US1674637A - Toy knockdown aeroplane - Google Patents

Toy knockdown aeroplane Download PDF

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US1674637A
US1674637A US235693A US23569327A US1674637A US 1674637 A US1674637 A US 1674637A US 235693 A US235693 A US 235693A US 23569327 A US23569327 A US 23569327A US 1674637 A US1674637 A US 1674637A
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member
fuselage
plane
toy
aeroplane
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US235693A
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Robert E Conway
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METALCRAFT CORP
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METALCRAFT CORP
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63HTOYS, e.g. TOPS, DOLLS, HOOPS, BUILDING BLOCKS
    • A63H27/00Toy aircraft; Other flying toys ; Starting or launching devices therefor
    • A63H27/001Making or assembling thereof, e.g. by folding

Description

June 26, 1928.

R. E. CONWAY TUY KNOCKDOWN AEROPLANE 2 Sheets-$heet 1 Filed Nov. 25, 1927 Arron/vars June 26, 1928.

R. E. CONWAY "IOY KNOCKDOWN AEROPLANE Filed Nov. 25,1927 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 //\/ve/vroe.a KOBE/2T 5. cO/VWAK 5/ W Whit Patented June 26, 1928.

UNlTED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

ROBERT E. CONWAY,,OF, HAMMOND, INDIANA, ASSIGNOR TO METALORAFT C0320- TIOIN, OFST. LOUIS, MISSOURI, A CORPORATION 01 MISSOURI.

TOY xnocxnown annornann.

Application filed November 25,1927. Serial No. 285,683.

This invention relates generally to toys, and more specifically to a toy comprising a plurality of separable partswhich ma be assembled to produce toy aeroplanes o various types, the predominantobject of the invention being to produce a toy which will' excite the interest and test the'mechanical ingenuity of a child and in this manner serve to entertain him while increasing his knowledge of aeroplanes and directing his ithoughts and activities ,along mechanical mes.

Briefly stated, the toy in its knock-down condition includes the various parts from which the toy aeroplanes are produced and all of the necessary bolts and nuts wh ch are used to secure the parts together.

By following the instruction sheet. which will accompany the toy, a child may construct, for instance, a bi-plane withthree engines, this type of aeroplane necessitating the use of all of the parts of which the toy is comprised; then by removing one aeroplanes, certain parts, a large number 0 Fig. 2;

' gined monoplane may structed whereby a of the planes from the bi-plane, a three-enbe produced; and by removing some of the parts representing the engines and propellers, a oneor two-engine bi-plane or monoplane may be produced.

position of certain of the parts of the toy so as to produce sea-planeswith pontoons attached thereto and bombers, certain of the parts which are used to represent parts of the engines in producing land planes being transposed and utilized to represent the ontoons of the sea-plane and the bombs o the bombers.

By eliminating from use certain of the parts of the toy and transposing, in'the organization of the parts producing the toy different types of aeroplanes ma be con-. toy is provi ed which serves as "a source of entertainment and instruction to the youthful user thereof.

Figure 1 is a front view of a three-engined bi-plane, the construction of which involves the use of all of the parts of my improved y;

Figure 2 is a view in sideelevat-ion of the toy aeroplane shown in Fig. 1;

Figure 3 is a section on line 3 -3 of Figure 4 is-a sectional view on an enlarged scale taken on the line 4-.-4 of Fig. 1;

Figure 5 is a similarview taken on the line 5-5 of Fig. 1;

Figure 6 is a view of the various parts V of my improved toy, duplicate parts being omitted;

Flgures 7 8 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13 are diagrammatical views 1llustrating various types of aeroplanes which may be constructed and bottom walls, and an nd wall which is located at the tail of the aeroplane. When the pair of members 1 are assembled to produce a fuselage, said members are arranged so that the edges of the top and'bottom walls and the edges of the end walls of the associated members 1 are in contact with each other, whereby a hollow body d is produced which is closed on all sides with the exception of the forward end,

as shown in Fig. ,5. The members 1 are so shaped that a fuselage is provided which is tapered .toward the smaller rear end thereof. The members 1 of the fuselage A'are held togetherat the forward end of said fuselage b. a cap 2 which is of suchdimensions t at it fits over the forward endv portions of the associated members 1, as shown in Fig. 5, said capbeing provided with ears 3, and said cap and members 1 bein he d and nut associated therewith which i passes transversely through the fuselage and extends through the side walls of the members 1 and through the ears 3 of the cap 2.

The members 1 of the fuselage are held toether at the rear end of the toy aeroplane a bolt 5 which also serves to secure a pair ofbraces 6 to the fusela e, said bolt havin a head and being provi ed witha nut an being extended through the side walls of the members 1 and through saidbraces, as shown in Fig. 3. The braces 6 are flared outwardly from the fuselage atLtheir upper ends and are attached at their u per ends by means of bolts to a member 7 w 10h represents the elevators of the toy aeroplane,

secured together by a bolt 4 having a said member 7 resting on the top surface of the fuselage and being held in place by'said braces 6. Beneath the rear end of the fuselage A, the braces 6 are bent toward each other and interposed between said in-- wardly bent portions of said braces is the rear ground wheel 8 of the aeroplane, there being a bolt 9 passed through said braces on which said ground wheel is rotatably mounted.

Located at the rear portion of the fuselage is a member 10 which re resents the rudder of the toy aeroplane, sai member 10 having a portion 11 which overlaps the member 7 and a portion 12 which passes into the interior of the fuselage and is provided with an aperture through which the bolt passes, whereby said member is held in place, the rear walls of the members 1 being cut away sufliciently to permit said portion 12 to pass between said rear walls into the interior of the fuselage.

Referring now to the front portion of the aeroplane, 13 designates the upper plane and 14 designates the lower plane thereof, the planes 13 and 14 preferably comprise flat strips of material, the top plane-bein in contact with the top surface of the fuse a e and the lower plane being in contact with t e bottom surface of said fuselage. The lanes 13 and 14 are held in place by a lura it of struts or braces, a pair thereo whic is designated by the reference character 15, being secured at their op osite ends by means of bolts 16 to the top p ane 13. The struts 15, asshown in Figs. 2 and 4, are spaced apart transversely of. the planes 13 and 14, each of said struts having angularly arranged portions 16 which pass inwardly and downwardly from the to plane 13 toward the lower surface of the uselage A, and the lower ends of the angularly arranged portions of each of said struts 15 being joine by a straight portion 17, which is in contact with the lower surface of the fuselage. 18 designates a pair of braces which extend from the angular portions 16 of one of the struts 15 to the side walls of the fuselage, each of said braces 18 bein secured at its opposite ends by means of be ts to one of the angularly arranged portions 16' of a strut 15 and to a side wall of the fuselage, respectively, whereby the strut 15 with which said braces 18 are associated is connected rigidly to the fuselage.

19 designates a member which serves as the undercarriage of the toy aeroplane, said member having the general shape of a letter W, as shown clearly in Fig. 1. The two outer legs of the member 19 are secured at their upper ends to the forward strut 15, this at tachment bein efi'ecte-d by the same bolts which secure t e braces 18 to said strut 15. The outer legs of the member 19 pass downwardly from the forward strut 15 and through a ertures 20 in the lower plane 14, said mem er being bent upwardly at the lower ends of the'outer legs thereof toward the fuselage. and bein provided with a straight portion 21 whic is arranged in contact with the lower surface of said fuselage. Rotatabl mounted on bolts 22 attached to the mem er 19 is a pair of circular elements 23 representing the ground wheels of the aeroplane. Located adjacent to the outer ends of the planes 13 and 14 are pairs of braces 24 each of which is attached at its opposite ends to said upper and lower plane, respectively.

Extended through an a erture in the cap 2 located at the forward end of the fuselage A and projected forwardly from said'cap is a bolt 25 (Fig. 5), said bolt having a head at its forward end and being rovided with a nut at its rearmost end. 26 esignates a cupshaped member having an end wall 27 and an annular wall 28, said end wall bein provided with an aperture throu h whidli the bolt 25 passes, whereby sai cup-shaped member is supported on said bolt. 29 designates a mem er havingbeapproximately the same shape as the mem r 26, said member 29 having an end wall rovided with an aperture through which .t e bolt 25 passes, but instead of having a solid annular wall, as has the member 26, the member 29 is provided with a plurality of cars which are arranged at an approximate right angle to the end wall of said member. 29 is of greater diameter than the member 26 and when the parts referred to are in their assembled positions, the member 26 is located within the member 29, as shown in Fig. 5. The angularly arranged cars 30 of the member 29 are provided each with an aperture, as shown clearly in Fig. 6, and extended through each of said apertures is a bolt 31,

1 said bolts being so arranged with respect to the members 26 and 29 that the head portions thereof are confined between the outer face of the annular wall 28 of the member 26 and the inner faces of the angularly arranged ears 30 on the member 29, and the threaded portions of said bolts extend outwardly radially from said cars 30. The members 26 and 29 and the bolts 30 are intended to repre-. sent an internal combustion engine of the radial type ordinarily used on aeroplanes,

the radially arranged bolts representing the radial cylinders of the engine, and the screwthreads on the bolts representing the cooling fins on the engine cylinders. a sleeve which surrounds theouter portion of the bolt 25,; and 33 designates a semi- -spherical cap or nose portion which is mounted on the bolt 5 at the outer end thereof, the .wall of said cap or nose portion having an aperture formed therethrough through which said bolt passes. The inner edge of the cap or nose portion 33 is spaced apart slightly The member 32 designates from the end wall of the member 29, and rotatably mounted on the sleeve 32 so that it will rotate in said space is a member 34 which is provided with outwardly extended wing portions whereby same resembles a propeller. It will be noted by referring to Fig. that when the nut at the inner end portlon of the bolt 25 is moved inwardly with respect to said bolt, the members 26 and 29, sleeve 32 and cap 33 are all drawn into close conrear end by a semi-spherical cap 37 and at its forward end each cylindrical element is provided withthe organization of parts al ready described, which produce a structure resembling and representing an internal combustion engine having radial cylinders and having a propeller associated therewith; that is to say, each of said cylindrical elements 35 is provided at its forward end with members 38 and 39 of the same'construction and arrangement as the members 26 and 29 already described, a sleeve 40, a cap 41, a

-' member 42 rotatably mounted on the sleeve '40 and resembling in shape a propeller, and

bolts 43. The caps 37 and 41 associated with each of the cylindrical elements 35 are drawn together by a bolt 44 which extends longi- .tudinally through each of said cylindrical elements, whereby said caps and the assoclated elements other than thenmember 42 are rigidly held in fixed positions. In 0on nection with the parts associated with the cylindrical elements 35, inward movement of the members 39 is prevented by the heads of the bolts 43. contacting with the forward edges of the cylindrical elements 35.

Thus far, I have described only one type of aeroplane toy, namely the three-en ined bi-plane, and as has been already state it is possibleby omitting certain of the parts or' transposing certain parts in the organizat1on of parts, toconstruct a number of different types of aeroplanes. For instance, if it were desired to construct a three-engined monoplane such as that shown diagrammatically in Fig. 7, it would be merely necessary to dispense with the use of the lower plane 14 and the braces 24 at the outer ends of the. planes, while if a two-engined monoplane such as that shown in Fi 9 were desired, the members 26 and 29, t e screws 31, the propeller 34, and the sleeve 32 would be omitted and the cap '33 would be drawn rear wardly by screwing the nut inwardly on the bolt 25 until the edge of said cap contacts with the cap 2. Also, a one-engined monoplane such as that shOWn in Fig. 10 may be constructed by omitting the cylindrical elements 35 and the parts associatedtherewith.

In like manner, it is possible to construct different types of aeroplanes by transposing certain of the parts. For instance, a oneengined sea-plane, either monoplane or biplane, ma be constructed by omitting the ground w eels 23 and attaching the cylindrical elements, which are closed at their oppositeends by the caps 37 and 41 and are without the engine parts and propellers, to

the member 19, as shown in Figs. 8 and 13.-

In accordance with this arrangement the cylindrical elements 35 represent the pontoons of the sea-plane.

Also, if it is desired to construct a bomber, the cylindrical elements 35 without the engine parts andpropellersare attached as shown in Fig. '12, while if a bi-plane bomber were to be constructed, the cylindrical elements 35 would be attached as shown in Fig. 11." Also the cylindrical elements 35 ma represent auxiliary fuel tanks when attac ed to the planes.

' In like manner, a great number of types of aeroplanes may be constructed by merely omitting some of the parts or 'transposing certain of the parts, it having been found that an excess of fifteen types may be made, and, therefore, a great amount of amusement and instruction is afforded in the use of my improved toy.

I claim 1. A toy aeroplane having an assembly of parts representing a motor, said parts including an annular member, and bolts extended radially therefrom simulating motor cylinders, said bolts' being provided with exposed screwthreads simulating cooling fins on the motor cylinders.

2. A toy aeroplane having an assembly of parts representing a motor, said parts includlng a member providedwith an annular wall, a second member having portions arranged parallel with-the annular wall of the first mentioned member, and a plurality of members representing the radial motor cylinders extending outwardly through apertures 1n the alined portions of the second mentioned member, said members representmg the motor cylinders having head portions which are confined between the annular wall of the first mentioned member and the parallel portions of the second mentioned member.

3. A toy aeroplane having an assembly of arts representing a motor, said parts inclu ing' a member provided'with an annular wall, a second member having portions ar ranged parallel with the annular wall of the first mentioned member, a plurality of screwthreaded bolts representing radial motor cylinders extended outwardly through apertures in the alined portions of the second mentioned member, the head portions of said bolts being confined between the annular wall of the first mentioned member and the parallel portions of the second mentioned member, a member representing a propeller, and a support for the last mentioned member on which same is rotatably mounted.

4. A toy aeroplane having an assembly of parts representing a motor, said parts including a member provided with an annular wall, a second member having portions arranged parallelwith the annular wall of the first mentioned member, a plurality of screwthrea-ded bolts representing radial motor cylinders extended outwardly through apertures in the alined portions of the second mentioned member, the head portions of said bolts being confined between the annular wall of the first mentioned member and the parallel portions of the second mentioned member, a member representing a propeller, a sleeve located adjacent to the first and second mentioned members on which said propeller is rotatably mounted, and a bolt extended through said sleeve and through apertures in the walls of said first and second mentioned members to maintain said parts in their proper positions. a

5. A toy aeroplane provided with a plane, a cylindrical member attached to said plane, an assembly of parts at one end of said cylindrical member representing a motor, said parts including a plurality of radially arranged screwthreaded bolts simulating radial motor cylinders having cooling fins thereon, a rotatably mounted member representing a propeller, a cap adjacent to said propeller, a second cap at the end of the cylindrical member opposite to the end thereof at which the assembly of motor parts is located, and a bolt extended longitudinally through said cylindrical member to maintain 11 their proper positions the parts associated with said cylindrical mem- 6. A toy aeroplane provided with a fuselage, a member at the tail end of said fuselage simulating the elevators of an aeroplane, braces attached-to said member and in contact with a portion of said fuselage, said braces having portions arranged in spaced relation beneath said fuselage, a ground contacting member located between said s aced portions of said braces, a fastening evice extended through said fuselage and through said braces for securing the braces to the fuselage, and a fastening member for securing said ground contacting member to the spaced portions of said braces.

7. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a plane arranged to rest upon said fuselage at'the top surface thereof, and a member simulating struts, for said plane, said member comprising a rigid element secured at its opposite ends to said plane and being arranged in contact intermediate of its ends with the lower surface of said fuselage.

8. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a plane arranged to rest upon said fuselage at the top surface thereof, and a member for simulating diagonal struts common to many full size aeroplanes, said member being secured at its opposite ends to said plane and having inclined portions representing the diagonal struts extended downwardly from the points at which said member is secured to said plane, and said member being provided with a portion arranged in contact with the lower surface of said fuselage.

9. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage,

a plane arranged to rest upon said fuselage 10. A toy aeroplane having a fuselagecomprising a plurality of separable, longitudinal elements assembled to produce said fuselage, a cap at one end of said fuselage arranged to embrace the adjacent end portions of said separable elements in a manner to maintain said separable elements in their assembled condition, and means at the oppo site end of said fuselage for aiding said cap in maintaining the separable elements com prising the fuselage in their assembled condition.

1-1. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a plane arranged to rest upon said fuselage at the top surface thereof, a member simulating struts for said plane, said member being secured at its opposite ends to said plane and being arranged in contact intermediate its ends with the lower surface of said fuselage, and an assemblage of parts representing a motor supported by said plane.

12. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a plane arranged to rest upon said fuselage at the top surface thereof, a member simulating struts for said plane, said member being secured at its opposite ends to said plane and being arranged in contact intermediate its ends with the lower surface of said fuselage, and an assemblage of parts representing a motor supported by said plane, said assemblage of parts representing motors being secured to the plane by the devices which secure. said lage, a lower plane arranged in contact with the lower surface of the fuselage, and means for maintaining said lower plane in its proper position.

14. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, an upper plane arranged to rest upon said fuselage at the top surface thereof, a member for simulating diagonal struts common to many full size aeroplanes, said member being secured at its opposite ends to said plane and having inclined portions representing the diagonal struts extended downwardly from the points at which said strut is. secured to said plane, and said member being provided with a portion arranged in contact with the lower surface of said fuselage, a lower plane arranged in contact with the lower surface of said fuselage, and braces for securing said lower plane to said upper plane.

15. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, an upper plane arranged to rest upon said fuselage at the top surface thereof, a member for simulating diagonal struts common to many full size aeroplanes, saidmember being secured at its opposite ends to said plane and having inclined portions representing the diagonal struts extended downwardly from the points at which said member is secured to said plane, and said member being provided with a portion arranged in contact with the lower surface of said fuselage, a lower plane arranged in contact with the lower surface gt said fuselage, braces for securing said lower planeto said uppervplane, and elements representing parts of an aeroplane structure secured to said lower plane.

16. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, an upper plane arranged to rest upon said fuselage at the top surface thereof, a mem ber for simulating diagonal struts common to many full size-aeroplanes, said member being secured at itsopposite ends to said plane and having inclined portions repre- -senting the diagonal struts extended downwardly from the points at which said member is secured to said plane and said mem her being provided with a portion arranged in contact with the lower surface of said fuselage,- a lower plane arranged in contact with the lower surface of said fuselage,

undercarriage to simulate a means for maintaining said lower plane in its proper position, an element simulating the undercarriage of an aeroplane secured to said member and extended through apertures in said lower plane, and supporting devices fixed to said element.

" 17. A toy aeroplane comprisinga fuselage,

a plane arranged immediately above said fuselage, and a strut for maintaining said plane in position with respect to said fuselage, said strut being secured at its opposite ends to said plane and having inclined portions extended downwardly from the points at which said strut is secured to said plane,

andsaid strut being provided with a portion in contact with the lower surface of said fuselage.

18. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage,

a plane arranged immediately above said fuselage, diagonal struts for said plane, members comprising the undercarriage of the toy aeroplane fixed to said struts intermediate the upper and lower ends thereof and extending downwardly from said struts, and supporting devices for the toy aeroplane secured to the lower ends of said members.

19. A toy aeroplane provided with a fuselage, a member at the tail-end of said fuselage simulating the elevators of an aeroplane, elements extended downwardly from said member, said elements being spaced apart from each other transversely of the fuselage at their lower ends, a ground wheel interposed between said spaced-apart lower portions of said elements, and means extended through saidelements and through said ground wheel at the center thereof, whereby. said ground wheel is rotatably supported.

20. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, an upper plane arranged immediately above said fuselage members simulating struts for said plane, an element simulating an undercarriage of an aeroplane, a lower plane arranged beneath said fuselage, and a member simulating a port-ion of a motor, a bomb, a pontoon, and an auxiliary fuel tank, said member being provided with an aperture to receive attaching means and said upper plane, said lower plane, and said undercarriage likewise being provided with apertures to receive attaching means whereby said member may be attached to said'upper or lower plane to simulate a part of a motor, a bomb or an auxiliary fuel tank, and to said ontoon.

21. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a plane arranged immediately above. said fuselage, a member for simulating dia onal struts common to many full size aerop anes, said member being secured at itsopposite ends to said plane and having inclined portions representing the diagonal struts ex tended downwardly from the points at which said member is secured to the said plane,

and said member being provided with a. portion arranged in contact with the lower surface of said fuselage, elements'comprising the undercarriage of the toy aeroplane aflixed to said member and extended downwardly therefrom, and supporting devices for the toy aeroplane secured to the lower ends of said elements. I

22. A toy aeroplane comprising a fuselage, a plane arranged immediately above said fuselage, members simulating struts for said plane, an element simulating an undercarriage of an aeroplane, and a member simulating a portion of a motor, a bomb, a pontoon and an auxiliary fuel tank, said member being provided with an aperture to receive fastening means and said plane and said element simulating the undercarriage likewise being provided with apertures to receive fastenin means, whereby said member may be attached to said plane to simulate a part of a motor, a bomb, a pontoon or an auxiliary fuel tank and to said element simulating the undercarriage to simulate a pontoon.

In testimony whereof, I have hereunto set my hand;

ROBERT E. CONWAY.

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2542042A (en) * 1944-02-16 1951-02-20 Howard M Mccoy Integrated model airplane
US2686609A (en) * 1948-12-06 1954-08-17 Fletcher Aviat Corp Auxiliary tip fuel tank
US3939600A (en) * 1974-10-30 1976-02-24 Eid Ellen G Take-apart toy

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2542042A (en) * 1944-02-16 1951-02-20 Howard M Mccoy Integrated model airplane
US2686609A (en) * 1948-12-06 1954-08-17 Fletcher Aviat Corp Auxiliary tip fuel tank
US3939600A (en) * 1974-10-30 1976-02-24 Eid Ellen G Take-apart toy

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