important advantage of this construction resides in the fact that the non-communicating compartments or passages permit the obtaining of different color effects, for instance, by the use of different gases in the different passages.

An important feature of my invention is that I provide for the illumination of signs by means which contemplate defining the pattern, at the light source itself, in a continuous and definite pattern, as distinguished from flashin vari-colored lights, or blending lights of di erent colors and am able to accomplish, with a simple change of light grids, a result which cannot be reached with the mechanical contrivances for flashing, in sequence, the different colors of signs now in use. i

Evidently many other variationsimay be made both as to the general form or arrangement of the color grids and by utilization in signs or analogous illumination apparatus, as will be sufficiently understood by skilled persons, from the examples given.

What I claim is: r

1. In an illuminating, appliance of the class described, a background composed of luminous tubing,the main ortions of which are arranged in spaced re ation so that the area of the background is well covered by bands of light emitted from the tube portions, and a relatively opaque screen located in front of the background and provided with relatively translucent patterned areas constituting a design illuminated by the back round, said translucent areas being dispose in front of said tubes and relatively close thereto, whereby to provide, when the tubes are made luminous, a pattern composed of bands or tripes of light visually distinguishable over said areas.

2. An illuminating device of the class described, comprising a grid composed of noncommunicatmg luminous gas filled tubing, electrodes for making the gas in said tubing luminous, a substantially flat light re fleeting member in the rear of said tubing, an opaque screen in front of said grid, said screen being provided with relatively translucent areas behind which said grid is disposed, said grid and areas being relatively arranged to provide, when the tubing is made luminous, a design composed of bands or stripes of intense light and of a" color characteristic of the gas contained in said tubin 3. Zn illuminating device of the class described, comprising grids composed of luminous gas filled tubes; portions of the tubes of one grid being disposed between the tubes of the other grid, electrodes for making the gas in said tubes luminous, and an opaque screen in front of the tubes and in relatively close proximity thereto, said screen being provided with designed relatively translucent areas, whereby to rovide, when the tubes are made luminous, iflused bands or stripes of intense light and of colors characteristic of the gas contained in said tubes.

4. An illuminating device of the class described, com rising a pluralit of grids, each composed o luminous gas tions of the tubes of the different grids being disposed between one another in substantially a common plane, electrodes for making the gas in said tubes luminous, and an opaque screen in front of the grid and in relatively close proximit thereto, said screen being provided wit designed relatively translucent areas in front of said tubes, whereby to provide, when the tubes are made luminous, diffused bands or stripes of intense light and of spectral colors characteristic of the gas contained in said tubes.

5. An illuminating device of the class described, comprising a background composed of non-communicating luminous gas filled tubes, electrodes for making said tubes luminous, means in the respective tubes for emitting different colors or tints, and an opaque screen in front of said tubes and in close proximity thereto and provided with, designed relatively translucent areas, said areas composed of visually distinguishable bands or stripes of intense light and of colors characteristic of the gas contained in said tubes.

6. An illuminating device of the class described, comprising grids composed of a plurality of non-communicating luminous tubes having electrodes for making the same luminous, said grids having main portions which are substantially parallel, and other portions angularly disposed relative to the main portions, a substantially fiat light reflecting member in the rear of said tubes, and a relatively opa ue screen closely positioned in front of tlie tubes and provided with relatively translucent areas arranged in front of the grid- 7. An illuminating device of the class described, comprising a background composed of a plurality of non-communicating luminous tubes having electrodes, certain of said tubes having main portions connected by bridge portions, other of said tubes having portions interspaced between said main portions, means in said tubes for emitting luminous rays of difierent colors'or tints, and means for causing illumination of the tubes ieparately for producing different color efects. I

8. An illuminating device of the class described, comprising a background composed of a plurality of non-communicating luminous tubes having electrodes, certain of said tubes having main portions connected by bridge portions, other of said tubes having led tubes, poring different color effects.

9. An illuminating device of the class described, comprising a background composed of a plurality of non-communicating luminous tubes having electrodes, means in thetubes for emitting luminous rays of different colors or tints, certain of said tubes having main portions connected to one another,

others of said tubes having main portions interspaced between said first mentioned portions, means in sa d tubes for emitting luminous rays of different colors or tints,

means for causing illumination of the tubes simultaneously for blended color effects, and an opaque screen closely positioned in front of the background and prgvided with designed translucent areas in front of the background, a

10. An illuminating device of the class described comprising a background composed of a lurality of non-communicating luminous tu es having electrodes, certain of said tubes having main portions connected by bridge portions, other of said tubes having portions interspaced between said main portions, means in said tubes for emitting luminous rays of different colors or tints,

a light reflecting member positioned in the rear end in'close proximity-t0 said-tubes,

and means for causing illumination of the tubes separately for producing different color eifects. g Signed at New York city, New York, this 18th day of January, 1928.

THOMAS K. PETERS.

US1680633A 1928-01-20 1928-01-20 Illuminating appliance Expired - Lifetime US1680633A (en)

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Cited By (10)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2726587A (en) * 1951-12-03 1955-12-13 Richard S Cutter Photographic contact printer
US2743388A (en) * 1953-09-08 1956-04-24 Samuel C Bartley Electric lamp
US3457662A (en) * 1967-05-19 1969-07-29 Ben W Rau Lighting apparatus
FR2585161A1 (en) * 1985-07-18 1987-01-23 Catteau Jean Jacques Flashing light signalling panel
WO1988008149A1 (en) * 1987-04-07 1988-10-20 Alphasil, Inc. Method of illuminating flat panel displays to provide crt appearing displays
FR2615929A1 (en) * 1987-05-29 1988-12-02 Catteau Jean Jacques Round signalling light with discharge lamp
US4950053A (en) * 1987-01-05 1990-08-21 General Electric Company Multibend fluorescent light source for liquid crystal displays with out of plane lamp electrodes
US5387837A (en) * 1992-03-27 1995-02-07 U.S. Philips Corporation Low-pressure discharge lamp and luminaire provided with such a lamp
US5664352A (en) * 1994-01-24 1997-09-09 Beckman; Sue Method and apparatus for illuminating artwork by a neon tube arrangement of selected configuration
JP2720385B2 (en) 1994-10-21 1998-03-04 日本電気ホームエレクトロニクス株式会社 The liquid crystal display device

Cited By (11)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2726587A (en) * 1951-12-03 1955-12-13 Richard S Cutter Photographic contact printer
US2743388A (en) * 1953-09-08 1956-04-24 Samuel C Bartley Electric lamp
US3457662A (en) * 1967-05-19 1969-07-29 Ben W Rau Lighting apparatus
FR2585161A1 (en) * 1985-07-18 1987-01-23 Catteau Jean Jacques Flashing light signalling panel
US4950053A (en) * 1987-01-05 1990-08-21 General Electric Company Multibend fluorescent light source for liquid crystal displays with out of plane lamp electrodes
WO1988008149A1 (en) * 1987-04-07 1988-10-20 Alphasil, Inc. Method of illuminating flat panel displays to provide crt appearing displays
US4842378A (en) * 1987-04-07 1989-06-27 Alphasil, Inc. Method of illuminating flat panel displays to provide CRT appearing displays
FR2615929A1 (en) * 1987-05-29 1988-12-02 Catteau Jean Jacques Round signalling light with discharge lamp
US5387837A (en) * 1992-03-27 1995-02-07 U.S. Philips Corporation Low-pressure discharge lamp and luminaire provided with such a lamp
US5664352A (en) * 1994-01-24 1997-09-09 Beckman; Sue Method and apparatus for illuminating artwork by a neon tube arrangement of selected configuration
JP2720385B2 (en) 1994-10-21 1998-03-04 日本電気ホームエレクトロニクス株式会社 The liquid crystal display device

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