US1527518A - Manufacture of garment patterns - Google Patents

Manufacture of garment patterns Download PDF

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Publication number
US1527518A
US1527518A US375247A US37524720A US1527518A US 1527518 A US1527518 A US 1527518A US 375247 A US375247 A US 375247A US 37524720 A US37524720 A US 37524720A US 1527518 A US1527518 A US 1527518A
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United States
Prior art keywords
pieces
pattern
sheets
patterns
piece
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Expired - Lifetime
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US375247A
Inventor
Hutter Franz
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MCCALL Co
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MCCALL Co
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Priority to US375247A priority Critical patent/US1527518A/en
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Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A41WEARING APPAREL
    • A41HAPPLIANCES OR METHODS FOR MAKING CLOTHES, e.g. FOR DRESS-MAKING, FOR TAILORING, NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A41H3/00Patterns for cutting-out; Methods of drafting or marking-out such patterns, e.g. on the cloth
    • A41H3/06Patterns on paper

Description

Patented 24,1325. x i UNITED STAT s PA-ENT rmz Korma, or NEW you, n. Y., assumes o run McCALL oomrm, a con.-
.. v ronarron on NEW YORK.
- mammncrunn or onnmnm rarrmns.
m'bDrawing '1 Application filed April 20, 19205 Serial No. 875,247.
To all whom it may concern: economies impossible under the old method. Be it known that I, FRANZ Home, for- Various other advantages aria referred to in merly a subject of the Emperorof Austriadetail hereinafter. Hungary, having declared my intention of The improved pattern comprises a number I becoming a citizen of the United States, and of separate pieces of suitable shape and of 60 a resident of the city, county, and State of paper which can be thicker than the ordi- New York, have invented certain new and nary tissue paper from which patterns have useful Improvements in the Manufacture of been made. Directly on each piece oi the Garment Patterns, of which the following is pattern I print graphic indications which a ifi ti n, are in exactly determined locations and at In my Patent No. 1,387,723, I have dcwhich indicate to the user the manner of scribed a garment 7 pattern comprising a cutting and use of the corresponding pieces number of pieces having printed thereon in of the fabric which are to be combined in the a determined locations, directions or graphic garment. These indications may be signs indications for the cutting or the use of the such as lines, triangles and so forth or they corresponding piece of the fabric from may be words, and enerally they will conwhich the garment is to be made, as a subsist ofboth signs ant? words so as to leave no stitute for the old and well known paper doubt of the exact location of a line or point patterns in which various lines and points on the fabric and of the use which is to be 2 were marked by special sorts of perforamade of this line or point,
tions, and a separate table or chart was used In the production of the patterns l take a h to tellwhat each kind of perforations meant. large sheet from which the pieces are to b The patterns have to be sold cheaply and out. lnsome cases the sheet may contain all transported to great dlstances and, therefore, the pieces of a complete attern. In other 25 have had to be made on very light paper, as cases, especially where "a considerable numa great many sheets of such paper can be her of large pieces is involved, the sheet in erforated in one operation. .Attempts have question may contain less than all the pieces eenmade from time to time to provide the of the'pattern. Or one sheet may contain a pieces of the pattern with one or. more plurality of complete patterns or a whole 30 printed signs. But such signs have generpattern and parts of another or parts of one ally been put on by hand, as by means of a pattern and parts of another. In tact, the rubber stamp or the like, so as to be quite grouping of the patterns on the printed expensive and not capable of exact location sheets will be varied considerably by manuon the pattern-piece; as would be necessary facturihg and commercial questions in con- 35 for example to mark the line of a hem or a nection with the several patterns. @n this as pbint to be matched with a corresponding sheet it print in accurately determined locapoint on another piece. It has also been tionsfor each 9f the' ntended pattern pieces proposed to print lines and legends of var1 the graphic indications desired. Preferous sorts on linen, muslin and other maably at the same time I print theoutline of 4c terials, but none of such suggestions have each piece as a gulde to the subsequent cut- 98 come into commercial use, chiefly because ting, although I may depend on the cutting they did not, in my judgment provide the machine to follow the correct outline withaccuracy required and also the possibility out the prcvlous printing of it on the sheets of manufacture cheaply in quantities. or with the printing of it on only the top 4 According to my resent invention I prosheet of a stack of sheets which are to be cut 100 vide a method by w ich the patterns can be at one operation." The printing operation produced in vast quantities economically and described is repeated on a number of sheets, i in light and small packages so that the cost printing the graphlc indications referred to of shipment over a wide territory is not too in the same locatlons on the successive sheets.
1 v 50 great. The product of my process is a pat- The printing can be done most rapidly on a tern which can be used easily and without roll of paper consisting in eflect of a number loss of time by inexperienced persons, is even of separate sheets which, however, are only more accurate than those'made by the old out from the roll after printing. method; and this' product is obtained by a The sheets thus printed are stacked 1n ex- 5 process of'manufacture involving certain act register with each other and a cutting 11o Q machihe or hand-cutting knife, which may be of the same type as that now used for cutting stacks of tissue paper patterns, is employed to cut out the separate pieces of the pattern from all the sheets of a stack simultaneously. Accuracy of register may be insured b stacking t e sheets on pins which I are ma e to pass through points marked in rangement identical locations on t e successive sheets; but this will not generally be necessary. This cutting out operation completes the manufacture of the patterns in the simplest embodiment of the invention and it is only necessary to gather the various pieces of each pattern together in the usual way.
The different pieces of the pattern should be arranged on the finished printed sheet preferably in such a way as to economize space, with projectin portions of one entering re-entrant port1ons of another. They may, however, be arranged in such a way that the grain of the goods runs in the same direction on all pieces. Whatever their relative arrangement the outlines of the different pieces must be separated from each other ,sufiiciently to allow a margin of inaccuracy in the subsequent printin of the pieces and the cutting of them out rom the sheet. In practice I find that the outlines of the pieces should be -s aced apart never less than onehalf an inc To secure this arrangement the different pieces of the cardboard model are cut out and placed in the determined arably varnished sheet of paper, and are used as models by which the outlines of the pieces are drawn on the transparent paper with a pen in opaque ink. The lines and notches on the several pieces of the cardboard model are then drawn in opaque ink within the outlines of the several pieces on the transparent sheet; and the names, numbers and legends required are also marked on the several pieces on the transparent sheet by means of rubber stamps or other devices with opaque ink, the lines being first protected from injury by a gelatine coating if necessary.
A very useful feature of the complete pattern is the tinting of each attern piece so that it stands out separate y on the sheet. This result I secure with an accuracy and economy not otherwise obtainable, by the following method. When the transparent sheet has been carried to the point described above I cut'the several pieces of the pattern out of another sheet of transparent aper which is uniformly tinted, preferabiy by stippling or fine dots arranged closely and approximately uniformly over the entire surface, since this form of tinting is most easily and accurately re-produced in printing. These tinted pieces are then pasted over the outlines of the corres onding pattern-pieces which have been awn on the upon a transparent and prefertransparent pa er. In fact, it is not necessary to have rawn the entire outline, the edge being possibly indicated by the tinted piece and being very distinct from the edge drawn by a so 1d line.
The transparent sheet having the pattern piece thus lined, lettered and tinted and in proper relative arrangement may be called the transfer, and is the final model from which the printing plate is made.
The printing plates may be used in an offset Web press with a delivery designed to produce an accurate stacking of the rinted paper sheets on top of each other. large number, sa 1,000, of the printed sheets are stacked an pattern-pieces are cut out from all the sheets in the stack at once preferably by means of a band saw. In this operation the reason will be clear for the leavlng of a space of one-half an inch or more between the edges of the different pattern-pieces as printed on the sheet. The band saw is arranged to cut the pieces with a margin of about one-quarter of an inch outside of the printed outline of each piece. This will allaw the operator to work very rapidly, and consequent variations in the cutting edge will be of no importance, the finished pattern-piece having its true outline printed thereon and having an unprinted margin of about one-quarter of an inch all around but capable of considerable inaccuracy without affecting the value of the pattern. The band saw may be guided by an attachment ending in a point standing exactly a uarter of an inch away from the knife an with which the operator will follow the printed outline of the pattern-piece.
The tint extending over the exact area of the pattern-piece holds the piece together in the eye of the observer, and aids the operator in cutting out the pattern pieces by presenting a striking difference between the pattern pleces and the spaces between them, through which the cutter must pass and the quarter inch margin left over in cutting be comes a negligible element so that the irregularities due to the sheets not being stacked in exact position on top of one another will be harmless. Previous proposals to print more or less of the outline of pattern-pieces have been regarded as futile because of the impossibility, in commercial manufacture, of cutting accuratel multaneously a large number of prlnted pat terns. These features of providing a margin and then eliminating all uncertainty resulting from the margin by holding the piece together to the eye by means of a tint, are, therefore, of considerable importance in the commercial practice of the invention.
In use, certain pattern-pieces are placed with one edge coinciding with a fold, but not with a cutting edge of the fabric. I prefer to distinguish such edges by making and siof the process and order the outline of the pattern-pieces in solid blacklines except such an edge as is to be placed on a fold, leaving only the edge of the tint along this line. Therefore, in the course of manufacture such pattern-pieces will be marked on the transparent transfer with a line extending all around except on the fold edge, and the stippling or tint will overlie the Whole area as usual; and this effeet will be repeated in the printing plate and in the printed pattern sheet.
In fact, though I have described with great particularity of detail certain specific processes and steps embodying my invention, yet it is not to be understood there-- from that the invention is restricted to the particular details disclosed. Various modifications thereof in detail and in the steps may be made by those skilled in the art without departing from the invention. For example, the transfer sheet is not necessarily transparent. It may be opaque and still be reproduced on the printing .plate by known photographic printing methods.
What I claim isl. The method of manufacturing a number of identical patterns for a garment which includes the following steps,-printing on each of a. number of sheets in succession pattern pieces separately outlined and spaced apart from one another, stacking said. sheets upon one another and cutting the separate pattern pieces from the stack by passing the cutter through the spaces between the separate pieces so as to leave each piece with a margin around its outline and with inaccuracies in register affecting the margins only.
2. The method of manufacturing a number of identical patterns for a garment which includes the following steps,-printing on each of a number of'shee'ts in succession pattern pieces each in a flat tint and spaced apart from one another, stacking said sheets upon one another and cutting the separate pattern pieces from the stack by passing the cutter through the spaces be tween the separate pieces so as to leave each piece with a margin around it.
In Witness whereof, I have hereunto signed my name.
FRANZ HUTTER.
US375247A 1920-04-20 1920-04-20 Manufacture of garment patterns Expired - Lifetime US1527518A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

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US375247A US1527518A (en) 1920-04-20 1920-04-20 Manufacture of garment patterns

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US1527518A true US1527518A (en) 1925-02-24

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE4229060A1 (en) * 1992-09-01 1994-03-03 Kloeckner Humboldt Deutz Ag Harvester for green fodder processing

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
DE4229060A1 (en) * 1992-09-01 1994-03-03 Kloeckner Humboldt Deutz Ag Harvester for green fodder processing

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