US1640760A - Friction connection fob spindles and bobbins ok spools - Google Patents

Friction connection fob spindles and bobbins ok spools Download PDF

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US1640760A
US1640760A US1640760DA US1640760A US 1640760 A US1640760 A US 1640760A US 1640760D A US1640760D A US 1640760DA US 1640760 A US1640760 A US 1640760A
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spool
spindle
plugs
bobbin
disk
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D01NATURAL OR ARTIFICIAL THREADS OR FIBRES; SPINNING
    • D01HSPINNING OR TWISTING
    • D01H7/00Spinning or twisting arrangements
    • D01H7/02Spinning or twisting arrangements for imparting permanent twist
    • D01H7/04Spindles
    • D01H7/16Arrangements for coupling bobbins or like to spindles

Description

1,640,760 1927' E. J. EMERY FRICTION CONNECTION FOR SPINDLES AND BOBBINS OR SPOOLS Filed Nov. 1, 1922 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 A; jvvero'oor g E. J. EMERY FRICTION CONNECTION FOR SPINDLES AND BOBBINS 0R SPOOLS 2 sheets-sheet 2 Filed Nov. 1, 1922 itatentecl Aug. 30, 1927.

UNITED STATES ELIAS J. EMERY, OF LYNN, MASSACHUSETTS.

FRICTION CONNECTION FOR SPINDLES AND ROBBINS OR SPOOLS.

Application filed November This invention relates to friction connections between spools or bobbins used in textile manufactures and the spindles. holders, pins or mountings upon which the spools or bobbins are carried, or held against rotation, or by which they are driven.

Both when winding and unwinding strands or filaments, such as yarns, thread, cordag'e, or wires. or at any stage or several of the 8615105 in the process of nmuufacture or handling of such filaments, it is desirable to provide for the certain connection of the bobbin or spool to the spindle and its attachments, so that the connection shall operate to fix against relative rotation the bobbin or spool and the spindle, except when the forces tending to rotate one in respect.

to the other reach or exceed a certain predetermined minimum value.

It also desirable in all stages of manufacture of wound packages, such the spools, bobbins, cheeses, or cops formed durine; the manufacture of all classes of textiles, to provide, when it is necessary to provide for rotating: a bobbin or spool in re spect to a spindle and its appurtenances. for a regulated, controllable. and dependable drag between the members of the unit comprised of a spool or bobbin and its spindle.

For example, in certain winding operations incidental to doubling, to drawing, to roving, or when winding only, spools receivingr the sliver, roving yarn. or doublet are mounted on stationary spindles so as to be turned by the drag of the strand delivered by a power-driven revolving tlycr. In other lHItEIQCBS a spool or bobbin is mounted upon a power-driven rotating; spindle and the strands are delivered by a guide which may or may not revolve about the spool.

In either case. rotation of the spool relative to its spindle or support must correspond to the rate of delivery of the strand independently of the rate of rotation of the spindle or of the delivery instrument, such as the tlyer, and this rotation is induced by increase in tension on the winding: strand.

he turnine; moment on the spool is measured by this tension and the radius of the wound mass. The turning moment neces sary to rotate the spool or bobbin in relation to its support. under ideal condit ons. should be contrived to remain constant (llllll'lf'l variation of the wound diameter of the pacle age, spool or bobbin, and during variation 1, 1922. Serial No. 598,412.

of the thrust of the spool or bobbin against its support induced by changed weights of the wound mass. It should never approach or exceed the breaking; strain on the strand.

The spools or bobbins referred to for various uses vary in size, from large spools or bobbins intended to hold a substantial weig ht, of heavy eordage, wire or woolen yarn to the light and delicate spools or bobbins, chiefly employed in the manufacture of silk and cotton.

I am aware that frictional resistance has heretofore been movidcd, especially in the case of spools supported on vertical spindles to receive heavy weights of yarn, by inserting, between a flange on the spindle and the spool or bobbin, a washer of leather, felt or similar friction material. upon which the lower end of the bobbin or spindle rests. If the diameter of such a washer be properly chosen, and the spools have perfect heads. substantially the desired frictional resistance may be obtained during a part of the winding operation, but as the weight of the spool or bobbin increases, it is necessary to lift it from the spindle and substitute a 'asher of another size, several such chaneycs being a frequent incident to proper winding; of lar je spools, especially of rela tively weak yarns or IOVlIlfl'S. p

I am also aware of sundry friction devices adapted to connect bobbins and spindles, but so far as I am aware these, devices all suffer either from the defect of not providing sufficient drag. thus causingthe minimum ten- Pinning at which the bobbin or spool will slip on the pindle to be too low; or, on the contrary, from being so efficient as for all practical purposes to loclc the spindle and the bobbin together, so that forces approaching the breaking; strains or exceeding them will be required to rotate the bobbin or spool in respec to the spindle by forces transmitted alone the strand. Winding; by machines as now practiced suffers serious losses due to failure of the art to provide so far as I am a are. an efficient friction device which will cooperate with spool or bobbin to grip it at normal tensions and release it when necessary.

A pr ncipal object of the presentinvention is therefore to preclude the ditficulties alluded to by the provision of means adapted to the several siti'iations mentioned, and constituting an improved kind of frictional connection between a, spindle or its attachments and a bobbin or .SPOi.)l1HOHI1tQ(l upon a spindle; to proi'ide for increasing the frictional resistance to relative turning of bobbin or spool and spindle in accordance with. the longitudinal thrust exerted by the spool or bobbin, iOI'GXiUliPlQ due to the weight-of the yarn wound upon it and independently of minor defects oi the spool or bobbin head; and to provide means for connecting a spindle and its appurtenances :,(i-i'li6 bobbin or spool, which will cause one of these members certainly to move with theother, but

which ,willyield upon the exertion of apredetermined inininiuin resistance to motion oil one in respect to the other; and which will. enable a bobbin or spool which has so yielded after the eXcrtion the said ii'iininiuin stress, to again become relatirel g lined when adapted and arrangei'l to p" the stress is relieved or to continue to slip under a relatively constant resistance to such I slippage.

' The invention includes :tor the above purposes a resilient tractor pad or member provided with engaging or tractor devices flClQ the desired rkind of engagement or bearing: between the spindle and the bobbin or si'iool, and tor this purpose adapted to attach itself to the spindle, (or to the bobbin or spool) and trictionailytto bear upon the bobbin and spool (or the spindle). This clniracteristic devi e of the invention may be useo with or without the felt washer Oil the prior art and is adapted for use without change, except of dimension, in the Various situations inentioiied and others which willbe apparent.

away; showing; a ..Inountedthereon in use with a:

ricebetween spindle and spool correspond- :iingto the invention;

partly in vertical cross section and to larger scale than l, .Sl10\Vl11Q' the pi pthe partswvhen the spool is c pty;

Certain preferred ways only ct accomplishing" the purposes of my inventiongare illustrated ,intlie d *awin in which side elevation partly broken winding spindle and a spool frictional de- Fig. 2 is a l i'agnientary side elevation,

on of 3 is a view similar to r i 2 but showing'the parts in the position which they cc:

.cupy whenthe spool is substantially tilled;

.' Fig; 4 a planyiew ot a cushioning and tension.regulating device iorininyg an essential feature of the present invention;

Fi 5 is a. )lan View similar to Fin. i: but

L? I 1 showing a. niooitied arrangement of parts;

Fig.6 is a YGPilCEll cross section to greatly enlargedscale on a line such as t36 of F s- Fig; 71s an edge. elevation of a device such asshown in Fig. 5 but lllllF-tli'ttllnfl a further inodiiication.

Fig. 8' is a seetioncot the device in use to connect a spool to a driven spindle, such as and serving as a stop or rest for the spool hating heads (3 and '7. in Fig. 8 which. shows a common forin'oit spooler having a siiii'idle l a tubular spindle it, and a whorl l having a flange ill. fast to the tubular indlc 1", the flange serves the same purmay be of any usual. hind having, fore ample. wooden heads 25 ai'inoredwith brass sheaths 2:; spun into grooves in the heads.

In either case, the spool (or a spinning bobbin on a spinnin' "spindle, which may be equipped with the 1 'esent cw devices with great benefits in operation will be'appareat to textile artisans) is related to and caused to be trictionally coupled to the spindle by interposing between the flange against which one end of it HbU'tSZIiNlt-lite :1b1l't1iii11li0l1tl of the spindle or bobbin, a friction device adapted to adlerestronrly to eitherthe bobbin or spool on the one hand 'orto the liangeon the spindle, or the SJlIltllG or botln on'the other hand. and to bear ainst that member of tl'iese'alnitting parts to which it does not adhere with a trio tionalresistance dependent in the firstinstance upon" the force of compression to which itis subjected In the instances shown, the friction device sticks more firmly to the flange and spindle than. to thebobbin or spool, and

preferably comprises i.- substantially flat resilient ring or annular d sk 9 of rubber vulcanizedv to hip hly resilient sott state, or other suitable resilient material which rests upon the upper surface of the flange 2, concentrically with the spindle l. provided with a central bore 7, for the spin die, and witl' plurality of spaced openings,

preferably arranged symmetrically with re spect to the center of the disk, and in each of these openings a vertically movable plug 1O arranged The plii gs'areof' slightly less diameter than the respective openings and are thus isolated from the bot y portion of the disk by annular recesses 11.. These plo same material the body of the disk and each integrally united therewithby a relatively thin brid 'e member '12 of sufficient tensile I "esilieiice tOPGlTlllitilifi plugs to more downwardly by tensile stretch oi? bridges l2 pose as a stop or rest "tor the spooly-which This dish is are preferably of the iii with relative ease into their respective openings when subjected to pressure. In the normal position, each plug projects a substantial distance above the upper surface of the disk, so that a chamber orrecess i3 is provided beneath the plug. Thus when the upper surface 1 of the plug is subjected to pressure the plug is free to move bodily down against the tension of the bridge mem- I ber 12.

\Vhen this invention to be used in winding large spools, as for heavy woolen yarns, it is preferred to place, underlying the lower surface of the head 7 of the spool, the usual friction washer 15 preferably formed of rel atively flexible material such as felt, or the like, and in the normal position of the parts this washer rests upon the upper surface of the disk 9 and contacts with the upper end: of the projections or plugs 10. The plugs underlying the felt washer produce regions of compression 16 in the felt washer, the upper surfaces of these regions being areas of frictional contact relied upon to oppose turning of the spool. These regions of pressure are indicated by the darker shading at these regions, which as shown in Fig. 52, are of a diameter corresponding to the effective area of the tips of the corresponding plugs in contact with the felt when the weight supported and pressure on the felt and plugs at a minimum. These regions of compres sion 16 of the felt washer 15 thus define areas of effective pressure contact between the washer and the lower face of the head 7 of the spool, the frictional effect of these areas of pressure contact. being at a minimum when the weight of the spool is least. During the winding operation, as the weight of the spool is increased by the growing yarn mass, the pressure upon the plugs 10 is constantly augmented so that the regions 16 increase in sizeand the plugs gradually move downward against the tension of the bridge members 12 until the upper, surfaces of the plugs may lie substantially flush with the upper surfaces of the disk. During such movement the regions 16 gradually increase in area, and the, pressures upon them are augmented so that their braking effect on the lower face of the spool continiiially increases, the position of the parts when the spool is weighted being indicated in Fig.3. It will thus be evident that as the thread mass on the spool increases in diameter and the lever arm with which the strand acts upon the spool to turn the latter increases, the frictional resistance to turning will likewise gradually increase.

The friction regulating device herein shown has the additional desirable fui'iction of serving as a cushion for the heavy spool so that even though the operator carclessly drops the spool upon the spindle no damage to the spool or other parts will be occasioned.

The use of the felt 16 is optional, and in many situations is not reconnnended.

Referring again to Figs. 1 and 8, and to the diagram, Fig. 10, the upwardly projecting plugs 10 yieldingly suspended on the integral resilient bridges 12 are particularly cll'ective instruments for the purposes above explained. Being freely and lightly resilient in the direction of the axis of the spindle, these plugs yield readily to roughnesses and projections on the face of the spool or bohbin; and whether or not a washer such as 15 interposed. they give the connection between the spindle and bobbin the property of resiliently yielding through a short relative turning motion before slippage between the spool or bobbin head and the friction device takes place. As shown in Fig. 10, for example, if we assume the head 25 of the spool 5 to be relatively stressed in the direction of the arrow, the plug 10 will move with the head 25 to the left from the dotted to the full-line position, against the resilient resistance of the bridge 12, which'is stretched upward on the near side and downward on the far side of every plug 10 tipped over by the stress on head \Vhen the plug can move no further, the head 25 will slip, but the bridges 12 are still effective to keep the plugs 10 .in contact with the surface of 25, whether this runs true or not. H avy weights are notessential to this action, which is competently effected by the friction devices 5), 1() for such relatively light masses as empty spinning-bobbins and small spools, such as are used for winding cotton thread.

hatever the kind of spool or bobbin, the plugs it) are highly sensitive to increases of weight, and the tension required to cause slippage varies with the thrust, and increases about in proportion to the growth of diameter of the winding when the resilience of the material of the tension disk and the size and number of the plugs 10 are properly, chosen, as will be apparent;

lhe disks 9, 9 or 9 may adhere to the flanges of the spindle, pin or whorl on which they rest by mere surface friction; or, as shown in Fig. 8, the central hole 6 may be a grasping fit on the spindle. If desired the disks 9 may be inverted to adhere to the bobbin or spool, and have the plugs 9 bear on the machined metal flange, but this is not reeomnnmded in view of the superior effect of the plugs 9 as frictional eontactors with the very variable surfaces of bobbins and spools.

In Fig. 5 a modified arrangement of tension regulating disc 9 is shown as provided with a plurality of series of the resiliently supported plugs, indicated at 10 and ll)" res 'ieetively. With such an arrangement the friction washer may be so small as to engage only the inner series of plugs, or may be till . made of av diameter to contact with the plugs widely. different sizes.

In Fig. 7 a further modification-is indicated in which theregulating disk 9 is provided with a plurality of series of plugs 10 10 and ll) of which the plugs of the inner series 10 are somewhat higher than those of the intermediate series 10 which in turn are higherthan those of the outer series. With this arrangen'ient the increase in frictional resistance to turning may be very delicately varied as the plugs ofthe two outer series do not become active until the plugs; of the inner series have been partly compressed. Thus the frictional contact surface may vary through very wide limits, providing an accurate. adjustment of the retarding action.

As will be clear from inspection of Fig; 6,the support of the plugs 10 by means of the relatively thin bridge member 12- permits such plugs to be depressed much more readily than the main body of the disc 9, thus giving a far greater resiliency to the device than. would be the case were these plugs formed as mere projections upstanding from the surface of the resilient disc. 'While such elastically supported plugs or projections are thus preferable for providing great delicacy in action, it is to be understood that projections otherwise supported might well furnish some at least of the advantag of the present device, and it is contemplated that in its broader aspects the present invention may be embodied in other and equiva lent arrangements"differing in detail from those herein disclosed.

Mention above of bobbins and sprints; with which the device is indifferently useful, is meant to be inclusive of either, and in the claims either word is to be understood'as generically applying to any species of container or support for a wound mass.

What I claim is:

1.. A frictiondevice comprising a perforate tension disk adapted to be interposed between surfaces of a spindle and of a bob bin or spool respectively for the purpose of acting as a brake against relative rotation between said surfaces, and having one or more resiliently supported plugs adapted to engage with one of said surfaces and to be displaced against its resilient support by pressure in the direction of the axis of the spindle.

2. A friction device comprising a resilient perforate tension disk adaptcd to be interposed between surfaces of a spindle and of a bobbin or spool respectively for the purpose of acting as a brake against relative rotation between said surfaces, and having one or more resiliently supported integral plugs adapted to engage with one of said surfaces and a spool comprising a perforate resilient rubber disk adapted to lie between a surface of the spindle and a surface of the spool, and having a plurahty of lntegralplugs supported by integral bridges and normally held thereby to project, from one face of said disk.

l. The combination with asubstantially vertical spindle and a spool thereon, of a support- .for the lower head of the spool COII1-.

prising a disk concentric with the spindle said disk having a plurality of spaced projections upstanding from its surface, and means for yieldingly permitting lateral motion of the projectionsin: respect to the" disk.

The'coinbination with a spindle and a 300l mounted thereon, of means for retarding rotation of the spool comprising a disk concentric withthe spindle, a plurality of" spaced elements projecting from the face of said (.lESli toward the adjacent head of the spool, and'resilient tension means for hold- .ing said elements innormal. relation to 't-he disk.

(3. he combination witlia spindleand a spool mounted thereon, of means for retardrotation of the spool comprising a disk .centric with the spindle, said disk havinc" an oienin therein, a. ilu within the opening, one end of the plug normally projecting beyond the plane of the disk and toward the adjacent head of the spool, and iiesjlient means connecting the plug to the tier.

porting and cushioninglthe spool comprising a rubber disk surrounding the spindle and below the lower head of the spool, and hav ing; a series of friction plugs projecting upwardly from the disk toward the lower head.

of the spool, said plugs being more readily depressed than thebody of the disk.

8. The combination with a vertical spin dle and a spool. mounted thereon, ofsupporting means for the lower head of the spool,

said supporting means providing resiliently supported frictional engaging surfaces contacting with the lower head of the spool and" constructed and arranged automatically to increase in braking effect as winding of material upon the spoollprogresses.

9. The combination with a vertical spindle having a radialfiange and a spool upon the spindle, of cushioning and retarding.

means for the spool comprising an annular rubber disk concetric with the spindle and below the lower head of the spool, said disk having a plurality of openings therein, rub- 7. The combination with a vertical spin I die and a spool thereon, of means for supher plugs within said openings, said plugs normally projecting upwardly from the upper face of the disk, resilient suspension means connecting the plugs to the body of the disk to permit resilient lateral displacement and depression of the plugs under pressure.

10. The combination with a spindle and a spool thereon, of friction means for retarding relative rotation of the spindle and the spool comprising an annular rubber disk concentric with the spindle and having an integral plug partially separated therefrom and projecting from the surface thereof in the direction of and adapted to contact with the adjacent end of the spool, the integral connecting bridge between the substance of the disk proper and the plug having tensile resilience and being adapted to be stretched by pressure of the spool head against the outer end of the plum 11. The combination with a spindle and a spool thereon, of friction means for retarding rotation of the spool comprising an interposed disk having a projecting integral plug supported for resilient deformation into alignment with the surface of the disk under pressure of the spool head, such deformation occasioning the tensile stretching of the integral junction between the plug and the body of the disk.

12. The combination with a spindle and a spool thereon, of means for opposing free rotation of the spool comprising a disk concentric with the spindle and having resiliently supported elements projecting from its surface toward the adjacent head of the spool, one of said elements projecting to a greater distance than another.

Signed by me at Boston, Massachusetts, this thirtieth day of October, 1922.

ELIAS J. EMERY.

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Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2534579A (en) * 1948-08-26 1950-12-19 George F Dennis Rayon-yarn basing pad
US2659541A (en) * 1946-12-31 1953-11-17 Armour Res Found Drive mechanism for magnetic recorders
US3762615A (en) * 1972-04-20 1973-10-02 Callister D Mc Sewing machine thread supply spool friction brake
US4336911A (en) * 1980-09-22 1982-06-29 Fairchild Wayne K Frictional tensioning device
US5344094A (en) * 1992-03-19 1994-09-06 Hoffman Julius E Process and apparatus for retaining and dispensing a coiled article
US20020117568A1 (en) * 2001-02-27 2002-08-29 Ronald Kronenberger Bobbin assembly with backlash preventing structure

Cited By (7)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2659541A (en) * 1946-12-31 1953-11-17 Armour Res Found Drive mechanism for magnetic recorders
US2534579A (en) * 1948-08-26 1950-12-19 George F Dennis Rayon-yarn basing pad
US3762615A (en) * 1972-04-20 1973-10-02 Callister D Mc Sewing machine thread supply spool friction brake
US4336911A (en) * 1980-09-22 1982-06-29 Fairchild Wayne K Frictional tensioning device
US5344094A (en) * 1992-03-19 1994-09-06 Hoffman Julius E Process and apparatus for retaining and dispensing a coiled article
US20020117568A1 (en) * 2001-02-27 2002-08-29 Ronald Kronenberger Bobbin assembly with backlash preventing structure
US6758427B2 (en) * 2001-02-27 2004-07-06 Ronald Kronenberger Bobbin assembly with backlash preventing structure

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