US1498377A - Crate - Google Patents

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Publication number
US1498377A
US1498377A US661846A US66184623A US1498377A US 1498377 A US1498377 A US 1498377A US 661846 A US661846 A US 661846A US 66184623 A US66184623 A US 66184623A US 1498377 A US1498377 A US 1498377A
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Prior art keywords
cleats
shingles
stack
ties
heads
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US661846A
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Harry H Honigbaum
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Harry H Honigbaum
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D9/00Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, components made wholly or mainly of wood or substitutes therefor
    • B65D9/32Details of wooden walls; Connections between walls
    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65DCONTAINERS FOR STORAGE OR TRANSPORT OF ARTICLES OR MATERIALS, e.g. BAGS, BARRELS, BOTTLES, BOXES, CANS, CARTONS, CRATES, DRUMS, JARS, TANKS, HOPPERS, FORWARDING CONTAINERS; ACCESSORIES, CLOSURES, OR FITTINGS THEREFOR; PACKAGING ELEMENTS; PACKAGES
    • B65D9/00Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, components made wholly or mainly of wood or substitutes therefor
    • B65D9/12Containers having bodies formed by interconnecting or uniting two or more rigid, or substantially rigid, components made wholly or mainly of wood or substitutes therefor collapsible, e.g. with all parts detachable

Description

June 17, 1924. 1-,4983377 H. H. HONIGBVAUM CRATE Filed Sent. lO. 1923 Patented .lune l?, li.
HARRY H. HONIGBAUM, OF RCllli'OND HILL, NEW YORK.
CRATE.
Application led September 1G, 1923. Serial No. 661,846.
To @ZZ whom t may concern:
Be it known that I, HARRY H. Home- BAUM, a citizen oic the United States, residing at Richmond Hill, county of Queens, and State of New York, have invented a certain new and useful Crate, or which the following' is a specification.
This invention is a. crate and while adapted tor general and varied uses in the dilerent arts is especially intended for the packagingof shingles in bundles and more particularly composition shingles which are commonly made in strips.
It has been the practice to boX thesecomposition shingles since the material from which they are made is relatively soft and will not withstand the wear and tear which would result if they were bound together by means of stripping or wire.
rlhe object of the invention with reference more particularly to its use in connection with shingles is to provide a simple and ethcient construction for packing the shingles in bundles in such manner that they will not be defaced, marred or destroyed either severally or collectively by the means which holds them in assembled relation or by Contact with other packages of the same character or of different character. Under prior practice, composition shingles have usually been entirely encased in a wooden box whereas in accordance with the present invention they are held in' packaging form by means of a skeletonized crate which may be readily assembled without the use ot any extraneous attaching means such as nails, screws or the like in an expeditious manner to hold the shingles in bundles.
rfhe crate is so constructed moreover that when it is desired to use the shingles the parts of the crate may be manually manipulated to dismantle the crate so that the several elements entering into its construction can thereupon be compacted and returned to the point of original shipment.
ln its preferred practical form, the invention embodies a crate embodyingn a plurality of cleats adapted to be posihoned at the top and bottom of a bunlle of shingles and the opposite ends of cach ot which cleats is provided with a reentrant portion which may in practice be of substantially dove tail shape. After the cleats have been assembled at the bottom and top of the stack of shingles, pressure is imposed upon the top cleats to place the shingles under slight compression and force the upper cleats suiliciently close to the lower 'cleats to permit the oppositeends of juxtaposed cleats at the top and bottom of the stack to be tied together by means of tie members each ot which is provided at its opposite ends with heads immediately adjacent which each tie member is shaped with a substantially oval cross section of less cross sectional area than the adjacent head. Each tie member when brought intocooperative relation with the associated dove tail reentrant portions of juxtaposed cleats is so proportioned that the oval sec-tion adjacent the respective heads may pass freely through the mouth oi the dove tail reentr'ant portions, but after entering these portions the tie member may be rotated through an angle of ninety degrees to lock the tie member against removal from said reentrant portions in a lateral direction while the heads oit the respective tie members will overlap the margins of the reentrant portions of the cleats and lock the cleats against movement in a'direction away from one another.
It the pressure is now removed from the shingle stack the stack will tend to expand thereby placing the tie members under tension and precluding inadvertent rotation of these members relative t0 the cleats. When the shingles reach their destination and it is desired to release them, the tie members may be rotated and individually removed to permit the cleats to be taken off and all ci? the elements ot the crate may be compactly stacked and bound together in compact t'orm and reshipped to the point of original shipment to be applied to another shingle bundle.
An important feature which will be apparent resides in the fact that no nails, screws or other extraneous attaching'means are utilized inthe construction and inasmuch as the cleats have a relatively eXtensive bearing surface with the shingles, the shingles will not be damaged or otherwise impaired when packaged in the manner described.
It is to be understood that the invention is not restricted to use in connection with strip shingles and oth-er uses as well as additional features of advantage inherent in this invention will be apparent from the hereinafter detailed description and claims when read in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.
The accompanying drawings illustrate one practical embodiment of the invention but the construction therein shownis to be understood as illustrffitive only5 and not as delining the limits of the invention.
Figure l is a plan view of a crate embodying the present invention showing the same as forming a package for a stack of strip shingles.
Figure 2 is a side elevation of the construction shown in Figure l.
Figure 3 is a perspective view illustrating one end of one of the cleats and the cooperating end of one of the tie members, these parts being separated in the interest of clearness; and,
Figure Il is a plan view of one end of one of the cleats showing diagrammatically the manner in which a tie member may be brought into and out of locking relation with reference thereto.
ln the accompanying drawings which illustrate the invention as applied to a crate for the packaging of shingles, l designates a stack of composition shingles. These shingles are adapted to be held tightly together for shipment from the point of manufacture to the place where they are to be applied to roofs.
In packaging the shingles for shipment I employ a plurality of cleats, eight being shown in the drawings. Three cleats 2 are positioned beneath the stack and extend transversely thereof, three similar cleats 8 are positioned on top of the stack and juxtaposed with reference to the cleats 2. A, long cleat Af extends longitudinally beneath the cleats 2 while a similar long cleat 5 extends longitudinally7 of the stack and above the cleats 3. lf desired the cleats 2 and 1lmay be cut with half lapped joints to interfit with one another to preclude any tendency to shift relative to one another and the cleats 3 and 5 may be similarly jointed if desired although in practice this is not necessary.
All of the cleats are constructed in the same manner. That is to say. the free end of each cleat is provided with a reentrant portion 6 best shown in Figures 3 and it This reentrant portion may differ in shape but is preferably substantially dove tail as shown so that the mouth 7 of said portion is relatively constricted while that portion of the recess back of the mouth is enlarged. The form shown in Figures 3 and 4f has been found to give thoroughly satisfactory results although this form may differ without departing from the spirit of this invention.
Wvith the corresponding ends of each two juxtaposed cleats is associated a tie member. The tie members 8 are adapted for cooperation with the cleats 2 and 3 while the tie members 9, which are somewhat longer, iu the form of the invention shown, than the tie members 8 are adapted to cooperate with the corresponding ends of the cleats l and 5. Except for slight differences in length all of these cleats are of the same construction and this construction is best sh wn in Figure 3.
nt the opposite ends of each tie member are heads 10 which in practice are made larger than the confines of the recesses o and directly adjacent each head l0, the tie members are cut away to provide a substantially oval cross sectional shank il. The smaller dimension of this oval cross seetional shanh is substantially equal to, though slightly less than, the mouth 7 of the recess 6. while the larger diameter of this oval cross section is considerably larger than the mouth opening. The oval portion i however so proportioned that when it smaller diameter is presented to the recess. it may be slipped through the mouth 7 to bring the oval cross section within the recess and the tie may be thereupon rotated through 9() degrees to bring the long dimension of the oval cross section transversely of the associated cleat for the purpose not only of locking the cleat against directwithdrawal through the mouth7 but also positioning the head 10 of the cleat so that it cannot pull through the recess 6.
As stated all the cleats are made in the same manner and the method of applying the crate to a stack of shingles, when the parts are thus constructed, will now be tlcscribed.
The lower cleats 2 and 4lare .first laid upon a suitable support in proper assembled relation with reference to one another. rlhis having' been accomplished the stack of shingles to be packaged is laid upon the cleats 2. rllhe cleats 3 and 5 are "thereupon laid on top of the shingle stack and pressure applied to these cleats in a downwmd direction. l
This pressure may be obtaineu from any suitable source such as a powe press or otherwise, the purpose being` to place the shingles -under compression and to force the cleats toward one another and into such spaced relation that the tie ineinbers may be brought into cooperation therewith. The tie members are made of such lengt that when the shingles are under compression as described they may be individually brought into cooperative relation with the corresponding ends of juxtaposed cleats in suc-h manner as to present the narrow lll) portions of the shingles l1 to the mouths of the Cleat openings. In this way, the tie members are, one at a time, brought into cooperative relation with the respective pairs of cleats and are rotated through degrees to lock them in position. After the cleats are in position pressure on the shingle stack is released whereupon the stack will expand sufficiently to place all of the tie members under tension and thus firmly lock the crate in assembled relation, with the shingle stack enclosed therein.
W'hen the assembly reaches its destination, the ties may be removed without necessarily applyingpressure to the shingles. The rotation of the tie members may be accomplished by al wrench or otherwise but in any event said members may be readily released to dismantle the cleats and permit the removal of the shingles.
After the shingles are removed, the cleats and tie members may be tied together with a piece of cord or wire and returned to the point of original shipment for further use. For such return shipment, the parts will be compacted so as to occupy minimum space.
A marked advantage in the present construction over prior practice resides in the great simplicity of the construction, the ease of assembly and dismantling` and the fact that nol nails, screws or other extraneous devices are necessary. The crate elements are economical and easy to manufacture and nice fitting of the parts is not necessary.
Experience has shown that the shingles will be properly protected during transit against damage such as is commonly the case when the shingles are bound together with metallic strapping, wire or cord and, moreover, a much more economical and efficient construction results from theV employment of the present invention than is the case when closed wooden boxes are usedv as a package for the shingles.
The fact that the heads of the tie members project beyond the cleats is an advantage since these projections protect the shin- :gles from damage by adjacent articles during shipment.
The accompanying drawings show the employment of cleats running both ways of the shingle stack, but I am aware that the cleats may if desiredy run in one direction. That is to say, the cleats t and 5 may be omitted if desired although for greater security I prefer to. use them in conjunction with the remaining cleats.
In the foregoing detailed description, the invention has been specifically described as used as a packaging for strip shingles. l am aware however that it is capable of other and. general uses. adapted for employment in connection with express and parcel post service since it en- For example, it is welll' ables articles either of a fragile' or a nonfragile nature to be securely packaged in such manner as to preclude their breakage 0r separation in the mails. The foregoing specification, in describing the method of packaging the shingles has referred to the employment of pressure on the goods when attaching the tie members. I am aware however that this pressure is not necessary in all connections or even in the packaging of strip shingles, since, when the ties are in position with reference to the cleats they will form a firm and rigid container for the articles housed therein.
Furthermore it will be apparent that while the drawings show the cleats and spacers to be positioned relatively far apart so as to form a relatively open crate, it will be apparent that instead of employing cleats at the top and bottom, plates may beern--v ployed and suiiicient number of spac erspositioned sufficiently close together maybe used to form a substantially closed recep-v tacle.
I am also aware that instead, of employ-l ing lcleats at the top and bottom a platform constructed in any suitable manner may be used at both the top and bottom or a fiat board may be employed with. the notches cut in the margins thereof. For these reasons, the invention is to be under-V stood as not restricted to the specic con'- struction shown but is to be understoodvas fullyv lcommensurate `with the appendedclaims.
Having thus fully described the invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Letters Patent is:
l. A crate embodying a plurality off cleats, each of which is providedat its opposite ends with reentrant portions having constricted mouths, and a plurality of tie members each of which is adapted to be asf sociated with two juxtaposed cleats and each of which tie members is provided at its opposite ends with heads adjacent which the ties are provided with shanks of` greater cross sectional dimension in one direction than in the other direction to permit the shanks to, enter the reentran't portions ofi the cleatsy and to be thereuponk rotated to lock said tie members against inadvertent removal from the reentrantportions, theheads of said tie members being sufficiently large to preclude their passage through the reentrant portions. Y
2. A crate unit embodying two cleats and'v two ties, each of the cleats being.` provided at its opposite ends with reentrant portions havingV constricted mouths and each ofthe ties being provided at its opposite en d with slots and Shanks adjacent the heads, said Shanks being' of greater dimension. in one direction than in the other direction to per# mit the Shanks to be introduced intoV theL reentrant portions and thereupon rotated to lock said shanks against inadvertent removal from such portions, the heads being sufliciently large to preclude the passage of the heads through the reentrant portions.
3. A crate embodying at least two cleats, each of which is provided in its opposite ends with reentrant portions and at least two ties, each of which is provided atits opposite end With a head adjacent the base of Which head is formed a shank of reduced cross section to permit the shanks to be positioned in the reentrant portions of the cleats, said heads being sufficiently large to preclude their passage through the reentrant portions.
4c. A crate for shingles embodying` a plurality of cleats adapted to underlie a shingle stack and extend beyond the edges thereof, a like number of cleats adapted to overlie a shingle stack in juxtaposition With the underlying cleats and to extend beyond the edges of said stack, each of said cleats being provided in its opposite ends With a reentrant portion, and a plurality of ties and each of which ties is provided at its opposite ends With heads and adjacent Which heads the ties are of reduced cross section to form shanks adapted to enter the reentrant portions of juxtaposed cleats, the heads of the ties being sufficiently large to preclude their passage through the reentrant portions of the cleats. I
5. A crate for shingles embodying a plurality of cleats adapted to underlie al shingle stack and extend beyond the edges thereof, a like number of cleats adapted to overlie a shingle stack in juxtaposition With the underlying cleats and to extend beyond the edges of said stack, each of said cleats being provided in its opposite ends With a reentrant portion, and a plurality of ties and each of Which ties is provided at its opposite ends with heads and adjacent which heads the ties are of reduced cross section to form shanks adapted to enter the reentrant portions of juxtaposed cleats, the heads of the ties being sufficiently large to preclude their passage through the reentrant portions of the cleats, the heads of the ties being spaced apart a distance which precludes the cooperation of the cleats and ties until the stack is placed under compression, whereby the release of such compression Will place the ties under tension and preclude their inadvertent disengagement.
6. A cratefor shingles embodying a plurality of cleats adapted to underlie a shingle stack and extend beyond the edges thereof, a like number of cleats adapted to overlie a shingle stack in juxtaposition With the underlying cleats and to extend beyond the edges of said stack, each of said cleats be ing provided in its opposite ends with a reentrant portion, and a plurality of ties equal in number to the number of cleats, and each of Which ties is provided at its opposite ends Wit-h heads and adjacent which heads the ties are of reduced cross section to form shanks adapted to enter the reentrant portions of juxtaposed cleats, the heads of the ties being sufliciently large to preclude their passage through the reentrant portions of the cleats.
7. A crate for shingles embodying a plurality of cleats adapted to underlie a shingle stack and extend beyond the edges thereof, a like number of cleats adapted to overlie a shingle stack in juxtaposition with the underlying cleats and to extend beyond the edges of said stack, each of said cleats being provided in its opposite ends with a reentrantportion, having a constricted mouth, and a plurality of ties equal in number to the number of cleats and each of Which ties is provided at its opposite ends With heads and adjacent Which heads the ties are provided With substantially oval shanks of reduced cross section adapted to enter the reentrant portions of juxtaposed cleats, the heads of the ties being sufficiently large to preclude their passage through the reentrant portions of the cleats.
8. A crate for shingles embodying members positioned below and above a shingle stack and extending beyond the edges of the stack, said extending portions being provided With reentrant openings, and a plurality of ties each of Which is provided with a head at its opposite ends and adjacent which heads the ties are of reduced cross section to form shanks adapted to enter said openings, the heads being sufficiently large to preclude their -passage through the openings and positioned at such distance apart that the shanks can be positioned iny the openings only When the shingle stack is under compression whereby the releasing of the compression will place the ties under tension and preclude their inadvertent disengagement.
9. A packaged shingle stack embodying a stack of shingles having upper and lower compression members and lateral tie members, the compression members extending beyond the edges of the stack and slotted to receive the tie members which are provided With heads adapted to engage the compression members beyond the slots for the purpose of holding the parts in assembled relation.
10. The method of packaging shingles which consists in placing a stack of shingles under compression, thereafter intertitting members extending around four sides of the stack and thereafter releasing the pressure on the shingle stack to hold the parts in assembled relation under the residual pressure of the shingle stack,
llt?
11. Means for packaging articles embody- Shanks to be positioned in said reentrant ing top and bottom members both of Which portions, said heads being sufficiently large are provided with reentrant portions and to preclude their passage through the re- 10 tie members, each of Which is provided at entrant portions.
5 its opposite ends with a head adjacent the In testimony whereof I have signed the base of which head is formed a shank of foregoing specification. reduced cross section adapted to permit the HARRY H. HONIGBAUM.
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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2730259A (en) * 1951-03-10 1956-01-10 Leo M Harvey Packing case
US2830699A (en) * 1954-07-14 1958-04-15 Sidney R Gill Package of oblong bars
US2885072A (en) * 1956-09-20 1959-05-05 Ibm Packaging means for an endless tape
US2957575A (en) * 1959-04-13 1960-10-25 Love Box Company Inc Shipping container
US3204803A (en) * 1963-10-10 1965-09-07 Raymond C Sandkuhle Basket structure
US3557990A (en) * 1969-02-24 1971-01-26 John Athanasios Lipiros Knockdown packing tray
US3758017A (en) * 1971-09-24 1973-09-11 D Ross Rigid panel container
US4050604A (en) * 1974-07-22 1977-09-27 Flanders Robert D Disassembleable, reusable container

Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2730259A (en) * 1951-03-10 1956-01-10 Leo M Harvey Packing case
US2830699A (en) * 1954-07-14 1958-04-15 Sidney R Gill Package of oblong bars
US2885072A (en) * 1956-09-20 1959-05-05 Ibm Packaging means for an endless tape
US2957575A (en) * 1959-04-13 1960-10-25 Love Box Company Inc Shipping container
US3204803A (en) * 1963-10-10 1965-09-07 Raymond C Sandkuhle Basket structure
US3557990A (en) * 1969-02-24 1971-01-26 John Athanasios Lipiros Knockdown packing tray
US3758017A (en) * 1971-09-24 1973-09-11 D Ross Rigid panel container
US4050604A (en) * 1974-07-22 1977-09-27 Flanders Robert D Disassembleable, reusable container

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