US1619474A - Pumping system - Google Patents

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Publication number
US1619474A
US1619474A US27728A US2772825A US1619474A US 1619474 A US1619474 A US 1619474A US 27728 A US27728 A US 27728A US 2772825 A US2772825 A US 2772825A US 1619474 A US1619474 A US 1619474A
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Prior art keywords
valve
tank
pumping
piston
rods
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Expired - Lifetime
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US27728A
Inventor
William E Hubbard
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HUBBARD MACHINE Co
LEON SLOSS JR
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HUBBARD MACHINE Co
LEON SLOSS JR
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F04POSITIVE - DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS FOR LIQUIDS OR ELASTIC FLUIDS
    • F04BPOSITIVE-DISPLACEMENT MACHINES FOR LIQUIDS; PUMPS
    • F04B9/00Piston machines or pumps characterised by the driving or driven means to or from their working members
    • F04B9/08Piston machines or pumps characterised by the driving or driven means to or from their working members the means being fluid
    • F04B9/10Piston machines or pumps characterised by the driving or driven means to or from their working members the means being fluid the fluid being liquid

Description

March 1 1927 w. E. HUBBARD PUMPING SYSTEM Filed May 4. 1925 5 Sheets-Shaw's 1 Aitor? March 1 1927.

W. E. HUBBARD PUMPING SYSTEM Filed May 4. 1925 5 Sheets-Sheet 2 1,6- ,4 4- March 1 1927' w. E. HUBBARD 19 7 PUMPING SYSTEM Filed May 4. 1925 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Inventor.

1,619,4 4 March w. E. HUBBARD 7 PUMPING SY STEM Filed May 4. 1925 5 Sheets-Sheet 5 INVENTOR. 102mm 6. MM.

BY M Mg): EYS.

Patented Mar. 1, 1927.

UNITED STATES 1,619,474 PATENT OFFICE.

WILLIAM E. HUBBARD, OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA, ASSIGNOR TO HUBBARD MACHINE COMPANY, A COPARTNERSHIP CONSIST IN G F WILLIAM E. HUBBARD AND LEON SLOSS, JR., OF SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA rumrI-NG SYSTEM.

Application filed May 4, 1925. Serial No. 27,728.

This invention relates to pumping systems and particularly to an improved fluid operated pumping system. In :pumping systems of the reciprocating type for use on oil or other deep wells, considerable power is necessary, and such power is exerted intermittently, being used only on the up stroke of the pump. The weight of. the pump and sucker rods is usually considerable, and this weight operates the mechanism by gravit on the-downward stroke. The primar o ject of my invention is to provide a uid operated pumping system wherein a continuously operating pump functions to continuously store up, energy in the form of a fluid under pressure, which fluid reacts to intermittently raise the Said pump rods on the upward stroke. Obviously such a system requires a smaller 0 pumping unit, since the same operates c011- tinuously and the operation of such a system is smoother and more uniform than the intermittently operating system heretofore used, and has other material advantages, as

. will hereinafter appear.

In my Patent Number 1,465,671, dated August 21, 1923, 1 have disclosed a pumping system wherein the weight of the sucker rods and the co-operating mechanism are counterbalanced, whereby the surplus energy of the downward stroke thereof is stored upin the foi'm of a compressed fluid and which fluid reacts on the rods "on the up ward stroke to assist in raising the same. It is a further object of my invention to combine this patented system with the improved pumping system of my present invention. These two systems combined comprise a pumping system in w ich the pump and pump rods are counterbalanced and operated by fluid pressure and to which power for the operation thereof is furnished by a continuously operating prime mover. Such a system is obviously most efficient and elastic in operation, and lends itself to great advantages, as. will hereinafter appear.

With the above and other objects in view, as will hereinafter appear, .my invention comprises the features of construction and operation set forth in the following specification and illustrated in the accompanying drawings. In such drawings, annexed here- 'to and forming apart of this specification, I have shown certain specific embodiments of my invention, but it will be understood that the invention can be otherwise embodied, and that the drawing is not to be construed asfdefining or limiting the scope of the invention, the claim appended to thisspecification being relied upon for that purpose.

Referring to the figures of the drawing,

Fig.1 is a front elevation of an apparatus I embodying my improved pumping system;

Fig. 2 is a plan view thereof;

Fig. 3 is a vertical sectional view of V a valve-controlling. .meohanism shown in F ig. 1

Fig. 4 is a cross-sectional view thereof on line IV-IV OfFig. 3;

Fig. 5 is a semi-diagrammatic view showing the construction and operation of my mproved system; Y

Flg. '6 1s a fragmentary view showin a ;portion of Fig. 5

position;

Fig. 7 is a vertical sectional view through a controlling valve, taken'on line VIIVII of Fig. 2; I

Fig. 8 is alike view with the valve parts in another position;

Fig. 9 is a horizontal sectional view through the valve Fig. 7;

. through the valve on line X X of Fig. 8; v F1g. 11 is a diagrammatic view showing a modified arrangement of my invention.

It should be understood. that the system and mechanism shown in Fig. 5 are in genin a difl'erentoperatmgon line of Fig. 10 is a vertical sectional view eral the same as those shown in Fig. 1- and Fig. 2. The same. reference characters are therefore used on like parts zip these views.

Other reference characters nate'parts which-are diil'ereri't. Figsll and 2 show my apparatus as actually-constructed,

n simpler form I while Fig. 5 shows the same and somewhat diagrammatically.

Referringmm Specifically to the ing, 1 indicates the tube ofan oil which is mounted my system, including a supporting base 2 for the pumping umt 3. This unit includes a pair of counterbalancing cylinders 4 carried directly on the base and having pistons 5 well, over operating wardly rom the pistons 5 through stufiing boxes 7 and guides 8. A cross head 9 com arealsed to desigimproved pumping.

therein. Piston rods 6 extend up} nects' the up er end of the rods 6 with the upper end 0 a piston rod 10. This rod 10 isconnected to a piston 11 operating in a. cylinder 12 carried on the frame above and between the cylinders 4. The piston 11 and cylinder 12 comprise the power unit and the pistons 5 and cylinders 4 comprise the counterbalaneing unit.

(lo-operating with the pumping unit are a pair of enclosed tanks 13 and 14 respectively adapted to operate in conjunction with the power cylinder 12 and the counterbalancing cylinders 4. For convenience the tank 13 is mounted on the tank 14 as illustrated. I referably term the tank 13 the storage tan or chamber, since energy in the form of fluid pressure is adapted to be stored up therein for operating the piston 11 in the cylinder 12. I term the tank 14 the balance chamber since the fluid pressure therein is.

adapted to counterbalance the weight of the pump rods and other weight thereon as hereinafter described. Water or other operating liquid is provided in the lower portions of these chambers and the remaining space therein is filled with compressed air.

An open tank 15 which I term the surge tank is provided for receiving the spent water from the power cylinder 12 through a pipe 16 and other connections hereinafter described. A rotary pump 17 driven by .a motor 18 is adapted to operate continuously to pump water from the tank 15 through a pipe 19 into the tank 13 under pressure. Chambers 20 having slotted connections 21 with the bottoms of the cylinders 4 are interconnected by a pipe 22 and connected to the bottom of the tank 14 by a pipe 23.

As illustrated in Figs. 5 and 6 a chamber 24 having slotted communication 25 with the bottom of the cylinder 12 is connected by pipes 26 and 27 to the bottom of the tank 13, a valve 28 being interposed in this con nection between the pipes 26 and 27. The valve also has an outlet 29 to the pipe 16. The flow of fluid through the valve is controlled by a sliding valve member 30. In Fig. 5 this member is shown in its lower position wherein the pipe 26 is in communication with the outlet 29. In Fig. 6 the memher is shown in its upper position wherein the pi 26 is in communication with the pipe 2 and the outlet 29 is closed.

The position of the valve member 30 is controlled by fluid pressure through an auxiliary controlling valve 31 having a port 31' therein adapted to connect the bottom chamher of the valve to the pipe 16 through pipes 32 and 33 (as in Fi 5) orto connect the.

bottom chamber of t e valve to the pipe 27 through pipes 32 and 34 (as in Fig. 6). The controlling valve 31 is adapted to be auto.- matically rotated to its two positions illustrated by the reciprocation of the power piston 11 in the manner now to be described.

Means for automatically operating the controlling valve 31 at the ends of the piston strokes is shown in Figs. 1 and 2. An arm 35 on the valve shaft 36 is connected by a link 37 to an arm 38 on a vertical rocker shaft 39. This shaft 39 carries upper and lower arms 40 and 41 on opposite sides of a rod 42 reeiprocated with the piston 11. This rod carries a double cam 43 co-operating with the arms 40 and 41. At the end of the up stroke the cam engages the arm'40 and rotates the valve 31 to the position shown in Fig. 5 and at the end of the down stroke the cam engages the arm 41 and rotates the valve to the position shown in Fig. 6.

The operation of the mechanism above described is as follows: i

It will be understood that the pump 17 is continuously operating to pump water from the surge tank 15 into the storage tank 13 under pressure, the air in the tank 13 being under compression. As illustrated in'Fig.

5 the piston 11 is connected to .the sucker.

rods 44 through a rod 45 extending from the bottom of the-piston through a stuffing box 46, the sucker rods extending downwardly into the casing 1 in the usual manner. The amount of water in the tank 14 and the compression of the air therein are such that the same react on the pistons 5 within the'cylinder 4 to support or countcrbalance about nine-tenths of the weight of the sucker rods. The remaining one-tenth of suclrweight is sufiicient to cause the rods and pumping mechanism to drop by gravity when permitted to do so.

As illustrated in Fig. 5, the pump has just completed its up stroke and the valve 31 has been automatically turned from the position shown 1n Fig. 6 to the position shown in Fig. 5. In such position of the valve 31 the upward pressure on the valve member 30 has been relieved through the pipes 16, 33 and 32, and" the member has thereupon dropped to the position shown in Fi 5. Communication is thereby established rom the cylinder chamber 24 to'the outlet pipe 16. The power head and sucker rods there'- upon drop by gravity, the water in the cyl-- inder 12 escaping through thepipe 16 to the tank 15.

pipe 27 through the pipe 34thereupon forces the valve member upward to the position Shownin Fig. 6, whereby communication is established between the tank 13 and the cylinder 12. The piston 11 and the power head the valve 31 is again turned by the cam 43 engaging the arm 40;

Pressure gauges 47 may be provided on iii. en the power head and piston 11 reach the bottom of their stroke the cam 43 enare thereupon raised on the up stroke until the tanks 13 and 14 for indicating the pressureof the air and water therein. Water glasses 48 and 49 are also provided for inicating the amount of water and am in the tanks. Air and water transfer piping 50 1s also provided between the two tanks whereby air. or water can be transferred from one to the other. This piping connects with the air and water portions of the-tank 13 at 51 and 52 and of tank 14 at 53 and a lower position not shown. By manipulating valves 54, 55 and-56 and another lower valve, air

or water can be readily transferred from one tank to the other. The pipe 50 at its lower end 57 is connected with the pipe 23 leading into the cylinders 4' and is controlled by a valve-controlled pipe 59 is also provided for" valve 58. By this arrangement the piston group can be moved to any position, eitherslow operation, adjustments or repairs, without opening the large main valve 28. A

discharging any surplus fluid from the tank 13'into the surge tank 15.

It is of course essential that the speed of operation of the power head be .controlled, andin Figs. 1 to 4 I have illustrated a novel valve means for this urpose. In the piping connecting the cylmder12 with the tank 13 is interposedthe valvecontrolling mechanism 60 and between the cylinders 4 and tank 14 I interpose the valve controlling mechanism 61. The mechanism 60 controls the flow of' fluid only in one-direction, that is from the tank 13 to the cylinder 12, while the mechanism 61 controls the flow of fluid .in both directions. .The construction of these two mechanismsis thesame except that mechanism 60 includes a sin le valve and mechanism 61 includes a doub e valve.

The construction of the mechanism 61 is shown in detail in Figs 3 and .4. A valve 62 is slidably carried on a M163 sup rted at 64 and threaded into the body, mem r 65 at 66. A spring 67 is mounted on'the rod between the valve'and a bu 68 secured to therod. This spring norma y operates tovhold the valve away from itsseat 69 as illustrated in fulllines The compressing same in a'djus action of the 'sprin on the valve can be varied by rotatin e rod and securing the tion bythe lock nut 70.

Under a normal ow of liquid through the valve the s ring will hold the same in the that a valve li e -Fig. 3is provided at 60 and. that two valves "tion in rested in full lines, wherein the 'qluid canflow' therethrough between the 'va ve and its seat. If the fluid pressure hecomes greater than normal the action of. the liquid against the face 62' of this valve will force the valve towards its seat against the action of the s 'rin It will be understoodthe right-hand portion of facing in opposite directions as shown in Fig. 3 are provided at 61.

.Whilethe valve 28 shown in-Figs. 5 and may be used in the umping system, I prefer to use a valve of t e type shown generally in Figs. 1 and 2 and in detail in Figs. 7, 8, 9

and 10. This valve, which is quite similar.

to the valve 28, comprises a body portion 71 having an inlet 72 from the tank 13, an out- .let 73 to the cylinder 12 and an outlet 74 to the ipe 16. The fiow of fluid through this va ve is controlled by a valve member 75 similar to the member 30 of valve 28 shown in Figs. 5 audit. The auxiliary controlling valve for, the member 75 is a sliding cut-off valve76 operated by an-arm 77 on the valve shaft 36. y

In Fig.8 the member 75 is shown in a position wherein the piston 11- is ascending,

the water flowing from the tank 13 through the port 72, valve chamber 7 5, port 73 to the cylinder 12. The member 75 is held in the position indicated by fluid pressure passing from port 72 and valve chamber 7 5' through port 7 8 into the auxiliary valvechamber 79, ports 80 and 81 into the chamber 82 behind the member 75. The member 75 is thereby held forced to the right (Fig. 8).

When the piston reaches the top of its stroke the cam 43 engages the arm 40 and rotates the shafts 39 and 36 to slide the valve 76 from the position shown in Fig. 8 to the position shown in Fig. 7. Communication position communication between the inlet 72 andthe outlet 73 is out off, and communication is established between the port 73 and the outlet 74. The .water from the cylin der 12'thereupon passes from the cylinder through the valve 71 to the outlet16, permitting the piston 11to descend.

It should be, understood thatthe construction illustrated and above described can be considerably modified-within the scopeof my invention. .In Fig-111 have illustrated a 1 slight modification thereof. It is well] known that oil wells are commonly pumped from a central-power plant which cares for the pumping of a dozen or more wells. M invention is particularly applicable to sue a centralized-system of pumping.

In Fig. 11 I have illustrated four widely as arated pumping units 90, eachincluding a use 2,-a' pumping unit 3, and tanks 13'and 14, substantially as illustrated in detail in Fig. 5. It will be understood that each of these units is locatedat a well to be umped.

'I provide fluid'under pressure to. t e tanks 13 from a central power plant 91 having a a rotary pump 17 operated by a motor 18 like that illustrated in Figs. 2 and 5. A central surge tank is also provided adjacentand in connection with the pump 17. Piping 92 connects the pump 17 with the tank 13 and piping 93 is provided for carrying the waste water from the pumps 3 to the surge tank 15.

A suitable reducing valve 94 is provided in the pipe92 at each tank 13 which automatically regulates the pressure in each tank to a predetermined amount necessary to operate the power head. Also the discharging waters through the piping 93 can be made to operate signals at the central plant for indicating the prop-er functioning of each individual power head and its rate of travel. This operation can of course be determined in a general way merely by observing the discharge of the waters from the pipes 93 into the tank 15'.

The operation of the system shown in Fig. 11 is substantially the same as that described in reference to Figs. 1, 2 and'5. The pump opiprates continuously to force water from t e tank 15 to the tanks 13 under pressu're. This water from tanks 13 is used in the manner already described to operate the well pumps, the waste water returning to the surge tank' through the piping 93. r

It is believed that the advantages of my improved pumping system will be obvious. The load carried by the pumping piston at each. well is counterbalanced by fluid pressure, as has been described. This load is considerable, and the counterbalancing thereof not only adds smoothness and uniformity to the pumping operation but great efiiciency is obtained by the storing up of the energy of the downward stroke to help lift the weight of rods and oil on the up-stroke. These rods in a 5,000-foot well weigh .about 8,450"

pounds, and the weight of oil thereon is about 9,500 pounds. i

It will be understood that the weight of oil is carried by the rods on the up-stroke and released on the down stroke. The great length of rods and the great weight of oil stretch is about 43 inches.

thereon cause the rods to stretch consider- Ordinarily this This stretch must of course be absorbed by giving the rods a very long pumping stroke. My system is particularly applicable to such a long stroke, since the cylinders 4 and 12 can be made in any length desired. This stroke of the rods causes a considerable loss in power in the mechanisms in present use, since in such mechanisms the length of stroke obtained is limited.

Reciprocating machinery of the crank type when used on strokes of more than inches requires enormous masses of metal structure to maintain alignment and to withstand the great an ular thrusts of the connecting rods. Muc efl'ective energy-is used ably at each up-stroke.

in overcoming friction of crossheads, bearings and other moving surfaces, which might be directly applied in doing useful work. The mechanism comprising my invention operates with great smoothness and uniformity from a continuously operating prime mover and avoids the objections and great loss of power. of the pumping mechanisms now in use.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim and desire to secure by Letters 'Pat ent is: v

A pumping system comprising the combination of a cylinder, a piston operating therein, a relatively large tank in communication with the cylinder, means providing fluid to the tank under pressure, a valve between the tank and cylinder for controlling the flow of fluid to the cylinder, means autm matically operating the valve in timed relation with the piston movements, a second cylinder and a piston therein operatably connected to the first piston, and a chamber in communication with the second cylinder whereby a fluid medium is confined for compression'by movement of the pistons 1n one direction to store up power for impelling the pistons in the opposite direction when the latter are free to so move.

WILLIAM E.'HUBBARD.

US27728A 1925-05-04 1925-05-04 Pumping system Expired - Lifetime US1619474A (en)

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Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2418325A (en) * 1940-05-21 1947-04-01 Lockheed Aircraft Corp Aircraft landing gear
US2449554A (en) * 1938-04-19 1948-09-21 Carlyle L Helber Hydropneumatic accumulator type power plant with differential speed motor
US2456566A (en) * 1946-11-18 1948-12-14 Shell Dev Reverse flow by-pass valve
US2490323A (en) * 1945-12-08 1949-12-06 Jay W Scovel Fluid operated pumping mechanism
US2504218A (en) * 1946-05-10 1950-04-18 Cons Western Steel Corp Pump operating unit
US2540347A (en) * 1948-09-13 1951-02-06 Jay W Scovel Fluid operated pumping mechanism
US2550391A (en) * 1943-11-03 1951-04-24 Liberty Planers Hydraulically operated machine tool
US2560676A (en) * 1948-05-14 1951-07-17 Calvin W White Pneumatic-hydraulic system for well pumping or drilling units
US2564285A (en) * 1948-03-11 1951-08-14 Samuel V Smith Pneumatic-hydraulic system for operating well pumping equipment
US2576359A (en) * 1949-10-08 1951-11-27 Tracy J Putnam Hoist control mechanism
US2594531A (en) * 1948-11-20 1952-04-29 Westinghouse Air Brake Co Automotive vehicle hoisting apparatus
US2628564A (en) * 1949-12-01 1953-02-17 Charles R Jacobs Hydraulic system for transferring rotary motion to reciprocating motion
US2644307A (en) * 1950-01-10 1953-07-07 Blair Walter Pneumatic hoist
US2645899A (en) * 1950-12-06 1953-07-21 United States Steel Corp Hydropneumatic pumping unit
US2717492A (en) * 1952-03-17 1955-09-13 Orion T Quinn Jr Fluid pressure actuated apparatus
US2728193A (en) * 1953-07-07 1955-12-27 Pelton Water Wheel Co Ram jack
US2827764A (en) * 1955-12-13 1958-03-25 L A Young Spring & Wire Corp Power system for a drop hammer
US2869469A (en) * 1954-03-31 1959-01-20 Williams Mary Jo Hydraulic pumping jack for oil wells
US2887846A (en) * 1956-01-19 1959-05-26 August F Habenicht Hydraulic power unit for deep well pumps
US2932286A (en) * 1958-02-10 1960-04-12 Gen Motors Corp Windshield wiper actuating mechanism
US2947144A (en) * 1957-08-19 1960-08-02 Pneu Hy Co Pneumatic hydraulic pumping apparatus
US2999360A (en) * 1959-05-26 1961-09-12 August F Habenicht Hydraulic pump apparatus
US3005413A (en) * 1957-04-01 1961-10-24 Kobc Inc Rod-type fluid operated pumping system
US3078594A (en) * 1960-11-18 1963-02-26 John J White Servo assist bungee
US3175362A (en) * 1961-11-17 1965-03-30 Walker Mfg Co Jack
US3212406A (en) * 1962-02-28 1965-10-19 Youngstown Sheet And Tube Co Pumping systems
US3643432A (en) * 1970-04-23 1972-02-22 Joseph H Klaeger Pneumatic pump activator for oil wells
US3971213A (en) * 1973-04-30 1976-07-27 Kelley Robert K Pneumatic beam pumping unit
US4400141A (en) * 1981-06-23 1983-08-23 Lee Jack E Hydraulic pump unit

Cited By (29)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2449554A (en) * 1938-04-19 1948-09-21 Carlyle L Helber Hydropneumatic accumulator type power plant with differential speed motor
US2418325A (en) * 1940-05-21 1947-04-01 Lockheed Aircraft Corp Aircraft landing gear
US2550391A (en) * 1943-11-03 1951-04-24 Liberty Planers Hydraulically operated machine tool
US2490323A (en) * 1945-12-08 1949-12-06 Jay W Scovel Fluid operated pumping mechanism
US2504218A (en) * 1946-05-10 1950-04-18 Cons Western Steel Corp Pump operating unit
US2456566A (en) * 1946-11-18 1948-12-14 Shell Dev Reverse flow by-pass valve
US2564285A (en) * 1948-03-11 1951-08-14 Samuel V Smith Pneumatic-hydraulic system for operating well pumping equipment
US2560676A (en) * 1948-05-14 1951-07-17 Calvin W White Pneumatic-hydraulic system for well pumping or drilling units
US2540347A (en) * 1948-09-13 1951-02-06 Jay W Scovel Fluid operated pumping mechanism
US2594531A (en) * 1948-11-20 1952-04-29 Westinghouse Air Brake Co Automotive vehicle hoisting apparatus
US2576359A (en) * 1949-10-08 1951-11-27 Tracy J Putnam Hoist control mechanism
US2628564A (en) * 1949-12-01 1953-02-17 Charles R Jacobs Hydraulic system for transferring rotary motion to reciprocating motion
US2644307A (en) * 1950-01-10 1953-07-07 Blair Walter Pneumatic hoist
US2645899A (en) * 1950-12-06 1953-07-21 United States Steel Corp Hydropneumatic pumping unit
US2717492A (en) * 1952-03-17 1955-09-13 Orion T Quinn Jr Fluid pressure actuated apparatus
US2728193A (en) * 1953-07-07 1955-12-27 Pelton Water Wheel Co Ram jack
US2869469A (en) * 1954-03-31 1959-01-20 Williams Mary Jo Hydraulic pumping jack for oil wells
US2827764A (en) * 1955-12-13 1958-03-25 L A Young Spring & Wire Corp Power system for a drop hammer
US2887846A (en) * 1956-01-19 1959-05-26 August F Habenicht Hydraulic power unit for deep well pumps
US3005413A (en) * 1957-04-01 1961-10-24 Kobc Inc Rod-type fluid operated pumping system
US2947144A (en) * 1957-08-19 1960-08-02 Pneu Hy Co Pneumatic hydraulic pumping apparatus
US2932286A (en) * 1958-02-10 1960-04-12 Gen Motors Corp Windshield wiper actuating mechanism
US2999360A (en) * 1959-05-26 1961-09-12 August F Habenicht Hydraulic pump apparatus
US3078594A (en) * 1960-11-18 1963-02-26 John J White Servo assist bungee
US3175362A (en) * 1961-11-17 1965-03-30 Walker Mfg Co Jack
US3212406A (en) * 1962-02-28 1965-10-19 Youngstown Sheet And Tube Co Pumping systems
US3643432A (en) * 1970-04-23 1972-02-22 Joseph H Klaeger Pneumatic pump activator for oil wells
US3971213A (en) * 1973-04-30 1976-07-27 Kelley Robert K Pneumatic beam pumping unit
US4400141A (en) * 1981-06-23 1983-08-23 Lee Jack E Hydraulic pump unit

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