New! View global litigation for patent families

US1548790A - Paper crinkling - Google Patents

Paper crinkling Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1548790A
US1548790A US48212321A US1548790A US 1548790 A US1548790 A US 1548790A US 48212321 A US48212321 A US 48212321A US 1548790 A US1548790 A US 1548790A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
cylinder
paper
vacuum
rapid
slow
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
William A Lorenz
Current Assignee (The listed assignees may be inaccurate. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation or warranty as to the accuracy of the list.)
OTAKA FABRIC Co
Original Assignee
OTAKA FABRIC Co
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31FMECHANICAL WORKING OR DEFORMATION OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31F1/00Mechanical deformation without removing material, e.g. in combination with laminating
    • B31F1/12Crêping

Description

Aug., 4, B925. L54879U W. A. LORENZ PAPER CRINKLING Filed July 2, 1921 Patented ug. 4, 1925. i

UNITI-:D sfrifras PATENT' OFFICE..

WILLIAM .a LORENZ, or HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, AssICNORTO THE OTAILA. FABRIC COMPANY, or HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, a CORPORATION or CONNECTICUT.

, PAPER CanaxLINe.

applic/anon mea my a,

To all whom t may concern:

Be it known that I, WILLIAM A. LORENZ', a citizen of the United States, residing in Hartford, in the county of Hartford and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Paper Crinkling, of which the following is a specl# cation.

This invention relates to transversely crping or crinkling a web of paper'.

The object of the invention is to crpe the paper by a simple and inexpensive evice, which may be operated at low cost, and which crpes the paper at high s eed and produces an improved character o crping.

According tothe present improvements, the crping is effected by the co-operation of y two adjacent cylinders, which may run just out of contact in either the same or opposite directions. There is provided vmeans for carrying a web of paper over a suction cylinder, then releasing the vacuum in the cylinder, and transferring the paper to a slower-moving vacuum cylinder lor drum,

' and causing the paper to be crinkled on that cylinder, which is provided with a strong vacuum.

' and may run at double the surface speed of the second. The slow or second cylinder is perforated and contains a vacuum device, the effect of which is to suck the paper against the slow cylinder as fast as it 1s delivered thereto by the first or rapid cylinder. The paper is delivered to the slow cylinder much more rapidly than the latter rotates, so that the effect of the suction is not only to stri thel paper from the 'rapid cylinder, but a so to cr e or crinkle the paper transversely, in which condition it is delivered from the machine by the slow cylinder. The paper may be moistened in preparation for the crinklin and may be held to the ra id cylinder y means of a relatively wea vacuum eiectivethrough perforations in the cylinder.

Other features and advantages will hereinafter appear.

ln the accompanying drawings,

Figure 1 is a sectional plan'of the appa-l ratus, taken at about the line 14-1 of Fifure 2. y

Figure 2 is a sectional elevation of the The first cylinder may for ex ample Ibe twice the diameter of the second,

1921,. serial no. 482,123.

same, taken at about the line 2-2 of Figure 1. e

' Figure 3 is a fragmentary view on a larger scale, to illustrate diagrammatically `the behavior of the paper at the point of transference from therapid cylinder to the slow one.

Figure 4 is a diagram to illustrate the 0peration when the cylinders are turned in opposite directions.

Figure 5 is a diagram showing how the paper may be crushed against a doctor-blade placed between the cylinders.

AThe web of paper is paid Off from a supply roll 10, having a Weighted friction strap 11. The web passes over a guide-roll 12 and onto a large hollow cylinder 13, having numerous closely-spaced perforations 14 throughout. The web passing around this' cylinder is indicated at 15, and it may be lnoistened by means of a sprinkler pipe 16, throwing jets 17 against the paper at the bottom of the cylinder. This moistening renders the paper softer, so as to conduce to the eiciency of the crping device.

At the delivery side of cylinder 13 is mounted a slow crping or crinkling hollow cylinder 18 of preferably, half the diameter of cylinder 13, and provided throughout with perforations 19, which may be much more closely spaced than the perforations 14 in the main c linder.

These two cylinders are connected to rotate simultaneously; the stub shaft 20 of the large cylinder having a gear 21 which meshes with an idle pinion 22, the latter meshing with'a gear 23 of small cylinder 18, which may thus rotate in the same direction as the large cylinder, as indicated by the arrows. The cylinders in practice are placed almost in contact, being separated by a distance equal to about the thickness of the paper web. rlhe surface speed of the small n cylinder may equal about half the surface speed of the large cylinder.

As a preferred means for enabling the rapid cylinder to carry the paper around `and deliver it to the'slow cylinder, air is exhausted fromfthe rapid cylinder through vacuum pip@ 24 threadedl into the end of a hollow hub 25 cast upon a hollow stationary core' 26, -upon which `the revolving hollow cylinder 13 closely fits; said cyllnder 13 lns having ends 27, 28, which tit closely to the surface of the vacuum core at. 32. Thus the paper may be held to the rapid cylinder or carrier by a comparatively weak suction,- and delivered thereby to the crinkling cylinderl8. e Said crinkling cylinder 18 may also `be provided with a stationary cylindrical eX- haust -core 33, having in its periphery depressions 341, communicating by passages 35 with the interior of the exhaust core, the latter having an exhaust opening 36 at one end. The cylinders are each provided .with aclosing end and a driving end, and otherwise the construction of cylinder 18, with the exhaust core and its appurtenances, may correspond substantially with that of"cylinder 13; and the depressions 34 may Vform conduits whereby the air isexhausted through the perforations 19 in the lcrinlirling cylinder. The grooves 34 in the crinkling cylin- ,der may extend nearly to the point of closest approach of the two cylinders, and a much higher vacuum may be maintained in the small cylinder thani'n the large, with the result that the atmospheric `pressure ^strips the paper from the large cylinder and crushes it against the small cylinder. Inasmuch as the surface speed of the small cylinder is much less than that of tlie large cylinder, it results that the paper is packed or pressed by the atmospheric pressure against the small cylinder in a manner to produce irregular plaits or wrinkles, whose characteristics depend to some extent upon the difference in speed of the two cylinders. flhe paper being damp and the exhaust ,be-

llng powerful in the small cylinder, an effecof the paper is thus effected .by

tive crping atmospheric ressure.`

The crpe or crinkled paper maybe vdelivered by the small cylinder at 37 endearried olf in any usual manner. Since half or more ofthe small cylinder is not` wrapped with paper, the imperforate ,portion 38 o1 the exhaust core therein may extend around half or more of its periphery; and illV desired the groove in t e main cylinder may terminate at a point39 well in advance or the linel of nearest approach of the cylinders, so that the paper may be earlier released from the control of the vacuum in the rapid cylinder, and may thereupon be more keasily stripped from the rapid cylinder.

Referring to Figure 3, it will be seen that, inasmuch as the cylinders are placed closely together, and inasmuch as the irregular plaiting or crping tends to lill the space in `the bight of the cylinders, an obstruction may be formed by the advancing web at 40,

which tends to choke the space between the cylinders, and which forms an obstacle against which the main cylinder tends to crush the advancing paper, so that the latter muy be crinkled partly by the crushing against the obstacle and partly by` atmospheric pressure of the crushed paper against the slow' cylinder.

' At Figure 4 the cylinders are illustrated4 as revolving in opposite directions, and the paperrpasses through the constricted throat between the cylinders; the arrangement of the vacuum core for the small cylinder being tleoppositc of the arrangement at Figure 2, so that suction takes place only in perforations that are covered by the crinkled paper. The grooving in both the upper and lower vacuum cores may be disposed with a slight neutral space between the exhaust areas of the two cylinders, as in Figure 2, so that the paper is readily stripped from the large cylinder by the small cylinder. The paper is irregularly plaited against the small cylinder; and, it' desired, the obstruction formed by .this plaiting may constitute an obstruction against which the large cylinder tends to crush the paper, thus more etfectually crinkling the same.

At Figure 5 the arrangement is the same as at Figure 2, except that the cylinders are more separated to permit the introduction of la thin ldoctor-blade 41 between the cylinders, against the edge of which the paper may -be driven by the large. cylinder 13, Awhereby the paper is stripped from the large cylinder and at the same time crinkled,

-' thejcrinkled paper being taken away by the small vacuum cylinder, against which the crimped paper is pinched by atmospheric pressure, to complete the l crinkling Variations may be resorted to within the scope of the invention, and portions of the lmprovements may be used without others. Having thus 'described my invention, l claim: v 1. A papcr-crinkling apparatus comprising adjacentcylinders connected to run at different surface speeds, the slow being a hollow vacuum cylinder and having perforations such that the pressure of air crinkles the paper thereagainst as the paper is delivered at a relatively-high speed by the fast cylinder; h

2. The combination of a perforated hollow revolvlng vacuum cylinder, and means to deliver a web thereto at a speed in excess by the pressure of air may crinkle the paperA against said oylinder of the surface speed of said cylinder, where- 3. Thecombination of a perforated hollow `revolving vacuum cylinder, means to deliver a .web thereto at a speed in excess of the surface speed 0f said cylinder, whereby the pressure of air may crinkle the papery against said cylinder, and means to deliver the crinkled papery from the cylinder.

4. The combination ofa perforated hollow revolving vacuum cylinder, means to deliver a web thereto at aspeed in excess of the surface speed of said cylinder, whereby the pressure of air may crinkle the paper against said cylinder, means to deliver the crinkled paper from the cylinder, and a hoilow stationary vacuum core fitting within said cylinder, and having passages to communicate with the perforations in said cylinder.

5. The combination of a perforated hollow revolving vacuum cylinder, means to deliver a web thereto at a speed in excess of the surface speed of said cylinder, whereby the pressureof air may crinkle the paper against said cylinder, means to deliver the crinkled paper from the cylinder, and a hollow stationary vacuum core fitting within said cylinder, and having passages to 'communicate with the perforations in said cylinder, said passages extending to the point where the cylinder receii es the web.

6. The combination of a perforated hollow revolving vacuum cylinder, means to deliver a web thereto at a speed in excess of the surface speed of said cylinder, whereby the pressure of air may crinkle the paper against said cylinder, means to deliver the crinkled paper from the cylinder, and a hollow stationary vacuum core fitting within said cylinder, and having passages to communicate with the perforations in said cylinder, said passages extending from the point where the cylinder delivers the web to the point where the cylinder receives the web.

7. A rapid suction cylinder for carrying paper to a slow suction cylinder whereby the paper is stripped from the rapid cylnder and crinkled by atmospheric pressure on the slow c linder.

8. The com ination of a hollow perforated vacuum cylinder, and a cylinder adjacent ythereto to run at high speed for delivering paper to said vacuum cylinder, by which the lpaper is crinkled by atmospheric pressure.

-means to produce a vacuum in the rapid cylinder from the intake side thereof to the delivery pointthereof, and means to produce a vacuum inthe slow cylinder from the intake point thereof.

11. The combination of a hollow perforated vacuum cylinder, a cylinder adjacent thereto to run at high speed for delivering paper to-said vacuum cylinder, by which the paper is crinkled by atmospheric pressure, means to produce a vacuum in the rapid cylinder from the intake side threof to the delivery point thereof, and means to produce a vacuum in the slow cylinder from. the intake point thereof, said cylinders rotating in the same direction.

12. The combination of a hollow perforated vacuuin cylinder, a cylinder adjacent thereto to run at high speed for delivering paper to said vacuum cylinder, by which the paper is crinkled by atmospheric pressure, vmeans to produce a vacuum in the rapid cylinder from the intake side thereof to the delivery point thereof, and means to produce a vacuum in the slow cylinder from being about half the diameter of the rapid cylinder.

13. The combination of a hollow perforated vacuum cylinder, a cylinder adjacent thereto to runY at high speed for delivering paper to said vacuum cylinder, by which the paper is crinkled by atmospheric pressure, means to produce a vacuum in the rapid cylinder from the intake side thereof to the delivery point thereof, and means to produce a vacuum in the slow cylinder from the intake point thereof, the slow cylinder being about half the diameter of the rapid cylinder, and geared to revolve at `about half the surface speed of the latter.

14. The combination of a hollow perforated vacuum cylinder, a cylinder adjacent thereto to run at high speed for delivering paper to said vacuum cylinder, by which the paper is crinkled by atmospheric ressure, means to produce a vacuum in t e rapid cylinder from the intake side thereof to the delivery point thereof, and means to produce a vacuum in the slow cylinder from the intake point thereof, the slow cylinder be-` ing about half the diameter of the rapid cylinder, and geared to revolve at about half the surface speed of the latter, said cylinders revolving almost in contact.

15. The combination of `a hollow perforated vacuum cylinder, and a cylinder adjacent thereto to run at high speed for dey l sages to communicate with perforations in ly slowhigh vacuum cylinder,l whereby fat-f 'said cylinder from the intakeside thereof to the delivery point thereof. i

16. The combination of a hollow perforated vacuum cylinder, and a cylinder adjacent thereto to run at high s eed for delivering paper to said'vacuum cy inder, by which the paper is crinkled byl atmospliericpressure, the slow cylinder having a stationary cylindrical exhaust core, with ,'passa'es to communicate with perforations in sai slow cyli/nder from the intake Side delivery sidethercof A 17. The process ot'transvers'ely crinkling foi-ated cylinder having a high4 degree of vacuum, which crinkles the` paper as it is stripped `from the fast cylinder, each of said cylinders having a`vacuu'm core prof vided with passages communicating with perforations in said cylinders from the iiitake side Yto the deliveryvpoint, and from the vacuum cylinder on t e delivery side dpoint beyond the delivery point of the rapi cylinder, Well in advance of theline of nearest approach of the cylinders.

thereof to the a web, .comprising moistening the web, hold-, ing it onto a relatively rapid cylinderby fluid pressure, and delivering it to a relative- '.inospheric pressure crinkles the paper de-l` livered by the rapid :cylinder to the slowcylinder.

18. The process of transversely criiikling a web, comprising moistening the web, holding it onto a relatively rapid cylinder b tliereof to the delivery point thereof, and delivering it tol a relatively slow cylinder, maintaining a high vacuum in the'slow cyl-4 inder from the intake point to the delivery atmospheric pressure side thereof whereb a delivered by the rapid crinlles the paper cylinder to the slow cylinder.

19. The processl of crinklingpaper, comprising cari'ying it around a, relatively rapid cylinder, and stripping it from said cylinder by means of a slowly-moving perforated cylinder having a high'degree of vacuum, which crinkles the paper as itis stripped from the fast cylinder.

cylinder having a high degree of vacuum,

which crinkles the paper as it is stripped from thefast cylinder, said crinkling cylinder having a vacuum core therein, having passages to communicate with perfora- 4tions in the crinkling cylinder from the intake point thereoflto the delivery side thereof.

22. The process of crinkling paper, comprising carrying it around a relatively .rapid cylinder by means of atmospheric' ressure, and stripping it from said cylinder by means of a slowly-moving perfluid pressure from the intake side..

23. The process of crinkling paper, coinprising carrying it around a relatively rapid f cylinder by means of atmospheric pressure, releasing the paper from the control'of atniospliericpressure on said rapid cylinder, and then strip inor cylinder by nieans of a` slowly-moving perorated cylinder having a high'degree of vacuum, which crinkles the aper as it is stripped 'from the fast cylin er.

y24E.l The process of crinkling paper, comp'rising causing it to adhere to a rapidlyrevolving c linder, and to forman obstruction in the ight between said cylinder and a slowlyrevolving cylinder turning in the samedi-rection as the rapid cylinder, crinkling the aper against such obstruction, and causing t e -crinkled 2'5. The process of vcrinlrling paper, coin prising causing it to adhere to a rapidlyrevolvin cylinder, and to form an obstrucpaper to be carried *oi by the slow cylinder.

it from said tion in t el bight between said cylinder and a slowly-revolving cylinder turning inthe kling the paper against such obstruction, and causing the crinkled paper to be carried off by the slow cylinder and lcompressed by means of atmospheric pressurethereon.

`saine direction as the rapid cylinder, crin- 26. rlhe `process of crinkling paper, comi prising causing it to adhere to a 'rapidlyrevolving cylinder, and to form'an obstruction in the biglit between lsaid cylinder and a slowly-revolving cylinder turning in thel saine direction as the rapid cylinder, crinkling the paper against such obstruction, and causing the crinlrled paper to be carried off by the slow cylinder, adoctor-blade being provided between said cylinders against the end of which the paper is crushed by the rapid cylinder. j Y

QZ. The process of carrying a web ofl paper over a vacuum cylinder or drum, releasing itfrom the `control of theV vacuum in the drurn or cylinder, transferring the web to a slow-moving vacuum cylinder, and causing the paper to be crinlrled by reason of the vacuum in said slow cylinder.

' 28. The process of crinkling paper, comprising causing it to adhere to arapidlyrevolving cylinder, and to form an obstruc` tion in the bight between said cylinder and a slowly-revolving cylinder turning in the same direction as the rapid cylinder, crin- Luengo of which thepaper is transferred in such manner that 1t 1s crinkled; and means for 10 driving the same at different speeds.

VILLIAM A. LORENZ.

Witnesses:

D. MAUDE SMITH, MARGARET T. DENNrs.

US1548790A 1921-07-02 1921-07-02 Paper crinkling Expired - Lifetime US1548790A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1548790A US1548790A (en) 1921-07-02 1921-07-02 Paper crinkling

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1548790A US1548790A (en) 1921-07-02 1921-07-02 Paper crinkling

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1548790A true US1548790A (en) 1925-08-04

Family

ID=23914776

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US1548790A Expired - Lifetime US1548790A (en) 1921-07-02 1921-07-02 Paper crinkling

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1548790A (en)

Cited By (13)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2934865A (en) * 1954-02-03 1960-05-03 Jesse R Crossan Method of packaging and sheet material for same
US3061505A (en) * 1958-04-16 1962-10-30 Helasti Olavi Method and apparatus for imparting enhanced stretchability to paper
US3104197A (en) * 1959-06-29 1963-09-17 Crown Zellerbach Corp Extensible paper and the process of producing the same
DE1203111B (en) * 1959-06-29 1965-10-14 Crown Zellerbach Corp Apparatus for producing a crepe paper
US3220914A (en) * 1960-12-27 1965-11-30 Cons Paper Corp Ltd Manufacture of crepe paper
US3804706A (en) * 1970-07-29 1974-04-16 Kuraray Co Inorganic fiber board with binder of thermosetting resin and thermoplastic vinylic resin
WO1981001427A1 (en) * 1979-11-16 1981-05-28 F Catallo Method and apparatus for the compressive treatment of fabric
US4447938A (en) * 1980-10-08 1984-05-15 Frank Catallo Method and apparatus utilizing an impact blade for the compressive treatment of fabric
US4689862A (en) * 1986-04-25 1987-09-01 Frank Catallo Method and apparatus for the compressive treatment of fabric
US4834838A (en) * 1987-02-20 1989-05-30 James River Corporation Fibrous tape base material
US5223092A (en) * 1988-04-05 1993-06-29 James River Corporation Fibrous paper cover stock with textured surface pattern and method of manufacturing the same
US5904812A (en) * 1997-06-16 1999-05-18 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Calendered and embossed tissue products
US6248211B1 (en) 1997-06-16 2001-06-19 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method for making a throughdried tissue sheet

Cited By (17)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2934865A (en) * 1954-02-03 1960-05-03 Jesse R Crossan Method of packaging and sheet material for same
US3061505A (en) * 1958-04-16 1962-10-30 Helasti Olavi Method and apparatus for imparting enhanced stretchability to paper
US3104197A (en) * 1959-06-29 1963-09-17 Crown Zellerbach Corp Extensible paper and the process of producing the same
DE1203111B (en) * 1959-06-29 1965-10-14 Crown Zellerbach Corp Apparatus for producing a crepe paper
US3220914A (en) * 1960-12-27 1965-11-30 Cons Paper Corp Ltd Manufacture of crepe paper
US3804706A (en) * 1970-07-29 1974-04-16 Kuraray Co Inorganic fiber board with binder of thermosetting resin and thermoplastic vinylic resin
WO1981001427A1 (en) * 1979-11-16 1981-05-28 F Catallo Method and apparatus for the compressive treatment of fabric
US4363161A (en) * 1979-11-16 1982-12-14 Frank Catallo Method and apparatus for the compressive treatment of fabric
US4447938A (en) * 1980-10-08 1984-05-15 Frank Catallo Method and apparatus utilizing an impact blade for the compressive treatment of fabric
US4689862A (en) * 1986-04-25 1987-09-01 Frank Catallo Method and apparatus for the compressive treatment of fabric
WO1987006632A1 (en) * 1986-04-25 1987-11-05 Frank Catallo Method and apparatus for the compressive treatment of fabric
US4834838A (en) * 1987-02-20 1989-05-30 James River Corporation Fibrous tape base material
US5223092A (en) * 1988-04-05 1993-06-29 James River Corporation Fibrous paper cover stock with textured surface pattern and method of manufacturing the same
US5314584A (en) * 1988-04-05 1994-05-24 James River Corporation Fibrous paper cover stock with textured surface pattern and method of manufacturing the same
US5904812A (en) * 1997-06-16 1999-05-18 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Calendered and embossed tissue products
US6077390A (en) * 1997-06-16 2000-06-20 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Calendered and embossed tissue products
US6248211B1 (en) 1997-06-16 2001-06-19 Kimberly-Clark Worldwide, Inc. Method for making a throughdried tissue sheet

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US3489406A (en) Folding apparatus
US3572681A (en) Apparatus for interfolding webs
US3296710A (en) Absorbent dryer
US4254947A (en) Sheet overlap device
US4693784A (en) Suction roll and method for applying a negative pressure over a sector of a roll
US2851934A (en) Manufacture of envelopes
US2593328A (en) Perforated multiple ply bag
US5332472A (en) Application of fluidized material to a substrate using displacement transfer
US4263724A (en) Traveling web drying apparatus
US2353445A (en) Folding and delivery mechanism
US2060082A (en) Means for attaching printing plates to presses
US4279411A (en) Method of lapping webs
US2039236A (en) All size rotary web press
US2092952A (en) Paper interfolding machine
US2171259A (en) Process for welding film
US6695245B1 (en) Turn-up apparatus and method
US1582842A (en) Elastic paper
US5653429A (en) Cylinder folding apparatus
US1548783A (en) Apparatus for and method of making crinkled fabric
US3931682A (en) Liquid removing method and apparatus
US3802639A (en) Method and apparatus for coreless spool production
US1714261A (en) Paper-converting machinery
US2144263A (en) Method of and machine for making tie bands
US6743334B2 (en) Method and apparatus for making a tissue paper with improved tactile qualities while improving the reel-up process for a high bulk web
US1834852A (en) Paper making machinery