US1603621A - Coal mining and loading machine - Google Patents

Coal mining and loading machine Download PDF

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Publication number
US1603621A
US1603621A US63490923A US1603621A US 1603621 A US1603621 A US 1603621A US 63490923 A US63490923 A US 63490923A US 1603621 A US1603621 A US 1603621A
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coal
cutter
frame
machine
conveyor
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Edward S Mckinlay
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Mckinlay Mining And Loading Ma
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    • EFIXED CONSTRUCTIONS
    • E21EARTH DRILLING; MINING
    • E21CMINING OR QUARRYING
    • E21C27/00Machines which completely free the mineral from the seam
    • E21C27/10Machines which completely free the mineral from the seam by both slitting and breaking-down

Description

Oct. 19, 1926.

E. S. M KINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE Origin l Filed April 26. 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet l E. S. M KINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE o i i l Filed April 26. 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet 2 S Mommy Oct. 19 1926. 1,603,621

E. s. MOKINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE Original Filed April 26. 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet s I\ a N &

Jfmifmlqg 61 L014 WA Oct. 19 1926. v 1,603,621

E. s. MCKINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE Origi l Filed April 26. 1923 12 Slwets-Shet 5 Oct. 19 1926. 1,603,621

' E. s. MCKINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE Original Filed April 26. 1925 12 Sheets-$heei 6 w 7 F 90 pg (952' Moe Mm E. mzrmza 3 M 9 @Mowmdd Oct. 19 1926. 1,603,621

E. s. MCKINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE Original Filed April 5 12 Sheets-Sheet 7 Fig.1.?

E 341 0011 boz Gm m4 Oct. 19 1926. 1,603,621

E. s. MCKINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE Original Filed pril 26. 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet 8 a 1 (w; l7

Oct. 19, 1926. 1,603,621 E. S. M KINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE Origi l Filed April 26. 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet 9 Oct. 19 1926.

Original Filed pril 26. 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet 10 Illlllnbl ..v n

Oct. 19 1926. 1,603,621

E. s. MOKINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE Original Filed April 26, 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet 11 Oct. 19 1926. 1,603,621

E. s. MCKINLAY COAL MINING AND LOADING MACHINE Original Filed pril 26. 1923 12 Sheets-Sheet 12 U l tou W4 Patented a. 19, 1926.

r UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

EDWARD S. MOKINLAY, OF DENVER, COLORADO, ASSIGNOR TO MGKINLAY MINING AND LOADING MACHINE COMPANY, OF DENVER, COLORADO, A CORPORATION OF OOLO-' RADO.

COAL MINING AND LOADING uacnmn.

Application filed April 28, 1923, Serial No. 684,908. Renewed January 21, 1926..

The present invention relates to improvements in coal mining and loading machmes, in Which provision is made for digging or excavating coal from the mine and transferring it immediately and automatically to a point removed from the scene of the cutting operations where it is loaded upon cars or other vehicles for transportation out of the mine.

The invention consists in certain lmprovements on my prior machines and consists In one aspect in certain reorganizations of the parts and mechanisms contributing to a more compact, strong and durable machine capable of being manufactured at reduced costs, while performing certain auxiliary" operations, hereinafter described, whlch improve the character of Work performed by the machine and which, furthermore, decrease the cost of coal mining, eliminate a large part of the hand labor heretofore required, promote safety in the mining and generally result in a more practical and satisfactory method of mining and loading the coal.

- With the foregoing and other objects in view, the invention will he more fully described hereinafter, and will be more particularly pointed out in the claims appended hereto.

In the drawings, whereinlike symbols refor to like or corresponding parts throughout the several views,

Figure 1. is a top plan view, with parts broken away showing an improved machine constructed according to my invention.

Figure 2 is a side elevation thereof.

Figure 3 is a front elevation of the machine. v

Figure 4; is a horizontal section taken on the line 44 in Figure 3.

Figure 5 is a vertical, central and longitudinal section throu h the machine.

Figure 6 is a vertica transverse section taken on the line 6-6 in Figure 2.

Figure 7 is a similar section taken on the line 7-7 also in Figure 2.

Figure 8 is'likewise a cross section taken on the line 8--8 in Figure 2.

Figure 9 is a fragmentary top plan view showing the extension conveyor.

Figure 10 is a side view of the same.

Figure 11 is also a fragmentary top plan view showing how the auxiliary frame may be turned at right angles.

Figure 12 is a cross section taken through the conveyor, and showing a modified form of roller su port. Figure 13 is a front view with parts shown in section showing a vertically reciprocating saw frame and with the frame in the upper position.

Figure 14 is a similar view of the frame in the lower position.

Figure 15 is a fra entary side view of the device shown in igure 13.

F Igure 16 is a fragmentary side view showing the slot cutters.

F i ure 17 is a plan view of the same ind cating in dotted lines the extended position of the slot cutters.

Figure 18 is a fragmentary front view of a modified form of machine showing two rotary cutter heads in combination with bottom slot cutter.

Figure 19 is a vertical section taken on the line 19-19 in Figure 18.

Figure 20 is a top plan view of the frame for the central slot cutter with the cutter chain omitted.

Figure 21 is a side view with parts broken away showing a means for drawing dust from the mine or for furnishing fluid to the mine wall.

Figure 22 is a front view of the same. Figure 23 is an enlarged section taken on the line 2323 in Figure 21.

Figure 24: is a modified form of cutter head.

Figure 25 is a front view, with parts broken away showing a still further modified form of cutter head.

Figure 26 is a cross section taken on the line 2626 in Figure 25 and shown on an enlarged scale.

Figure 27 shows a front view of the same.

Figure 28 is a fragmentary side view of a further modified form of cutter head.

Figure 29 is a perspective view of thesame on an enlarged scale.

Figure 30 shows a fragmentary side view of the cutter head showing an improved form of scoop with an adjustable gate.

Figure 31 is a perspective view of the same on an enlarged scale. Figure 32 is a side view of the cutter head having improved scrapers thereon.

Figure 33 is a rear elevation showing the same.

Figure 34 is a perspective view of a cone for use on the cutter head.

Figure 35 is a similar view showing an elevation of a modification.

Figure 36 is an end view thereof Figure 37 is a fragmentary side view showing the cutter head with an ad ustable breaking disc.

Figure 38 is a section taken on the line 3838 in Figure 37. v

Figure 39 is a diagrammatic view showlng how three cutter heads may be mounted upon a machine and indicating the several circles of operation.

Figure 40 is a fragmentary plan view showing the bearings at the oint of connection between the shafts an the cross bar connected to the hydraulic mechanism.

Figure 11 is an enlarged section taken on the line 41-41 in Figure/i0.

Figure 42 shows a longitudinal section taken through the motor shaft,' and Figure 43 is a transverse section taken on the line 43-43 in Figure 42.

Referring more particularly to the machine shown in Figures 1 to 8 inclusive of the drawings, the machine comprises generally a frame work composed of pairs of upper and lower longitudinal rails l and 2,

which are spaced apart horizontally and vertically, the upper pair of rails 1 being preferably extended to the rear beyond the lower rails, and said lower rails are supported for rolling movement in the mine upon the rollers or wheels 3 and 4. These rollers are shown in Figure 1 to extend beyond the sides of'the frame work in order to'give a better balance to the machine and said rollers are journaled upon shafts 5 and 6 carried by bearings affixed to the lower rails 2.

The upper rails 1 are appropriately supported from the lower rails as by the use of posts 7, 8 and 9 at suitable intervals; and the upper and lower pairs of rails are secured together horizontally by an appropriate number of horizontal braces. The framework is otherwise braced or trussed as may be desired to meet the requirement of strength.

At the front of the machine are mounted a number of cutter heads, in this form of the invention shown to be two in number and designated at.10 and 11, the cutter heads carrying a number of cutters spaced radially apart and adapted to be rotated from shafts 12 and 13 which extend in parallel relation at opposite sides of the frame work of the machine and are journaled, in bearings for instance carried by the posts 7 and 9. The e shafts occupy a substantially intermediate position with respect to the height of the frameand they are driven by appropriate gearing which receives its source of motion om an electric or other motor 14 mounted upon the frame preferably at the upper forward portion thereof.

As shown the shaft 15 upon which the armature of the motor is mounted extends rotate in any appropriate manner with the oppositely rotating shafts '12 and 13 and the cutterheads 10 are probably in the nature of flat bars extending diametrically to opposite sides of the shafts and havin a number of cutters 20 and 21 rovided with toothed or serrated cutting e ges for taking into the coal vein or wall of the mine. As shown in Figure 3 the cutters partake of the same curvature as coincides with their radial distance from the centers of the shafts 12 and 13, the curvature therefore being sharpest for the innermost cutters, the outer cutters progressively flattening to a greater extent, this for the purpose of causing the cutters to bite into the coal vein in true circular paths without encountering an lateral strains upon the cutter blades an without tearing or shearing the coal. The result produced in the coal vein by the rotation of the radially separated cutters is a number of concentric rings in the face of the coal which on attaining a suitable depth by the cutters are intended to be broken off and to fall to the bottom of the mine in front of the machine where they will be lifted by scoops 22 and 23, carriedby the rear faces of the cutter heads 10 and 11, such coal being deposited by the scoops or shovels or pusher lates on to a hopper by which the coal is fed to a conveyor for transferring the same to cars or other vehicles by which it is transported out of the mine.

The breaking of the rings of coal is accomplished by suitable devices carried by the cutter heads. Each cutter head carries a centering and boring bit 24 which constitutes an extension of a cone 25 disposed against the forward face of each cutter head and in alinement with the cutter shaft. The cone 25 progresses into the centereof the innermost and smallest ring of coal which is cut out by the bit 24 and the two cut er lades nearest the center of the thereon is at right angles to its connection with the coal bed and directly opposite to the outer side of the ring which has been removed and cut away by the action of the cutters.

The cutter head 10 carries a disc 26, which is secured thereto by an appropriate bracket located at the edge of the cutter head 10 which is the rear or trailing edge as respect the direction of rotation. The wheel or disc 26 is adapted to rotate and it is shown as substantially in alinement with the second cutter blade from the center upon one side,

of the cutter head and as seen in Figure 3 this disc or wheel is substantially straight disc 27 is also with reference to the curved character of the adjacent cutter blades and the disc may be given any angular tilt or position desired 1n order that it may exert a sidewise pressure against the second concentric ring thus tending to break this ring and cause the coal com osing the same to fall to the bottom of tlib mine. In a similar manner the other side of the cutter head 10 carries a similar disc 27 which is also mounted upon the rear or trailing edge of the cutter head and is therefore seen in Figure 3 to be disposed on a relatively 0 posite edge of/ the disc. The located a greater distance from the center .of the cutter head and opposite the third cutter blade in order to sever and break off the outermost concentric ring of the coal. The other cutter head 11 is similarly equipped to cause breaking of the rings of coal out out thereby.

The scoops .0r shovels 22 and 23 carried by the rear edges of the cutter heads are provided with rear openings 28 adjacent inwardly curved Walls 29 which direct the coal toward the openings 28 upon the arrival of the scoops at an uppermost position and in this uppermost position the openings 28 in the scoops are disposed to direct the coal out of the openings 28 and upon troughs 30 and 31. The troughs 30 and 31 are mutually inclined and are fixed to the outer posts 7 of the frame Work or to other appropriate parts. The inner and lower ends of the troughs are arranged to deposit the coal upon the chute 32 having its forward and upper part disposed beneath the troughs as shown to best advantage in Figures 5 and 6, the trough inclining downwardly and converging rearwardly and having flanges 33 at its sides to avoid the escape of the coal therefrom.

These flanges further serve to guide the coalinto the constricted neck of the chute where it is deposited upon a belt conveyor 34. The conveyor extends longitudinally of the frame and its forward portion lies beneath the discharge mouth of the chute 32 and at this point 1t is desirable to have confining walls 35 at the sides of the discharge mouth of the trough and just above the conveyor belt in order to guide the coal on to the belt and to place it and fix it before the belt moves with its load away from the receiving point. This construction is shown most clearly in Figure 7 and this construction avoids the spreading of the'coal upon the conveyor and its spilling over the sides after the conveyor moves from under the confining walls 35, which are suitably suspended by brackets or arms 36 from the frame work.

A second chute 37 is provided beneath the upper chute 32, said lower chute sloping in an opposite direction or upwardly from the front of the frame work back over the forward part of the conveyor 34. The lower and wider portion of this lower chute 37 isdisposed close to the bottom of the mine for the purpose of catchin the material upon the floor as the mac ine moves into the retreating wall of the vein. The coal upon the floor of the mine is thus forced up the inclined lower chute 37 until it is caught upon the conveyor 34; it being understood from Figure 6 that the lower chute also converges to a point above the conveyor belt and is provided with side walls 38 the outer ends of which are secured for instance to the front posts 7. The base portions of the front post 7 are also utilized to hold the Wings 39 and 40 which shoves the coal lying in the bottom of the mine ahead and out of the path of the rollers 3. These wings have curved under walls in order to allow the coal to escape past the same when it has been shifted out of the direct path of the rollers.

Now itwill be appreciated from Figure 3 that the two rotating cutter heads will cut out from the coal vein or Wall two circular cavities leaving material above and H desirable and necessary therefore to cut out these triangular portions and to accomplish 2 this I propose to provide a pair of upper saws 41 and 42 and a pair of lower saws 43 and 44, all of which saws are carriedby a horizontally reciprocating frame work 45 mounted at the front portion of the machine and being of a substantially open or rectangular construction having the inner side portions engaged by eccentrics 46 and 47 keved to the shafts 12 and 13 as shown in Figure 6. It will be noted that the eccentrics are offset approximately 180 degrees in order to provide for the movement of the frame first to one and then to the other side in order that the saws connected to the frame may be made to partake of the recipiiocating movement necessar to cut through the triangular portions 0 the coal left untouched by the rotating cutters.

The frame is held in place by clips 48 and 49 slidingly engaged with the upper and lower bars of the frame and bein bolted or otherwise secured to the cross are 50 and 51 which extend between the front posts 7.

It will be noted that the bars 50 and 51 are flanged or of angle iron construction and the frame is supported upon rollers 52 which are carried by said frame and rest upon the horizontal flange of the upper bar 50 across which they are adapted to roll. Moreover other rollers 53 carried by the upper portion of the reciprocating frame 45 roll in contact with the vertical flange of the upper bar50 and act to steady and guide the moyement of the frame.

In a similar way lower vertical rollers 54 move incontact with the horizontal flange of the lower rail 51 and lower horizontal rollers 55 lie in contact with the vertical depending flange of said lower rail 51. By the use of the clips and these rollers the frame is adequately secured in place while at the same time being free to move transversely with the greatest ease. The arrangement also reduces the friction to a minimum.

Now referring more particularly to the conveyor construction, the front portion of the conveyor extends about the forward shaft or axle 5 upon which the rollers 3 are mounted and the conveyor belt is preferably engaged with a roller 56 at this point. Thence the conveyor extends back and upwardly in a generally diagonal direction and the rear end of the conveyor engages over a roller 57 upon a shaft 58 which is journaled in appropriate bearings upon the rear extended ends ofthe upper rails 1. Adjacent this roller 57 is a companion roller 59 engaging the upper run of the belt near the roller 57, said roller 59 being supported upon a shaft 60 also carried by the upper rails. Closelyadjacent the roller 59 is an idler 61 at a lower elevation engaging the lower run of the belt and guidin it to the roller 57. The idler 61 is carried y a shaft 62 which is journaled in theside portions of the upper rails 1.

The driving connections for the belt are placed intermediately thereof and consist in a friction driving roller 63 mounted upon a shaft, 64 carried by an appropriate part of the frame work and at a suitable elevation to engage beneath the lower run of the belt at a point opposite one or more pressure rollers 65 which extend between the two runs of the belt and which are forcibly pressed against the lower run of the conveyor belt and which in turn forcibly press the conveyor belt against the driving roller 63. A guide roller 66 is placed above and adjacent the driving roller 63 and engages beneath the lower run of the belt and is so positioned and arranged as to guide the two runs of the belt closely together and to force the lower run of the belt about an extended area of the surface of the pressure roller 65 in order to secure comparatively great traction at the driving point. The pressure roller 65 is carried upon a shaft 67 carried in the ends of a pair of arms 68 which are pivoted as indicated at 69 upon the intermediate part of the vertical posts 8. The opposite ends of these arms are engaged with coil springs 70 connected to eye bolts 71 passing throu h the upper rails 1 and having adjusting an lock nuts 72 thereon for the purpose of re ulating the tension of the springs 70 and consequently the degree of slippage of the belt 34 which governs its rate of speed. By loosening the tension of the springs 7 O to the suitable degree the driving of the belt may be entirely stop ed.

Now the riving roller 63 is rotated by virtue of the connection of a worm 73 upon its shaft 64 with a .worm wheel 74 secured upon the cutter shaft 13. The electric motor 14 is therefore also the source of power for driving the conveyor.

The machine is intended to be held up against its work and against the likelihood of backing off by the use of claw bars 75 and 76 which diverge rearwardly and are pointed or sharpened as indicated in Figures 1 and 5 to take into the side walls of the mine. These bars at their forwardly convergent ends are coupled to a head 77 carried by the plunger 78 which fits into a hydrauliccylinder 7 9 carried beneath the upperportion of the frame work and preferably centrally thereof and longitudinally of the machine so that the thrust exerted thereby will take place proportionately and uniformly upon both sides of the machine. The cylinder 79 slides in a yoke or stirrup 80 extending down from a cross brace 81 connected between the rear projecting ends of the rails 1. At the forward end of said cylinder 79, the same is coupled to a cross bar 82 as by the coupling member 83 or other device. The cross bar 82 extends transversely of the machine and in line with the cutter shafts 12 and 13 and bears against the rear ends of these, shafts in order that the hydraulic pressure developed in the cylinder 79 may be realized through these shafts directly upon the cutter heads, rather than through the frame work of the machine. Thus the entire weight of the machine is taken off the hydraulic apparatus and its function of keeping the cutter heads up to their work is greatly facilitated.

The operation of the apparatus thus far described is substantiall as follows The machine is rolle into the mine and moved up to its work with the blades upon the cutter heads 10 and 11 engaging the horizontal wall of a coal vein. The claw bars 75,

and 76 at the rear end bf the machine are pushed forwardly until the plunger is all the way in the hydraulic cylinder 79, whereupon these claw bars are engaged with the side walls of the mine as indicated in Figure 1. Hydraulic pressure in a suitable amount is turned into the hydraulic cylinder 79 forwardly of the piston by the use of appropri-.

ate valves and connections which are not shown as they form no part of the present invention; The hydraulic ressure attempts to move the cylinder 79 orwardly as the piston is anchored against movement by the Q claw bars 75 and 76. The force of the hydraulic pressure is transmitted to the cross bar 82and through the cutter shafts to the cutter heads thus holding these cutter heads against the wall of the coal vein and forcing the heads forwardly .as the cutters round out the grooves between the concentric rings of coal.

The circuit through the electric motor 14 is closed and the motor driving the shaft 15 a will communicate rotary movement to the cutter shafts 12 and 13 and Ya consequent rotary movement to the cutter heads. This movement will be in relatively opposite directions so that the strain of one cutter head willbe absorbed by that of the other, and substantially equal reactions taking place, the strain upon the machine and other parts is reduced and properly compensated for.

The rotation of the cutter shafts 12 and 13 rotates the eccentrics which reciprocate the saw frame 45 and the upper and lower triangular portions-of coal not reached by the circular blades will be cut into strips by the saws. The scoops or shovels carried by the rotary cutter heads constantly act to elevate the coal thrown upon the floor ofthe m1ne by the cutters and saws and this'coal is deposited in the chute and delivered to the conveyor 34. The conveyor being also driven from the electric motor by the drive roller 63 conveys the coal to the rear of the machine and to a high elevation beneath which cars may be placed to receive the coal fed to this point. The machine advances automatically because of-the hydraulic pressure and the action goes on until the cylinder 79 has moved to a position Where the piston has arrived at the rear portion of such cyl-- trained over a roller 92 at its desired to stabilize the mac casual movement and the strains incident to .the mining operation. The machine ade-' quately' takes care of all I the coal cut by the use of the'two cutter heads, the conveyor buckets and the conveyor and the drive mechanism for the conveyor is similarly easy regulable and secures high traction to avoid slippage of the belteven under the commay be increased at this ointwhere it is me for resisting u per rails 1 of the frame work of the ma- 0 ineand are secured to said upper rails as by the use of plates bolted or otherwise secured as represented at 86. The extension frame is intended to carry the conveyor 34' rearwardly for-loading the coal into the cars or other vehicles represented in dotted lines at 87. The rear ends of the sills 84 are carried by posts 88 having rollers 89 similar to the rollers upon which the machine is carried in order that the frame work and the extensions may be movable as a unit in the mine. It.v will be noted that the extension lies well above the claw bars in order to avoid interference with the operation of the latter.

Now the conveyor 34 is spliced as indicated at 90 to the extension belt 91, this latter extension belt extending over the length of the extension frame and being rearmost end. The lower 'run' of-this extension belt is supported by. guide rollers 93 and 94 and a guide roller 95 upon the upper side of the 7 lower run between the supporting rollers 93 and 94, forms abight in the belt to keep the upperrun taut. This upper run of the belt is supported upon a number of idlers '96 and 97 which are similar to the rollers 57 and 59 and are located on the extension frame adjacent to the latter rollers.

As shown by a comparison of Figures 9 and 11, the extension frame is adapted to be turned angularly with respect to the ma-. chine as for instance to pass around corners in the mine and for this purpose the extension frame carries a cross beam 98 having a forwardly extending central tongue 99-provided with a longitudinal slot 100 which communicates at its rear end with a-transverse slotlOl in the beam 98. The two slots combine to form a substantial T. The rear part of the rails I carry a transverse plate 103 provided with a downwardly extendin pin 102 which passes through the T shape slot in the beam 98.

In moving the extension frame to an angular position, the plates 85 are first removed and the extension frame is dropped to a more convenient position which is permitted by unloosening the screws 104 in the socket 105 of the leg structure, which permits the socket members 105 to descend upon the posts 88 a sufficient distance to allow clearance by the extension sills 84 of the rails 1 and the extension frame may be thereupon turned angularly u onthe pivot pin 102. It will be noted t at the pivot pin in Figure 9 fits intothe forward end of the tongue slot 100; while in Figure 11 it fits into one of the branches of the slot 101 in the beam 98. Should the extension frame be swung in the opposite direction the pin 102 would occupy the other branch. The extension frame may be made to assume any angular position and of course the-lacing 90 is undone and the extension belt 91 has its free ends laced together so as to form a continuous and independent conveyor with its end extending beneath the end of the conveyor belt 34 so as to receive the coal therefrom. Any means may be employed for rotating the extension belt 91 and this may derive its movement either from the belt 34 or from an independent source of power. 7

Now in Figure 12 a modified form of en porting roller 106 is shown in which t e conveyor belt 107 extends the full width of the roller and substantially the full width of the frame, the channel rails of which are indicated at 108 and 109 and these rails assist to guide the coal on to the belt 107 which assumes a curved shape transversely with its lower part in the middle and its ends highest whereby to guide the coal on to the belt and avoid its possible spilling over the sides. To efiect this result the supporting roller 106 isof substantially elliptical form and being of less diameter in the middle and gradually increasing toward both ends thereof.

Referring more particularly to Figures 13, 14 and 15, there is here shown an arrangement of reciprocating saw frames 110 at the front of the machine which may take the place of the saw frame heretofore described. In this particular instance the saws 111 are arranged vertically instead of horizontally and the frame 110 is made to undergo a vertical reciprocating movement. In this instance the same eccentrics 46 and 47 ar employed and they operate upon the upper and lower surfaces of recesses 112 and 113 made in the sides of the frame. In this instance the front posts 7 of the ma chine receive the guide rollers 114 and 115 carried by the frame and engaging respectively the side and front faces of the posts. The frame is held to the post by the use of clips 116 which permits the frame to freely move in a vertical direction. This vertically reciprocating saw frame may be used with or without rotating cutter heads and the saws will cut out the coal in relative- 1y thin vertical strips which can be broken off easily and removed by the conveyor or any other means from the mine. In case the saw frame is used without rotating cutter heads, it will be understood that cuts will have to be made initially at the head short of each other and are provided with bevel pinions 121 and 122 which are in continuous mesh with opposite sides of the same bevel gear 123. These gears 123 are mount ed loosely upon cutter shafts 12 and 13 and with the gears are provided clutch collars 124'cooperating with sliding clutch collars 125 which are keyed to the shafts and are moved into and out of engagement with the clutch collars 124 by the use of levers or other suitable mechanism 126.

The slot cutters are preferably composed of chains having teeth thereon and these chains are pivoted about the shafts 119 and 120 and are adapted to swing out to the dotted line position shown in Figure 17 in order to cut slots in the side Walls of the mine as the machine progresses. The slot cutters normally occupy a folded position against the sides of the frame as shown in full lines in Figure 17 and are adapted to be gradually swun out by hand or automatic mechanism. fine manner of doing this consists in the use of ratchet wheels 127 secured to the frames of the slot cutters and engage by escapements 128 which receive movement from levers 129 mounted upon the frame work. When the slot cutters are to be put in movement the clutch is engaged so that the shafts 119 and 120 are driven and the slot cutters are gradually fed outward.

Beferrin somewhat in which a'central slot cutter is used at the base of the machine between the two rotary cutter heads. In Figure 18 the path of these cutter heads is indicated in broken lines which shows the substantially triangular space unaffected by the operation of the rotary cutters. At the base of this triangular space is provided the frame 130 which is secured to the machine in any appropriate manner and which carries a chain 131 provided with a number of teeth 132 projecting beyond the frame for the purpose of cutting into the coal vein. The frame may be of any shape desired and 'a preferred form is shown in Figure 20 in which to Figures 18, 19 and 20, a

iiferent form of machine is used the frame is substantiall rectangular having a triangular rear en and containing a number of sprocket wheels 133 over which the chain 131 moves. One of the. sprocket wheels is connected to a shaft 134 which extends upwardly to a suitable point as shown in Figures 18 and 19 and as provided at its upper end with a bevel pinion 135, which is driven by suitable gearing from one of the cutter shafts for instance by the arrangement of gearing indicated in dotted lines. The frame 130 is provided with a number of rollers 136, and with advantage four such rollers are provided through which the conveyor belt 137 is wound as indicated in Figure 19, the lower run of the belt being mounted over and under consecutive rollers. The forward end of the conveyor belt is thus brought directly beneath the ledge produced by the slot cutter and the coal is received directly upon the conveyor. It is noted that the conveyor belt is also by this means brought very close to the rotary cutter heads.

Coming now to Figures 21, 22 and 23, it

is herein proposed to provide a means ofsucking the coal dust and gases evolved in the mine throu h a suitable piping system or to ump fluid through this piping system to t e working faces of the cutters and in carrying out this idea I prefer to make use of a hollow shaft 138 which carries the cutter head 139, the shaft 138 being driven by the electric motor or otherwise. The shaft 138 is supported in a hollow bearing 140 provided with an annular channel 141 placed in communication with the interior of the shaft 138 through one or more perforations 143 in said shaft. The pipe 143 is coupled to the hollow bearing 140 and communicates with the annular channel 141. The pipe is adapted to convey off the gases and coal-dust or is placed in communication with a source of fluid supply and a pump may be used if desired to force the fluid through the pipe 143, or a fan or other suction device may be provided to create a partial vacuum in the piping system. The front end of the hollow shaft 138 is provided with pipe branches 144 extending to either side and placing the interior of the hollow shaft in communication with conduits 145 and 146 which extend along the side edges of the cutter heads 139. From these conduits lead tubes 147 and 148 which ar: disposed at the ends of the cutter blades 149, the open ends of the tubes terminating just short of the outer cutting edges of the blades where they are in position to receive the coal dust and gases generated during the actual cutting operations.

Here these tubes are also well located to direct streams of fluid upon the coal vein and to wash down the cuttings.

In Figure 24 a modified form of cutter head 150 is shown in which the bar of metal or other material of which the cutter head is made is twisted in reversely curved directions from the center 151 so that the entire stance the cutter blades 152are circumferentially shaped or curved to corres ond with the curvature given the cutter ead and corresponding further to their positions on the cutter head and their relative location from the center 151.

The purpose of this shape is to throw the various cutter blades 152 in offset relation as respects radii of the cutter head as this is particularly desirable where strata of dirt are encountered in coal mining operations. The S shape causes only one of the cutter headsto pass through the stratum of dirt at a time and the drag is preserved by the remainder of the cutter blades on thisside. of the cutter head so as. to balanceand oppose the action of the cutter blades on the opposite side of the head which are passing through the coal bed.

With reference to Fi ures 25, 26 and 27, the cutter head 153 in t is instance is in the form of a hollow bar in which pairs of tubes 154 and 155 are mounted side by side and held in place as by the set screws 156 or other appropriate devices. The tubes- 155 carry strands 157 of wire or other appro-. priate material and wire cable is found excellent for this purpose as the extremities thereof form numerous sharp points adapted to bite into the coal. are left open for the purpose of supplying fluid to the surface of the coal beside the cutting strands 157 or for conveying out the coal dust and gases and for this purpose the v inner ends of the tubes 154 are slotted as The other tubes 154,

indicated at 158, the slots being in c0mmunication with the interior of the hollow bar 153, and this bar is in turn in communication with a source of fluid supply or a source of suction.

Coming now to Figures 28 and 29 a cutter head is shown at 159 and the blades at 160 and additionally I propose to provide upon one edge, preferably the trailing edge of the cutter bar 159, an upwardly projecting cutter bit 161 which is preferably embedded in the cutter head or removably fitted in a socket provided therein and held as by a screw 1.62. The edge of the bit extends outwardly beyond the edge of the cutter head to come in contact with the outer walls of the groove cut in the coal by the outer most cutter blade 160. This in fact acts as a reamer to enlarge the diameter of the outer circle cut in the coal and thereby providing more room for breaking the rings of coal.

In Figures 30 and 31 the cutter head is indicated at 163, the cutter blades at 164 and the scoops or shovels at the back of the cutter blades generally at 165. These buckets or shovels are provided with the openings 166 in the rear walls 167 and the bottom wall is sloping as indicated at 168 to direct the coal to the outlet 166 on the elevation of the bucket. The base 169 is secured against the rear face of the cutter head 163 by approriate means and this base carries an adustable end wall 170. The wall 170 is preferably adjustable by the use ofa hinged connection 171 with the end of the base 169 and for purposes of efi'ecting the adjustment and securing the gate or wall 170 in position under adjustment, a bolt 172 is used, said bolt having a hook 173 to engage over the outer edge of said gate and the bolt extendmg through an arcuate slot 174 made in the bottomwall. The bolt is adjusted by means of a nut 175 which is tightened to hold the gate in the adjusted position; This gate may be adjusted through a wide range as indicated in Figure 30 and controls the delivery of the coal to the conveyor 'so as to avoid the simultaneous dumping of too greatr a quantity of coal upon the conveyor such as would spill over the sides of the same and in general these devices provide for delivery of the coal in an even and uniform stream to the chute and to the conveyor.

As a modification of this idea the cutter heads 176 shown in Figures 32 and 33 are provided with scrapers 177 which are blades extending rearwardly from the cutting bars and having a sufficiently extensive radial area in order to sweep the coal'after the manner of a broom upon the conveyor when the construction shown in Figures 18, 19

and is employed. These scraper blades are attached to the cutter heads in any suitable manner as for instance by a flange.

In Figure 34 is shown the cone which is carried upon each of the cutter heads at a central point. It will be noted that this cone has a uniform frusto-conical wall and is provided with a bore 178 to take the cutter shaft. An opening 179 may be provided in the side of the cone to take a pin for securing the cone to the shaft or the other appropriate part.

Figures and 36 show a modification of this cone in which a cylindrical sleeve 180 is secured upon the shaft as by a pin or other connection and this sleeve carries the wedge shaped conical portions 181 and 182 diametrically opposite and between these portions are left spaces. In this case the action Will be freer and it may be more desirable in certain circumstances and in certain characters of coal beds to use the interrupted cone rather than the full cone shown in Figure 34.

In Figures 37 and 38 the breaking disc indicated at 183 is carried in arms 184 projecting from a plate 185. The plate is pro vided with slots 186 for adjustment, screws- 187 passin through the slots and into the cutter hea ndicated at 188. By loosening the screws 186, the breaker disc may be shifted back and forth to a desired osition.

In Flgure 39 I have illustrated ow the machine may be provided in which three cutter heads 189, 190 and 191 may be used, each having its own circle of operation and provided with members of cuttmg blades as heretofore described. The end cutter heads 189 and 191 may be mounted upon the cutter shafts and the central cutter head 190 driven by a belt 192 or other mechanical arrangement from one of such cutter shafts. The machine may be made up of one or more of such cutter heads as will be obvious.

Referring to Fi ures 40 and 41, the cross bar 82 to which tie hydraulic cylinder 79 and the cutter shafts 12 and 13 are connected is provided with races to receive ball bearings 193 which takeagainst the ends of the shafts and act to reduce the thrust and to enable the shafts to turn freel although pushed axially'by the strong hyd i'aulic pressure.

In Figures 42 and 43 is indicated the electric motor 14 preferably having a tubular armature shaft 194 and slidable through this armature shaft is the Worm shaft 15, keys 195 being provided to couple these two members in driving relation but allowing the shaft 15 to be adjusted through the sleeve 194. This is for the purpose of compensat mg for wear. in the gearing and to permit the shaft 15'to adjust itself toirregularities in the gearing Without causing any movement of the armatureor parts of the motor.

It will be understood that the machine and r the method of breaking out a core in small pieces may be applied to other uses than 1 mining coal, and the improved belt conveyor, wedging devices combined with the hydraulic ramand other parts of the machine may be used separately or'in other machines.

The wire end cutters will find a wide use 110 not only in coal mining but also in ordinary drilling in earth, rock and other material. These wires as shown in Figs. 25, 26 and 27 are encased in tubes 155 which are preferably castings of soft metal possessing suifi- 115 cientrigidity to sustain the wires in the cutting operation but adapted to wear down to constantly'expose the ends of the wires for the cutting of the material.

The machine might be mounted on plates 120 or shoes instead of wheels particularly where the floor was wet, muddy or slippery. The machine might be moved back and forth on wheels or plates or shoes without the use of jacks against the coal roof, floor or sides.

I do not desire to be limited to driving the conveyor, hydraulic pump and other devices on the machine from'the one motor, as it may be best touse separate motor or motors.

There is one feature connected with my

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Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2548952A (en) * 1948-08-27 1951-04-17 Crossland Alfred Coal mining and conveying machine
US2550202A (en) * 1948-08-14 1951-04-24 James S Robbins Rock cutting apparatus
US2606010A (en) * 1945-10-29 1952-08-05 Consolidation Coal Co Mechanized production of solid fuel
US2669441A (en) * 1950-01-04 1954-02-16 Alder F Castanoli Coal boring unit
US2694562A (en) * 1948-03-02 1954-11-16 Colmol Company Apparatus for continuously digging coal
US2694563A (en) * 1950-05-24 1954-11-16 Dallas P Graham Rotary mining machine head and cutter carried thereby movable in elliptical paths
US2705624A (en) * 1952-01-04 1955-04-05 Goodman Mfg Co Coal mining machine with collapsible head
US2707626A (en) * 1953-08-26 1955-05-03 Goodman Mfg Co Adjustable boring head for continuous mining machine
US2711887A (en) * 1953-10-13 1955-06-28 Goodman Mfg Co Retractable boring arm assembly for mining machine
US2730345A (en) * 1952-12-17 1956-01-10 Goodman Mfg Co Mining machine with radially adjustable boring arm
US2733057A (en) * 1956-01-31 Continuous mining machine having
US2734731A (en) * 1956-02-14 Mining machine
US2734732A (en) * 1956-02-14 tracy
US2743092A (en) * 1951-10-25 1956-04-24 Funk Harry Calvin Apparatus for the continuous underground mining of coal
US2749104A (en) * 1952-01-26 1956-06-05 Joy Mfg Co Auger drill head
US2750175A (en) * 1954-10-07 1956-06-12 Goodman Mfg Co Boring type continuous mining machine
US2750176A (en) * 1954-05-21 1956-06-12 Goodman Mfg Co Collapsible boring head for mining machines
US2753167A (en) * 1954-05-10 1956-07-03 Goodman Mfg Co Boring type mining head having wedge means
US2766977A (en) * 1954-12-08 1956-10-16 Goodman Mfg Co Rotary cutter head for boring type continuous mining machine
US2776123A (en) * 1952-10-23 1957-01-01 Colmol Company Boring type mining head having eccentric wedge
US2777681A (en) * 1951-09-15 1957-01-15 Joy Mfg Co Mining and loading machine with upper and lower relatively movable disintegrating head portions
US2783038A (en) * 1954-09-29 1957-02-26 Goodman Mfg Co Oscillating burster cone assembly for boring type miner head
US2783037A (en) * 1954-09-27 1957-02-26 Goodman Mfg Co Variable height boring type continuous mining machine
US2799488A (en) * 1955-05-12 1957-07-16 Ambrose H Mandt Method of and apparatus for the continuous mining of mineral material by combined drilling, undercutting and shooting operations
US2801093A (en) * 1947-02-01 1957-07-30 Joy Mfg Co Method of and apparatus for mining by slot cutting and dislodging
US2834588A (en) * 1956-02-24 1958-05-13 Goodman Mfg Co Boring type mining machine having four boring heads
US2836407A (en) * 1953-09-24 1958-05-27 Nat Mine Service Co Continuous mining machine of the boring type having adjustable cutter chains
US2862700A (en) * 1957-04-10 1958-12-02 Goodman Mfg Co Boring type miner
US2868527A (en) * 1951-05-23 1959-01-13 Bituminous Coal Research Continuous mining machine
US2868526A (en) * 1951-05-22 1959-01-13 Bituminous Coal Research Mining equipment having cutting rotors adaptable to varying conditions
US2877999A (en) * 1949-09-08 1959-03-17 Colmol Company Continuous mining machine with vertically separable cutter carrying units
US2878001A (en) * 1949-09-08 1959-03-17 Colmol Company Vertically and laterally expansible continuous mining machine
US2939690A (en) * 1955-06-16 1960-06-07 Consolidation Coal Co Rotary cutting head having core burster means
US3010708A (en) * 1960-04-11 1961-11-28 Goodman Mfg Co Rotary mining head and core breaker therefor
US3050293A (en) * 1960-05-12 1962-08-21 Goodman Mfg Co Rotary mining head and core breaker therefor
US3050292A (en) * 1960-04-11 1962-08-21 Goodman Mfg Co Core breaker roller for rotary mining head

Cited By (36)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2734732A (en) * 1956-02-14 tracy
US2734731A (en) * 1956-02-14 Mining machine
US2733057A (en) * 1956-01-31 Continuous mining machine having
US2606010A (en) * 1945-10-29 1952-08-05 Consolidation Coal Co Mechanized production of solid fuel
US2801093A (en) * 1947-02-01 1957-07-30 Joy Mfg Co Method of and apparatus for mining by slot cutting and dislodging
US2694562A (en) * 1948-03-02 1954-11-16 Colmol Company Apparatus for continuously digging coal
US2550202A (en) * 1948-08-14 1951-04-24 James S Robbins Rock cutting apparatus
US2548952A (en) * 1948-08-27 1951-04-17 Crossland Alfred Coal mining and conveying machine
US2877999A (en) * 1949-09-08 1959-03-17 Colmol Company Continuous mining machine with vertically separable cutter carrying units
US2878001A (en) * 1949-09-08 1959-03-17 Colmol Company Vertically and laterally expansible continuous mining machine
US2669441A (en) * 1950-01-04 1954-02-16 Alder F Castanoli Coal boring unit
US2694563A (en) * 1950-05-24 1954-11-16 Dallas P Graham Rotary mining machine head and cutter carried thereby movable in elliptical paths
US2868526A (en) * 1951-05-22 1959-01-13 Bituminous Coal Research Mining equipment having cutting rotors adaptable to varying conditions
US2868527A (en) * 1951-05-23 1959-01-13 Bituminous Coal Research Continuous mining machine
US2777681A (en) * 1951-09-15 1957-01-15 Joy Mfg Co Mining and loading machine with upper and lower relatively movable disintegrating head portions
US2743092A (en) * 1951-10-25 1956-04-24 Funk Harry Calvin Apparatus for the continuous underground mining of coal
US2705624A (en) * 1952-01-04 1955-04-05 Goodman Mfg Co Coal mining machine with collapsible head
US2749104A (en) * 1952-01-26 1956-06-05 Joy Mfg Co Auger drill head
US2776123A (en) * 1952-10-23 1957-01-01 Colmol Company Boring type mining head having eccentric wedge
US2730345A (en) * 1952-12-17 1956-01-10 Goodman Mfg Co Mining machine with radially adjustable boring arm
US2707626A (en) * 1953-08-26 1955-05-03 Goodman Mfg Co Adjustable boring head for continuous mining machine
US2836407A (en) * 1953-09-24 1958-05-27 Nat Mine Service Co Continuous mining machine of the boring type having adjustable cutter chains
US2711887A (en) * 1953-10-13 1955-06-28 Goodman Mfg Co Retractable boring arm assembly for mining machine
US2753167A (en) * 1954-05-10 1956-07-03 Goodman Mfg Co Boring type mining head having wedge means
US2750176A (en) * 1954-05-21 1956-06-12 Goodman Mfg Co Collapsible boring head for mining machines
US2783037A (en) * 1954-09-27 1957-02-26 Goodman Mfg Co Variable height boring type continuous mining machine
US2783038A (en) * 1954-09-29 1957-02-26 Goodman Mfg Co Oscillating burster cone assembly for boring type miner head
US2750175A (en) * 1954-10-07 1956-06-12 Goodman Mfg Co Boring type continuous mining machine
US2766977A (en) * 1954-12-08 1956-10-16 Goodman Mfg Co Rotary cutter head for boring type continuous mining machine
US2799488A (en) * 1955-05-12 1957-07-16 Ambrose H Mandt Method of and apparatus for the continuous mining of mineral material by combined drilling, undercutting and shooting operations
US2939690A (en) * 1955-06-16 1960-06-07 Consolidation Coal Co Rotary cutting head having core burster means
US2834588A (en) * 1956-02-24 1958-05-13 Goodman Mfg Co Boring type mining machine having four boring heads
US2862700A (en) * 1957-04-10 1958-12-02 Goodman Mfg Co Boring type miner
US3010708A (en) * 1960-04-11 1961-11-28 Goodman Mfg Co Rotary mining head and core breaker therefor
US3050292A (en) * 1960-04-11 1962-08-21 Goodman Mfg Co Core breaker roller for rotary mining head
US3050293A (en) * 1960-05-12 1962-08-21 Goodman Mfg Co Rotary mining head and core breaker therefor

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