US1596028A - Machine for producing chinchilla and other finishes - Google Patents

Machine for producing chinchilla and other finishes Download PDF

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US1596028A
US1596028A US3344A US334425A US1596028A US 1596028 A US1596028 A US 1596028A US 3344 A US3344 A US 3344A US 334425 A US334425 A US 334425A US 1596028 A US1596028 A US 1596028A
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fabric
platen
fibres
pile
web
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US3344A
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Manley A Spaulding
Charles P Thiel
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Davis and Furber Machine Co
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Davis and Furber Machine Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06CFINISHING, DRESSING, TENTERING OR STRETCHING TEXTILE FABRICS
    • D06C29/00Finishing or dressing, of textile fabrics, not provided for in the preceding groups

Description

Aug. 17, 1926. 1,596,028
M. A. SPAUL DING ET AL MACHINE FOR PRODUCING CHINHILLA AND OTHER FINISHES *"iled Jan. 19, 1925 3 Sheets-Shah! 1 Invegrorsfd M mle A. pou m chc les P. Thiel Anya Aug. 17 1926. 1,596,028 M. A. SPAULDlNG ET AL MACHINE FOR PRODUCING CHINCHILLA AND OTHER FINISHES File'd Jan. 19
ln venTors.
Mc1nle A. Spqulding Charre's F.Thne\ b 5 8 ;%,k y Afly Aug. 17,1926. 1,596,028
M. A. SPAULDING ET AL MACHINE FOR PRODUCING CHINCHILLA AND OTHER FINISHES Filed Jan. 1925 3 Sheets-Sheet 5 Inverflors.
ante A.Spc1u\ding' Char es P. Thiel Patented Aug, 17, 1%25.
' warren FFICE.
I'JIANLEY A. SPAULDING, OF DOVER-FOXCROFT, IvIAINE, AND CHARLES P. 'II-IIEL, OF NORTH ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS, ASSIGNGRS TO DAVIS 8a FURTHER MACHINE COMPANY, OF NORTH ANDOVER, MASSACHUSETTS, A CORPORATION OF MASSACHU- SETTS.
MACHINE FOR PRODUCING CHINCHILLA AND OTHER FINISHES.
Application filed January This invention relates to improvements in .machines for finishing the napped or pile face of a fabric, the fibres the pile of which are of wool or of a woolly nature, and
the object thereof is to provide an improved and more durable finish than has heretofore been produced.
More particularly the invention relates to improvements in machines for treating pile fabrics to produce a chinchilla efi'ect. The term napped is used herein in its broad sense to include all fabrics having a nap or pile. In usual types of machines for producing finish. known as the chinchilla finirh or \Vhitney finish, the web of fabric is passed between a stationary platen and a relatively movable platen having a frictional surface and which is moved in a different direction than the movement of the web of fabric In the production of a Whitney finish the movable platen is recigrocated in a direction transversely of the direction of movement of the web. In the production of a chinchilla finish the movable platen is rotated about a central axis perpendicular to he direction of movement of the web.
Whitney and chinchilla finishesare produced upon pile fabrics in which the pile 18 or wool or of a woolly nature, such asmohair. \Vhen the cloth comes from the preparing machine, which is usually a napping machine, the pile fibres of wool or of a woolly nature are more or less curly and in termingled and matted together. They do not stand upright, nor do they lie in any particular direction. By reason of their curly nature the fibres are of unequal length when straightened out. \Vhen the surface of the pile is acted upon by a moving platen, or other device, the curly fibres are stretched out and intermingled in such a manner as to,
give the pile face of the fabric a distinctive appearance. In the lVhitney finish, in
which platens are reciprocated at an angle to the direction of the line of movement of the web, the resultant surfaeehas a wavy appearance. If the platen, or other rubbing deviee, is given circular or other curvi- 19, 1925. Serial No. 3,344.
linear movement the fibres are twisted into knobs, shorter fibres thus treated making more knobs and more closely associated knobs than long fibres with the same movement of the platen. The longer fibres in either case are likely to extend from the knob to which they belong and intermingle with the fibres of an adjacent knob. The ob ject of the present invention is to provide a process of so treating fabrics having a nap of woolly nature as to produce a more distinctive finish by causing the longer of straggling fibres to becomeassociated with the groups of fibres to which they belong, instead of other adjacent groups so that a more perfect, distinctive'finish will be'produced.
in the usual manufacture of chinchillas or whitneys the intermingling and holding in place of the fibre. is due to the curly nature of the wool or hair of the pile caused by the interlocking of the serrations of the fibre by the movement of the platen and the pressure applied during such movement.
The present invention comprises the process and apparatus for finishing napped or pile fabrics which comprises successively moving the fibres of the nap in different directions. In the production of chinchilla finish the present invention comprises broadly the process of imparting to the fibres of the nap or pile curvilinear movements first in one direction and subsequently in the reverse direction. By thus causing the fibres of the nap or pile first to move in one direction and then in another direction an improved and more permanent laying of the fibres in the desired position is attained, as the opposite movements of'the fibres tend to separate them from one another and finally to position them more firmly in the desired will partially destroy the feet of the treatment.
fibres of a pile are in any way intermingled these fibres will be twisted into a knob whether they belong normally to the group which should form that particular knob or to an adjacent group.
In the production of the chinchilla finish the difference between the usual continuous circular movement of the fibres in one direction and the rotative movement first in one direction and then in a reverse direction comprising the present invention is that the knob of fibres which has started to form in the old process is never again disturbed and any fibres that have been caught at the start and twisted into that knob are retained in such position, while in the process forming the present invention any fibres not belong ing to a particular knob are finally started in the opposite direction and twisted into the knob to which such fibres naturally belong. This produces a cleaner cut chinchilla than one in which the rotative movement is al ways in the same direction.
A. further object of the invention is to provide a method and apparatus which will more effectively prepare the fibres for the finishing action and which will cause the fibres when acted upon to be more permanently set in the desired position. fhis is accomplished by moistening the fabric, prefer ably upon the pile side, prior to the treatment of the pile and also preferablyby heating the fabric during the treatn'ient oi the pile, the heat desirably being applied during the last stage of the finishing operation.
Any desirable means may be provided for performing this process. Desirably, however, steam is applied to the woven face of the fabric before it is treated and one or more of the devices for imparting movement to the fibres of the pile. including preferably the last, is heated sulliciently to el the moisture. By applying steam to the labric in this manner the fibres of. t e wool or hair will absorb a certai. amount of moisture which will make them more flexible and more easily nlaced in the desired posi on. By heating the fibre during treatment the moisture thus added to the fibres is etipellec and sincev the fibres are worked upon and held in the place they are supposed to take while the moisture is being expelled they will be more permanently held in such position without having to rely wholly upon their natural curl and the interloclrin of their serrations to retain them in permanent position. It is preferable to apply moisture to the surface only of the fabric than to treat the fabric in wet or a partially wet condition since in the latter case the goods cannot be completely dried until after finishing and the moisture remaining in the goods subsequently acting upon the fibres advantageous ef- It is found that fabrics treated by the process embodying the invention present a superior appearance than when treated by the usual pr cess and that they have a better and longer wearing quality.
A suitable mechanism for performing the process embodying the present invention is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which,
Fig. 1 is an end view of a machine for producing a Vahitney or chinchilla finish 2 is side elevation of the machine shown in 1;
Fig. 3 is a letail plan view of the roll for e fabric through the machine and stripping mechanism for removing the eerie from the drawing roll;
rig. 4: is a detail plan view of the upper orable p aten and the mechanism for actutl same;
Fig. 5 is a plan view of the tension roll over which the fabric is drawn to the finishing mechanisn. The mechanisms illustrated in Figs. 3, l and 5 are shown in the relative positions they occupy in the machine;
Fig. 6 is a detail view, partially in section, on line 6--6 Fig. 4:, of the shaft and eccentric for actuating a movable platen; and
Fig. 7 is a detail view, partly diagrammatic and partly in vertical section through the bed of the machine, the movable and stationary JlZIiGDS, also showing the manner in which the fabric is moistened, passed progres ively between the upper surface of the stationary pla en and the co-operating movable platen, and ther after between the lower surface of the stationary alaten and the cooperating heated movable platen, and illustrating in displaced position the tension and drawing rolls.
The finisaing machine illustrated. in he accompanying dra rings comprises a pair of P 2 conn c'ed by a suitable to 3 which supports the finishing mechanism. tandards 4; and 5 mounted upon the end frames 1 and 2 extend upwardly and ar provided with curved ends overhanging the central portion of the machine and provided with bosses 6 and '7 in which is mounted a shaft 8 of a winch having depending chains 9 and 10 provided with hoolcs adapted to be engaged with the mem bers of the finishing mechanism to raise and lower them from position in dismantling or assembling the machine. The winch shaft 8 has at one end a worm wheel 11 which is by a worm 12 which is fixedly secured upon a shaft 13 mounted'in a bracl-tet extending from the standard 5 and is actuated by a crank 15.
The finishing mechanism comprises a lower platen 16 which is fixedly secured to the bed 3, an upper platen l? which desirabl is located directly above the platen lo and a movable intermediate platen 18. The platens I6; 17' and 18 desirably present contiguous flat surfaces which are provided with means for frictionally engaging the web of cloth passed betweenthem. Such frictional faces may be provided by stretching suitable material, such as webs of carpet or sheets of rubber, across the faces of the platens. The friction of the material which is stretched across the stationary platens may be sheets 19 and 20 of carpet rubber or other struction illustrated herein the intermediate movable platen is reciprocably mounted between pairs of parallel guide plates 26 and 27 which are spaced apart by sleeves 28 ample as trolled by brake bands 38 and which surround respectively vertical screw threaded standards 29 having nuts 30 to support-the lower plate and nuts 31 which are clamped down upon the upper plate. By adjusting the nuts 30 and 31 the intermediate mov'ablc 'platen may be raised and lowered relatively to the lower platen. The upper platen 17 .is provided with arms 32 extending outwardly from its ends, the arms being provided with holes to receive the up per ends of the standards Nuts and 3 1 on the'standards 29. located respectively above and below the arms 32, provide means for raising and lowering the upper platen 17 relatively to the movable platen.
Any suitable means may be provided for passing the web of fabric between the platens. In the construction illustrated the fab .ric 35 passes from the cloth roll (not shown) beneath an idler 36, thence over a portion of the periphery of a tension roll 37 provided with a cloth-engaging surface, such for exa surface provided by card-cloth- The rotation of the friction roll is con- 39 which are .pivotally mounted upon a stud L0 projecting from, the end'franie and frictionally engage a pulley or drum l1 which is secured to the shaft 12 of .thefriction roll. The frictional ing.
engagementbetween the brake bands 38' and 39 and the drum 41 may be varied by a bolt 43 passing through extensions of the bandsand having a nut, such as a winged nut 1 1 engaging one of the extensions.
p The web of cloth 35 passes from the ten-' sion, roll over suitable idle 'rolls 4L5 and lti, th latter of which directs the cloth beneath the under surface of the upper platen 17.
by a worm 58 upon a vertical shaft mounted a cylindrical The web then passes over idlers 17 and 18 o vided with a cloth-engaging surface, such as card-clothing which will produce a nonslipping and uniform tension upon the cloth.
The CQFQl-ClOtlllllg desirably is placed upon the drawing roll in sections which are separated to provide paths for endless stripping belts which pas over an idle roller 51. By reason this construction the cloth which is engaged by the card-clothing of the v drawing roll is gradually stripped from the roll by the endless stripping belts and thereby delivered from the machine.
Any suitable means may be provided for actuating the drawing roll. As illustrated herein the shaft of the drawing roll is provided with a worm gear 52 which is engaged 5 1 mounted in suitable hearings in the frame. the lower end of the shaft 54 being provided with a. beveled pinion 55 which engages a coinplementarv pinion 56, preferably of smaller diameter, upon a shaft 57 having a pulley 58 which is driven by a belt 59 from a pulley 60 from a main shaft 61 which is journalled in suitable bearings in the lower portion of the end frames of the machine.
The main shaft may be driven in any suitable manner as from fixed and idle pulleys 62 and 68 which may be actuated from any suitable source of power.
v Any suitable mechanism may be employed for actuating the intermediate movable platen. 7 In] the construction illustrated herein each end of the movable platen has affixed to it a guide plate case which comprises a block 64 having laterally extending flanges which are bolted to the ends of the. platen 18 and a description of one will serve as a description for both. The block 6 1 is provided with a cylindrical aperture in which is guide plate 66 having a diametrically extending slot 67. The guide plate (36 is rotarily adjustable and adapted to be secured in adjusted position by a set screw 68. The block 64-. is also provided with an outwardly extending arm 69 having at its end a cylindrical strap'TO in which is mounted a cylindrical guide plate 71 provided with a slot 72 which guide plate and slot may be considered complementary to the guide plate 66 and slot 6'4.
The guide plate 71 desirably has an annular flange 73 which rests upon the strap 'i'O and the guide plate is held in rotarily adjusted position by set screws 7 1. The periphery of the flange 73 may be provided with gradua'tions constituting a dial adapted to register with a suitable index upon the periphery of the strap and the guide plate 66 dewhich'may be caused to register with a suitable index upon the block 64, as illustrated in Fig. 4, so that theslots 6'7 and 72 may be set in proper correlation. I
A hearing block 75 is reciprooably mounted in the slot 72 of the guide 71, but is adapted to be held in stationary position when it is desired to impart a circular movement to the platen by one or more set screws 76. The bearing block 75 provides a bearing for a shaft 77 extending upwardly from a boss 76 upon a circular plate 79 which rests upon a complementary circular plate 80 and is adjustably secured thereto by a radial key 81 and suitable bolts 82 which pass through slots in the plate 79 and are seated in the circular plate 80. lhe circular plate 60 is secured to or formed upon the upper end of a vertical shaft 83 which is mounted in suitable bearings in the end frame of the machine and is provided its lower end with a beveled gear which meshes with complementary beveled gear 85 upon the main shaft 61. By adjusting the circular plate 79 radially with respect to the plate 80 the shaft 77 may be placed at differentdesired distances from the axis of the shaft 83 so that the shaft 77 in effect forms a cranlr which, upon rotation of the shaft 83, will travel in a circle about the axis of the shaft 83. Consequently the bearing 75 if free will be reciprocated 1n the slot 72 during the rotation of the crank 77 and a bodily.
movement will be transmitted to the arm 69 and the movable platen in a direction perpendicular to the walls of the slot.
The plates 26 and 2'? are provided with alined pin holes 86 to receive pins which pass through the slot 67 in the guide plate 66 and when the slot 6? of the guide plate 66 is placed in proper relation to the position of the slot 7:? in the complementary guide plate 71 the platen may be given a predetermined direction of movement. Thus by placing the slots 67 and 72 in perpendicular relation, to each other the platen may be given rectilinear movements either at right angles to the direction of the movement of the web of fabric between the platens, or in any desired angular direction relatively to the movement of the fabric. By such adjustments any desired'character of Vi hitney finish may be produced upon. the pile of the fabric.
In producing chinchilla finish the platen isgiven a curvilinear movement, usually a circular movement. To produce this finish the pins are removed from the pin holes 86 that the platen is given amovement to correspond to the rotative movement imparted to the ends of the arns 69 by the cranks 75. In producing such circular movements both bearing blocks 75 are usually locked in position by the set screw 76, but one or both blocks may be permitted to slide freely, whereupon different curvilinear movements it is acted upon by the finishing mechanism.
iiloisture may be applied to the fabric in any suitable way, preferably by projecting it upon the pile of cloth in advance of its ongement by the relatively movable platens. Desirably the moisture is applied by jets of steam projected upon the pile side of the cloth.
it further important feature of the inven tion consists in applying heat to the fabric as it passes through the finishing mechanism,
the heat desirably being applied during the finishing operation so that the moisture which has previously been supplied to the fabric is expelled during the last finishing operation parted to the fibers than has heretofore l een attained.
A preferred embodiment of these features of invention is illustrated in the apparatus shown in the drawings, particularly in Fig. 7, in which the moisture is shown as being projected upon the cloth in jets from a steam pipe 92 which extends transversely of the web of the cloth in advance of the idle roll d5 which is a sutiicient distance from the point at which the web is engaged by the relatively movable platens to permit the moisture to act upon the fibres of the pile.
Any suitable means may be provided for expelling the moisture thus supplied. As illustrated the lower stationary platen 16 is provided with a chamber for a heating fluid which as shown comprises a. conduit 93 within the body of the platen 16 and which passes back and forth, preferably lengthwise of the platen, and communicates with a conduit- S l leading to the conduit 92 which projects the steam upon the pile of cloth. Steam is supplied to the intake end 95 of the conduit from any suitable source. Thus the steam is utilized both for the purpose of heating the lower stationary platen and also for moistening the web of fabric.
in the operation of the machine the web of fabric is led from the usual roll (not shown) upwardly over the idler 36, thence over the tension roll 37 where it is engaged by the card-clothing thereof, thence over the idlers and t6 between the upper stationmeans 3 and a more permanent set imary platen and the intermediate movable platen. Passing from the movable platen it is led over the idlcrs ll" and i8 and between the lower stationary platen and the movable platen, thence over the draw' ig roll 49 where it is engaged by the teeth of the card-clothing and is finally stripped from the drawing roll by the stripping bands 50 and delivered from the machine. The pile surface. of the web of fabric when thus led through the machine is presented toward the .niovable plate-n. The movable platen is actuated in such a manner that it has to move in a different direction from the direction of move merit of the web of cloth. In producing the. Whitney type of finish the inovementof the fabric is .arectilinear movement either at right angles to or oblique to the direction of movement of the web of fabric. In the production of chinchilla cloth the movable platen is moved in a'curvilinear path about axes which are perpendicular to the plane of the faces of the platens. As the web of fabric passes first above and then below the platen the upper and lower surfaces of the movable platen move in reverse directions thus tending to move the fibres of the pile first in one direction and then in the re verse direction. This movement of the fibres tends to more effectively straighten the curl from the fibres and when moved in circular paths, as in producing chinchilla finish, to cause groups of fibres to be wound'into the respective knobs to which they belong and any fibres belonging to one group which are first wound into the knob of a different group are by the reverse movement separated therefrom and twisted into the group to which they belong, thereby producing a more permanent and better appearing chinchilla finish.
By progressively moisten'ing the pile of the cloth as it approaches engagement. by the stationary and movable platens the fibres are made more pliable and more easily responsive to the action of the finishing mechanism and by applying heat during the passage of the web through the machine, preferably during the last finishing stage, the moisture is expelled from the fibres and they retain more permanently the position in which they are placed by the finishing mechanism. Thus a more perfect and permanent finish is produced.
It will be understood that the embodiment of the invention disclosed herein is illustrative and not restrictive and that various changes in form, construction and arrangement of parts may be made within the spirit and scope of the following claims.
Having thus described the invention, what is claimed new, and desired tobe secured by Letters Patent, isz' 1. The process of treating pile fabrics hav ing a nap comprising fibres of a ,wooly nature to produce a chinchilla finish which action of a plurality consists in rotating the fibres of the pile in one direction to cause a grouping of the fibres and the interlacing of the fibres of the respective groups to produce nobs, then rotating the piles in the opposite direction to cause straggling fibres to become asso ciated with the nobs to which they naturally belong.
52. The process of treating a pile fabric to produce a chinchilla finish which comprises subjecting the pile of a continuously moving web of fabric progressively to the action of a plurality of flat surfaces hav ing respectively curvilinear movements in reverse directions about axeswhich are substantially perpendicular to the direction of movement of the web. Y
The process of treating a pile fabric to produce a chinchilla finish which com.-v prises subjecting the pile of a continuously moving web of the fabric progressively to the action of a plurality of flat surfaces under pressure and rotating respectively in clockwise and counterclockwise directions about central axes perpendicular tothe direction of movement ofthe web.
i. I he process'of treating pile fabric, having a nap comprising fibres of a woolen nature, to produce groups of interlaced pile fibres which comprises moisteningthe pile face of a moving web of the fabric, rotating the fibres of the pile in one direction to cause a grouping of the fibres and the interlacing of the fibres of the respective groups, thereafter rotating the pile in the opposite direction to cause straggling fibres to be associated with the nobs'to which they belong and subjecting the fibre to heat to fix the fibres thus associated in the respective nobs firmly in position.
5. The process of treating a pile fabric to produce a chinchilla finish which comprises moistening the body of the fabric, subjecting the pile thereof progressively to theaction of a pluralityof flat surfaces under pressure moving in curvilinear paths in IGSPQC". tively reverse directions about axes perpendicular to the direction of movement of the web.
6. The process. of treating a pile fabric to produce a chinchilla finishwhich comprises moistening the body of the fabric, subject ing the pile thereof progressively to the action of a plurality of flat surfaces under pressure moving in curvilinear paths in respectively reverse directions about axes perpendicular to the direction of movement of the web and heating the fabric during the action of one of the moving surfaces upon the pile.
7. The process of treating a pile fabric to produce a chinchilla finish which comprises moistening the body of the fabric, subjecting the pile thereof progressively to the of flat surfaces under pressure moving in curvilinear paths in respectively reverse directions about axes perpendicular to the direction of H10V611111t of the web and heating the last of the moving surfaces during its action upon the pile to expel the moisture from the fabric.
8. An apparatus for treating napped fabric comprising a plurality of platens having co-operating pairs of flat frictional surfaces, one of the surfaces of each pair being stationary and the other movable, means for passing a web of fabric progressively between the co-operating surfaces of successive pairs of platens with the nap of the fabric presented to the movable surfaces and means for imparting to said movable surfaces movements in different directions relatively to each other and also relatively to the direction of movement of the web of fabric.
9. An apparatus for treating napped fabric comprising a plurality of platens having co-operating pairs of frictional surfaces, one of the surfaces of each pair being stationary and the other movable, means for passing a web of fabric progressively between the co-operating surfaces of successive pairs of platens with the nap of the fabric presented to the movable surfaces and means for imparting to said movable surfaces curvilinear movements in respectively reverse directions about axes perpendicular to the direction of movementof the web of fabric.
10. An apparatus for treating napped fabrics comprising superposed upper and lower stationary platens, a movable platen intermediate of said stationary platens and provided with frictional surfaces contiguous to the respective surfaces of the stationary platens, means for passing the web of fabric progressively over the stationary platens with the nap of the fabric presented to the intermediate platen and means for moving the intermediate platen in a direction difierent from the direction of movement of the web of fabric.
11. An apparatus for treating napped fabrics comprising superposed upper and lower stationary platens, a movable platen intermediate of said stationary platens and provided with frictional surfaces contiguous to the respective surfaces of the stationary platens, means for adjusting the relative positions of said platens, means for passing the web of fabric progressively over the stationary platens with the nap of the fabric presented to the intermediate platen and means for moving the intermediate platen in a direction different from the direction of movement of the web of fabric.
12. An apparatus for treating napped fabrics comprising superposed upper and lower stationary platens, a movable platen intermediate of said stationary platens and provided with frictional surfaces contiguous to the respective surfaces of the stationary platens, means for adjusting the relative positions of said platens, means for passing the web of fabric progressively over the stationary platens with the nap of the fabric presented to the intermediate platen and means for imparting to the intermediate platen a rotative movement about an axis perpendicular to the direction of movement of the web of fabric.
13. In an apparatus for treating pile fabrics to produce a chinchilla finish comprising a plurality of platens having co-operating pairs of flat frictional surfaces, one of the surfaces of each pair bein stationary and the other movable, means for passing a web of fabric progressively between the co-operating surfaces of successive pairs of platens with the nap of the fabric presented to the movable surfaces, means for moistening the pile side of the fabric before its introduction between the first of said pairs of surfaces, means for imparting to the movable surfaces movements respectively in the reverse direction about an axis perpendicular to the direction of movement of the web of fabric, and means for applying heat to the body of the fabric during its passage between the last of said pairs of relatively movable surfaces.
14. An apparatus for treating pile fabric comprising an upper stationary platen, a lower stationary platen having a heating chamber therein and means for supplying a heating fluid thereto, an intermediate movable platen having frictional surfaces contiguous to the respective surfaces of said stationary platens, means for moving the intermediate platen in a curvilinear path about an axis which is perpendicular to the faces of the stationary platens, of means for passing a web of fabric progressively between the upper stationary platen and the movable platen, and then between the lower stationary platen and the movable platen with the napped surfaces of the web at all times presented to the frictional surfaces of the movable platen, and means for progres sively moistening the pile surfaces of the fabric as it approaches engagement by the (ho-operating surfaces of the upper stationary platen and the movable platen.
15. Anapparatus for treating pile fabrics comprising a stationary platen and a cooperating relatively movable platen, means for passing the web of fabric between said platens, means for actuating said movable platen including shafts perpendicular to the plane of reciprocation of said movable platen having cranks connected with said movable platen and counterbalancing means connected to said shafts.
16. An apparatus for treating pile fabrics comprising a stationary platen and a co operating relatively movable platen, means therefrom and counterweights adjuzstably mounted upon said screw threaded rods.
In testimony whereof, We have signed our 10 names to this specification.
MANLEY A. SPAULDING. CHARLES P. THIEL.
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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2758354A (en) * 1952-01-15 1956-08-14 Decloux Maurice Textile fabric and its process of fabrication
US5193362A (en) * 1991-08-01 1993-03-16 Milliken Research Corporation Apparatus for textile treatment
US5199125A (en) * 1991-08-01 1993-04-06 Milliken Research Corporation Method for textile treatment

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2758354A (en) * 1952-01-15 1956-08-14 Decloux Maurice Textile fabric and its process of fabrication
US5193362A (en) * 1991-08-01 1993-03-16 Milliken Research Corporation Apparatus for textile treatment
US5199125A (en) * 1991-08-01 1993-04-06 Milliken Research Corporation Method for textile treatment

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