US1601836A - Forming machine - Google Patents

Forming machine Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1601836A
US1601836A US676570A US67657023A US1601836A US 1601836 A US1601836 A US 1601836A US 676570 A US676570 A US 676570A US 67657023 A US67657023 A US 67657023A US 1601836 A US1601836 A US 1601836A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
mold
station
neck
blank
molds
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
US676570A
Inventor
Stenhouse Thomas
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
HAZEL ATLAS GLASS CO
HAZEL-ATLAS GLASS Co
Original Assignee
HAZEL ATLAS GLASS CO
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by HAZEL ATLAS GLASS CO filed Critical HAZEL ATLAS GLASS CO
Priority to US676570A priority Critical patent/US1601836A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1601836A publication Critical patent/US1601836A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • CCHEMISTRY; METALLURGY
    • C03GLASS; MINERAL OR SLAG WOOL
    • C03BMANUFACTURE, SHAPING, OR SUPPLEMENTARY PROCESSES
    • C03B9/00Blowing glass; Production of hollow glass articles
    • C03B9/13Blowing glass; Production of hollow glass articles in gob feeder machines
    • C03B9/193Blowing glass; Production of hollow glass articles in gob feeder machines in "press-and-blow" machines
    • C03B9/195Rotary-table machines

Description

Oct. 5 1926. 1,601,836
T. STENHOUSE FORMING MACHINE Filed Nov. 23, 1923 11 Sheets-Sheet 1 gwuemkozz THOMAS 5TENH0U5E Oct. 5 1926.
T. STENHOUSE FORMING MACHINE 11 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed Nov. 23, 1923 Wm: THOMAS 5TENH0U5E I me m Oct. 5 1926. 1,601,836
T. STENHOUSE FORMING MACHINE Filed Nov. 23, 1923 ll Sheets-Sheet 4 i1 1 JMZzb/zfi.
THOMAS STENHDUSE alhwnn s Oct. 5 1926. 1,601,836
"r. STENHOUSE FORMING MACHINE Filed Nov. 23, 1923 11 Sheets-Sheet 5 THOMAS STENHwsE mfW who (4 5. I
T. STENHOUSE FORMING MACHINE Oct. 5, 192.6. 1,601,836
Filed Nov. 23, 1923 ll $heets-Sheet 6 Whoa: HOMAS STENHDUSE awe vamp.
(Yet. 5 1926.
imam Z1 1,601,836 T. STENHOUSE FORMING MACHl NE Filed Nov. 25, 1923 ll Sheets-Sheet '7 Whoa,- THomAs STENHDUSE Oct. 5 1926.
T. STENHOUSE FORMING MACHINE Filed Nov. 23, 1923 11 Sheets-Sheet 8 THOMAS STENHQUSE I Mv W Oct. 5 1926. 1,601,836
T. STENHOUSE FORMING MACHINE Filed Nov. 23, 1923 ll Sheets-Sheet 9 J wow I Tom;
THOMAS STENHOUSE Mam Oct. 5 1926. 1,601,836
T. STENHOUSE FORMING MACHINE Filed Nov. 23, 1923 11 Sheets-Sheet ll gav (2 THOMAS TENH0U5E Patented Oct. 5, 1926.
UNITED STATES PATENT OFF-ICE.
THOMAS STENHOUSE, OF WASHINGTON, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR T0 HAZEL-ATLAS GLASS 00., 0F WHEELING, WEST VIRGINIA, A CORIPOBATION O IE WEST VIRGINIA. v
FORMING MACHINE.
Application filed November 23, 1923. Serial No. 676,570.
The invention relates to machines for the manufacture of jugs, jars and similar articles, and particularly to a machine in which the glass charges are fed to blank molds of greater cross-sectional area than that of the neck mold, and in which the automatic positioning of the neck mold having restricted area is subsequent to the delivery of the charge to the blank mold, and prior to the pressing operation whereby the article is partly formed.
The invention involves various novel features, advantages in construction, and methods of operation, and all such improvements will be apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed description when taken in connection with the accompany drawings, in which:
Figure l is a plan view of the complete apparatus.
Figure 2 is a more or less diagrammatic view to show the position of the various molds at different stations, and to show the two cam tracks and the operating connections between the cams and the molds.
Figure 3 is a vertical sectional view of the apparatus; the section being taken through the diametrically opposed stations B and G; that is, through the pressing station and the delivery station. The lower portion of the apparatus is shown in elevation,
Figure 4 is a vertical sectional view through station B, or the pressing station, but on a larger scale than Figure 3.
Figure 5 is a vertical sgctional view through station C, or the coolingstation.
Figure 6 is a vertical sectional view through station D, or the first blowing station.
Figure 7 is a vertical sectional view through station E, or the second blowing station.
Figure 8 is a-detail viewof the blank mold charged with glass, as at station A, or
' the charging station.
F1gure 9 is a detail view of the blank mold at station B, or the pressing station; the plunger having been inserted and the glass forced into the neck and handle.
Figure 10 is a detail view of the molds at station C,or the cooling station; the blank mold having been withdrawn, leaving the glass blank. suspended from the neck mold, and the air cooling means inserted in the interior of the blank.
Figure 11 is a detail view of the molds at station D, or the first blowing station, and showing the first blowhead positioned on the neck mold.
Figure 12 is a detail view of the molds at station E, or the second blowing station, and showing the neck mold open and the second blowhead positioned on the body mold.
Figure 13 is a detail view of the molds at station F; both molds being open and the article resting on the mold bottom.
Figure 14 is a detail view of the molds at station G, or the delivery station; both molds being open, and the mold bottom having been withdrawn, carrying the article with it ready to be picked up and delivered to a conveyer by the transfer device.
Figure 15 is a detail view, showing the means by which the blank mold is mounted for vertical reciprocatory movement. Figure 16 is a detail view of the cams and associated parts, and showing the means for maintaining the cam-operated slides in radial vertical alignment and for causing the upper and lower slide plates to rotate together and with the mold table.
Figure 17 is a vertical 'sectional view of the first blowhead and the mechanism by which it is operated.
Figure 18 is a sectional detail view of the second blowhead disconnected from its operating mechanism.
Figure l9- is a plan view of one of the clamps for securing the molds in closed potable 2 carrying a series of molds; ten molds being illustrated in the present instance; though, of course, the number may be varied as desired.
The column 1 1s hollow, as shown in Figure 3, and an air supply pipe may be connected to the flange 3, or the air may be introduced through the bottom of the column; the purpose being to maintain a reservoir of air in the column for cooling the molds. The column has ports 4 therein for the purpose of providing communication between the interior of the column and the interior of the casting 5, as shown in Figure 7.
The air may be supplied from the casting 5 to the blank molds in any desired manner. The construction shown herein consists of a conduit 180 having a nozzle 181 provided with suitable apertures, and being curved to deflect the cooling air against the molds. An ordinary sliding damper 182 is mounted in the conduit for controlling the volume of air supplied, and for shutting the supply off entirely when desired.
The means for mounting the mold-carrying table and for rotating it step by step will first be described.
The casting 5 is recessed to receive a ballbearing race 6, and the lower side of the mold-carrying table 2- is recessed to receive a cooperating race 7, thus providing a ballbearing mountin for the table.
The table is g1ven an intermittent rotary movement by means of a Geneva stop construction, and for this purpose the table is provided with a series of alternate slots and curved recesses, as indicated bynumerals 8 and 9, respectively (Figure l). A Geneva wheel 10 carries a roller 11, and when this roller enters the slots 8 the table is driven, and when the roller passes out of one of the slots the adjacent curved recess 9 is engaged by the peripheral portion 12 of the Geneva wheel, thereby locking the table against rotation. Referring particularlyto Figure 6, the Geneva wheel is fixed to a vertical shaft 13 which is mounted in bearings 14, 15 and 16. Loosely mounted on the shaft 13 is a worm wheel 17; the worm wheel being caused to rotate with the shaft by means of a friction clutch comprising a friction wheel '18 keyed to the shaft, friction blocks 19, a disc 20, and
bolts 21 for adjusting the position of the disc. Obviously, by setting up on the bolts 21 the blocks carried by the friction wheel will be caused to frictionally engage the worm wheel so that the worm wheel and shaft will rotate together. This construction provides a safety device, in that if some accidental disarrangement or obstruction occurs tending to prevent the rotation of the table, the friction clutch will slip, thereby preventing the further damage which would follow if there was a positive connection between the worm wheel and the shaft 13. A motor 22, preferably of the variable speed type, drives a pinion 23 which meshes with a gear 24 fixed to a shaft 25, and this shaft carries a worm 26 meshing with the worm wheel 17.
It is thus seen that the mold-carrying table is given a rotary step-by-step movement through the medium of the Geneva stop construction and that the driving mechanism for the Geneva wheel includes a safety de vice in theform of a friction clutch to prevent damage to the apparatus when some unusual load is thrown on the driving mechanism because of an accidental obstruction to the moving parts.
The shaft 13 for driving the mold table functions also as the means for rotating the cams controlling the operation of the various valves commonly employed in machines of this character. For this purpose a gear 27 is fixed to the shaft 13 and meshes with an intermediate gear 28 carried by a bracket 29 mounted on a pair of standards 30, 30; the standards also assisting in the support of a plate 31 carrying the various air valves. The intermediate gear 28 meshes with a gear 32 which is fixed to a shaft 33, and this shaft, as shown in Figure 6, carries cams 34 for operating the air valves 35. The cams and the means for operating the valves may be of any well known construction, and as they form no part of the present invention it is believed to be unnecessary to illustrate in detail this part ofthe apparatus. However, the preferred construction is illustrated in a general way in Fi re 6, and by reference to that figure it Wlll be seen that a lever 36 is operatively connected at one end with the air valve 35 and that the opposite end of the lever is forked and carries rollers 37 which are alternately engaged by the cams 34, 34. The forked construction of the lever is clearly shown in Figure 1. Of course, there are a number of these valves not shown, and the connections from the valves to the various cylinders are also not shown, as the arrangement may be such as is desired and involves no invention.
The rotary table 2 carries a series of molds, and these molds are carried step by step from the charging station, where the gob of glass is delivered to the blank mold, to the station where the finishedarticles are delivered from the molds and automatically transferred to a conveyer. Each complete mold consists of a blank mold H, a neck mold I, a body or blow mold J, and a mold bottom K.
The means for mounting the body mold, neckmold, and mold bottom on the table, the means for opening and closin the body and neck molds, and the means or sliding the mold bottom into and out of operative struction the neck and body molds are held in proper vertical alignment with the blank mold H. Both the neck mold and body mold are formed as usual in two sections, and the sections are hingedly mounted on the hinge rod 40, as clearly shown in Figure 4.
In the operation of the machine the neckmold and body mold are both open at some stations; both are closed at other stations; the neck mold is closed and the body mold open at another station; and at still another employed, and for an understanding of the cam structure and the connections between the mold sections and the cams reference Is to be had particularly to Figures 2 and 4.
' Two stationary cams 42, 42 are mounted' on the column 1; and the cams are provided on their lower faces with cam tracks 43 and 44, numerals referring respectively to the upper and lower cam tracks. Except for the contour of the cam tracks, the up per and lower cams and associated elements for operating the mold sections are identical in construction, and a description of one of them will be sufiicient. Cam slide, plates 45 are mounted for rotary movement on the column 1, and these plates are caused to rotate together and with the mold table in a manner to be hereinafter described. Cam slides 46 are mounted for reciprocatory movement on the slide plates, and these cam slides carry rollers 47 engaged in the cam tracks 43 and 44, by which arrangement the slides are moved inwardly and outwardly in accordance with the contour of the cam tracks. A yoke 48 is provided for each neck mold and for each body mold, and these yokes are operatively connected with the neck and body molds respectively by means of links 49 pivotally attached to the yokes and to lugs on the neck and body molds, as clearly indicated in Figure 2. Each yoke has an integral rod 50 slidably mounted in the cam slides 46, and the yoke and rod are normally heldin their forward position, with respect to the slide, by means of a coil spring 51 mounted on the rod within the slide. The operation will be obvious. As the slides move forward, due to the engagement of the rollers in the cam track, the rod and yoke will be carried forward with them and the link connections with the molds will cause the latter to be closed. The resilient mounting of the yoke in the slides provides a safety device, for it is apparent that if some unusual obstruction prevents the closing of the molds no breakage of parts will occur, for the slide will merely move forward against the pressure of the spring, while the yoke and rod remain stationary.
The cam tracks 43 and 44 are of irregular contour; the contour being so designed that the neck and body mold sections will be opened, closed, or remain unchanged, in accordance with the requirements of the machine, as the molds are moved from station to station. As hereinbefore stated,
both molds are open at some stations, and,
both are closed at other stations, and consequently the upper and lower cam tracks coincide at such stations, as clearly shown in Figure 2. On the other hand, the neck mold is closed andthe body mold open at one station, and the neck mold open and the body mold closed at another station; and, of course, at these stations the cam tracks are out of coincidence, which is also clearly shown in Figure 2. The opening or'closing of the molds as they travel from station to station, and their open or closed position at each station, will be fully'described hereinafter.
As previously stated herein, the upper and lower cam slide plates 45 are caused to rotate together and with the mold table,
and for a clear disclosure of thesimple means by which this is accomplished reference is to be had to Figure 16. Rods 52 are mounted in the mold table 2, and these rods are engaged in notches provided in the upper and lower cam slide plates, thus imparting to both plates the same rotary movement as that of the mold table. It will be understood, of course, that the rods 52 are so spaced as not to interfere with the inward and outward movement of the cam slides 46 and yokes' 48.
For a disclosure of the means for moving the mold bottom K into and out of operative position, reference is to be had to Figures 1, 3 and 4. The mold bottom is mounted on a slide 53 adapted to reciprocate in the guide plate 38 secured to the mold table. The slide carries a roller 54 which is adapted to engage an irregular stationary cam track 55- during a portion of the travel of the mold table. An inspection of Figure 1 will show that the track 55 is so designed as to draw the slide 53 and mold bottom K outwardly to the full extent as the table travels from station F to station G. From station G to station B the contour of the cam track is concentric with the center of the mold table, and hence the mold is retained in its withdrawn position until it reaches station B,.at whichpreferably operated by fluid pressure, being automatically controlled by one of the valves 35 hereinbefore referred to. At the proper instant, and after the blank mold has been lowered to its inoperative position, the cylinder and plunger function to push the mold bottom into its operative position in alignment with the center of the mold. The mold bottom remains in this position until it again reaches station F, at which point the roller engages the track 55, and
as the table moves to station G the mold is drawn outwardly to inoperative position.
The blank mold H and the means for operating same will now be described, reference being had particularly to Figures 3, 4, 6, 15 and 21. Before describing the details of construction it may be well to state generally the operation of the blank mold. The mold is mounted for vertical sliding movement, and as the mold approaches the charging station, i. e., station A, it is elevated by an inclined track into position to receive the glass gob; both the neck mold and body mold being open. Particular attention is called to the fact that the neck mold and body mold are open at the charging station, as this is one of the very material features of the invention, in that it makes it possible to drop a larger gob of glass than would be possible if the neckmold were closed. In the former practice the neck mold was usually closed during the charging operation, and, while such practice is satisfactory for wide mouthed ware, it is obviously not practicable for narrow necked ware, for it is impossible to feed a gob of sufficient size through the restricted neck mold. However, in accordance with the present invention, the neck mold is open during the charging operation, and hence the .gob is not limited as to size, and the machine is thus adaptable to the manufacture of a wide field of articles, ranging from very narrow necked ware to large mouthed ware. After receiving the gob the mold is moved'to vard the next station, remaining in its elevated position, and during this movement the neck mold is closed. Just before reaching station E, and after the neck mold is closed, the blank mold is given a sharp rise, causin it to interlock with the neck mold. fter the pressin plunger has descended to cause the initial displacement of the glass, the blank mold is lowered to its inoperative position, where it remains until it again approaches the charging station.
By reference to Figures 4 and 9 it will be seen that a valve 183 is mounted in the bottom of the blank mold, and this valve has a slight vertical movement limited by the pin 184. The purpose of this construction is, of course, to admit air into the bottom of the mold when it is lowered from the blank. The stem 58 also projects into the blank mold and is detachably connected thereto by a cotter pin 185. Referring now to Figure 15, it will be seen that the stem 58 of the blank mold H is mounted in a carrier 59; the latter being slidably mounted on a pair of parallel standards 60, 60 fixed to the mold table and of such length as to permit the blank mold to descend below the table. In Figure 15 the mold is shown in dotted lines in its lowered position, and in full lines in its elevated position. The carrier 59 is provided on one side with a roller 61 which is adapted to engage a track 62 extending part way around the machine; the track being clearly shown in elevation in Figure 3, and a developed view of the track being illustrated in Figure 21. Assuming the mold to be in its lowermost position and carried by the standards 60; then when the table has rotated to a certain position the roller 61 will engage the track 62, and upon further rotation of the table the roller will ride up the inclined portion of the track, thus elevating the blank mold until it reaches the horizontal portion of the track, indicated by numeral 63; and it is in this elevated osition that the mold reaches the station where the glass charge is delivered. Upon further travel of the table and mold, and just as the mold reaches station B, or the pressing station, the roller 61 engages the sharp rise 64 in the track 62, and this elevates the mold still farther and causes the flange 65 at the top of the mold to engage in a recess 66 in the bottom of the neck mold, thereby 1nterlocking the blank mold and neck mold, as clearly shown in Figure 4. The construction might be modified, as illustrated in Figure 9, wherein the flange 65 engages about a depending collar 67 formed on the bottom of the neck mold.
Just after the blank mold has been given the final elevation to interlock it with the neck mold, the roller 61 passes off of the track and onto a vertically movable carria e 68 (Figure 4). The carriage 68 is carried y the piston rod 69 of a cylinder 70, to which cylinder fluid pressure is automatically admitted and exhausted at the proper time by the operation of one of the valves 35. Another fluid pressure cylinder, indicated by numeral 71, is mounted on an anvil 72. The piston rod 73 of this cylinder operates a suitably mounted arm or block 74, and the cylinder is operated in timed relation by one of the valves 35 so that the armor block 74 is pushed forward under the stem 58 of the blank mold just after the roller passes onto the carriage 68; and this arm or block relieves the carriage of the pressure exerted by the plunger as it descends at this station. The opposite end of the piston rod 7 3 ex- Ill . in the present construction the size of the tends through the rear end of the cylinder 71 and has nut locks 186 mounted thereon, whereby the limit of stroke of the piston is varied. This variation in the limit of lowered. By the operation of cylinder 7Ov the carriage and mold are lowered to a position beneath the table, leaving the glass blank supported by the neck mold.
It is to be noted that the body mold, is
open when the blank mold is in operative position with the neck mold, and thus the present construction differs radically from the well known telescoping blank molds. This feature is of importance, for obviously blank mold is not limited by the interior dimensions of the body mold, and thus the present machine is adapted to make articles of a larger variety of sizes than is possible with a machine employing the telescoping blank molds. As previously stated herein, the neck mold is open at the charging station, so that the size of the glass gob is not limited by the restricted opening in the neck mold, and this feature is of material importance. as will appear hereinafter.
It is believed that the construction and operation of the various molds will be clearly understood from the foregoing description. Theoperation of the entire machine will now be described, and during the course of this description the apparatus employed at each station will be described in detail.
The operations commence at station A, the charging station. The blank mold H has been elevated to charging position by the inclined track 62, and both the neck mold and body mold are open. The molten glass flows in a stream from a flow spout, is sheared b any well known means, as, for instance, y the shearing mechanism illustrated in my pending application No. 403,- 068, filed August 12, 1920, and the severed gob drops between the open molds into the blank mold H.
The arrangement of the parts at station A has not been illustrated in the drawings, except as shown in Figure 8. i The only operation performed at this station is the charging of the glass to the blank mold; this operation, however, presents a wide departure from the prior practice. In the prior practice the neck mold has been closed at the charging station and this is not practical for narrow necked articles, for it would be impossible to deliver a glass gob of sufii cient size through the restricted opening 1n the neck mold. In the present apparatus the neck mold is open during the charging operation, so that the glass gobs, whether .large or small, drop freely into the blank mold; and hence the present apparatus is equally well adaptable to either wide or narrow necked articles. Figures 1 and 2 show the neck and body molds open and the-blank mold arranged in operative position between them, and Figure 8 gives a detail view of the blank mold after it has been charged.
After the blank mold has been charged the mold carrier or table is rotated to station B, or the pressing station, by the Geneva wheel 10. As the table rotates from A to B the roller 47 traveling in the upper cam track causes the neck mold sections to be closed in the manner previously described. By an inspection of Fi ure 2 it will be seen that between stations and B the upper cam track is of a contour designed to close the neck mold at this point; and it will also be apparent that the contour of the lower cam track 44:, shown in dotted lines, is such a as to'retain the body mold sections in open position. After the neck mold has been closed, further travel of the table causes the blank mold to be elevated into interlocking engagement with the neck mold, this further elevation of the blank mold being effected by the sharp rise 64 in the elevating track 62. It is thus seen that when the pressing station is reached the neck mold is closed and is in engagement with the blank mold, and that the body mold is open. Prior to the pressing operation the neck mold is locked by means of a locking-clamp designated generally by the letter L. The locking clamp is employed at several of the stations, and it will be described in detail hereinafter.
The apparatus for performing the pressing operation will now be described, reference being had particularly to Figures 3, 4 and 9. The pressing apparatus is referred to generally by the letter M, and includes the usual plunger carried by the piston rod 76. The plunger is adapted to pass through a suitable aperture provided in a spring plate 77, and this spring plate is resiliently attached to the piston-rod 76 by two or more rods 78 fixed to the spring plate andslidably mounted in a collar 79 at-' a neck ring 81 which is adapted to seat in the recess 82 in the neck mold (Figures 4 and 9). The piston rod is operated by a cylinder 83 which is controlled by one of the valves 35, as clearly shown in Figure 1. Referring to Figure 3, it will be seen that the cylinder is provided with an emergency valve 84,; adapted to be operated by a hand I lever 85.. So. that, while the operation of the valve 35 may continue, the operator may However, a full disclosure of the safety at will stop or start the operation of the plunger; this control being particularly for use when the machine is being started at the beginning of operations, to retain the plunger in its elevated position while the glass and molds are being conditioned for pressing. And in case of an emergency the hand lever and valve may be operated to cause the plunger to assume an' upwardly sustained inoperative position.
The operation will be apparent from the foregoing description. 'Pressure being admitted to the top of cylinder 83 causes the piston rod to descend, carrying with it the plunger, spring plate and neck ring. The neck ring 81 is first seated in the recess 82 provided in the neck mold I, and the plunger continues its downward movement and displaces a portion of the glass charge, forcing it up into the cavity of the neck and handle portion of the neck mold. Pressure is then admitted to the bottom of the cylinder, thereby withdrawing the plunger and lifting the spring plate and neck ring free of the neck mold.
At the same time the plunger is lifted the arm' or block 74 is withdrawn by the opera.- tion of cylinder 71, leaving the blank mold supported by the carriage 68 and ready to be lowered into inoperative position, and this is now accomplished by the operation of cylinder 70. After the blank mold has been lowered to inoperative position, leaving the pressed blank suspended by the neck mold, the cylinder 56 is operated and its plunger pushes the slide 54 and with it the mold bottom K into alignment with the center of the mold body; and the clamp L is released from locking engagement with the neck mold, leaving the mold free to be moved. Immediately thereafter the table is moved to station C, or the cooling station, by means of the Geneva wheel.
In connection with the plunger-operating mechanism and the motor for driving .the mold table, I employ a safety device by which the electrical-control mechahism is rendered inoperative whenever, for any reason, the fluid pressure supply to the plunger-. operating cylinder or other cylinders is shut off, thus preventing the breakage of parts or the disorganization of the machine. And this safety mechanism also renders it impossible for the operator to inadvertently start the motor driving the mold table be fore having admitted pressure to the various cylinders to insure the proper operation of the machine. The safety mechanism is of general application to all glass machines employing fluid pressure and electricity for the operation thereof, and, as the mechanism is in no way limited to use with the present machine, it is-thought to be entirely unnecessaryto illustrate the apparatus'heremechanism will be found in application Serial No. 660,057, filed by myself and David Stenhouse August 9, 1923.
Durin the movement of the table from station I? to station C, or the cooling station, the body or blow mold J is closed about the pressed blank. The closing of the body mold is accomplished by the engamement of the lower roller 47 in the lower cam track 44, and an inspection of Figure 2 will show that the contour-of the lower cam track 44 is such as to come into coincidence at station C, sothat both the neck and the body mold are closed at this point. The molds are maintained in closed position by the pressure exerted by the cam-operated closing means, and, as no pressure is exerted on the interior of the molds at the cooling station, it is not necessary to employ the locking clamps L at this station.
The apparatus for cooling the pressed. blank indicated generally by letter N is clearly shown in Figure 5; and in the following description reference is to be had to that figure and to Figure 10.
Prior to the blowing operation it is desirable to cool the pressed blank at the thicker portion, and without unduly cooling the nezk portion which is detrimental to the finished product. The practice before the present invention was simply to blow air into the top of the blank after the plunger had been withdrawn; but obviously such a practice results in cooling the neck portion of the blank to the same extent that the thicker portion of the blank is cooled. The purpose of the present cooling apparatus is, therefore, to cool the blank at the desired point only, and also to'provide the apparatus with a selective feature, whereby the point of cooling may be varied to suit various articles.
The cylinder for operating the cooling means is indicated by numeral 86, and it is provided with the usual pipes 87 and 88 at the top and bottom, respectively, for admitting pressure to the cylinder on opposite sides of the piston 89; the admission and exhaust of the fluid pressure being controlled by one of the valves 35. The piston carries a hollow piston rod 90? and attached to the lower end of the piston rod is a hollow pipe 91 adapted to be projected into the interior of the pressed blank, and provided with apertures 92 at its lower end to permit the 0001- ing air to escape into the interior of the blank at the desired point. Adjacent the upper end of the piston rod :1 port 93 is provided for the purpose of admitting the air or other fluid from the cylinder to the interior'of the rod; and the volume of the fluid admitted to the rod is controlled by a regulator valve 94, which is vertically adjustable b a threaded portion 95 to vary the size 0 the inlet port. A sleeve 96 surrounds the piston rod 90, and is screw threadedly mounted in the lower end of the cylinder 86; the sleeve being vertically adjustable and adapted to be held in adjusted position by means of a lock nut 97. The operation of the device may be briefly described as follows:
Referring to Figure 5, assume that the piston 89 has been moved to the top of the cylinder 86, thereby withdrawing the cooling pipe 91 from the interior of the blank. VVith' the piston at the upper end of its travel it will be apparent that the port 93 will be clear of the cylinder and open to the atmosphere. The regulator valve 94 will be adjusted to regulate the size of the port and thereby control the volume of fluid admitted to the rod. Now when fluid pressure is admitted above the piston, the latter will be moved downward, but the fluid will not pass into the hollow' piston rod until the piston and rod have moved a sufficient distance to bring the port 93 into the interior of the cylinder. \Vhen the piston and rod have moved sufficiently to permit communication between the interior of the cylinder and the interior of the rod the pipe 91 will have been projected into the interior of the pressed blank, and the air entering the rod through the port 93 will escape through the apertures 92 into the interior of the blank, thereby cooling the same. As clearly shown in Figures 5 and 10, the point at which the cooling air is projected against the blank is well below the neck portion, so that this thinner portion receives little, if any, of the cooling effect. For different articles it may be desirable to apply the air at different points, and it is obvious that the point of application of the air may be quickly and easily variedv by the simple adjustment of the sleeve 96, thereby varying the limit of the down stroke of the piston and parts carried thereby. It is thus seen that the apparatus disclosed herein is selective as to the point at which the blank will be cooled; that-the volume of the cooling air may be easily varied by the adjustment of valve 94; and-it will be apparent that the use of the hollow piston and port construction obviates the necessity for the use of a flexible hose and valves such as have beencommonly employed heretofore.
The duration of the cooling'operation is variable, of course, and is controlled by the timing of the valve associated with the cylinder 86. At the termination. of the cooling operation the piston rod 90 and pipe 91 are lifted clear of the blank and mold; and the mold is ready to be moved to station D by the operation of the Geneva wheel.
In traveling from station C to station D, or theflrst blowing station, both the neck mold: and body mold are retained closed, and air-inspection of Figure 2 will show that the upper and lower cam tracks are in coincidence from station C to station D. As the blowing operation is performed at station D,v it is necessary to have both molds locked in closed position, and by reference to Figure 6 it will be seen that two of the clamps L have been provided for that purpose. These clamps are, of course, automatically operated by the valves 35 to lock the molds as soon as they reach station D.
The apparatus for performing the first blowing operation is indicated generally by the letter O, and in the following description reference. is to be had particularly to Figures 6, 11 and 17.
The blower head is indicated by numeral 98, and it is adapted to fit against the top of the neck mold during the blowing operation and convey air under pressure to the interior of the neck and body molds t0 distend the blank to the shape of the interior of the blow mold in the well known manner. The blower head is raised and lowered by a hollow piston rod 99 which is loosely connected to the blower head to provide for irregularities. The particular loose coupling illustrated herein includes a short nozzle 100 screw threadedly mounted on the piston rod and having a ball flange 101 on its lower end; the flange being mounted in a recess 102 in the blower head and held in place by a cap 103 detachably connected to the blower head. The hollow piston rod 99. is attached to' the piston 104 in the operating cylinder 105, and the piston rod extends on through the top of the cylinder. The upper portion of the hollow piston rod is provided with a port 106 for the admission of air to the interior of the rod when the rod has descended far enough to bring the port within the interior of the cylinder. Air or other fluid pressure for operating the piston is supplied to the top and bottom of the cylinder by the pipes 107 and 108 controlled by one of the valves 35, and the volume of air passing from the cylinder to the interior of the rod is controlled by a regulator valve 109 screw threadedly mounted in the top of the rod.
The pressure in the blow mold is controlled by a relief valve preferably of the ball type, as indicated by numeral 110. The pressure in the blow mold is communicated to the ball valve through the passages clear ly shown in Figure 17 and if this pressure becomes too great it will lift the ball from its .seat against the pressure of the coil spring 111, and permit the fluid to escape to the atmos here through the passage 112, thereby re ucing the pressure to the desired extent in the article being blown. The tension of the spring against the ball is adjusted to suit conditions by the screw 113.
In the operation of the blower apparatus air or other fluid pressure is admitted above the piston to force it downwardly, thereby seating the blower head 98 on the neck mold I, and when the piston rod has moved downwvardly to a sufficient extent the port 106 is brought within the interior of the cylinder 105, thereby opening communication between the interior of the cylinder and the interior of the rod, and thus permitting the air or other fluid under pressure to flow through the rod, nozzle and blower head to the interior of the article to-be blown. The volume of air'supplied to the mold is adjusted by the regulator valve 109, and excessive pressure in the mold is relieved by the valve 110. Figure 11 shows the article after it has been blown.
The structure above described provides an extremely simple apparatus for effecting the blowing operation; and it will be apparent that the loose coupling between the piston rod and blower head will allow for any irregularities and will result in a tight fit between the blower head and neck mold;
and it will also be apparent that the hollow D to station E, or the second blowing piston and port construction greatly simplifies the apparatus, eliminates the use of flexible hose and valves commonly employed heretofore.
When the blowing operation is completed pressure is admitted to the opposite side of the piston, thereby lifting the blower head and cutting off communication between the interior of the cylinder and the interior of the rod. The locking clamps are now opened and the mold table is ready to be moved to station E.
As the mold table is rotated from station station, the neck mold is opened while the body mold is retained closed. An inspection of Figure 2 will show that the contour of the upper cam track between stations D and E is such as to open the neck mold.
In the following description of the second blower reference is to be had to Figures 7 12 and 18.
The second blowing apparatus is indicated generally by the letter P, and its purpose is to supply air pressure sufiicient to keep the blown article distended to contact with the mold. The second blower head is indicated by numeral 114, and, as shown in the drawings, this blower head is bell-shaped and is adapted to fit down on the body mold and over the neck of the jug or other article, so that the neck of the article is inclosed within the bell-shaped blower head. Figures 7 and 12 show the second blower head in operative position, and its relation to the neck of the article. A recess 115 is provide-d in the top of the blower head for'the purpose of loosely coupling it with a hollow pis ton rod in exactly the same manner as described in connection with the first blower head and as illustrated in Figure 17. Further, the cylinder for operating the second blower head, the port for admitting the air from the cylinder to the interior of the piston rod, and the regulator valve for control ling the volume of air admitted are all iden tical in construction with the apparatus disclosed in connection with the first blower head, and consequently it has not been deemed necessary to illustrate the operating mechanism in connection with the second blower head. However, Figure 7 shows a portion of a hollow piston rod 116 having a ball flange 117 seated in the recess 115, and loosely held in place by the plate 118.
The blower head 114 is also provided with a relief valve, as indicated by numeral 187, and as this valve is of the same construction as the relief valve 110 of the first blower head it need not be described in detail.
As previously stated, this second blowing operation is for the purpose of setting the glass permanently in its molded form. After the completion of this second blowing operation the locking clamp 4 is opened and the article should be sufiiclently set to permit the opening of the body mold, and, in accordance with the present disclosure, this is done on movement to the next station. It will be understood, however, that where the article is of such a character as to require more time to set the cam track may be changed to open the mold at a later station.
The formation of the article is now complete and the two remaining stations relate to the opening of the mold and the delivery of the finished article; but before describing these two. stations the specific construction of the locking clamps L will be described.
The locking clamps L are employed at stations B, D and E; two superposed clamps being employed at station D, as both the neck and body mold are locked at this station. In the following detailed description reference is to be had particularly to Figure 19. Numeral 119 indicates an ordinary cylinder provided with a piston 120, and operated in the usual manner by air or other fluid pressure; the operation of the cylinder being controlled by one of the valves 35. Guide rods 121, 121 are attached to the cylinder mounting and extend forwardly in spaced parallel relation. The guide rods 121, 121 are connected at their forward ends; and where two complete mold clamp-s are employed, as at station D, I prefer "to employ a plate 122 for this purpose, whereby all four of the guide rods are maintained in proper spaced and parallel relation. Obviously, if only a single unit were employed, then an ordinary crossbar would be substituted for the plate. 122.
A crosshead 123 is slidably mounted on the guide rods 121, 121, and this crosshead is connected to the piston rod 124 carried by the piston 120. The crosshead is connected mounted on the crosshead 123, and these pivotally mounted jaws are operatively connected to a head-piece 128 by means of pivotally mounted links 129; the head-piece 128 being mounted on the piston rod in fixed relation thereto. The links 127 operate through slots 130 provided in the guide rods for that purpose. A coil spring 131 is mounted on the piston rod 124 between the crosshead 123 and head-piece 128, and normally holds the crosshead in its forward position on the piston rod, for a purpose to be described hereinafter.
The operation of the apparatus will now be described; it being assumed that the clamp is in its withdrawn or inoperative position.
The admission and exhaust of air to the operating cylinder is, of course, in timed relation with the operation of the glass machine, and when a mold reaches a station where it is to be clamped air is automatically admitted to the rear of piston 120, thereby forcing the piston and its rod 124 forwardly. As the rod moves forwardly it carries with it the head-piece 128; and because of the pressure of the coil spring 131 the cross head 123 is maintained in its foremost position on the piston rod; i. e., the pin 125 remains in the forward end of the slot 126. It is thus seen that there is no relative movement between the crosshead 123 and the head-piece 128, and thus all the parts move forward in exactly the same relative position 1 as they occupy when the device is in inoperative position.
This forward movement, without relative change of position of the moving parts, continues until the crosshead contacts with the plate or crossbar 122, and
at this point the parts are in the position shown in dotted lines in Figure 19; the clamping jaws still remaining in open position, but having been carried forward until they are in alignment with the ordinary clamping lugs provided on the glass molds.
The crosshead remains in its position abutting the member 122, but the pin and slot connection with the piston rod permits the latter to continue its forward movement,
carrying with it, of course, the head-piece 128. And obviously this further forward movement of the. head-piece causes the clamping jaws. through the connecting'links 129, to swing inwardly and clamp the mold in closed position.
From the foregoing description it will be apparent that it is impossible for the clampin'g apparatus to exert any pressure whatever on the mold tending to displace it; for l the clamping jaws are moved to their extreme forward position while still open, and thus it is impossible to subject the mold to any pressure other than the pinching or closing pressure.
At the proper moment the air is released from the rear of the cylinder and pressure" is admitted to the front thereof, and the movement of the parts is, exactly the reverse of that described above. The spring 131 retains the crosshead in its forward position, while the head-piece moves to the dotted line position, thereby moving the clamping jaws to the open position, also shown in dotted lines. At this point the pin 125 strikes the forward end of the slot 126, andfurther .rearward movement of the piston rod carries the parts, in open position, to the inoperative position of the apparatus.
No claim is made herein to the clamping mechanism per se, as it forms the subject matter of a separate application, Serial No. 663,221, filedSeptember 17, 1923.
Returnin now to the description of the operation of the jug machine, the formation of the article has been completed at station E, or the second blowing station, the blower head has been lifted and the locking clamp has been released from the body mold. The table is now ready to be rotated to station F.
During the rotation of the table from station E to station F the body mold is open, leaving the finished article resting on the mold bottom. An inspection of Figure 2 will show thatthe upper and lower cam tracks come into coincidence at station F, with both molds open. Figure 13 shows a detail view of the finished article resting on the mold bottom with both the neck mold and body mold open. The table is now ready to be rotated to station G.
'During the movement of the table from station F to station G the slide 53 is Withdrawn, carrying with it the mold bottom K on which is resting the finished article. Fi ure 14 is a detail view showing both mol s open, the mold bottom withdrawn, and the finished article resting on the mold bottom.
The mechanism for withdrawing the mold bottom is illustrated in Figures 1 and 3. By reference to these Figures it will be seen that the roller 54 carried by the slide 53 engages the track 55 at station F. The track 55 extends outwardly from station F to station G, as clearly shown in Figure 1, so that when the table has reached station G the slide and mold bottom have been withdrawn to the full extent, and the finished article is ready to be lifted from the mold bottom and transferred to any suitable point, such as the conve er Q for carrying the finished ware to te lehr. The automatic transfer device is indicated generally by the letter R,
US676570A 1923-11-23 1923-11-23 Forming machine Expired - Lifetime US1601836A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US676570A US1601836A (en) 1923-11-23 1923-11-23 Forming machine

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US676570A US1601836A (en) 1923-11-23 1923-11-23 Forming machine

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1601836A true US1601836A (en) 1926-10-05

Family

ID=24715053

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US676570A Expired - Lifetime US1601836A (en) 1923-11-23 1923-11-23 Forming machine

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1601836A (en)

Cited By (14)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2570817A (en) * 1946-05-11 1951-10-09 Neill Patents Ltd O Glassware forming machine
US2914799A (en) * 1954-01-05 1959-12-01 Plax Corp Plastic bottle blowing apparatus
US2942382A (en) * 1956-11-19 1960-06-28 Lynch Corp Mold holder and finish ring holder locking means
US3235352A (en) * 1961-10-09 1966-02-15 Owens Illinois Glass Co Glass forming apparatus
US3251668A (en) * 1962-04-20 1966-05-17 Owens Illinois Glass Co Method for mold release during glass forming
US3329492A (en) * 1964-02-12 1967-07-04 Glass Machinery Inc Apparatus for forming hollow glassware
US3334985A (en) * 1962-12-19 1967-08-08 Owens Illinois Inc Reciprocating glass pressing apparatus
US3499747A (en) * 1967-04-11 1970-03-10 Corning Glass Works Split mold operating and clamping apparatus
US3642462A (en) * 1970-02-20 1972-02-15 Maul Bros Inc Glassware-forming machine blow mold station
US3765862A (en) * 1971-04-02 1973-10-16 Emhart Corp Apparatus for making glassware by a press and blow technique
US4139358A (en) * 1977-06-28 1979-02-13 Corning Glass Works Method of forming a vessel with pouring lip
US4200449A (en) * 1978-04-20 1980-04-29 Investigacion Fic Fideicomiso Apparatus for blow molding hollow glassware
US20050031723A1 (en) * 2001-12-07 2005-02-10 Matteo Zoppas Device and method for compression moulding of plastic articles
US10807297B2 (en) * 2017-07-21 2020-10-20 Sidel Participations Maintenance method for an installation for forming containers, including a resynchronizing procedure

Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2570817A (en) * 1946-05-11 1951-10-09 Neill Patents Ltd O Glassware forming machine
US2914799A (en) * 1954-01-05 1959-12-01 Plax Corp Plastic bottle blowing apparatus
US2942382A (en) * 1956-11-19 1960-06-28 Lynch Corp Mold holder and finish ring holder locking means
US3235352A (en) * 1961-10-09 1966-02-15 Owens Illinois Glass Co Glass forming apparatus
US3251668A (en) * 1962-04-20 1966-05-17 Owens Illinois Glass Co Method for mold release during glass forming
US3334985A (en) * 1962-12-19 1967-08-08 Owens Illinois Inc Reciprocating glass pressing apparatus
US3329492A (en) * 1964-02-12 1967-07-04 Glass Machinery Inc Apparatus for forming hollow glassware
US3499747A (en) * 1967-04-11 1970-03-10 Corning Glass Works Split mold operating and clamping apparatus
US3642462A (en) * 1970-02-20 1972-02-15 Maul Bros Inc Glassware-forming machine blow mold station
US3765862A (en) * 1971-04-02 1973-10-16 Emhart Corp Apparatus for making glassware by a press and blow technique
US4139358A (en) * 1977-06-28 1979-02-13 Corning Glass Works Method of forming a vessel with pouring lip
US4200449A (en) * 1978-04-20 1980-04-29 Investigacion Fic Fideicomiso Apparatus for blow molding hollow glassware
US20050031723A1 (en) * 2001-12-07 2005-02-10 Matteo Zoppas Device and method for compression moulding of plastic articles
US7425124B2 (en) * 2001-12-07 2008-09-16 S.I.P.A. Societa Industrializzazione Progettazione Automazione S.P.A. Device and method for compression moulding of plastic articles
US10807297B2 (en) * 2017-07-21 2020-10-20 Sidel Participations Maintenance method for an installation for forming containers, including a resynchronizing procedure

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1601836A (en) Forming machine
US3024571A (en) Apparatus for molding glass
US2357501A (en) Glass forming machine
US2984047A (en) Apparatus for transferring and molding charges of molten glass
US3198617A (en) Mechanism for pressing charges of molten glass in a forming mold
US2101213A (en) Machine for producing glass vessels from tubing
US1957410A (en) Glassware shaping apparatus
US1693069A (en) Glass-forming machine
US3240582A (en) Method for forming and delivering glass
US1959428A (en) Glassware forming machine
US1956203A (en) Method of and apparatus for forming hollow glassware
US2049422A (en) Method and apparatus for the manufacture of hollow glassware
US1836646A (en) Glass forming machine
US1747438A (en) Automatic bottle-blowing machine
US1737524A (en) Glass-blowing machine
US2593999A (en) Vacuum flask sealing machine
US1550346A (en) Glass-forming machine
US1382994A (en) Method and apparatus for making glass articles
US1742098A (en) Method of and apparatus for charging molten glass into molds
US1807857A (en) Glass shaping machine
US2282449A (en) Glass forming machine
US2252391A (en) Glass blowing machine
US2051468A (en) Glassware forming machine
US1876005A (en) Glassware forming machine
US1809793A (en) Glass forming machine