US1548783A - Apparatus for and method of making crinkled fabric - Google Patents

Apparatus for and method of making crinkled fabric Download PDF

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US1548783A
US1548783A US34631019A US1548783A US 1548783 A US1548783 A US 1548783A US 34631019 A US34631019 A US 34631019A US 1548783 A US1548783 A US 1548783A
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cylinder
web
paper
corrugations
means
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William A Lorenz
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OTAKA FABRIC Co
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OTAKA FABRIC Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B31MAKING ARTICLES OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER; WORKING PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31FMECHANICAL WORKING OR DEFORMATION OF PAPER, CARDBOARD OR MATERIAL WORKED IN A MANNER ANALOGOUS TO PAPER
    • B31F1/00Mechanical deformation without removing material, e.g. in combination with laminating
    • B31F1/12Crêping
    • B31F1/122Crêping the paper being submitted to an additional mechanical deformation other than crêping, e.g. for making it elastic in all directions

Description

Aug. 4, 1925. 1,548,783 W. A. LORENZ APPARATUS FOR AND METHOD OF MAKING CRINKLED FABRIC Filed Dec, 2OJ 1919 5 Sheets-Sheet 1 Aug. 4, 1925.

l l 1,548,783 W. A. LORENZ APPARATUS FOR AND METHOD OF MAKING CRINKLED FABRIC Filed Dec, 20, 1919 f2 .5, 5/ y 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 fnvenzor LORENZ Aug. 4, 1925.

APPARATUS FOR AND METHOD OFMAKING GRINKLED FABRIC.

5 Sheets-Sheet 5 Filed DeG. 20, 1919 Patented Aug. 4, 1925..

UNITED STATES y naar PA'rEN'r oFFicE.

WILLIAM A. LORENZ, OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, ASSIGNOR TO THE OTAKA FABQRIC COMPANY, OF HARTFORD, CONNECTICUT, A CORPORATION OF CONNECTICUT.

APPARATUS FOR AND METHOD OF MAKING 'CRINKLED FABRIC.

Application filed December 20, 1919. Serial No. 346,310.

To all who/m, it may concern.' p

Be it known that l, WILLIAM A. LORENZ, a citizen of the United States, residing in Hartford, in the county of Hartford and State of Connecticut, have invented certainnew and useful Improvements in Apparatus for and Methods of Making Crinkled Fabric, of which the following is a specification.

This inventionrelates to the crinkling of paper, etc.

An object of the invention is to crinkle paper and other fabricl in suoli a manner that it will be elastic or yielding in all directions andv possess other valuable properties.

To this end the npaper or fabric,which may be in the form of a web, is led from a supply roll or spool between formers, which may consist of sets of bars or ribs, which corrugate the web longitudinally. The web may then be led around a cylinder, to which it may be caused to cling by the use of a vacuum appliance. rllhe cylinder has grooves into which the corrugations of the paper fit. The paper is advanced edge foremost against a crimping` obstruction in the form of a doctor blade, which strips the web from the cylinder and in so doing crinkles the web transversely. The doctor blade has teeth which mesh into the grooves in the cylinder, so that all portions of the web are transversely crinkled; that is, not only the tops and bottoms of the ridges or flutes, but also the intervening portions, so that the web is entirely crinkled, and the roduct is there` fore a crinkled web in which the crinkles undulate or form waves continuously across the sheet. This paper or other fabric. is elastic in all directions, and is capable of a wide' range of use.

Other features and advantages will hereinafter appear.

In the accompanying drawings,

Figure-1 represents a plan view of the ap paratus to carry out the process.

Figure 2 is a central longitudinal view on the line 2 2 of Figure 1.

Figure 3 is a front View looking in the direction of the crinkling blade and the grooved cylinder.

Figure 4 shows a sectional view on an enlarged scale of a portion of the cylinder, the crinkling blade and the roll adjacent to that blade, taken on the line 2 2 of Figure 1.

Figure 5 shows a sectional view on the line 7 7 of Figure 1, showing a portion of the fluting blade.

Figure 6 shows ay plan View and y Figure 7 a side view of the steps inthe process of forming this paper.

Figure 8 shows a section on the line 8 8 of Figure 6 of a portion of a sheet of paper.

Figure 9 is a section on the line 9 9 of Figure 6,7shovwing the iiuting or grooving.

Figure 10 shows a section on the line 10-10 of Figure 6, showing the crinkled paper. y j

Figure 11 is a full-size view of part of a sheet produced by the novel method.

The paper or other web to be treated may be led (preferably in dry condition) from a supply spool 10, rotation of which may be, retarded by a brake device, comprising an inclined strap 11 suspended from a fixture 12 and pulled down by a weight 13. The paper is led from this supply roll over aroll or drum 14, which uides the paper into the jaws of a forming evice, comprislng co-o'perative ribbed plates 15,16, whereby the' web is longitudinally corrugated or liuted reparatory to being transversely crimple or crinkled. These forming plates, which may be supported yby means of bars 17 upon the side arms 18 of the machine, have sets of converging ribs 17a formed in their opposing faces, the ribs being shown in cross-section at Figure 5, and their` converging arrangement being shown in plan at Figure 1. The ribs in one set extend into the grooves between the ribs of the other set, so as to give the paper the desired corrugation. ,As l'the web advances, the corrugations formed are at first shallow and finally deep, this deepening being due to the relative sloping arrangement of the ribs or formers, one set be-` ing inclined relatively to the other set. The

extent to which the ribs in one set sink into the grooves in the other set is least at the receiving end and greatest at the emergent end of the forming plates, whereby the fab-l ric. is gradually contracted in width and changed from the fiat form into the deeply and smoothly or evenly corrugated web seen at 19, Figure 5.

The fabric is considerably contracted in width upon emerging from the corrugating plates 15, 16. It may be led over the top of a guide roll 21, upon which preferablyv runs a companion roll 20, both rolls being provided with peripheral grooves 21a that may correspond or agree with the corrugations that have been made in the paper by the plates 15, 16. The upper roll 2O may aid,

having peripheral grooves 23 to correspond With those of the rolls 20 and 21, so that the iutes and ridges in the corrugated paper it into the contour of the main cylinder. Roll 21 may be juxtaposed to or press against the main cylinder 22, at the point where the corrugated paper leaves 21 to curve in the re verse direction around the under side of cylinder 22, the ribs on 21 preferably meshing with those on 22, these rolls co-operating to v grip the corrugated paper at this point where the reverse bend begins, and the roll 2l being driven in any suitable way, as, Jfor example, by cylinder 22, and this may be eiected either through both the longitudinal pull upon the web and thel pressure of one roll against the other or in any other 4suitable way. Said main cylinder 22 therefore draws the paper off from the retarded supply 10, and around the guide roll 14 and through the 'luters 15, 16, and also around the roll 21; and said cylinder 22 also effects the transveiie crimping of the corrugated or fluted we By reason of the stii'ened condition of the corrugated web, it resists being bent closely around cylinder 22, and tends to bulge away from the same. To overcome this tendency, and insure that the -Web shall bend closely around the cylinder and cling thereto at all points, so that the cylinder may exert the desired control over the web, there is provided means for exhausting the air from Within the stifened web, whereby it is pinched against the cylinder by atmospheric pressure. F orthis purpose thereis preferably employed a vacuum box 25, from which air is exhausted through a pipe 26. This vacuum box is stationary and conforms to the curvature of cylinder 22 and is open only upon the cylinder side. One side of the box extends at 27 far into the bight of roll 21 with cylinder 22; and the opposite j side of the. box has a side portion or member 30, having a corresponding relation with the bight of said cylinder with a delivery roll 33, presently to be described, so that exhaustion of the air from the box. produces a partial vacuum between the web and the cylinder 22, thus permitting the stil/tened web to be pressed at all points firmly against the cylinder by the atmosphere. The edge portion of the box at 27 may be provided upon its outer side with grooves and ridges to tit the corrugations in the web, or with teeth (similar to 31 at Figure 3) to lie within the troughs in the web, so that this box edge may lie close against the web upon the roll 21, to exclude' the air, thus conducing to the successful exhaustion of.,air from between the web andthe cylinder-22, at the point where the web advances upon the cylinder, so that this portion of the web is at once pinched against the cylinder by the atmosphere, which maintains its,.c0ntrol until the point is reached where the web is to be stripped from the cylinder'.

The opposite side of the box comprises said member 30, which, as seen at Figures 3 and 4, is in the nature of a metal blade formed with teeth 31, .which fit. into the grooves 23 upon the cylinder 22 with sufficient tightness to permit the required partial va-cuum to be made within the web as it advances upon the cylinder 22.

Close to said blade 30, which is termed a `doctor blade, may be mounted a. webfeeding or pressure roll 33 (driven by any suitable means), which has peripheral grooves 34 to match the corrugations in the web and to co-operate with the cylinder 22 to hold the web firmly where the latter encounters the doctor blade or obstruction v 30;v The periphery of the roll 33 may be made of soft rubber or other elastic material if desired. The pressure exerted by the atmosphere in holding the web against the cylinder and the force of the feeding roll 33 may be relied upon to urge or force the leading portion of the advancing web edge- I Wise against theilower part of the stationary doctor blade, to enable the latter to strip the web from the cylinder by a web-crimping action; so that the web as it strips from the cylinder is crimped or crinkled by the co-operatio-n of the blade with the cylinder and the roll 33. The roll 33 may have a smooth face if desired, i. e., it may be lain or uncorrugated. The front face o the tangent doctor blade 30 may be made entirely straight, or it may be beveled or formed at an angle at its lower edge, so as to hold back the paper which runs across its face in order to crinkle it, as shown at 35, Figure 4.

The originally corrugated paper is thus formed with crinkles which conform generally .to the corrugations and therefore extend in undulations across the web. In other words, the crinkling or crimpling extends into the grooving or corrugations, -so thatthe product is .crinkled over. its entire weaves surface, asset forth in my (zo-pending application No. 333,750, iiled Octob'er27, 1919,

which covers the novel product herein disclosed. The proportion of the grooving 'in width and depth may be made as desired,

4crimping operation may be varied according to the. thickness or quality of the paper to be crimpled. The crinkled paper emerges over delivery rolls or belts 36.

`fis delivered as at 57.

The process is illustrated in 'Figures 6 to 10, in which the width of the original web is shown at 50 (enlarged in Figure 8), which is contracted from 51 to the width desired as at 52 (enlarged in Figure 9). Then the paper passes around the roll 21 -as at 53, and then around the cylinder 22 as at 54, and under the pressure. roll 33 as at 55. There it emerges against the, doctor blade or crimper as at 56, and becomes crinkled and 'The paper may be dry throughout the entire operation, but in some cases it is desirable to moisten the paper slightly, and this may be done either by the use of steam, or by means of an atomizing device on either side rof the web, .or on both sides.

rlhere is illustrated a sprinkling pipe 58,'

Figure 2, extending along the web at one side to moisten the same. There is also shown a sprinkling pipe 59 extending across the web on'the other side, so that either one or both sides may be watered or moistened.

Preferably, the moistened' paper is dried while in the machine, and for this purpose the cylinder 22 may be heated, so that the paper, in passing over the hot cylinder, will be deliveredv dryor nearly so, its condition depending upon the degree of heat and the diameter of the cylinder. 'lhe corrugations and crinkles in t-he product will be sti'er and stand up better, and will also be more elastic and hold better against the tendency to stretch, if the crinkling is done while the paper is hot. rlhe cylinder may be heated by a steamV pipe 60 entering through the end of a hollow axle 61 which supports the cylinder. Condensation in the cylinder may be drained through a pipe 63 at the other end of the hollow axle. rlhe product, as set forth in said application, is elastic in all directions, owing to the undulatory character of the crinl'rling; and the elasticity is increased by drying the dampened paper at the crinkling operation, as

, above explained.

Any other suitable means may be employed for forming the web into longitudinal grooves, as at 52, and the paper thus grooved may be passed either around the cylinder 22, or in a straight line, or otherwise against a doctor blade, to form the paper in line transverse crinkles which undulate or followvthe general contour of the grooves er waves.

At Figure 10, which is an enlarged sec'- tional view on the line 10--10 of Figure 6, is shown diagrammatically the irregular crinkling that is produced in the fabric. llt will .be observed that the longitudinal corrugations which are originally made in the `web, as at Figure 9, will be converted into' crinkled or irregular troughs and ridges or ribs.

rl'he speed of the machine may be varied and therebythe crinkling may be modified,

a low speed tending -to make the crinklesk sharp and deep, while high speed tends to make themo shallow and open. In this and other ways, various designs in crinkling may be produced, coarse or line. Variation in n the appearance of the crinkling may also be made by making the front face'of the doctor blade more or less abrupt. Variations in the crinkling may also be produced by varying the degree of vacuum in the vacuum box, so as to cause the atmosphere to hold the stilened web more or less closely to the cylinder 22, and urge it with more orless force against the doctor blade or crinkling device 30. The paper may be crinkled dry if preferred, but if it is made slightly moist and then dried upon the heated cylinder during the crinkling operation, the crinkled paper will be more elastic. lt will not be usually desirable to take -the preliminary step of dipping'the paper into a saturating water bath, which would be liable to weaken the paper permanently. rllhe invention is not limited to moistening the paper after the corrugating operation, since it is often desirable to effect the moistening before (or during) corrugation thereof, on one or both sides.

ll am aware of the British patent to Parrish, No. 1610 of 1871, covering wrinkled paper which is corrugated transversely to the Wrinkles, to render the paper elastic 1n all directions, said patent setting forth:

The corrugations or wrinkles in the sheetY are all in one direction, so that the sheet is elastic only in the opposite direction, but-by passing the sheet through or between a pair of corrugated or wrinkled rollers or plates 1n the opposite direction the sheet can be made elastic all Ways. v The invention herein disclosed is manifestly distinct from the process of said Par# rish patent, since my novel undulatingly crinkled sheet and my novel process possess obviousadvantages over the process disclosed by Parrish of modifying paper which has originally been crinkled in one direction by passing it between corrugated rolls which then corrugate the paper in the other direction.

lt will be seen that theprocess of forming elastic paper or fabric which is elestic in all.

directions, comprises narrowing the Width of the web or sheet by producing longitudinal grooves or corrugations therein, then moving the web so corrugated against an obstruction in the form of a doctor blade, which converts the corrugated web into mal terial in which crinkles run in Waves across the Web, conforming more or less closely to the Waves or corrugations Which are originally made in the Web, whereby the smooth Wave-like corrugations are converted into crinkled corrugations. The invention, however, is not limited to the process of reducing the width of the web. Any suitable paper or webmay be employed, such, as sulphite or Wood-pulp or kraft papers.

Variations may be resorted to Withinv the scope of the invention, and portions of Ithe improvements may be used Without others.

Having thus described my invention, I claim:

1. The process of forming paper Vor fabric elastic in all directions, consisting in corrugating a web or sheet longitudinally, thereby reducing it inwidth, and advancing the corrugated paper edgewise in the direction ofthe corrugations While obstructing it at its leading. portion, to crinkle the sheet transversely of the corrugations, with the crinkles conforming generally to the contour of said corrugations.

2. The process of making a paper elastic in all directions, comprising forming the paper in longitudinal corrugat-ions and advancing the paper in the direction of the corrugations While preserving the corrugated condition of the paper by unsupported atmospheric pressure thereon, While obstructing its path to crinkle the corrugations transversely of their length.

3. The process of 'making a paper elasticA in all directions, comprising, first, forming the paper into longitudinal grooves, and, second, forming the grooves and corrugations into minute crinkles throughout.

4. The process of making a paper elastic in all directions, comprising, first, forming the paper into longitudinal grooves, and, second, forming thevgrooves and corrugations into minute crinkles throughout, by advancing the paper edgewise in the direction of the grooves while obstructingits path.

'5. The process of forming in a sheet 1ongitudinal corrugations, moistening the sheet, and advancing the sheet While obstructing its leading edge or portion to form it into transverse crinkles, and simultaneously heating the sheet.

6. The process of advancing corrugated paper or fabric in the direction of the corrugations While obstructing at all points the path of the advancing fabric, to crinkle it throughout its corrugations in lines transverse thereto.

7. The process of advancing moistened corrugated paper or fabric in the direction of the corrugations While obstructing at all points the path of the advancing fabric, to crinkle it throughout its corrugations in lines transverse thereto.

8. The process of advancing ymoistened corrugated paper or fabric in the direction of the corrugations While obstructing at all points the path of theadvancing fabric, to crinkle it throughout its corrugations in lines transverse thereto, and heating the paperto vdry it at the crinkling operation.

9. The process of making the hereinbefore-described fabric, comprising, first, producing corrugations in the fabric, and, second, advancing the corrugated sheet in a direction longitudinal of the corrugations, While obstructing the advance of the fabric at its leading edge or portion in a manner to crinkle thefabric throughout said corrugations, the crinkles being transverse to the corrugations.

10. The process of making the hereinbefore-described fabric, comprising, first, producing corrugations in the fabric, and, sec* ond, advancing the corrugated'sheet in a direction longitudinal of the corrugations, While obstructing the advance of the fabric at its leading edge or portion in a manner to crinkle the fabric throughout said corrugations, the crinkles being transverse to the corrugations, moistening the paper preparatory to the crinkling operation.

11. The process of making the hereinbe fore' described fabric, comprising, first, pro- Y ducing corrugations in the fabric, and, second, advancing the corrugated sheet in a direction ,longitudinal of the corrugations, while obstructing the advance of the fabric at its leading edge or portion in a manner to crinkle the fabric throughout said corrugations, the crinkles being transverse to the l nally corrugating a Web and "reducing its- Width, advancing the paper and bending it facewise first in one direction and then in the other by atmospheric pressure as it advances, and obstructing its leading edge to 'i effect crimping thereof throughout the corrugations.

14. The process of making a paper elasiaa'ree tic in all directions, comprisinglongitudinallyv corrugating the web, dampening the Web, heating the Web, and obstructing its leading edge to crinkle it transversely entirely across the corrugations.

15. The combination of means for longitudinally corrugating a paper or fabr1c, means for advancing the paper through the corrugating means, means for retarding the A paper as it is led into said corrugating means," and means for obstructing' the corrugatedipaper to crinkle it throughout its corrugations transversely thereof.

16. The combination of means for longitudinally corrugating a paper or fabric, means for advancing the paper through the corrugating means, means for retarding the paper as it is led into said corrugating means, and means for 'obstructing the corrugated paper to crinkle it throughout its corrugations transversely thereof, said corrugating means comprising opposite setsof convergent forming barsor ribs, the ribs in one set 'meshing with those in the other set.

17. 'The combination of means for longitudinally corrugating a web, a pair of feedrolls at the delivery side of said corrugating means, said rolls having meshing peripheral ribs to correspond to the corrugations in the Web, a main cylinder upon which one of said rolls runs, said main cylinder being peripherally grooved, a doctor blade having .teeth inserted in the grooves in said main cylinder, and a feed-roll running upon said main cylinder. in proximity to said doctor blade.

18. The combination of means for longitudinally corrugating a Web, a pair of feedrolls at the delivery side of said corrugating means, said rolls having meshing peripheral ribs to correspond to the corrugations in the Web, a main cylinder upon which one of said rolls runs, said main cylinder being peripherally grooved, a doctor blade having teeth inserted in the grooves in said 'main cylinder, and a feed-roll running upon said main cylinder in proximityto said doctor blade, means being provided for exhausting air to cause the atmosphere to press the corrugated Web into lthe grooves upon the main cylinder. y

19.- rfhe combination of means forilongitudinally corrugating a web, a pair of feedrolls at the delivery side of said corrugating means, said rolls having meshing peripheral ribs to correspond to the corrugations in the Web, a main cylinder upon which one of said rolls runs, said main cylinder being peripherally grooved, a doctor blade having teeth inserted in the y rooves insaid main cylinder, and a feed-roll running upon said main cylinder in proximity to said doctor blade, means being provided for exhausting air to cause the atmosphere to press the `'.zorrugated Web into the grooves upon the main cylinder, said exhausting means comprising a vacuum box fitting around the periphery of said cylinder and open at said periphery and comprising said doctor blade,

the teeth on the blade obstructing the inflow Y 20. The combination of means for narrowing a sheet or Web by producing longitudinal corrugations therein, means for advancing the corrugated Web, and means, including a serrated doctor blade, for 0bstructing the advance of the Web in a manner to convert it into transversely crinkled material, with the crinkles conforming generally to the corrugations.

21. rlhe combination with a doctor blade having serrations, of means'for advancing a corrugated fabric in the direction of the -corrugations edgewise upon or against said doctor blade at its serrations, to convert the fabric into transversely crinkled material elastic inall directions, With the crinkles conforming generally to the contour of the original corrugations.

22. The combination of means for narrowing a Web by forming longitudinal corrugations therein, a corrugated cylinder over which the Web is led, means for exhausting air to enable the atmosphere to pinch the Web against the cylinder, a doctor blade and means to co-operate With said cylinder to force the leading end or portion of the web against the doctor blade, to crinkle the paper by converting the smooth Wave-like corrugations into crinkled Wavelike corrugations.

23. The combination of a device for forming a `Web into longitudinal corrugations, a peripherally grooved roll over Which the web is led, a main cylinder having peripheral grooves to correspond With the corrugations in the Web, the ribs on said main cylinder running in mesh with those on said grooved roll, a doctor blade mounted at the delivery side of said cylinder and having teeth to enter the grooves in the' main cylinder, and a feeding roll runnlng uponthe main cylinder in proximity7 to said doctor blade. A

24. rl`he combination of a device for forming a Web into longitudinal corrugations, a peripherally grooved roll over Wh1ch. the Web is led, a main cylinder having peripheral grooves to correspond With the corrugations in the web, the ribs on said main cylinder running in mesh with those on sa1d xgrooved roll, means for exhausting air to cause the atmosphere to press the Web againstl the cylinder, a doctor blade mounted at the delivery side of said cylinder and having teeth to enter the grooves in the main cylinder, and a feeding roll running upon the main cylinder in proximity to said doctor blade.

25. The combination of a device for forming a web into longitudinal corrugations, a peripherallygrooved roll over Which the Web is led, amain cylinder having peripheral grooves to correspond With the corrugationsin the web, the ribs on said main cylinder running in mesh With those on said grooved roll, a doctor bl'ademounted at the delivery side of said cylinder and having teeth to enter the grooves in the main cylinder, a feeding roll running upon the main cylinder in proximity to said doctor blade, and means :for dampening the paper preparatory to advancing around said main cylinder.

Y 26. AThe combination of a device for forni` ing a Web into longitudinal corrugations, a peripherally grooved roll over which the Web is led, a main cylinder having peripheralA grooves to correspond with theI corrugations in the web, the ribs on said main cylinder running in mesh With those on said grooved roll, a doctor blade mounted at the delivery side of vsaid cylinder and having teeth to enter the grooves in the main cylinder, a feeding roll running upon the main cylinder in proximity to said doctor blade, means for dampening the paper preparatory to advancing around said main cylinder, and means for heating the cylinder.

27. The combination of a device for forming aweb into longitudinal corrugations, a cylinder having peripheral grooves to correspond with the corrugations in the Web, a doctor blade mounted at the delivery side of said cylinder and having teeth to enter the grooves in the cylinder, and means to cooperate vvith the doctor blade to crinkle the paper.

28. The combination of a device for forming a web into longitudinal corrugations, a cylinder having peripheral grooves to correspond with the corrugations in the web, means for exhausting air to cause the atmosphere to press the Web against the cylinder, a doctor blade mounted at the de'- Iivery side of said cylinder and having teeth to enter the grooves in the cylinder, and means -to co-operate with the doctor blade to c rinkle the paper.

29. The combination of a device for forming a Web into longitudinalI corrugations, a

cylinder having -peripheral grooves to correspond With the corrugations in the web, a doctor blade mounted at4 the delivery side of said cylinder and having teeth to enter the grooves in the cylinder, means to co-operate with the doctor blade to crinkle the paper,

'and means for heating the cylinder.

30. The combination of a supply-roll, a guide-roll over Which a web is led from the supply-roll, a device for formingthe web into longitudinal corrugations, a peripherally grooved feeding roll between which the Web is led, a main cylinder peripherally grooved t0 correspond With the corrugations of the Web, means for exhausting air to` cause the atmosphere' to press the Web against the cylinder, a doctor blade mounted at the delivery side of said cylinder and having teeth to enter the grooves in the main cylinder, and a peripherally grooved -elastic feeding roll running upon the main cylinder in proximity to said doctor blade.

31. The combination of a supply-roll, a-

brake. therefor, a guide-roll over Which a Web is led from the supply-roll, a device for forming the Web into longitudinal corrugations, comprisingl opposite plates having converging ribs or bars on each plate sloping into the grooves in the other plate, peripherally grooved feed-rolls between Which the Web is led from said plates, a main cylinder having a peripheral groove to correspond with the corrugations of the web, thev ribs on said main cylinder running in mesh with those on one of said feed-rolls, means for exhausting air between the web and the main cylinder, to cause the atmosphere to press the web against the cylinder, said ex hausting means comprising a vacuum box having a side which extends into the bight of said cylinder and its said feed-rolhsaid side being toothed to enter the grooves in the feed-roll to obstruct the inflow of air, a dootor blade mounted at the delivery side of said cylinder and forming a part of said vacuum box and having teeth to enter the grooves in the main cylinder, a peripherally grooved feeding-roll running upon the main cylinder in proximity to saiddoctor blade, and having an elastic surface, said doctor blade having its toothed portion at an angle, to hold back the advancing paper and crinkle it, in both grooves and ridges, means for dampening the paper on both sides preparatory to advancing it around said main cylinder, and means for heating the cylinder to dry the paper. 32. The combination of means for longitudinally corrugating a web of paper or the like, means for heating the paper, and means for obstructing the corrugated heated paper to crinkle it throughout its corrugations transversely thereof.

33. The combination of means for longitudinally corrugating a web of paper or the like, means for moistening the paper, means for heating the paper, and means for obstructing the corrugated heated paper to crinkle it throughout its corrugations transversely thereof.

34. Apparatus for making stretchable paper,-comprising a rotatablel drum having a suction box associated therewith and operative upon the surface thereof, and a doctor co-operative with said drum, said drum, suction box and doctor having a` construction and relative arrangement for crinkling the paper Web both transversely and longi tudinally. l i

35. ln an apparatus for operating on pagating a Web and advancing'the web while per, the combination of a supporting sur ace `obstructing its path and While maintaining 1o for the paper having grooves therein paralit 'in corrugated condition to` crinkle the le] with the direction of travel of the paper corrugations transversely.

5 and a crinkle-forming abutment having ser- WILLIAM A. LORENZ.

rations -tting into said grooves. Witnesses:

36. Theprocess in the art of making pa- CATHERINE A. NEWELL,

per which consists in longitudinally corru- JENNIE P. THORNE.

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Cited By (15)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2425207A (en) * 1940-02-19 1947-08-05 Cincinnati Ind Inc Creping corrugated papers
US2761490A (en) * 1953-11-09 1956-09-04 Victor G Dugal Condensing of sheet materials
US2938568A (en) * 1956-11-27 1960-05-31 Arkell Safety Bag Co Machine for and method of corrugating paper
US2950223A (en) * 1956-08-06 1960-08-23 Kimberly Clark Co Cellulosic product
DE1093659B (en) * 1956-05-28 1960-11-24 Richard Rohdes Walton Means for cross-creping or -stauchen a continuous sheet material folienfoermigen
US4717329A (en) * 1986-12-30 1988-01-05 Bird Machine Company, Inc. Apparatus for compressively treating travel flexible sheet material
US4859169A (en) * 1986-11-20 1989-08-22 Richard R. Walton Web processing by longitudinal compression using matched drive disks and retarding fingers
US4921643A (en) * 1988-06-24 1990-05-01 Richard R. Walton Web processing with two mated rolls
US5656134A (en) * 1994-10-11 1997-08-12 James River Corporation Of Virginia Biaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US5685954A (en) * 1994-10-11 1997-11-11 James River Corporation Of Virginia Biaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US6344110B1 (en) * 1997-12-30 2002-02-05 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method of producing a paper having a three-dimensional pattern
US6425983B1 (en) 1994-10-11 2002-07-30 Fort James Corporation Creping blade, creped paper, and method of manufacturing paper
US6527913B1 (en) 1999-10-07 2003-03-04 Fort James Corporation Creping blade, system, and method for creping a cellulosic web
EP1619016A1 (en) * 2004-07-22 2006-01-25 Alcan Technology & Management Ltd. Process for continuously manufacturing creped web material
US20160249650A1 (en) * 2014-08-28 2016-09-01 Edric Sizemore Method for abosrbing and draining oil from fried food using an oil absorbent paper

Cited By (25)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2425207A (en) * 1940-02-19 1947-08-05 Cincinnati Ind Inc Creping corrugated papers
US2761490A (en) * 1953-11-09 1956-09-04 Victor G Dugal Condensing of sheet materials
DE1093659B (en) * 1956-05-28 1960-11-24 Richard Rohdes Walton Means for cross-creping or -stauchen a continuous sheet material folienfoermigen
US2950223A (en) * 1956-08-06 1960-08-23 Kimberly Clark Co Cellulosic product
US2938568A (en) * 1956-11-27 1960-05-31 Arkell Safety Bag Co Machine for and method of corrugating paper
US4859169A (en) * 1986-11-20 1989-08-22 Richard R. Walton Web processing by longitudinal compression using matched drive disks and retarding fingers
US4717329A (en) * 1986-12-30 1988-01-05 Bird Machine Company, Inc. Apparatus for compressively treating travel flexible sheet material
US4921643A (en) * 1988-06-24 1990-05-01 Richard R. Walton Web processing with two mated rolls
US6451166B1 (en) 1994-10-11 2002-09-17 Fort James Corporation Biaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US5685954A (en) * 1994-10-11 1997-11-11 James River Corporation Of Virginia Biaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US5690788A (en) * 1994-10-11 1997-11-25 James River Corporation Of Virginia Biaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US5885415A (en) * 1994-10-11 1999-03-23 Fort James Corporation Biaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US5656134A (en) * 1994-10-11 1997-08-12 James River Corporation Of Virginia Biaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US5885416A (en) * 1994-10-11 1999-03-23 Fort James Corporation Creping process using undulatory blade
US5908533A (en) * 1994-10-11 1999-06-01 Fort James Corporation Biaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US6096168A (en) * 1994-10-11 2000-08-01 Fort James Corporation Creping process using undulatory blade
US6709548B2 (en) 1994-10-11 2004-03-23 Fort James Corporation Creping blade, creped paper, and method of manufacturing paper
US6425983B1 (en) 1994-10-11 2002-07-30 Fort James Corporation Creping blade, creped paper, and method of manufacturing paper
US5885417A (en) * 1994-10-11 1999-03-23 Fort James Corporation Biaxially undulatory tissue and creping process using undulatory blade
US6540879B2 (en) 1994-10-11 2003-04-01 Fort James Corporation Creping blade, creped paper, and method of manufacturing paper
US6344110B1 (en) * 1997-12-30 2002-02-05 Sca Hygiene Products Ab Method of producing a paper having a three-dimensional pattern
US6527913B1 (en) 1999-10-07 2003-03-04 Fort James Corporation Creping blade, system, and method for creping a cellulosic web
US20030106656A1 (en) * 1999-10-07 2003-06-12 Fort James Corporation Creping blade, system, and method for creping a cellulosic web
EP1619016A1 (en) * 2004-07-22 2006-01-25 Alcan Technology & Management Ltd. Process for continuously manufacturing creped web material
US20160249650A1 (en) * 2014-08-28 2016-09-01 Edric Sizemore Method for abosrbing and draining oil from fried food using an oil absorbent paper

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