US1630841A - Double-piston two-cycle engine - Google Patents

Double-piston two-cycle engine Download PDF

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US1630841A
US1630841A US74656524A US1630841A US 1630841 A US1630841 A US 1630841A US 74656524 A US74656524 A US 74656524A US 1630841 A US1630841 A US 1630841A
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Prior art keywords
piston
cylinder
chamber
stationary
reciprocating
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Fusch Otis Ora
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Fusch Otis Ora
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/28Engines with two or more pistons reciprocating within same cylinder or within essentially coaxial cylinders
    • F02B75/30Engines with two or more pistons reciprocating within same cylinder or within essentially coaxial cylinders with one working piston sliding inside another
    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F02COMBUSTION ENGINES; HOT-GAS OR COMBUSTION-PRODUCT ENGINE PLANTS
    • F02BINTERNAL-COMBUSTION PISTON ENGINES; COMBUSTION ENGINES IN GENERAL
    • F02B75/00Other engines
    • F02B75/02Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke
    • F02B2075/022Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke having less than six strokes per cycle
    • F02B2075/025Engines characterised by their cycles, e.g. six-stroke having less than six strokes per cycle two

Description

ay o. O.-FU$CH DOUBLE PISTON TWO-CYCLE ENGINE Filed 000- 29. 1924 'ciprocating therein,

' the reciprocatingpiston reciprocates, 10.

Patented May 31, 1927. 7

" one one ruson or iannrirtowne, Leeann. w

v 5o113143.1 1 s'ron 'trwo-oYonn ENGIN L I have entitled my invention as: a double piston two cycle engine, as this is my present preferred use of the features of rnyinvention. 1 The invention in its broadfeatures"coin prises a stationary cylinder, apiston reserted Within the cylinder" and over; which i I This basic, mechanism, With suitable Valves; inlets and outlets, may be nsedaas an'i'nternal com}- bustionen'gine of the twocycle and the four double expansionisteam engine. 7 structure maybe used as agas compressor cycle t'ype. Itmay y pp ting power to operate the mov ng'piston'the 'of the single or: two stage type.

My invention of the'tWo cycle'fengineitype is designed to oyerconie some of the disadvantages of-the present type in whichthe 1 fuel gas is compressed jin'the crank charm.

ber before entering the explosion cylinder. i

V V I also amenabledtdprovide a :forcedfeed of lubrication for the pistons and connecting rods instead 1 of 1 having to mix lubricating oil with'thepowerfuel such' as gasoline.

The broad features of my two cyclenn- V fternat-combustion engine comprise a staa piston reciprocat piston mounted in? side of the cylinder and over which: the A connecting" tio'n a'ry outer cylinder; ing therein, a stat onary piston sli'des.

reciprocating v p by a 'wrlst pinto the reciprod is secured rocating pistonand operates a crankshaft in the usual manner.

In the specific operation of this engine, on theupstroke of the reciprocating piston, gas is sucked into th e inner chamber between" the 'stationaryland the --reciprocating"piston; ='-O'n"fthe downward movement of thereciprocating piston the gas is forced out of'thisinner-"chamber and "into the outer chamber between the cylinder and the reciprocating piston{ "On the second upstroke the gas in the outerchamber is compressed and 'I-fresh gas is drawn into the inner chamber. *l-rt the top position the explosion is causedby the usua'l spark plug giving the explosion-stroketo the reciprocating piston the dow'nstroke the explodedfnel islead out of the ordinary twocycle'exhaust port. 1

Thus on the v explosion stroke the gas is compressed in the lnner chamber andfforce'd into the "outer chamber; On the compresa stationary piston in- Near the end of sion stroke in the 'outer chamberfresh gas is drawn into the inner chan'iber.v I'thereby obtain a two cycle engineinwhich the fresh 3 fuel is drawn" and compressed Within the body offthe reciprocatingpiston An important function of this operation '60 is the cooling'o'f' the reciprocating piston by' the freshjfuel-gasbeing drawn into the in-- lner chamber inside of the reciprocating piston; I may provide, necessary, means for circulating ater passages in. stationary Cylinder;

Myrinvention en been Cla e nd stood from -the"followin'g specificationfand- 1 accompanying drawings, in Which] '1 Figure 1 1s" a transverse' sectionthrough its upperposition.-

- Fig. 2 1s 'aisection-ioffjFigl on the line 2- 2 looking np as indicated by! thejarrows', show ng the base of the stationary cylinder.-

-Figfl8 :is asectiOn-of Fig; 21011 the :line

,the t. pin details;

- Figens a. liagraminatic yieyv of th tawith the reciprocating piston". its

the enginewith" the reciprocating piston in in the direction of t he'i'ar'rowjs showing I c ed'onia crank 'case' Bg A -reciprtmating pis n on "theoutsi'de ofthe stationary pis outlet port fTfheQ duct 7 to convey tfliefuel to the lntake' portj-isdifierent from the'usual construetionf- Thereciprocating pistonfa'r as the -upperfp'o'rtion'10: is concerned is sjilnil'arto the pr esent two cyclepistons, having a baflle -11 onthe P1St011 l121l 12 to deflect the inconfi'ng gas; I preferablyliextendthe cylinder Twalls .on each side forming skirts 13 in which the wrist-pin is"secured,' the detaile'd fastening of which shown in Fig; 2. I The 7 bushings 14 are fastened on the inside ofithe 1 v sliirtsjby means of screWs15. The'wristjpin 5 r 16 is 'i'nounted in these bushings; The usual piston rings l'hnaintaiirthecompression in 'what' I term the outercham'be'r between the cylinder andth'e piston head 12.

' -Thestationary piston, I believe, is of Y -entirely new construction, having a cylindrical wall aipiston head 21', andfiange 22 with piston rings 23 tomaintain the compression in whatgl term theinnerchamber I r 7 ton and the piston-head. 21;.

intakechamber28 can be formed as an exstem 30, so as to maintain the valve head .31

sucked into the 'innerchamber;

between the insideofthe reciprocating pis v The stationary. piston has; a "duct 24 leading through the the piston head 21. If desired,anenlarged tension ofthe-fintake26. The valve 27 is shown with a 'spring'28 engaging a spider 29 across the valveopening'andthe valve seated but allowit to. open 'whengas; is

The outlet from'theinner chamber-is through. the compression valve chamber in which avalve head .36 is heldseated by theengine The stationary piston-Li's preferablyire be ed.

a spring 37 engaging-a spider [38 and at-' j tached to. the valvei' stem: 39. :l This spring. is preferably much stronger than the spring r on the intakevalve- Below thevalve anen larged" compression'chamber 40 is formed on I the body of-tlieypiston and leads into a compression duct 41;wl'1ich passes through the Hang-e 22 on the lefthancl side as indicated. by 42,1 and thence connects tothe duct 7. of the cylinderizas:indicated at 43."

Thejs'tationa-ry piston: ispreferablyicored to. form "fif'WEllZI; jacket 44 which'j connects cessedlfrom the bottom upward to .allow the wristpin to extend upwardly."intojthe' cylinder. .I-Iowever, the construction could be modified in hichthe wristpin at its upper most positionj wonldbev substantially? level.

with the fia'ngesxf. *this case tliezbearing surfaceof the nner and outer piston would In the assembly shown iii 2-offthe cylinder and the flange422 0f: the

stationary piston are bolted to the top offthe crank case B by bolts 56. The crank case is preferablyformedf in two .-'parts,' an upper section 57 and .a lowerjse'ction 58 V .beingbolted at the flanges 59.f; Ahandplate 60 may be placed-at the. bottom. if desired.

The crankcase has the usual brackets 61" for the crank shaft 62Which has the usual crank l bearings 63 for'tlie connecting-rod 64 of the 2 l type engaging the wrist pinlt at; its

{upper end 65. J v

-,Theoperation of my-engine is asifoll'owsz -Presuming the reciprocating piston G to be-in'the lower pos tion, as shown in Fig. 4,

on the'upstrokegas is drawn in .from the carburetor through the ducts24 and 26 and- .intake valve 27. The spring 128 is su lciently a e to anew the at; headeia lift with the suction; On the downstrokeof the reciprocating piston the, gas, in the inner chamber between the poston Gand the piston head 210i the stationary piston is com pressed and forced out throughthe compres 'sion' valve'chamber 35, As-above mentioned, 1

it is preferableto use a strong spring n th1s valve so that the gas, will'be considerably compressed before [the valve "head-BG-lifts' from its seat. The compressed gas is forced through the chamber40 andducts '41Zand 7 to. the. port 5. The'recipro'catingpiston is now in itslower positioirsov thatthe compressed gas is .forcedover the head l2fstrik ing first the baflie 11 Theupstroke' ofthe f reciprocating piston compresses-this-gasin now with the piston inltheirpper position,

and-exhausts the exploded gas through the 1 exhaust port 6. Asabove mentioned. the,

the exploded" gas is exhausted whileItl1e- 'fresh 'fuelfgas is forcedkin in' the usual two 1 cycle practice. Thelengine now gcontinues automatically on the two cycle-principle and may be controlled by both the usua .and' spark advanceand retardation.

g 7 As abovementioned .the gas in the -inner; by 1any suitable conduits such as 45 and 46 with: "the usual water circulating system of chamber cools the reciprocating. pisto n'and l throttle Y we I thereby' becomes ore-heated so that hot 2'gas. r

is introduced: into: the outer; or explosion chamber; If

invention. in the form of a I tw ."For; instance, the wrist pin-as above me-n} V vole] engine ISOP'GII to considerable modificat on.

=tiouedcould be on substantially .thesanie glevel as the flanges; in which case it would be desirable to' continue-a skirt-downwardly "from the cylinder to. form alonger bearing l =-for the reciprocating 131543011 The water con cluitsand gas du'ctscould be-suitably posi to the incoming gas; V V v An adaptation of my design to a four cy-.

tioned to. transfer the heat from the water fcle engine'would be'somewhat as follows: Poppet. valves would be mounted in the stationary piston and operated from cam shafts, preferably-indie crankchamber. A l spark plug would-alsobe situated in the face (of the stationaryfpiston.

The cyli der andthereciprocatiug piston fcould. functio'nfas theordinary four cycle engine, preferablylof; the 1 overhead valve 'type,in the usual fmanner; It will thusbe seen, that the reciprocating piston would-be sion in the inner-chambers-This would d-ou' acted upon by theexplosion in theouter chamber and alsoby the alternatingexplm intake port 5, exhaustv port 6: and the battle 11v are arrangedinthe ordinaryfway soth'atm J ciprocatingpiston and crank would 'be' sub-'- ject over the ordinary construction, thereby increasing the efficiency of the engine.

The same-basic design of acylinder, a piston reciprocating therein, and a stationary piston over which the reciprocating piston reciprocates'could be used as a steam. engine of the double expansion type. "Throughany suitable and well known valve mechanism live steam would be lead through'the sta-' tionary cylinder into the inner chamber.

The exhaust from this inner chamber would j be lead through suitable ports to an intake into the outer chamber. portioning the area of the pistonsand the volume of the stroke, the steam could be ex panded in succession, 'the prop'er amountin each of the chambers; It might be necessary to form an inner false wall on the reciproeating piston inorder to decrease the area 'of the stationary piston and hence the volume of the inner chamber compared with rocating p ston. It might also be desirableto operate the valves in the head of the 1113 "highly compressed gas.

These merely indicate'soine modifications ofv the construction and'use of mybas1ciin-- vention- It may bedesirable to mount the,

rigidly as shown.

claimed.

open from a v V 7 piston being supported on the lower edge of the outer chamber. It will thus be seen that in such a double expansion steam engine the reciprocating piston and crank shaft would act under the impulse of double expansion steam. As well known in the steam engine art, the valves could be operated to cause both the inner and the outer chambers to act as high pressure expansion chambers.

The same basic construction of the reciprocating piston and stationary piston may be adapted to. an air and gas compressor of the single or two stagetype, In this case the crank shaft would be rotated by some primeinover and the outer 'chamberwould form and exhausted therefrom into the inner chamber and exhausted therefrom fa-s a inner piston in a flexiblemanner instead of This could be done by passing the suction and compressed gases through 'swiveled sleeves. Such construction would allow slight lateral movement of the piston in reference to the I'GClP- stationary ner piston bycams in the. same manner as poppet valves in four cycle engines.

Various changes may be madejwithout de- I the side walls inside the cylinder, a sliding By suitably *prothe first stage ofthe compression. By suitable valvesv and ports the airor other as would be drawn into the outer. chamber piston liaviiig'bearing surfaces on the cyli'n-i der and thestationary pistOmopposite'ly po sit-ioned skirts dependingfrom-the sliding piston into the openings in the sidewalls of the stationary piston, ttfWI'iSt pin-between the skirts,-a" crank in'thecrank case, a connecting rod between the crank and the wrist pin, inlet and :outlet valves {in theheadof the stationary cylinder, ducts leading through the, side-wallportions of the: sta-. tionary cylinder to said valves: and inlet and outlet; ports v in the cylinder positioned to feedand'to'discl arge gas between the ;iiiov,- ing piston andthecylinder. r

havinga crank case, a cyl- 2. An engine tionary piston being supported on-th'elower edge .of thetsidegwalls inside the cylinder, a sliding piston having bearing ,sur aces on the cylinder and the stationary piston, op-

positely positioned skirts depending from as I the slidingpiston into the openings inthe side walls of the stationary piston, a Wrist sidewall portions of the stationary piston. 3. An'engine having a crank case, a cylinder supported thereon, astationary piston having a closed head and side walls partially f open from theirj lower edge, the stationary. 3

piston being supported-on the lower edge ofthe side walls inside the cylinder, a] sliding '90 7 pin between the skirts, a crankinthe crank case, aflconnectingyrod between the crank and the "wrist pin, and a water jacket in the piston'havin'gbearing surfaces on-thecylin} V der and'thestationary. piston, oppositely p01 sitioiied skirts depending from the sliding piston into the openings in the side walls .of the stationary piston, a wrist pinbetween 1 the skirts,'a crank in the crankcase, a connecting rodbetween the crank and the wristpin, duct-s leading through the side wall portions of the stationary piston, valves in the head oft-he stationarypiston connected to said ducts, a water-jacket in the sidewall,

portions of the stationary piston and inlet and exhaust ports in the cylinder for the moving piston,

4. An engine comprising in. combination.

ports, a reciprocating piston having a'closed piston head forming therewith an outer ing therewith an inner" chamber, a connecting rod attached to the reciprocatingpiston,"

a crankshaft connected to: the connecting rod, a duct to convey gaseous fuel to the chamber, a stationary piston having a head" with inlet and outlet valves over which the inner chamber through the inlet valve, a duct from the outlet valve to the-inlet port of the cylinder: and means to explode theouter chamber.

5. An engi 'e as claimed inclaini4, in)

the gas in so inder supported thereon, a'stationary piston ,having'a;ciosed head and sidewalls par-.1 tiallyiopen from their lower edge, the sta 11 5* a cylinder'having valveless inlet and outlet reciprocating piston reciprocates-and forina ivhichthe ducts to the inlet andbntlet valves are formed in the body: structure of the sta 'tionaryp'ist'on. and an additional duct is formed in the cylinder leading to the inlet port ofsaidflcylinder. .i V '6. Anflengine'having a cylinder, afpis'ton reciprocating, therein, a stationary piston f having a head W1th valves therem, ever I i Whiclithe reciprocating-piston reciprocates',

a Water 1' acket' in the stationary piston and means to circulate water therethrongh. 7.'An1eng1ne compris ng in :c o1nb1nat10n a crank'case, a cylinderextendingtnpwardly from the crank case, a stationary-piston having side Walls fixedly attached fto the crank case, inside the cylinder,v a reciprocating pismeans to conduct a gas through the, side rwallslof the stationary cylinder to and from the innerchainber; means: to conductgas from the inner chamber through the structureof thee-cylinder to theiouter chamber, 7

inlet and" exhaust ports in the cylinder 'fbrij with thestationarypi'stenan .inner-chamber,=

the enter chamberyinwhich the opp'ositepor- 'tions of the sidewalls are left open and the reciprocating piston has oppositely vposi ing said-skirts and a connecting rod connect- "tioned' depending skirts, a Wrist pin connect ed to. said wrist pin;the innerpistOn having I spring controlled inlet and outlet valves" in Inv testimony whereof I have signed name t0thisspecification; r p

thehea defthe said pisten, and duc'tslead- 7 ing to and from said valves. r

-- 1 f OTisORA r Usen. 1 i

US1630841A 1924-10-29 1924-10-29 Double-piston two-cycle engine Expired - Lifetime US1630841A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2516427A (en) * 1945-01-01 1950-07-25 Stewart Warner Corp Measuring device for lubricating systems
US3177855A (en) * 1963-07-25 1965-04-13 Alfred M Suggs Internal combustion engine arrangement
US20080216480A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2008-09-11 Harmon James V Internal combustion engine with auxiliary steam power recovered from waste heat
US20090205338A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2009-08-20 Harmon Sr James V High efficiency dual cycle internal combustion engine with steam power recovered from waste heat
US20090293480A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2009-12-03 Harmon Sr James V High Efficiency Multicycle Internal Combustion Engine With Waste Heat Recovery
US20100300100A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2010-12-02 Harmon Sr James V High Efficiency Dual Cycle Internal Combustion Steam Engine and Method
US20110083434A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2011-04-14 Thermal Power Recovery Llc Method and Apparatus For Achieving Higher Thermal Efficiency In A Steam Engine or Steam Expander
US9316130B1 (en) 2007-03-07 2016-04-19 Thermal Power Recovery Llc High efficiency steam engine, steam expander and improved valves therefor

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2516427A (en) * 1945-01-01 1950-07-25 Stewart Warner Corp Measuring device for lubricating systems
US3177855A (en) * 1963-07-25 1965-04-13 Alfred M Suggs Internal combustion engine arrangement
US7997080B2 (en) 2007-03-07 2011-08-16 Thermal Power Recovery Llc Internal combustion engine with auxiliary steam power recovered from waste heat
US20090205338A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2009-08-20 Harmon Sr James V High efficiency dual cycle internal combustion engine with steam power recovered from waste heat
US20090293480A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2009-12-03 Harmon Sr James V High Efficiency Multicycle Internal Combustion Engine With Waste Heat Recovery
US20100300100A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2010-12-02 Harmon Sr James V High Efficiency Dual Cycle Internal Combustion Steam Engine and Method
US20110083434A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2011-04-14 Thermal Power Recovery Llc Method and Apparatus For Achieving Higher Thermal Efficiency In A Steam Engine or Steam Expander
US20080216480A1 (en) * 2007-03-07 2008-09-11 Harmon James V Internal combustion engine with auxiliary steam power recovered from waste heat
US8061140B2 (en) * 2007-03-07 2011-11-22 Thermal Power Recovery Llc High efficiency multicycle internal combustion engine with waste heat recovery
US8109097B2 (en) * 2007-03-07 2012-02-07 Thermal Power Recovery, Llc High efficiency dual cycle internal combustion engine with steam power recovered from waste heat
US8448440B2 (en) 2007-03-07 2013-05-28 Thermal Power Recovery Llc Method and apparatus for achieving higher thermal efficiency in a steam engine or steam expander
US8661817B2 (en) 2007-03-07 2014-03-04 Thermal Power Recovery Llc High efficiency dual cycle internal combustion steam engine and method
US9316130B1 (en) 2007-03-07 2016-04-19 Thermal Power Recovery Llc High efficiency steam engine, steam expander and improved valves therefor
US9828886B1 (en) 2007-03-07 2017-11-28 Thermal Power Recovery, Llc High efficiency steam engine and steam expander

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