US1616662A - Octave-key mechanism - Google Patents

Octave-key mechanism Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1616662A
US1616662A US65671A US6567125A US1616662A US 1616662 A US1616662 A US 1616662A US 65671 A US65671 A US 65671A US 6567125 A US6567125 A US 6567125A US 1616662 A US1616662 A US 1616662A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
octave
key
arm
lever
floating lever
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US65671A
Inventor
Loomis Allen
Original Assignee
Loomis Allen
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Loomis Allen filed Critical Loomis Allen
Priority to US65671A priority Critical patent/US1616662A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1616662A publication Critical patent/US1616662A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • GPHYSICS
    • G10MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACOUSTICS
    • G10DSTRINGED MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; WIND MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; ACCORDIONS OR CONCERTINAS; PERCUSSION MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; AEOLIAN HARPS; SINGING-FLAME MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS; MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • G10D9/00Details of, or accessories for, wind musical instruments
    • G10D9/04Valves; Valve controls
    • G10D9/047Valves; Valve controls for wood wind instruments

Description

Feb.v 8, 1927. I A. LOOMIS OCTAVE KEY MECHANISM Filed Oct. '29. 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 1 Feb. 8, 1927.
1,616,662 A. LOOMIS.
.QCTAVE KEY MECHANISM Filed 001,. 29, 1925 2 Sheets-Sheet 2 adapting said principles to use with instru- Patented Feb. 8, 1927.
ALLEN LOOMIS, OF ELKI-IART, INDIANA,
OCTAVE-KEY MECHANISM.
Application filed Gctober 29, 1925. Serial "No. G5,6?1.
I Thepresent invention relates to the octave 'keys of musical 1nstruments. of the .wood wind type. More particularly, it is concerned with an octave key or mechanism of the general type disclosed in my prior Letters Patent of the United States, No. 1,585,295, dated May 18, 1926, and embodies the same principles of the mechanism described in said prior application, with modifications in, construction and arrangement ments, of specifically different form. For
' instance, whereas the mechanism illustrated in saidprior application was designed with particular reference to Saxophones having curved mouth tubes, andsimilar instruments,
the @present mechanisinhas been designed -forrstraight instruments; at least those which. are substantially or'nearly straight as tothe partsof, the body tube where the octave holes areloc'ated. Such instruments I i include saxophones of the smallest sizes and highest pitches, and the varioussizes of oboes, etc. The'mechanism herein shown and described to illustrate the present invention has been designed for the E-flat soprano saxophone, but in principle, and in substantially complete, detail also, it is ap plicable to other instruments of the wood wind type, Wherefore such illustration is not to be construed as a limitation of the protection which I claim. Such protection extends to all equivalent forms of the mechanism herein described, and the combination ofsuch mechanism, orits equivalents, with all'instruments of the wood wind type to which it maybe usefully applied. Vithin the meaning of the term wood wind type as here used, I include all musical instruments of which the distinguishing character- T istic is a tubular 'body'containing a vibrating'column ofair and having lateral holes adapted to'be opened and closed for determining the length of the vibrating air column, and hence the pitch of the emitted note, whether actually made of wood or'ot metal or other material.
1 The objects of this invention are the same I as thoseset forth in myprior application "aforesaid, tog'ether with'the further ob ect of adapting thersame principles to an instrument having a substantially straight tube. In the preferred form it is made with both octave holes on. the upper side, in order to prevent them from filling with Water.
of a straight saxophone, and typifies other instruments of the wood windtype also. The mouth piece or reed, commonly used with saxophones and other instruments of this type, is not shown, here, but all those skilled in the art will understand that it is to be applied to the upper (smaller) end of the body tube. The numerals 4t and 5 represent the stoppers or keys which cover the lower and upper octave holes respectively. Such octave holes, in the embodiment shown in Figs. 1 and 2, are both on the upper side of the body, by which I mean that neither one is so near the lower side, when in the position for playing,that water can collect andfill them orstand in contact with the pads of the cover keys. The stopper or key a is connected to an arm 6 secured to a sleeve 7 having a rotative bearing on a rod 8, which rod is mounted in posts or pillars 9 and 10 secured to the instrument body, and is substantially parallel to such body. Sleeve 7 is prevented from moving endwise on the rod 8 by sleeves mounted at either sideof it. on the same rod, one, at the left of the sleeve 7. being shown in these (llttWlllgS, and that or those at the right oi it being omitted for the sake of clearness. The rod 8 provides a fixed axis for the key or stopper 4 approximately or nearly in the plane of the rimof the octave hole, enabling the stopper to open and close without in any circumstancessliding or scuiling across such rim.
Also mounted "on the pivot rod v8 are sleeves 11' and 12, the former of which carries an arm 13 overlying the stopper. l and a second arm 14, and the second of which carries arms l5 and 16.. The arms 14 and 16 are connected rigidly by a bridge rod 17. The arm 15 carries a stopperfor cover 18 for one of the tone holes of the instrument, and to this cover is secured a finger key 19.
Thus the key 19 serves as means for moving the arm 13, raising the latter when depressed, owing to the rigid connection which exists between the key and arm through th parts above described, and causing-the arm to be raised when the key is depressed. In this specification, the term raised, or terms of similar import, when applied to designate the movement of, or pressure applied-to or by, a key or stopper, or parts associated therewith, signifies movement or pressure away fromthe body of the instrument, whatever may be the direction of such movement or pressure with respect to the horizontal, and the term -depressed, or terms of equiv alent import, used in the same connection, means movement or pressure toward the body of the instrument. A spring 20 is mounted in the post or pillar 10 and acts on a hook 21 fastened to the sleeve 12, with tendency to raise the key 19 and to depress thearm 13 and the octave key a. The'particular key 19 here shown typifies any key which might be connected w th the arm 13, or an equivalent member, for controlling the octave key 4. It will be appreciated that the spring 20 tends to close the'octave key and that depression of key 19 overcomes this tendency and leaves the octave key free to be opened by other agency.
The stopper or key 5 for the upper octavhole is carried by an arm 22 secured to the sleeve 23, mounted rotatively on a pin sup ported by posts or pillars 24 and 25. I second arm 26 is secured to the sleeve 23 and projects to the opposite side of the pivotal axis of the arm 22. A spring 27 is mounted in the post 24 and is engaged with a hook 28 on the sleeve 23, exerting tendency to close the stopper 5.
Connection is made between the two octave keys through a lever 29 and a rocker or rock lever 30." The lever 29 is mounted in a floating manner on a carrier consisting of two arms 31 and 32, secured to a sleeve 33, mounted on a pivot rod 34: held in posts or pillars 35 and 36. The arms 31 and 32 carry and are connected by a pivot pin 37, on which the floating lever 29, and a hub or sleeve 38 secured thereto, have their hearing, One arm of lever 29 is connected to the arm 6 of the lower octave key by means of a pin 39 projecting from the side of the arm 6 and having a'slide block or cross head 10, which occupies in a sliding manner a notch in the adjacent arm of the lever 29. The oppositearm 29 of said floating lever 29 underlies one arm of the rock'lever 30, and the other arm of the rock lever overlies the arm 26 which is rigidly connected to the upper octave key, as previously mentioned. Said rock lever is mounted on a transverse pivot rod, supported by pillars from the body, as clearly shown in the drawings and well understood in the art. The pivotal axes of both octave keys, the floating lever and the floating lever carrier, are all generally parallel 'to the body of the instru- 'ment, and therefore to each other. The two arms of the floating lever are in the same alarm or substantiall so transverse to their axis and to said body.
To the sleeve 33 of the floating lever carrier is connected a key 11, adapted to be depressed by the performcrs thumb; and a spring 43 is mounted in the pillar and engaged with a hook 42 on the sleeve 33,
tending to raisekey 4L1 and depress the pivot pin 37.
The tendency of the springs 20, 27 and 43 is to close both octave keys, all cooperating to the same end. No spring is applied directly to the lower octave key, but this key is freely rotatable about its pivot rod, and is moved only as it is acted upon in one manner or another by :the springs above named and the mechanisms affected thereby. Spring 43 acts to move it into the closed position when the key tlis released after having been pressed on, and holds it in closed position unless the thumb key is depressed,
by acting through the floating lever, the arm 29 of which then bears and reacts on the body. Such reaction of the floating lever is an impoitant feature and has an essential coaction with the spring 13 in closing the lower octave key and holding it tightly closed. This closing means is effective even though the pressure of the arm 13 be released. Preferably, a cork buffer or pad is cemented to the body underneath the arm 29. Changes in the positions of the octave keys from the normal positions shown in these drawings are eifected by manipulation of the keys 19 and 41, or equivalent keys.
Depression of the key 19 alone has no effect on the octave keys, but the opening novement of the latter is effected by depression of the key 11, and one or the other of the octave keys is opened according as the key 19 is depressed or not. It key 41!. alone is depressel, the octave key 5 is opened because the pivot pin 37 on the carrier is raised and the pin 39 on the arm 6 remains stationary. The floating lever then turns about the pin 39 as a fulcrum, raising its other arm, rocking the lever 30 and dcpresing the arm 26. Such depress on of arm 26 and raising of the upper octave key 5 takes place against the resistance of spring 27, and occurs because the resistance opposed by spring 20 to the forces exerted upon and through the floating lever is greater than the resistance of spring 27, being sufficiently stiff to have that effect. The rock lever 30 has no spring of its own, and therefore opposes no resistance or assistance to any of the movements in which it takes part, except the slight and negligible resistance of friction on its pivot.
-"l Butif key 19 'is depressed before and durupper'octave key remains closed. effect Occurs because, as spring 20 now a ing the time that the key 41 is pressed upon,
the lower octave key 4 is opened and the This opposes no resistance to the movement of the floating lever, the resistance of spring 27 issuflicient to hold the rock lever 30 7 stationary. as an'abutment', causing the float- ;ers finger orby' spring when such pressure' is released, the 'COHdllJlOIlS of both octave keys are reversed, the one which Twas previously opened being closed and the previously closed one being opened.
" It follows from the actions just described that the octaveholes are properly opened to control the playing of notesin the middle and upper registers of the instrument, by
I the performer pressing upon the key 41, and that where a transition from one registcr to another requires the position of the octave keystobe reversed, such reversal is automatically effected by pressing upon or releasing; the tone key 19. But the octave keys are-"both tightly closed when notes in .the lower register are played.
-The"1nechanism herein described lends itself very readily to manufacture by economical factory methods of quantity production, and the longitudinal members are made principally of standard tubing which can be cut in any lengths. Thus in order to adapt the essential mechanism to instruments in which the holes are differently spaced apart, the only members of the structure which need to be different from one another, among a wide range of instruments, are the longitudinal members.
'Floating levers and arms of the same sizes and dimensions may be used in many different' instruments, and identical sliding "blocks and pins may be used with instru- "ments of all sizesand models, and in all situations, in which this particular machine element is used. The last statement is also t-ruewith respect to the arm 6 which carries 1 the lower octave hole stopper and the arm "f. 13,-which overlies such stopper; These two arms areeconomically made from a single piece machined and bent into U form, and then sawed-apart at or near the middle of the bend. 'I 'he contiguous extremities of the two armsthus resulting are cut away so as to receive the hole cover, and the operation of thus cutting them may be performed before they are sawed apart. Afterwards, the recess in the arm 13 may be cut a little deeper to receive the cork or other buffer pad which is preferably applied to it to deaden the noise of striking the cover.
IVhat I claim and desire to secure by Letters Patent is: v
1. In combination with an instrument of the wood wind type having a substantially straight body tube, and two octave holes, 5
keys for the said octave holes supported from the body of the instrument and having pivotal motion, and their only motion, about fixed axes generally parallel to said body,
a floating lever carrier, a floating lever pivoted to said carrier, both said carrier and floating lever having their only motion about axes generally parallel to said body, means connecting one arm of said floating lever to one of said octave keys, and'transmission mechanism for converting rising movement of the other arm of said floating lever into rising movement of the other octave key.
; 2. In a musical instrument of the wood wind type having two octave holes and beingsubstantially straight in that portion where said octave holes are located, octave keys respectively covering said holes and pivoted on'axes' substantially parallel to said body and having their only motion about said axes, a floating lever pivotally connected to one of said octave keys. a floating lever carrier pivotally supported from the instrument body and to which said floating lever is pivoted, the axes'of both said carrier and said lever being substantially parallel to the instrument body, and motion transmitting means between said floating lever and the other octave key.
3. In a musical instrument of the wood wind type having a substantially straight body and two octave holes, a floating lever pivotally supported from the axis of said body to turn about an axis substantially parallel thereto, a floating lever pivoted to said carrier on an axis substantially parallel to the axis of the latter, and motion transmitting connection between the two arms of said floating lever and the respective octave keys.
4. In a musical instrument of the wood wind type having a substantially straight body and-two octave holes, a floating lever carrier pivotally supported from said body to turn about an axis'substantially parallel thereto, a floating lever pivoted to said car-' rier on an axis substantiallyparallel to the axis of the latter, and motion transmitting connections between the two arms of said floating lever and the respective octave keys. said connections causing the movement of either octave key and of that arm of the floating lever which is respectively connected thereto to occur in the same sense with respect to the body of the instrument.
5. In a musical instrument of the wood wind type having a substantially straight body with two octave holes, a floating lever carrier pivotally supported from the body of the instrument, a floating lever pivoted to said carrier, the axes of'both'the carrier and the floating lever being substantially parallel'to the-instrumentbody, a coupling between one arm of: said'flo'ating lever and one of the octave keys, and-a rock lever engaged with the-other armofsaid floating lever 'and with the other octave-key.
6. In musical instrument ofthe character set forth having two octave holes, octave keys for said holes pivoted on fixed axes substantially parallel to the body of the instrument and having their only movement about said axes, an arm connected to one of said octave keys and extending to the opposite side of its axis from said key, a rock lever pivoted to the instrument body and engaged with said/arm, a floating lever carrier pivotally supported from the body to turn about an axis substantially parallel thereto,-anda floating leverepivoted to said carrier on an axis substantially p'arallelto the axis of the latter and having arms extending to opposite sides of its pivot, one of said arms being engaged with said rock lever and theother' being. engaged with the other octave key.
7 In a musical instrument. of the character set forth having two octave holes, octave keys for 'said holes pivotally sup ported from the body of the instrument,
a floating lever carrier pivotally supported "from said body to turn about an axis substantially ip'arallel thereto, a floating lever pivotally supported by said carrier, both arms of said floating lever being in the same plane transverseto its pivot, and one of said arms being coupled pivotally with one of said octave keys, and an arm arranged to bear on the othcrarinof said floating lever and being pivotally mounted from the instrument body and arranged to impart movement toithe other octave hole key,
8.. An octave key mechanism of the char acter. set forth comprising a floating 'lever having a tubular hub pivotally supported- "fromthe bodyof the instrument on an axis substantially parallel to said body, a finger key secured to said tubular hub, parallel arms secured to said hub and projecting from one side thereof, a floating lever having a tubular hub interposed between said arms, and a pivot or fulcrum pin passingthro'ugh the-floating lever hub andmounted in-said arms, a plurality of octave keys, and a pres sure transmitting connection between the arms of said lever and the different octave keys.
ALLEN LOOMIS.
US65671A 1925-10-29 1925-10-29 Octave-key mechanism Expired - Lifetime US1616662A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US65671A US1616662A (en) 1925-10-29 1925-10-29 Octave-key mechanism

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US65671A US1616662A (en) 1925-10-29 1925-10-29 Octave-key mechanism

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1616662A true US1616662A (en) 1927-02-08

Family

ID=22064327

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US65671A Expired - Lifetime US1616662A (en) 1925-10-29 1925-10-29 Octave-key mechanism

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1616662A (en)

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3142222A (en) * 1961-06-13 1964-07-28 William C Polisi Bassoon
US20070163421A1 (en) * 2006-01-17 2007-07-19 Cannonball Musical Instruments Wind instrument having a modified tone-rich surface

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3142222A (en) * 1961-06-13 1964-07-28 William C Polisi Bassoon
US20070163421A1 (en) * 2006-01-17 2007-07-19 Cannonball Musical Instruments Wind instrument having a modified tone-rich surface
US7439429B2 (en) 2006-01-17 2008-10-21 James Wood Wind instrument having a modified tone-rich surface

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1616662A (en) Octave-key mechanism
US2508550A (en) Cylindrical pipe wood-wind instrument
US2033774A (en) Saxophone
US4453445A (en) Saxophone valve key
US3890874A (en) Keying mechanism for wind instruments
US1546153A (en) Clarinet
US2055382A (en) Saxophone
US1706796A (en) Octave-key mechanism for musical instruments
US1585295A (en) Octave key
US2832250A (en) Key mechanism for clarinets
US2211770A (en) Musical instrument and valve action therefor
US2133625A (en) Wood-wind instrument
US2208384A (en) Shift mechanism
US1662196A (en) Octave-key mechanism for wood-wind instruments
US3017798A (en) Clarinets
US2036492A (en) Reed musical instrument
US3212385A (en) Clarinets
US2163352A (en) Wind instrument of the reed type
US745804A (en) Wind instrument.
US878333A (en) Clarinet.
USRE23725E (en) Mechanism fob alto and bass clarinets
US1728370A (en) Musical instrument
US1735411A (en) Saxophone
US1462444A (en) Plectrum piano action
US2791145A (en) Clarinets