US1481757A - Art of producing tight-wrapped packages for preserving commodities - Google Patents

Art of producing tight-wrapped packages for preserving commodities Download PDF

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US1481757A
US1481757A US571029A US57102922A US1481757A US 1481757 A US1481757 A US 1481757A US 571029 A US571029 A US 571029A US 57102922 A US57102922 A US 57102922A US 1481757 A US1481757 A US 1481757A
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wrapper
carton
adhesive
surface
moisture
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US571029A
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Stokes John Stogdell
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Stokes & Smith Co
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Stokes & Smith Co
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    • BPERFORMING OPERATIONS; TRANSPORTING
    • B65CONVEYING; PACKING; STORING; HANDLING THIN OR FILAMENTARY MATERIAL
    • B65BMACHINES, APPARATUS OR DEVICES FOR, OR METHODS OF, PACKAGING ARTICLES OR MATERIALS; UNPACKING
    • B65B11/00Wrapping, e.g. partially or wholly enclosing, articles or quantities of material, in strips, sheets or blanks, of flexible material
    • B65B11/06Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths
    • B65B11/28Wrapping articles, or quantities of material, by conveying wrapper and contents in common defined paths in a curved path, e.g. on rotary tables or turrets

Description

Jan. 22 ,1924, 1,481,757

,1. s. STQKES v ART OF PRODUCING TIGHT WRAPPED PACKAGES FOR PRESERVING COMMODITIES Filed June 26., 1922 3 SheetsSheet 1 gvmenfoz Jan. 22, 1924; 1,481,757

J. s. STOKES ART OF PRODUCING TIGHT WRAPPED PACKAGES FOR PRESERVING COMMODITIES Filed June! 26 1922 3 Sheets-Sheet 2 J.'S. STOKES ART OF PRODUCING TIGHT WRAPPED PACKAGES FOR PRESERVING COMMODITIES Jan. 22 1924.

Filed June 26, 1922 3 Sheets-Sheet5 .HIIIIIIIVI. II Em n llwl RHH l z I 1 I l ll 5 don Valley, in the county of Patented Jan. 232,

teams? FATENT JOHN STOGDRLL STOKES, F HUNTING-DON VALLEY, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNOR T0 STOKES & SMITH COMPANY, OF SUMMERZDALE, PHILADELPHIA, PHIG'SYLVANIA, A

CORPORATION OF PENNSYLVANIA.

ART OF PRODUCING TI GHT-WRAEPED PAQKAGES FOB PRESERVING COHBEQDITESQ Application filed Eune 26, 1922. Serial 1%. 571,029.

' To all whom it may concern:

Be it known that 1, JOHN STOGDELL S'ronns, a citizen of the United States, and resident of Spring Valley Farm Hunting- Montgomery and State of Pennsylvania, .have invented certain new and useful Improvements in the Art of Producing Tight-Wrapped Packages for Preserving Commodities, of which 0 the following is a specification.

This invention relates to the art of preserving commodities and more especially to the production of improved sealed packages which elfectively protect the commodity 5 from a change in moisture content.

More particularly described the invention relates to tight-wrapped packages and provides for applying a sealed Wrapper with an adhesive substance which is at the same time u an effective moisture barrier, with due regard to various requirements of the commercial packaging art, as sufiic1ently explained below.

A great variety of commodities, such for example as food. products, including crackers or biscuits, cereals, in comminuted, granular or other forms, non-cereal food products, and various tobacco products, are now packed in boxes or cartons of paste-board 0 or fiber board, of moderate size, for retail vending. In a class of packages now in great demand the outer surface of the carton is printed, or the carton is enclosed in a wrapper, which is usually printed on its outer face wit-h the desired advertising mat ter, trade-marks and other commercial indicia, the wrapper providing in many cases, for various reasons, the most desirable means for applying and displaying such printed ,0 matter and indicia upon the completed ackage. 'In the approved class of pac ages known as tight-sealed-wra-pped packages the printed wrapper is pasted or secured over substantially the entire surface of the l5 carton by an adhesive which is usually a is to prevent the commodity from either gaining or losing moisture after the package 1s completed and before It can be utilized by the consumer. For instance, in the case of many food products, such as biscuits and cereals, it is desirable to furnish them to the consumer in a very dry, crisp. condition, and in packaging such goods the ob- ]0t is toprevent the commodity from gainin moisture, while in other cases such as ra1sins and other food products, and many classes of tobacco products, the commodity when completed and packaged contains a certain amount of moisture, and it is desired to prevent loss of the moisture content prior to use, Tight-wrapped packages as so far described, while satisfactory in many cases Where a change in moisture content is im" material, do not satisfactorily prevent increase or decrease of the moisture content; in other words, such packages are not satis factorily moisture-proof. If it is attempted to make such a package more or less moisture-proof by using a so-called water-proof glue, the result is unsatisfactory because it is difiicult to provide a suitable glue which is really water-proof after drying-and such glues morever having water as the'solvent or liquid medium, give up this water in drying, and the carton and the enclosed commodity necessarily absorb a considerable art of this moisture so that a substan tial c ange in the commodity moisture content occurs very quickly after the packaging operation.

It has been proposed to protect the package, by applying an outer wrapper which is treated to render it more or less moisture proof, for instance, the outer wrappers are of such materialas glacine paper, or waxed paper. Such papers are thin and, as distinguished from a mere surface coating, are substantially impregnated with the waterproofing oil or wax. In addition to the obvious added cost of an outer wrapper,

such wrappers, although more or less transparent, necessarily obscure to a considerable extent and often to a prohibitive extent, the printed insignia on the carton or inner wrapper; it is diflicult or impossible to cause such treated wrappers to adhere to the package by the use of ordinary adhesives; it has been proposed to apply waxed wrappers by heating the wrapper along overlapping margins or folds to cause the wax to melt and act as an adhesive, but such wrappers are not tight-wrapped or sealed all over the outer surface of the carton; the waxed wrappers cannot be printed satisfactorily; if printed wrappers are parafiined according to usual methods the cost Is greatly increased 5 and wrapper paper parafiined 1n the ordinary way is objectlonably greasy or waxy to the touch and tends to accumulate dust and dirt. Moreover, these methods of sealing by heating along the joints or margins provides for no adhesion of the wrapper, except in limited strips or zones. If the wrapper is torn at any free point air is admitted and the commodity ma absorb or discharge moisture, and the liability of tearing is considerable because large areas of the outer wrapper are unsecured and are more or less loose and, therefore, easily ripped or punctured in handling.

So far as I am aware no successful attemptshave been made to water-proof packages by treating the wrapper before application to the package, because if the paper is so treated before printing, the printing operation is rendered diflicult or entirely impossible, and if treated after printing the ap pearance of the wrapper is altered by impregnation with th moisture-proofing material, the surface is rendered oily r greasy and dirt-attracting, and difficulties in a plying and securing such a wrapper will e expenenced as in the case of an ordinary waxed wrapper, above referred to.

According to another plan, a package, ordinarily produced, has been dipped into or brushed with wax or similar material, but such methods are unduly costly; they leave the package unevenly coated with oily or waxy material which is disagreeable to the touch, tends to accumulate dust, stains the wrapper and obscures the printing more or less, and in general these packages and methods are impracticable for many purposes and unless extreme conditions are to be met.

On account of the conditions briefi mentioned above, and other conditions a ecting packagin operations, too numerous to exlain in detail, as far as I know, no satisactor moisture p'roof package of the general c as described has ever been economically produced on a commercially practicable scale, and this is due to the very complex' problem resented by the various conditions mentione By long familiarity with the packaging art, study and experiment, I have provided a satisfactory solution of the problem, as disclosed herein.

Briefly described, in general terms, the invention consists in utilizing the ordinary embryo package or carton containin the commodity and any suitable or ordinary printed wrapper of any ordinary or suitable grade of paper, usual y paper-of moderate thickness which when printedon one side eme? presents a suitable decorative or attractive appearance for commercial purposes. One suitable form of wrapper is the now wellknown and typical sealed-wrap wrapper, cut with marginal or end flaps so that when applied the main sides or faces of the carton are covered with a single thickness of the body portion of the wrapper with one marginal overlap and the ends are covered by the end flaps which have at least a mar-\ ginal overlap or one of the end flaps is cut so as to cover substantially the entire end of the carton, thus providing a complete wrapper enclosure for the carton. Machines have been developed for handling such cartons and wrappers automatically on a commercial production basis.

For commercial production methods the wrappers are necessarily arranged in a group or stack and it is necessary to separate individual wrappers from the stack for association with the individual cartons. It is practicable to separate the individual wrappers when they are of an ordinary kind, that is consisting simply of a printed paper sheet with the paper untreated with wax or other water-proofing material, whereas new and more difiicult problems are involved if it is attempted to handle waxed or similarly treated wrapper sheets. After the individual wrappers are separated from the stack an adhesive is applied to the wrapper prior to its association with. the carton, and instead of using the ordinary adhesive, such as glue, I apply to the inner or unprinted" face of the wrapper adjacent to the point where the wrapper is to be associated with the carton, and as briefly as possible before such association occurs, a moisture-proof adhesive which may best be described con-. cisely as a wax, in heated and melted condition so that the waxmay be properly, quickly and freely distributed over the entire face of the wrapper, the amount of wax applied being sufficient to form a layer of ample and substantial thickness. The carton I and wrapper are then brought into contact. this being conveniently termed an initial or assembly contact, with one face of the carton in engagement with a part of the coated surface of the wrapper, careful attention being paid when necessary, as in the case of an especially contoured or cut sealed-wrap wrapper, to registration, that is the exact location of the carton upon the wrapper so that subsequent folding and wrapping operations may result in the correct and complete enclosure of the carton.

The initial contact between the carton and wrapper is effected while the wax is still in a soft or viscous condition from retained' heat, or whenever necessary or desirable provision may be made for maintaining a heated zone adjacent to the wrapper during its travel from the wax applying pointto answer .the assembly point, or heat may be applied to the wrapper or in the neighborhood of the waxed surface immediately adjacent to the assembly station, and similar provisions may be made during subsequent wrapper applying or folding and pressing operations to insure the proper adhesion ofall parts of the wrapper to the carton surfaces.

After initial assembly the-folding of the wrapper on thecarton is completed in more or less progressive stages, the exact order of folding and pressing down the label body portions and flaps being capable of many variations. In onemethod of wrapper ap plication "the wrapper is applied to three main sides of the carton and two of the end flaps are applied to the carton ends substantially concurrently with the initial as- .sembly contact of the carton and wrapper, and these, portions of the wrapper are pressed in place to insure proper adhesive connection by means of the interposed wax layer, a large part of the complete wrapping operation being, therefore, performed while the adhesive wax is still soft and tacky by reason of heat retained from the time of application to the wrapper, with or without the supply of additional heat between the point of wrapper application and the point of assembly, or adjacent to the assembly and initial wrapping folding and applying positions. In the particular style of folding and applying the wrapper just mentione the application of the wrapper to the remaining side of the carton is then completed, a marginal overlap of the wrapper along one side being incidentally pro duced, and the remaining end flaps are then turned down and pressed on the ends of the carton in a suitable way, additional heat being supplied where necessary or desirable to maintain the viscous or tacky condition of the wax, or to more or less remelt the wax if it has completely hardened.

Throughout the wrapping operations particular attention is paid to applying the appropriate areas of the wrapper to corresponding surfaces of the carton sothat the wrapper is adhesively sealed all over the carton surface by the interposed wax layer, and when the wrapping is complete the carton is provided with a substantially continuous or unitary wrapper sealed to the carton at all points by the interposed moisture-proof adhesive. The completed package presents approximately or substantially the same appearance as a package which is completed by ap lication of the same wrapper by the use 0 ordinary adhesive, that is to say, the printed wrapper surface is freely exposed to show the goods in substantially.

the same way when arranged for sale. The added cost of any additional or outer wrapping, and the partial concealment of the printed wrapper by such an outer covering,

into the carton or carton contents.

are avoided. The wrapper adheres tightly and closely to the package at every point, and is, therefore, especially free from likelihood of tearing or puncturing, Which would let in outside air, but, moreover, even if it is punctured or torn at one or more points, the moisture-proof character of the package is not likely to be aifected because in the application of the wax-coated wrapper the wax necessarily adheres to the carton' surface and the mere tearing of the wrapper is not sufficient to destroy the wax film on the carton, and since the wrapper is completely sealed all over, at ,the boundarms; of any such tear or puncture, the complete wrapped sealing continues, without opportunity for air to get in under the wrapper and circulate about the package as in the case 'of previous packages covered with waxed paper, as above explained. The moisture-proof wax layer is practically continuous, unbroken, and free from cracks, which would tend to let in or permit the escape of moisture, because the wax as applied to the wrapper originally is in a con tinuous layer of substantial thickness and While it is being folded is still in a warm or at least a soft and more or less viscous and pliable condition, so that when the wax layer finally hardens it is' entirely free from cracks or breaks. The contents of the package is entirely unafi'ected by the nature of the adhesive, because the adhesive employed, above briefly described as a wax, is practicall or entirely free from watermoisture' an therefore, in hardening there is no moisture to be given off and no opportunity for any such moisture to be absorbed The desired moisture content, that is the relative dryness or moistness of the commodity, is, therefore, unaffected during or subsequent to packaging, and the commodity remains .in this desired condition until the package is intentionally broken open by the consumer.

The moisture-proof adhesive may vary within considerable limits. In a preferred form it is desirably a wax, which may be parafiin, or any other suitable mineral or non-mineral material having the desired characteristics of softening under heat and being suitably viscous or tacky as it hardens and, therefore, capable of adhering to a carton surface, is substantially unaffected by chemical change until the carton can be utilized in the ordinary course of business and is practically free from moisture for reasons above explained; The adhesive may in some cases be a compound or mixture comprising'a wax and other materials, such as rosin, to enhance the adhesive quality, or other materials may be added in some cases as sufiiciently explained hereafter. A principal and characteristic featurepof the adhesive is that in most cases it solidifies by izing at an ordinary temperature and substantially free from water.

\Vhile the package and method so far described are satisfactory for many purposes, in many cases the wax or waxy component of the adhesive, when it is applied to the wrapper, will soak into the wrapper to a greater or less extent, and more or less discolor the exposed outer surfaces of the 1 wrap-per. For instance, in some cases this action of the adhesive tends to stainexposed white surfaces of the wrapper more or less yellow. This is found in some cases to be undesirable on the ground merely of the altered appearance of the package and otherwise, especially when the adhesive contains any particularly oily or greasy component, the outer surface of the wrapper becomes more or less oily or waxy, and, therefore, disagreeable to the touch, and may in some cases tend to catch or hold. dust or dirt, which will still further impair the attractive appearance of the package. To

avoid these disadvantages the wrappers may be treated at a suitable time or stage in the operations, this treatment consisting in a preferred example in coating a surface of the wrapper with a suitable material, which is substantially proof against the action of the adhesive; and since a, suitable material preferred in most cases is substantially a varnish (for instance shellac, consisting of the ordinary gum shellac dissolved in alcohol) the material may be referred to conveniently as a varnish and the treatment of the wrapper as a varnishing operation.

The varnish is most desirably. applied over the inner, unprinted surface of the wrapper, and the varnishing operation may be either a part of the present method or may be performed previously and is then reall distinct from the present method per se. {Vhen varnish is so applied it imparts a smooth and impervious coating to the wrapper sheet and when the adhesive or wax is applied over the varnish, the varnish prevents any oily or waxy components of the adhesive from penetrating the wrapper and, therefore, the appearance of the Wrapper is unchanged, the outer surface is entirely free from any waxy or oily feeling and has no tendency to gather and retain dust or dirt. In other words, according to this performance of the method the outward ave? characteristics of the wrapper are not altered in any wa as compared with the same wrapper applied with an ordinary glue according to ordinary sealed-wrap operations.

The characteristics and advantages of the invention are further sufliciently described in connection with the following detail descr ption of the accompanying drawin s, which-show certain representative embo iments of the -invention, both in respect to the method and the product.

In the drawings:

Fig. l is a perspective view of the obverse side of a wrapper blank at the top of a stack of similar blanks. I a

Fig. 2 shows the reverse side of a wrapper blank.

Fig. 3-shows the reverse side varnished.

Fig. 4 shows the reverse side coated with adhesive.

Fig. 5 is a section of part of the treated blank.

Figs. 6 to 11, inclusive, show progremive stages of the association of a carton with 2. treated blank and the folding of the blank about the carton.

Fig. 12 is a perspective view of a completed carton produced by the operations in dicated in the previous figures.

Fig. 13 is a section of the same.

Fig. 14 is a fragmentary section of the same.

Fig. 15 is a mainly diagrammatic view of mechanism suitable for erforming the wrapping operations according to one adaptation of the method.

Fig. 16 is an enlarged-transverse section showing mainly one of the assembly pockets and heating means.

Fi 17 is a detail view enlarged, showin mainly the-discharge belt arrangement and folding, pressing, heating and cooling means.

Fig. 6 shows an ordinary carton C, in this case of rectangular outline, since a large vavriety of commodities are packed in cartons of this general shape, and special problems are involved in wrapping such cartons, although in a broader aspect of the invention, the particular form of the carton is immaterial.

According to the usual and preferred trade methods these cartons are of ordinary pasteboard or fiber board without any sure facing or finishing paper. thereon and with out printing, since it is most desirable and practicable to apply the insignia or printed matter at the same time the rough carton is wrapped, by placing the insignia upon the wrapper paper. The carton is filled with a commodity having a certain preferred state of moistness or dryness, a principal pur ose of the present invention being to provi e a package and method which will preserve the reenter stated moisture content of ,thecoodity with due regard to other considerations, some of which are mentioned previously. The carton in this particular instance has broad sides a, b, narrower sides 0, vi, and ends f.

Fig. 2 shows he reverse or unprinted side of a wrapper sheet B adapted to fit the particular carton according to the sealed-wrap method, although the particular form of the wrapper is not essential and may vary in ac-' ginal lap portion p at one end of the blank,

- that is alongside of the blank section a, and

flaps g, h, In and m extending at the sides of the blank from ends of the blank sections, a,

b, o and (2, respectively. The obverse or outer face of this blankis shown in Fig. .1, I

this face being usually imprinted with suitable indicia l0, sufiiciently indicated in the "present instance by. the legend Jones flakes, and while in many printed wrappers a large area of the outer wrapper surface is covered with ink, which may not be subject to noticeable discoloration if the ink is dark, the ink may be of a light color or tint. and

also there are usually plain paper surfaces uncoveredby' ink, these spaces being, of course, white when white paper is used,-as is often the case, and these plain or white spaces are subject to discoloration in certain cases referred to hereafter. Such plain spaces are sufficiently represented in the present drawings by the interior areas of the outline letters or any other surfaces of the wrapper uncovered by printing. Fig. 1 shows the blank B as the top one. of a stack S of similar blanks.

In carrying out my method in one particular form, a single blank B, Fig. 2, 1s separated from the group or stack and arranged suitably for coating. It need not be turned bottom up, but it is so shown in Fig. 2 for convenience in illustration, the legend Reverse clearly indicating that the blank surface shown is the inner or unprinted side. When it is desired to protect the blank from penetration by the. adhesive wax or by any components of the adhesive used, the reverse side of the blank is now coated with a suitable varnish V. Instead of the varnishing being done at this stage of the complete method performance, it may have been done previously, and in that case the blanksare arranged in the stack S, Fig. 1, printed as usual on the obverse sides and varnished on the reverse sides, and the nature of the var nish employed is such that the. varnished sheets may be fed singly from the stack in a satisfactory manner by automatic feeding mechanism.

The waterproof adhesive, consisting-of a suitable wax or waxy composition, substantially water-free, is applied in melted condition so that it is reasonably hot and flows freely, over the reverse side of the blank as indicated at W, Fig. 4a, forming a layer of appreciable thickness, which when varnish has been previously applied, as above described, is prevented entirely from soaking into the paperand staining or discoloringthe paper and especially from staining or discoloring the light or whiteareas of the wrapper as viewed from the obverse side.

The, adhesive wax may be applied in any convenient way by brushing or by suitable apparatus, as more particularly explained hereafter. The blank thenconsists, as best shown in the sectional view, Fig. 5, of the sheet of wrapper paper B, with the coat of varnish V on the reverse side and the layer of wax W on the reverse side over the varnish, the layers being shown of exaggerated thickness and not necessarily in proper rela tive ]proportions. The layer of varnish is usua y very thin and the wax coating may be of quite substantial thickness, in some cases equal. to or even greater than the thick-.

ness of the paper.

When it is not desired to protect the blank from permeation by the adhesive, the varnish layer V is omitted and the wax is a plied directly to the plain reverse face of t e outer wrapper surface, but'this discolora tion is usually substantially uniform and unobjectionable in some cases; or the amount blank as in Fig. 2, and in such cases the hot of oily or waxy material which passes into the blank, may be regulated and minimized to a great extent or entirely by properly compounding and proportioning the ingredients of the adhesive, or by adding ingredients which stop such penetration, such as rosin or celite, or both.

In this case the rosin and celite constitute what is substantial] a neutral filler as a component of the a hesive. As previously pointed out the rosin adds to the sticky or adhesive qualities of the mixture, and the rosin and celite both tend to prevent the penetration of the parafiin into or through the label. Other suitable materials may be used for this purpose in some cases, and when such materials are used in suitable uantity, varnishing or other treatment of t e blanksurfaces to gilevent penetration by components of the a esive may be dis pensed with and the blank will be largely or entirely unafiected by penetration of the adhesive or component parts of 1t.

When the inner surface of the wrapper is unprotected by varnish while a certain part of the adhesive or certain parts of some its constituents may in some cases penetrate more or less into the paper, this penetration is not necessary or desirable for the waterroofing efiect, and is only incidental; and y far the larger part of the adheslve-remains upon the inner surface of the blank as .a surface coating to act as a combined adhesive and moisture-proof barrier layer of substantial thickness. between the paper wrapper and the'carton.

In any of the described performances of the method the wrapper blank is now ready for association with the carton and it will be observed that an important characteristic of the invention is the coating of the ordinary printed wrapper blank, or such a blank with 1 after the blank is separated from a. group or stack, so that the ready separation and feeding of the individual blanks is not interfered with by previously deposited wax or other waterproofing material, and this adhesive a plication is moreover made at a time an place closel approximate to the point of association 0 the wrapper with the 'cartonso that the waxy adhesive remains in substantiall melted or at least in heated viscous or a herent condition when the carton is applied.

Fig. 6 shows the carton C brought into contact or assembly with the blank B, with carton face (1 applied to blank portion d, and in the case of an especially contoured blank such as the present specific example, care is taken that the carton and blank are precisely registered, that is, exactly located in relation to each other.

, Two other main or body-blank sections a and b, are then turned up. and pressed against carton faces a and b, respectively, and flaps m are turned up and pressed against carton ends f, (Fig. 7), these operations being performed while the adhesive is in adherent condition, as suliiciently explained above. in successive stages the marginal strip p is folded over on carton face 0', (Fig. 8), and blank section a is turned down and pressed on carton face 0' and over marginal strip p (Fig. 9) fla s k are turned in and pressed on carton en s f (Fig. 10) flaps h are turned down (Fig. 11); and finally flaps g are folded and pressed, completing the packallge P in one form, as shown in erspective,

ig. 12. Evidently the initia assembly osition of the carton on the blank may be ifi'erent, and the order of folding may be varied, the assembly position and folding order above described being especially adapted for one particular performance of neeafier varnish treatment as described,

the method b machine operations, described hereafter; he sealing material may retain its adhesive uality throughout the described '0 rations, i they are performed with suffiblank B, which has overlapping margins at every joint or intersection, providing a comlete enclosure; every surface of the carton.

1s covered by a layer of the wrapper, adherently' secured over the entire contacting surfaces by a layer of the water-proof adhesive W, and overlapping wrapper portions are also similarly secured. The commodity is, therefore, kept in its desired state of moisture or dryness for an indefinite period. The wrapper protects the moisture-proof layer or barrier from scratching'or cutting in handling the package. The external appearance of the package is the same as if the wrapper were applied by an ordinary adhesive and especially the printed surface of the wrapper is not obscured by any outer waterproofing wrapper; and when varnish is applied to the inner surface of the wra per as indicated in section in Fig. 14., th wrapper is maintained in its natural condition without any stainin or discoloration by the adhesive. Fig. 12 siiows a small art of the wrapper cut out and peeled o in order to show that the waterproof, waxy adhesive'W adheres to the surface of the machine operations and preferably by the operations of an automatic machine in a very rapid and economical manner.

A turret 12 rotates in a vertical plane on a shaft 13 and is provided with a series of equally s aced pockets 14 to receive package assemb ies, each consisting of a carton and wrapper. At one side of each pocket is amovable' pressing member 15 pivoted at 16.- In advance of each pocket in the direction of rotation as indicated by the arrows is a blank gripper 17 adjacent to answer provided with a water-jacket 29 containingwater, which is heated by suitable means such as an electric. heating element 30, sothat the adhesive is heated and maintained in the'proper melted condition by the water bath. As the blank advances over the adhesive applying roll 26. it is stripped ofi by stripper plates 31 and the forward edge of the blank is directed close to the turret and against the stops 18 'corresp ondingto one ofthe pockets 14 and the gripper 17 then closes and the blank-is drawn onward by the turret, lying across the open outer end of the pocket, as shown in the lower right hand position of the'turret, Fig. 15. The operations of this mechanism are in accordance with the method steps previously described, and therefore, the blank section cl is directly over the open mouth .of the.

pocket. The turret is desirably advanced intermittently with a rest during the time that each pocket is at certain stations, for instance. there is a rest while each pocket is nearlydirectly above the adhesive roll 26.

The pockets are spaced about the turret so that each pocket will also be at rest at a,

point substantially 90 fromithe point just mentioned that is at the right hand horizontal position adjacent to the lower end of a stack of cartons C supported in guides 35 which are interrupted at 36 inst above the lower carton in the stack, which rests on a plate 37 and a pusher 38 is provided to discharge the lowermost carton when a blank is positioned witlr its section (I opposite the carton face d. The pusher may-be actuated in any suitable way, for instance,

by a lever 39 and cam 40 and it-is to be understood without 7 further detailed explanation that themoving parts are interconnected by gearing or other mechanism to operate in the manner above and-hereafter described, the details of the mechanism being mainly unessential, so far as the method is concerned. Asa carton is discharged from the carton stack its face (1' strikes the sec-. tion 11 of the positioned blank and at about this time the corresponding blank gripper 17 is retracted, releasing the blank and the blank is bodily pushed into the pocket along with the carton and in thismovement the blank sections a and b are folded against carton faces a, b, and pressed in position by the movable presser plate 15, while the blank section cl is pressed against the carton sembly into the pocket by flap folding plates 42 (see also Fig. 16), mounted on plunger 43 and actuated by springs. 44. The plungers 43 pass through side bars 46 secured to the turret. Asjthe assembly enters the plates 42 yield outward slightly and fold the flaps m and then press them in position on the ends of the carton.

According to one plan of operation the adhesive wax may be sufiiciently soft. and adherent when thewrapper reaches the initial folding station without the provision of special means for keeping it heated or reheating it; but in many cases it is desirable to apply additional heat to insure that the wax is in the proper condition at this time. For this purpose an electric heating element 48 is inserted in the body of the turret-near each pocket and current is supplied to the heating element during a restricted part of itstravel, forinstance; substantially from the blank receiving position to the initial folding-position, by means of an arc-shaped stationary contact strip 50 which is engaged bycontact pieces 51, each corresponding to one of the. heating elements, and connected'to it by a conductor 52. In the-arrangement shown in the drawings in a diagrammatic or elementary way, a ground connection is to be provided for the other side of the circuit, but otherwise evidently a complete insulated circuit may be provided by arranging anothercontact strip adjacent to thestrip 50 and providing two moving contact pieces 51 for each heating element. engaging with the stationary contact strips of opposite polarity. Of course, any other suitable heating means may be provided, electrical devices being indicated here as a preferred form, because electrical heating is most convenient in many adaptations of the invention. Each heating element then commencesto discharge heat into thebody of the turret as the corresponding turret pocket approaches the lowermost position and the blank is, therefore, warmed by contact with the turret.- as it passes around to the assembly and initial folding position at the right, and the wax is thus warmed and kept in proper adhesive condition for the folding and pressing operations that. take place at the right hand station, Fig. 15. Heat is supplied to the .flap folders and pressers 42 by radiation through the metal body of the turret and the arms 46, and-so through the pins 43 to the .presser blades 42.

To the rear of each pocket a movable folding blade 55 is arranged transversely across the peripheral face of the turret, and this blade is actuated by a lever 56 pivoted at 57. When the folding operations above dewith an ejector plate 41- 'ret, and when the the dischar 6 position the inward end of the scribed have been performed the blank margin strip p projects at the rearward side of the-pocket in front of the folding blade '55. The blade is now moved by any suitable means (not particularly shown), toward thepocket, and the strip p is folded and pressed down upon carton face 0, as in Fig. 8. The wrapper section 0 projects at the advance side of the pocket as in Fig. 8, and in the further advance of the turret this flap is brought under a folding and pressing plate 60 heated by an electric heating element 61, supplied by conductors 62, 63, and the section 0 is pressed down on the carton side 0, blade 55 having been reviously withdrawn, and over the margina strip {0, the adhesive being at the same time heated and sufficiently melted by the heat of plate 60. At about this time or just previously, the supply of heat to the pockets and adjacent elements is discontinued by reason of contact 51 passing away from ti end of stationary contact '50. j

Thereafter it is in some cases desirable to cool the adhesive to insure 'proper setting and hardening and for this purpose the periphery of the turret and the package assemblies therein pass beneath a water-jacket 65, and side cooling jackets 66 may also be located .adjacent to the turret sides around to the discharge position at the leftof Fig. 15, and water is circulated through the jackets and 66 by a-water supply connection 67. which may have a suitable controlling valve 68 water connections 69 from jackets 65 to jac ikets '66 and discharge pipes 70 leading from jackets 66.

Each f the ejector plates 41, previously mentioned, is carried by a rod or stem having a reciprocating mounting in the turpackage assembly reaches corresponding plunger 75 is brought into cooperation with a suitable ejector mechanism, such as an arm 76 carried by a sleeve 77 reciprocably mounted on a slideway 78 and operated by a lever 79- and cam 80. The lever 79 is then oscillated and the package is ejected between two continuous conveyor belts 80 mounted on pulleys 81, 82, 83 and 84: and driven in any suitable way.

One of the conveyor belts is' provided with spaced driving cleats 85 to positively move, the packages.- As each package passes between the belt pulleys 81 and 83,-flap folding plates 86 fold down and press the flaps as indicated in Fig. 10. In the further advance of the packages between the belts 80 stationary flap-folding plates 87 engage and turn down and press the flaps h, as in Fig. 11, and then similar folding plates 88 turn up and press the flaps g as in Fig. 12. Since the adhesive 'isusually completely hardened by the time it reaches the ejecting position,

1 answer it is desirable to provide reheating means in general similar to the heating means previously described in connection with the pockets. Particularly for cooperation with the flap folders 86, 87 and 88, this heating means comprises electric heating elements 90 located in metallic frame members or housings 91 located alongside the ends of the packages as they pass, between the belts 80. At the forward end of each ofthese housings is a metal bar 92 through which ass stems 93 carrying the flap pressers 86, w ich are urged inwardly by springs 94. The presser plates 86 are heated by radiation through the bars 92 and stems 93 and the folding plates 87 and 88'are heated more directly by contact with the housin s 91, the heat supplied in each case being su cient to properly melt the adhesive and cause it to adhere to the underlying surface.

Thereafter the packages are passed by belts 80 between cooling. jackets 96 through the cooling jackets 96. The completed packages are then ejected from the belts.

The adhesive em loyed has been briefly described in the ear y part of the specification as a wax or waxy compound, either of pure paraffin or other suitable wax, or such a wax with additional ingredients, such as rosin, to give added adhesive qualities. Other ingredients may be added in many cases for articular purposes. One example of a suita le compound including wax is a mixture consisting of paraflin, rosin, cotton oil and celite- The exact quantities of the in edients may be varied considerably.

hat I claim is 1. A moisture-proof package comprising acarton over the entire outer surface of the carton and securing the wrapper to the carton. I.

3. A moisture-proof package comprising a carton of fibrous sheet material enclosing a .commodity, a paper wrapper enclos ing the carton, printed on its outer surface and coated on one side with material impervious to oily or waxy substances, the wrapper being secured over all exterior surfaces of the carton by a coating of moistureproof, waxy adhesive.

4:. A moisture-proof package comprising a carton of fibroussheet material enclosing waxy, moisture-proof adhesive interposed between the wrapper and the carton throughout the entire opposing surfaces of the carton and wrapper adhesively'securing the 'wrapperto the carton over its entire area.

6. A'moisture-proof package comprising a carton of fibrous sheet material enclosing a commodity and a paper wrapper completely enclosing the carton and printed on its outer surface, the wrapper having on its inner surface a coating of varnish, and a layer of waxy, moisture-proof adhesive interposed between the varnish coating and the carton throughout the entire opposing surfaces of the carton and wrapper and adhesively securing the wrapper to the carton over its entire area. p

7. The method of producing packages comprising applying to one surface of a wrapper a coating of heat-softened moistureproof adhesive, bringing a coated surface of the wrapper in contact with a surface of an article, and applying other portions of the coated wrapper surface to othersurfaces of the article while the coating is soft, the applied surface of the wrapper being retained in adhesive engagement with the article by cooling of the-coating.

8. The method of producing packages comprising applying to one surface of a wrapper a coating of heat-softened, waxy, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing fa coated surface of the wrapper in contact with a surface of an article, and applying other portions of the coated wrapper surface to other surfaces of the article while the coating is warm, the applied surface of the wrapper being retained in adhesive engagement with the article by cooling of the coating.

9. The method of producing packages comprising applying to one surface of. a wrapper a coating of heat-softened moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the coated surface of the wra per in contact with a surface of an artic e, and applying other portions of the' coated -wrapper surface to other surfaces of the article while the coating is heated to insure adhesive engagement of the entire contacting surfaces.

10. The method of producing packa es comprising applying to one surface 0 a wrapper a coating of heat-softened moistureproof adhesive, bringing the coated surface of the wrapper in contact with a surface of an article, and applying other portions of the coated wrapper surface to other surfaces of the article while the coating is heated to insure adhesive engagement of the entire contacting surfaces, the adhesive being subsequently set by cooling.

:11. A method of packaging comprising applying a coating ofheat-softened moistureproof material to one surface of a wrapper,

applying to a portion of the coated wrapper surface a surface of a carton containinga commodity while said material is still in heated condition, and applying other portions of the coated wrapper to other surfaces of the carton while the coating is in adhesive condition.

12. A method of packaging comprising applying a coatingof eat-softened moistureproof material to one surface of a wrapper, applying to a portion of the coated wrapper surface a surface of a carton containing a commodity while said material is still in heated condition, applying other portions of the coated wrapper to other surfaces of the carton. while the coating is heated, until the carton is completely covered by the wrapper, and cooling the package to harden the adhesive.

13. A method of packaging comprising applying to a surface of a wrapper a coating of heat-softened, non-aqueous, moistureproof adhesive, bringin the coated wrapper into assembly contact with a carton containing a commodity and folding the wrapper about the carton to form a complete enclosure while the adhesive is inheat-softened and adherent condition.

14;. A method of packaging comprising applying to a surface of a wrapper a coating of heat-softened, non-a ueous, moistureproof adhesive, bringing t e coated wrapper into assembly contact with a carton containing a commodity and folding the wrapper about the carton to form a complete enclosure while the adhesive is in heat-softened and adherent condition, and substantially inga commodity and folding the wrapper about the carton to form a complete enclosure while the adhesive is in heat-softened and adherent condition, the wrapper beingsecured over the entire exterior" surface .of the carton.

16. A method of packaging comprising applying to a surface of a wrapper a coating of heat-softened, non-aqueous, moistureproof adhesive, bringing the coated wrapper into assembly contact with a carton containing a commodity and folding the wrapper about the carton to form a complete enclosure while the adhesive is in heat-softened and adherent condition, the wrapper being secured over the entire exterior surface of the carton, and substantially hardening the adhesive by cooling.

17. The method of producing moistureproof packages comprising coating one surface of a wrapper blank with heat-softened, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the wrapper inassembly contact with a carton containing a commodity, folding and securing successive portions of the wrapper over entire surface areas of the carton, and supplying heat during certain of the folding and securing operations to maintain the adhesive in soft condition.

18. The method of producing moisture-' proof packages comprising coating one surface of'a wrapper blank with heat-softened, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the wrapper in assembly contact with a carton containing a commodity, folding and securing successiveportions of the wrapper over entire surface areas of the carton, supplying heat during certain of the folding and securing operations to maintain the adhesive in soft condition, and cooling the adhesive to substantially harden it. "19. The method of producing moistureproof packages comprising coating one surface of a wrapper blank with heat-softened, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the wrapper inassembly contact with a carton containing a commodity, folding and securing successive portions of thewrapper over entire surface areas of the carton, supplying heat during certain of the folding and securing operations to maintain the adhesive in soft condition, and cooling the adhesive after certain of the applyin operations.

20. The method of pr ucmg moistureproof packages comprising coating one entire surface of a wrapper blank with heatsoftened, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the wrapper in assembly contact with a carton containing a commodity, folding and securing successive portions of the wrapper over entire surface areas of the carton, to completely enclose the carton in the wrapper, and supplying heat during certain of the folding and securin operations to maintain the adhesive in ad erent condition. 21. The method of producing moisturememe? proof packages comprising coating one entire surface of a wrapper blank with heat-' softened, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the wrapper in assembly contact with a carton containing a commodity, folding and securing successive portions of the wrapper over entire surface areas of the carton, to completely enclose the carton in the wrapper, supplying heat during certain of the folding and securing operations to maintain the ad esive in adherent condition, and cooling the adhesive.

22. The method of producing moistureproof packages comprising coating one entire surface of a wrapper blank with heatsoftened, waxy, moisture-proof adhesive,

maintain the adhesivein adherent condition,

and cooling the adhesive after certain of the intermediate applying operations.

23. A method of producing moistureproof packages comprising applying a coating of heat-softened, non-aqueous, moistureproof, waxy material to a surface of a paper wrapper, bringing a carton containing a commodity in assembly contact with the coated wrapper surface quickly after the coating operation, and folding portions of the wrapper successively about the carton to completely enclose the latter with adhesive contact of the wrapper over the entire outer carton surface.

24:. A method of producing moistureproof packages comprising applying a coating of heat-softened, non-aqueous, moistureproof, waxy material to a surface of a paper wrapper, bringing a carton containing a commodity in assembly contact with the coated wrapper surface .quickly after the coating operation, folding portions of the wrapper successively about the carton to completely enclose the latter with adhesive contactof the wrapper over the entire outer carton surface, and supplying additional heat at certain stages of the folding and securing operations to maintain the applied material in approximately melted or adhesive condition.

25. A method of producing moistureno I " applied material in adhesive 26. A method of producing moistureproof packages comprising applying a coating of heat-softened non-aqueous, moistureproof material to a surface of a paper wrapper, advancing a carton containing a commodity and bringing it in assembly contact with the coated wrapper surface quickly after the coating operation, folding portions of the wrapper successively about the carton to completely enclose the latter with adhesive contact of the wrapper over the entire outer carton surface, and maintaining the condition during the folding and securing operations.

'27. A method of producmg moisture-' proof packages comprising applying a coating of heat-softened non-aqueous, moisture- ,proof material to a surface of a paper wrapper, advancing a carton containing a oommodity and bringing it in assembly contact with the coated wrapper surface quickly after the coating operation, folding portions of the wrapper successively about the carton to completely enclose the latter with adhesive contact of the wrapper over the entire outer carton surface, maintaining the applied material in adhesive condition during the folding and securing operations, and suppl ing additional heat at certain stages of t e olding and securing operations to maintain the applied material in approximately melted or adhesive condition.

28. A method of producing moistureproof packages comprising applying a coatmg of heat-softenednon-aqueous, moistureproof material to a surface of a paper wrapper, advancing a carton containing a commodity and bringing it in assembly contact with the coated wrapper surface quickly after the coating operation, folding portions of the wrapper successively about the carton to completely enclose the latter withadhesive contact of the wrapper over the'entire outer carton surface, maintaining the applied material in adhesive condition durin, the folding and securing operations, supp ying heat at stages of the folding and securing operations and withdrawing heat after certain of v the wrapper securing operations.

29. A method of producing moisture-proof packages comprising coating one surface of a paper ,wra per with heatsoftened, moisture-proof ad esive material, bringing a carton in assembly contact with the coated surfaces of the wrapper while said material is in heat-softened condition, folding and securing certain portions of the wrapper over certain entire surfaces of the carton withdrawing heat to harden the material after saidsecuring operations, folding and presj ing other portions of the wrapper on surfaces wrapper over certain entire surfaces of Y packages of the. canton with application of heatto soften said material, the carton being finailiy covered by the wrapper secured by the hesive. .7 i

30. A method of producing moisture-proof packages comprising coating one surface of a paper wrapper with a heat-softened, moisture-proof ton in assembly contact with the coated surfaces of the wrapper while said material is in heat-softened condition, folding and securing certain portions of the wrapper over cer-.

tain entire surfaces of the carton, withdrawing heat to harden the material after said securing operations, folding and pressing other portions of the wrapper on surfaces of the carton with application of heat to soften said material, the carton being finall covered by the wrapper secured by the ad esive, and finally cooling the package to harden said material. w v 31. A method of producing "moisture proof ackages comprising coating one-surface 0 a paper wrapper with a heat-softened, .molsture-proof adhesive material, bringinga carton in assembly contact with the coated surfaces of the wrapper while said material is in heat-softened condition, folding and securing certain portions of the wrapper over certain entire surfaces of the carton, withdrawing heat to harden the material after said securing operations, folding and pressing other portions of the wrapper on surfaces of the carton with application of heat'to soften said material, the carton being finall covered by the wrapper secured by the a he'sive and with certainmarginal portions of the wrapper overlapping other wrapper portions and secured by said material.

- 32, A method of producing moisture-proof packages comprising coating one surface of a paper wrapper with a moisture-proof nonaqueous heat-softened material, bringing a filled carton in assembly contact with the coated surfaces of the wrapper while said material is in heat-softened condition, folding and securing certain portions of tge t e carton, withdrawing heat to harden the material after said securing operations, folding and pressing other portions of the wrapper on surfaces of the carton with application of heat to soften said material, the carton bein finally covered by the wrapper adhesivel secured by the moisture-proof material. V 1

33. Amethod of producing moisture-proof adhesive material, bringing a car-- comprising coating one surface of a paper wrapper with a moisture-proof nonaqueous-heat-softened material, bringing a filled carton in assembly contact witht-he coated surfaces of the wrapper while'said material is in heat-softened condition, field 1 ing and securing certain portions of the wrapper over certain entire surfaces oi the carton, withdrawing heat to harden the meterial after said securing operations, folding and pressing other portions of the wrapper on surfaces of the carton with apphcation of heat to soften said material, the carton being finally covered by the wrap r adhesively secured by the moisture-proo mater al, and finally cooling the package to substantially harden said material.

34. A method of producing moisture-proof packages comprising coating one surface of' certain marginal portions of the w'ra per overlapping other wrapper portions an secured by sa-idmaterial.

35. The method of packaging, comprising applying to a surface of a wrapper blank material which is impervious to oil or grease, coating a surface of said blank with a waxy, non-aqueous, heat-softened adhesive, applying the coated surface of the wrapper to a carton, and folding the wrapper completely about the carton while the adhesive is in heat-softened condition.

36. The method of packaging, comprisin applying to a surface of a wrapper blank material which is-impervious to oil or grease, coating a surface ofsaid blank with a waxy, non-aqueous, heat-softened adhesive, applying the coated surface of the wrapper to a carton, folding the wrapper completelv about the carton while the adhesive is in heat-softened condition, and cooling the package to harden the adhesive.

37. The method of packaging, comprising applying to a surface of a wrapper blank material which is impervious to oil or grease, coating a surface of said blank with a waxy, non-aqueous, heatsoftened adhesive, applying the coated surface of the wrapper to a carton, folding the wrapper completely about the carton while the adhesive is in heat-softened condition, and cooling the package after certain folding operations and previous to such other operations to secure wrapper portions already applied.

38. The method of packaging, comprising applying varnish to one surface of a wrapper blank, coating a surface of said blank with a waxy, non-aqueous, heat-softened adhesive, applying the coated surface of the wrap er to a carton, and folding and pressing t e wrapper completely about the carmeme? ton while the adhesive is in head-softened condition.

. 39. The method of packaging, comprising appl ing varnish to one surface of a wrapper lank, coating a surface of said blank with a waxy, non-aqueous, heat-softened adhesive, applying the coated surface of the wrapper to a carton, folding and pressing the wrapper completel about the carton while the adhesive is in eat-softened condition, and cooling the package to harden the adhesive.

40. The method of packaging, comprising applying varnish to one surface of a wrapper blank, coating a surface of said blank with a waxy, non-aqueous, heat-softened adhesive, applying the coated surface of the wrapper to a carton, folding and pressing the wrapper completely about the carton while the adhesive is in heat-softened. condition, and cooling the package after certain folding operations and previous to such other operations to secure wrapper portions alread applied.

41. The method of producing moistureproof packages comprising varnishing a surface ofa wrapper blank, applying to a surface of said blank a coating of waxy, nonaqueous, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surface of the wrapper in contact with a carton and folding the wrapper completely about the carton.

42. The method of producing moistureproof packages comprising varnishin the inner surface of a wrapper blank, app ying to the inner surface of said blank over the varnish a coating of waxy, non-aqueous, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surface of the wrapper in contact with a carton and folding the wrapper completely about the carton with overlapping wrapper margins, to form a complete moisture-proof enclosure.

43. A method of producin moistureproof packages comprising applying a coating of material impervious to oil or grease to one surface of a printegl wrapper sheet, applying to a surface of said of heat-softened. non-aqueous, waxy, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surface of the sheet in assembly contact with a carton, folding the wrapper completely about the carton with complete surface engagement of the wrapper with the carton while the adhesive is in heat-softened condition.

sheet a coating 44. A method of producing moisture-proof packages comprising applying a coating of material impervious to oil or grease to one surface of a. printed wrapper sheet, applying to a surface of said sheet a coating of heatsoftened, non-aqueous, waxy, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surface of the sheetm assembly conm with a 7 i carton, folding the wrapper completelytao,

while the adhesive is in heat-softened conwearer about the carton with cemplete surface en merit of the wrapper with the carton dition, and cooling the package to harden the-adhesive.

packages comprising applying a coating of material impervious to oil or grease to one surface of a printed wrapper sheet, applying to a surface ofsaid sheet a coating of heatsoftened, non-aqueous, waxy, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surface of the sheet in assembly contact with a carton, folding the wrap er completely 'aboutzthe carton with comp etc surface en- 45. A method of producing moisture proof eagernent of the wrapper with the carton while the adhesive is in heat-softened com dition, coolin the package at an intermediate stage of t e wrappersecuring operations to harden the adhesive, and thereafter heating the package tosoften the adhesive forfurther securing operations. I

I ld. A method of producing moisture-proof packages comprising applying a coating of varnish to the inner surface of an exteriorly printed wrapper sheet, applying to said sheet over the varnish a coating of heat-softened, non-aqueous, waxy, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surface of the sheet in assembly contact with a carton, folding'the wrapper completely about the carton with complete surface engagement of the wrapper with the carton while the adhesive is in heat-softened condition.

47. A method of producing moisture-proof packages comprising applying a coating of varnish to the inner surface of an'exteriorly printed wrapper sheet, applying to said sheet over the varnish a coating of heat-softened, non-aqueous, waxy, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surface of the sheet in assembly contact with a carton, folding the wrapper completely about the carton with complete surface engagement of the wrapper with the cartoh while the adhesive 1 is in heat-softened condition, and cooling the package to harden the adhesive;

48. A method of producing moisture-proof packages comprising applying a coating of varnish to the inner surface of an exteriorly printed wrapper sheet, applying to said sheet over the varnish a coating of heat-softened, non-aqueous, waxy, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surface of the sheet in assembly contact with a. carton, foldin the wrapper completely about the carton with complete surface engagement of the wrapper with the carton whilethe adhesive is in heat-softened condition, and cooling the package at an intermediate stage of the wrapper securin I operations to harden the adhesive, therea ter heating the package to soften-theadhesive for further securing operations, and then again cooling the adhesiveL 49. A method of producing moisture-proof packages in which a filled carton is enclosed in a wrap er which is printed on its outer surface, said method comprising applying to I the inner surface of the wrapper a coating of grease or oil resisting material, applyin over said material a coating of heat-softene waxy, non-aqueous, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surfaces of the wrapper in assembly contact with the carton,

in a wrapper which is printed on its outer surface, said method comprising applying to the inner surface of the wrapper a coating of varnish, applying over said varnish a coating of heat-softened, waxy, non-a ueous,

moisturesproof adhesive, bringing t e ad- I hesive coated surfaces of the wrapper in assembly contact with the carton, and folding and preming the wrapper about the entire exterior surface of the carton to form a complete, tight-wrapped enclosure.

51. A method of producing moisture-proof packages in which a filled carton is enclosed 1n a wrapper which is printed on its outer surface, send method comprising applying to the inner surface of the wrapper a coating of varnish, applying over said varnish a coating of heat-softened, waxy, non-aqueous, moisture-proof adhesive, bringing the adhesive coated surfaces of the wrapper in assembly contact with the carton, and folding and pressing the Wrapper about the entire exterior surface ofthe carton to form' a complete, tight-wrapped enclosure with heat supplied to render the adhesive soft and adherent during certain of the applying op-- losed i wrapper printed on its outer surface and varnished to resist action of an adhesive, said method comprising applying a waxy, heat-softened adhesive boa surface of the wrapper, bringing a filled carton in assembly contact with the adhesive coated wrapper surface, and folding'and pressing the wrapper in complete surface enga ement with the carton surface while the a hesive is in adherent condition. I I I 54. A method of producing moistureltd lit

proof packages in which i filled carton is enclosed in a wrapper printedfon its outerv surface and varnished on its inner surface to resist action of an adhesive, said method,

comprising applying a waxy, heat-softened adhesive over the varnished surface of the closed completely in a wrapper blank which is printed on its outer surface and varnished on its inner surface to resist permeation by an adhesive, said method comprising apptllying a heat-soiled, waxy adhesive over e varnished surface of the wrapper, bringing the adhesive coated surfaces of the wrapper in amembly contact with the filled carbon, and iolg and pressing the wrapper about the carton in complete surface engagement while the adhesive is in heat-softened condition.

56. A method of producing moistureproof cartons in which a filled carton is enclosed completely in a wrapper blank which is printed on its outer surface and varnished on its inner surface to resist permeation by an adhesive, said method comprising appl ing a heat-soften, waxy adhesive over t e varnished surface of the wrap r, bringing the adhesive coated surfaces 0 the wrapr in assembly contact with the filled carton, and folding and pressing the wrapper about the carton in complete surface engagement while'the adhesive is in heat -softened condition, and applying heating and cooling effects at different stages of the folding and pressing operations.

57. A moisture-proof package comprising an inner enclosure containing a commodity and a wrapper completely covering the innor enclosure and adherently secured to outer surfaces of the enclosure by a waxy, moisture-proof adhesive containin a filler tending to prevent penetration of t e blank by components of the adhesive.

58. A moisture-proof package comprising an inner enclosure containing a commodity and a wrapper completely covering the innor enclosure and secured all over the outer surfaces of the enclosure by a waxy, nonaqueous moisture-proof adhesive containing rosin.

59. A moisture-proof package comprising an inner enclosure containing a commodity and a wrapper completely covering the inner enclosure and secured all over the outer surfaces of the enclosure by a waxy, non-aqua ous moisture-proof adhesive containing rosin and celite.

60. A moisture'proof package comprimng i nw .an inner enclosure containing a commodity and a wrapper completely coverin the inner' enclosure and tightly and herently' secured all over the outer surfaces of the enclosure by a moisture-proof non-a ueous' adhesive containing a wax, rosin an celite.

61. A moisture-proof package comprising an article, a paper wrapper thereon, a layer of heat-softening, substantially non-aqueous and moisture-proof adhesive material adherently; securing the wrapper to the article, and a coating on the wrapper of material serving to otect the wrapper from components of adhesive material.

. 62. A moisture-proof package comprising an inner article, a wrap r therefor of thin, sheet material, a layer 0 heat-softening, substantially moisture-proof adhesive material adherently securing the wrap or to the article, and a coating of material per serving to prevent permeation of the wrapper by components of the adhesive ma-.

terial.

on the wrap.

63. A substantially moisture-proof package comprising a container, a paper Wrapper of substantially moisture-proof, heat-softening adhesive material between the wrapperand the container and adherently secur mg the wrapper thereto, the wrapper having on its inner surfaces a coating of material adapted ,to resist penetration of the wrapper by components of the adhesive material.

64. A substantially moisture-proof package comprising an inner container, a paper wrapper substantially enclosing the container, a layer of substantially moisture-proof heat-softening, substantially non-aqueous adhesive material between the wrapper and the container and adherently securing the wrapper thereto, the wrapper having on its inner surfaces a coating of varnishadapted to resist penetration of the wrapper by 'components of the adhesive material.

65. A substantially moisture-proof package comprising an inner article or container, a pa r wrapper substantially enclosing the arti e and printed on its outer surface, a layer of heat-softening, substantially moisture-proof adhesive material adherently socuring the wrapper to the article, the inner ion meme? blank to an article, and. folding the blank about the article while the adhesive is in heat-softened condition.

67. A method of packaging, comprising applying to a surface'of a wrapper blank, material which is substantially impervious to components of a heat-softening, substantially non-aqueous and moisture-proof adhesive, coating asurfaoe of the blank with heated adhesive of the character described applying the adhesively coated surface 0' the blank to an article, and folding and pressing the blank about the article While the adhesive is in heat-softened condition.

68. A methodlof producing substantially l5 moistureroof packages, comprising varnishin t e inner surface of an exteriorl printe wrapper blank, applying heat-so tened, substantially moisture-proof adhesive material over the varnished surface of the blank, applying the coated surface of the blank to an article and folding and securing the blank about the article while the adhesive is in heat-softened condition.

Signed at Philadelphiain the county of Philadelphia and State oi Penna. this 17th day of June A. D6 1922.

JQHN STGGDELL STQKES.

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Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2577183A (en) * 1947-07-28 1951-12-04 Harvey R Denton Method of heat sealing pliofilm
US2738714A (en) * 1952-03-31 1956-03-20 Gen Mills Inc Mechanism for folding container end flaps
US2762271A (en) * 1952-09-20 1956-09-11 Harry A Mead Automatic bag-making machine
US2770175A (en) * 1952-11-05 1956-11-13 Ex Cell O Corp Machine for making flat-topped paper bottles
US2971442A (en) * 1955-11-28 1961-02-14 Redington Co F B Bag forming and inserting mechanism
US2976653A (en) * 1955-10-10 1961-03-28 Peterson W Jerome System of merchandising and equipment therefor
US3225680A (en) * 1964-01-08 1965-12-28 Andex Corp Filter and retaining device
US3252403A (en) * 1962-10-19 1966-05-24 Polizzi Anthony Charles Coffee filter
US5950915A (en) * 1997-10-14 1999-09-14 Moen; Lenard E. High strength stackable container

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2577183A (en) * 1947-07-28 1951-12-04 Harvey R Denton Method of heat sealing pliofilm
US2738714A (en) * 1952-03-31 1956-03-20 Gen Mills Inc Mechanism for folding container end flaps
US2762271A (en) * 1952-09-20 1956-09-11 Harry A Mead Automatic bag-making machine
US2770175A (en) * 1952-11-05 1956-11-13 Ex Cell O Corp Machine for making flat-topped paper bottles
US2976653A (en) * 1955-10-10 1961-03-28 Peterson W Jerome System of merchandising and equipment therefor
US2971442A (en) * 1955-11-28 1961-02-14 Redington Co F B Bag forming and inserting mechanism
US3252403A (en) * 1962-10-19 1966-05-24 Polizzi Anthony Charles Coffee filter
US3225680A (en) * 1964-01-08 1965-12-28 Andex Corp Filter and retaining device
US5950915A (en) * 1997-10-14 1999-09-14 Moen; Lenard E. High strength stackable container

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