US1672590A - Gas floor furnace - Google Patents

Gas floor furnace Download PDF

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US1672590A
US1672590A US105126A US10512626A US1672590A US 1672590 A US1672590 A US 1672590A US 105126 A US105126 A US 105126A US 10512626 A US10512626 A US 10512626A US 1672590 A US1672590 A US 1672590A
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radiator
main
furnace
floor
casing
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US105126A
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Fred J Ward
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Fred J Ward
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24HFLUID HEATERS, e.g. WATER OR AIR HEATERS, HAVING HEAT GENERATING MEANS, IN GENERAL
    • F24H3/00Air heaters having heat generating means
    • F24H3/006Air heaters having heat generating means using fluid combustibles

Description

F. J. WARD GAS FLOOR FURNACE June 5, 1928.
Filed April 2 1926 5 Sheets-Sheet June 5, 1928. 1,672,590
F. J. WARD GAS FLOOR FURNACE Filed April 28,1926 s Sheets-Sheet 2 I zvuenf'ovv June 5, 1928. F. J. WARD GAS FLOOR FURNACE 3 Sheets-Sheet 3 Filed April 28, 1926 Patented June 5, 1928.
' UNITED sraras FRED J. warm, orio'no BEACH, CALIFORNIA.
GAS FLOOR FURNACE.
A licationfiled A ril as, .1926.
"My invention is a floor-furnace to be installed'in the floor ota room or structure in which the lighting and control of the gas is done 'from the floor level and the air to be heated is drawn downwardly from the floor and passed through the heater and discharged at the floor level.
An ,object'ot my invention is a floor gas furnace having a by providing a central burner 0r fire box and downwardly ext-ending combustion passages spaced from the main'radiator, whereby air may circulate around the main radiator chambers for the products of combustion.
Another object of my invention is to-provide a furnace of the typedescribed, in which the cold air is d rawn downwardly througl'i'an outer grate and discharged upwardly around the main radiator, and the products of combustion chambers, and dis charged through a central grate.
Another object of my invention is to construct a tioor'turnace of such tpe that it may be readily cleaned, by providing a floor grate which may be readily removed, with a downwardly extending inner casing; thus all'owing'aecess to the casing bottonrofthe main or outer casing to allowcleaning.
Another object of my invention is to suspend the whole furnace construction from the floor by an ou'tercasing and to confine the air to be heated within said casing, drawing the air to support the products of combustion from below the floor and outside of the. casing. I
In constructing my furnace I preferably make same rectangular in shape, of a greater :length than width, providing a rectangular or boxdikc outer casing open at the top, this casing being suspended trom the icon through a proper sized opening therein. it
burner or fire box is supported on the bottom ot' the casing, the burner box being open-at the bottom. An inner casing is suspended from the grate, ing in the floor and a radiator mounted on the burner box and chambers for products of combustion separate therefrom at each end, are housed in the inner casing. A domeor radiator top forms a gawtight closure for the top ot he radiator and the products of combustion chambers.
A cap with a' transparent closure is centrally positioned 1n the dome so that the operation of the burner may be inspected building large radiating surface.-
'rad1ator above the and around the extending around the open- SeriatNo. 105,126.
and a central removable grate is positioned forming an outlet over the inner casing.
My invention will be more readily understood from the following description and drawings, in which;
Figure 1 is a plan view of the furnace, showing the grates and stationary plate attached to an opening in the floor;
Fig. 2 is a vertical longitudinal section of the furnace. on the line 2 2 of Fig. 1, in the direction of the arrows, on an enlarged scale;
Fig. 3 is a horizontal section on the line 3+3 of Fig. 2, in the direction of the arrows, illustrating mainly part of the main radiator construction, the burner box and the products of combustion chambers, or as they may be designated, the supplementary radiators;
Fig. 4 is a plan view taken in the direction of the arrow 4 of Fig. 5, of the main radiator and the supplemental radiators with the dome or radiator top removed;
Fig.. 5 is a side elevation of Fig. 4, taken in the direction of the arrow 5;
Fig. 6 i-s a plan view of the burner box and base,'taken in the direction of the arrow 6 of Fi 7 Fig. %is a side elevation of. Fig. 6, taken in the direction of the arrow Fig. 8 is a detail of the bottom closure of the supplemental radiators;
Fig. 9 ,is a horizontal section taken on the.
'line 99 of Fig. 2, on a reduced scale, showin the dome or radiator top;
1g. 10 1s a perspective view of the outer casing;
Fig. 11. is a detail plan of the stationary control plate through which the ems o i' the main burner and pilot valves extend;
Fig. 12 is a cross section of Fig. 'l1,on the line 1212 in the direction of the arrows;
Fig. 13 is a vertical detail Section on the line l3--13 of Fig. 12 in the direction of the. arrows I v Fig. it is a sectional vertical detail. illustrating the. manner of suspending the outer and inner casings. i
The outer casing and burner box cons-trad tion is substantially as follows, having reeren ce particularly to Figs. .2, 3. (i. 7. i and 1 The outer casing 1' is l'CCitlllglllill, being the shape of the floor opening and preferably of greater length than width and formed with flatsides. The casing sides 2 have a flange '3 onthe upper edge extending outwardly, the flange engaging over the edge of the floor or other support for the furnace, A casing bottom 4 is preferably a casting and hasa T-sliaped flange 5 on the edge. The lower edge of this flange engages an inwardly turned flange (3 on the casing walls.
A series of lugs 7 are utilized to bolt the casing bottom to the casing walls. The burner or fire box is designated generally by the numeral 8 and has a lower flange 9 bolted to the casing bottom. there being an opening 10 in the bottom of proper size and shape to accommodate the burner box. This box is provided with a groove 11 at the top edge and to support. the main radiator as hereunder set forth.
The burners 12 are supported on vertical pipes extending from the horizontal pipes 13, these latter being supported by suitable brackets. A pilot burner 1 1- extends upwardly between the main burners and is also connected to horizontal supply pipes. These pipes have valves 15 with stems 16 leading upwardly to valve handles 17; thus con-.
trolling the supply of gas from the feed pipes 18.
An outer grate 19 rests on the floor, extending over the flange 3 and has a cutout section in which is secured the control indicator plate 20. This plate is illustrated particularly in Figs. 11, 12 and 13, the plate being formed angularly with a web 21 which is'bolted to one side of the casing and has apertures 22 for the valve stems and handles 17. i
The inner casing designated generally by the numeral 23 has vertical walls 24, these walls having an inward taper 25 at the top with a short vertical section 26 and an inturned flange 27. This flange is supported on the outer register or grate as indicated particularly in Figs. 2 and 14. The inner casing is open at the bottom as indicated by the numeral 28 and'has vertical slots 29 therein to accommodatetheexhaust flues 30 which lead to a smoke pipe 31.
The radiator construction is substantially as follows, having reference particularly to Figs. 2, 3. 4, 5, 8 and 9:
The main radiator is designated generally by the numeral 39, having supplementary or auxiliary radiators 33 on the ends. The main radiator has corrugated side walls 3% with deep corrugations and curved end walls 35. These walls fit in the groove 11 on the upper edge of the burner box. The auxiliary radiators 3i have an inner curved wall 36 concentric with the curved wall 35, an. outer wall 37 parallel to the ends of the furnace, and side walls 38 parallel to the side walls of the furnace. These side walls are preferably on the line with the outer edge of the corrugations of the side 34 and connected to the lines 30. connected above the level of the burners.
These dues are A closure plate 39 is secured to the lower end of the supplemental radiators, being held in place by rods 10 and are secured to a radiator cover or topplate ll. It. will be noted that the top plate is somewhat arched or dome shaped over the main radiator and has depressed end portions over the auxiliary radiators. The shape of this plate is illustrated particularly in Fig. 9, forming a gas-tight closure with the top of the main radiator and ot the supplemental radiators. An opening for the products of combustion is formed by a downwardly curved transition plate 5- which joins the walls and 36 leading upwardly to the top plate 41 on the edge; thus giving suilicient space to allow reversal of direction ol' the. burnt gases from the burners.
The dome is provided with a circular flange it to which is titted a cap 45 having a transparent. window il-6 and having a handle 47 to allow removal. This window allows inspection of the burners in order to see it they are burning properly and by removing the cap the pilot burner or the main burner can be 'lit by inserting a match or the like held in a suitable holder. Tie "bars l8 are utilized to secure the dome and the burner box tightly together, being bolted through a flange it) on the upper edge oi? the burner box. A central removable grate or register 50 is fitted on the flange 27 ot the outer casing and may be bodily removed to allow access to the cap to for lighting the burners.
The manner of using my gas floor furnace and the functions of the different parts are substantially as follows:
It will be understood from the above de scription, that my gas floor furnace may be installed in old as well as in new buildings provided there is sutlicient space underneath the floor for the installation. The outer casing with the casing bottom forms an airtight chamber .so that. no air "from below the floor may get, into same, except the small amount which might pass around the valve stems 1G. The burner base is tirmly secured to the casing bottom. the burner extending upwardly into said base so that the air for consuming the gas is drawn from below the floor and doesnot draw air from the room being heated.
The main radiator has deep corrugations on opposite sides which transfer heat to the upwardly ascending air. this air being drawn downwardlv into the furnace through the outer grate l9 and between the inner and outer pasing. The end walls of the main radiatorbccome very hot on account of the products o't coinluistion passing into the sum'ilcmental or auxiliary radiators SI) in. which the ii-(shirt of combustion pass downwardly to the exhaust flnes 3Q. ("in account of the space between these eiid'walls lot) llltl erally, installed. in. houses which have. no, basement, and'therefore, thev structural-tea and-the supplementaliradiators, the airbein heated isbroughtrinto intimate contact wit these surfaces. passage strikes the curved transition plateor inverted arch 13. and is forced. sideways :to
opposite sides-of the inner casing. The heated air; therefore which;ipasses around the main-and the two supplemental I radia tors, passes upwardly. .and outwardly out of'i'the central grate or register 50;,
If desiredlugs 51.may be securedlin the corner of the outer casing to which bolt s- 52. passingsythrough ,the outer: grate are' secured, thus holdingjsaid grate-in a firm. position On remo.ving said bolts .the inner and outer gratings-may beremoved with. the inner casing.;.-thusgivingaccessto as; considerable partofthefurnace, especially; 1-
the casing bottom to allow cleaning. 7 necessary. ferrules 53 may be placed between the-lower ends ofzthe main radiators andit'he supplementall radiators between the walls 35v and 86' to hold the supplementalradiators in proper adjusted position.
My gas floor furnace is of a type which may be installed through an opening in-a floor and is particularly adapted for houses where the climatic conditions."-a;re not sosevere as-to require largefheating units, and
is .of especial advantage where gas is rela ti'vely cheap,.as 1n the neighborhoodof oil fields, .such'as; 1n some parts of California and Texas. This type oflfurnace is/gentures which allowfthis to be, assembled substantially completelywhile b i l s permanent location are of considerable commercialadvantage, Moreover, the type of floor furnace illustrated has alarge heat-' ing area for its size. By means ofjhaving the valves regulatable from the floor level,
the regulation o the heat is easily -accom-v plished;
It, will also be noted, moreover, that with my constructionproperly built and installed,
the-re is no opportunity for gasfu'mesto ,escape'into the building. An'advantage'in the art of my furnace in havingtheauxiliary, radiators at each, end
of the main radiator'and spaced therefrom by the transition plate 4.3 is that a much larger surface of the radiators is exposed to the air to be heated with the productsof combustion passing through the interior of such radiators. Therefore, the temperature of-the products of combustion at the outlet into the fiues'or vents leading to the stack may be much lower than when this construction is not used. This gives the effectv that a greater amount of heat is extracted from the products of'combustion from the gas burners than when there are no auxiliary radiators with a distinct air space therebetween. Moreover, with the transition plate The .air on its upward i at". a lower-level i so :that -:th
' claim is:
-; 43" forming an inverted 5 arch, the aireflmv-ing up betweenithe ends of the main land lauxilr ary radiators is not: obstructed I in athe up ward :flow butris, diverted' t'o both sides, passing upwardly.outwardly;through the center a "Another" ellzfracteristi Vantage-- o if my. invention is that? the cover; eve-re -.th' e-n1a-inw radiator hasacente "t'i' 'lged up\\-'ardly with the,;parts o'\e1 H auxiliary".- radiator.
bastionpassing;upwardly box are grve'nia zdowni directions at. the ends.
leflection .in both the..-n1a:m*rathalon Another advantage-: ofg'jhazving" the two auxiliary radiators with fthe ,ventz outlets therefrom! that in lighting; the burners it:
' *uducts O'lhl-fOtll our the burner is much easier' 'to secure aproper draft-on accountof; the ven't openings bein-g at oppo.-' site ends ofYt hefin-nace-iand allowing-the products of; combustionto -di'\e-rted inboth directions at the t'op of 't-lre' combustion chamberoverth-e burners- The -struetural. features of "h'a 'ijl g."thef'closure' at! the lowerend offthe auxiliai'y' fradiators supported.
from-the. cover atthe top. facilitates-the-as- 'of my floor furnaceniay be materially changed tov suit'diiferlent types of constructions and installations. Such changes. how
ever, would be withinythe--.spiritofz'my in ventionas set forth in the-description, drawings and claims.
Having descr1be,d.,. myinvention, what I 1. A gas floor furnace coinprisingiinuconibin'ation an outer casinghaving .side' walls suspendedv from the floor, a-.-casingfbotto1n. having a central opening "with :a burner boxattachcdthereto, the burner box being open atthe top bottom. a main radiator-"sup ported lon t'he burner'box, a radiatorftop-or dome connected thereto, supplelnentz'u'y radiators spaced from the *main radiator by transition plates an'db'eing' suspended from the dome, there being passages" for products of combustion between the .ma'EnYandsupplementary radiators at' -th'e top thereof, and
vent pipes connected to the supplementary radiators.
2. A gas .fioor furnace.asclaimedlinclaim 1, the supplementary radiators-having lower closure plates, the suspendingmeans being thereof.
4. In a gas furnace, a main radiator having outwardly curved end walls, deeply corrugated side walls, a radiator top plate resting on the upperedges of the said sides and ends, supplementary radiators having inner walls concentric with the curved outer ends of the main radiator and spaced therefrom by transition plates, the said supplementary radiators being secured to the said cover plate, there being passages for products of combustion bet-ween the main and supplementary radiators at the upper portion thereof, and vent pipes from the supplementaryradiators. I v
5. In a gas furnace as'claimedin claim 4, in which the supplementary radiators are each provided with a closure plate at their lowerend, thesaid closure plate being suspended from the cover plate of the radiator.
6..- A furnace having a burner box, a main radiatorhaving vertical corrugations supported thereon, a cover plate connected to the main radiator, an auxiliary radiator connected to the main radiator at one end thereof and at the upper part by a transition plate, there being an air space distinct from the corrugations between the main and auxiliary radiators at the lower part thereof, and means to suspend the auxiliary radiator from the cover plate.
7. A furnace comprising in combination a burner box having a radiator with vertical corrugations on itsside and having convex vertical ends, a cover plate secured to the top of the radiator, an auxiliary radiator spaced from the end of the main radiator by a transition plate and having an adjacent wall concentric to the end wall of the main radiator, said transition plate and cover forming a connection for the passage of products of combustion out of the upper 8. A furnace comprising in combination a burner box having a main radiator with vertical corrugations on its side wallssupported on said box, a. cover plate secured to the top of the radiator, an auxiliary radiator on the end of the main radiator and spaced therefrom, the adjacent ends of the main and auxiliary radiators being concentric, a'cl'osure plate on the lower end of the auxiliary radiator, a transition plate forming an inverted arch making a connection between the adjacent walls of the main and auxiliary radiators, and means to suspend the auxiliary radiator from the cover plate, there being an air space between the lower part of the auxiliary radiator and main radiator distinct from the corrugations.
9. A gas floor furnace comprising in combination a supporting structure connected to a floor having a burner box thereon, a main radiator supported by the burner box, a cover plate secured'to the top of the main radiator, a transition plate secured to the end wall of the main radiator, an auxiliary radiator connected to said transition plate and having its lower part separated byan air space from the end of the main radiator, said cover plate enclosing the upper end of the auxiliary radiator, and a closure for the lower end of said auxiliary radiator, there being a vent adjacent the lower end of said auxiliary radiator.
10. A gas floor furnace comprising in combination a supporting structure having a burner box, a main radiator mounted thereon and having a cover plate, a transi tion plate secured to the end wall of the main radiator, an auxiliary radiator attached to said plate, the cover plate extending over the auxiliary radiator, said plate having a dome section above the main radiator and a depressed end over the auxiliary radiator, a closure for the lower end of the auxiliary radiator, there being a vent adjacent to said lower end. V
11. A gas floor furnace comprising in combination a supporting structure having a burner box therein, a main'radiator mounted thereon and having vertical ends curved outwardly in horizontal section, a cover for the main radiator, a transition plate secured to the end of the main radiator, an auxiliary radiator connected to-the transition plate and having a wall spaced from the curved end wall of the main radiator and concentrio thereto, the cover plate forming a top closure for the auxiliary radiator, and a closure for the lower end of the auxiliary radiator with a vent adjacent thereto. I
In testimony whereof I have signed my name to this specification. I FRED J. WARD.
US105126A 1926-04-28 1926-04-28 Gas floor furnace Expired - Lifetime US1672590A (en)

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Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2614554A (en) * 1948-05-22 1952-10-21 Coleman Co Floor furnace
US2655177A (en) * 1946-05-13 1953-10-13 Eppa H Ryon Floor furnace valve

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2655177A (en) * 1946-05-13 1953-10-13 Eppa H Ryon Floor furnace valve
US2614554A (en) * 1948-05-22 1952-10-21 Coleman Co Floor furnace

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