US1415245A - Picture puzzle device - Google Patents

Picture puzzle device Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1415245A
US1415245A US37681520A US1415245A US 1415245 A US1415245 A US 1415245A US 37681520 A US37681520 A US 37681520A US 1415245 A US1415245 A US 1415245A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
picture
sections
element
mortise
screen
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
James J Kennedy
Original Assignee
James J Kennedy
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/06Patience; Other games for self-amusement
    • A63F9/10Two-dimensional jig-saw puzzles
    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63FCARD, BOARD, OR ROULETTE GAMES; INDOOR GAMES USING SMALL MOVING PLAYING BODIES; VIDEO GAMES; GAMES NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • A63F9/00Games not otherwise provided for
    • A63F9/06Patience; Other games for self-amusement
    • A63F9/10Two-dimensional jig-saw puzzles
    • A63F9/1044Display boards therefor

Description

J. J. KENNEDY.

PICTORIAL PUZZLE DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED APR. 25. 1920.

1,41 5,245. Patented May 9, 1922.

2 SHEETSSHEET I.

I I i 26 z x l2 it INVENTOR 1.]. KENNEDY.

PICTORIAL PUZZLE DEVICE.

APPLICATION FILED APR.26. 1920.

2 SHEETS-SHEET Z.

1 ,4 1 5,245 Patented May 9, 1922 III IIIIIII'IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII mm 9% I N VEN TOR.

YES J. KENNEDY, OF NEW YO PICTURE PUZZLE DEVICE,

T 0 all whom it may concern:

of New York, in the county of New York and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in a Picture-Puzzle Device, of which 'the following is a full, clear, and exact specification.

This invention relates generally to a class of devices commonly known as picture puz The object of my invention is to provide a new and interesting picture'game which consists in transforming a clear and definite pictorial representation of a landscape, exterior or interior view, animal, bird, still life, people, etc. so as to present an entirely different picture.

The principle by which I obtain another and different representation from a single picture consists in screening or stopping from sight a portion of the aforesaid picture, the exposed part of which now shows, what before was unobserved, the whole form of an animal, bird, fish or other creature or, as the case may be, inanimate objects with all the necessary delineations of character and drawing in light and shade to produce to an observer a correct and finished picture in monotone or natural colors.

In the screening process, the element employed may be of plates of wood, very thick paper, or ordinary cardboard of about threeply in thickness. The cardboard, which in size is the same as the picture it covers, has a cut-out or mortise through its centre which is the exact duplicate, in size and form, of the animal concealed in the picture. An essentialfeature of the objects of the puzzle device is the covering material, besides containing a mortise must also be cut into separate, interfitting sections.

The surface of this material may show a picture representing a scene, or surroundings indigenous to the object so readily brought forth by the mortise. When this is the case it may be said that we have a dissected picture; and when all the separate parts are properly fitted together over the first picture, covering all except the section shown through the mortise, it will be seen that another complete picture is the result.

vI accomplish the object of my said invention in the manner illustrated in the accompanying drawings, which are made a part Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented May 9, 1922.

Application filed April 26, 1920. Serial No. 376,815.

hereof and on which like characters of reference denote like, or corresponding parts, in which Figure 1 is a front view of the surface element on which is provided a picture representing a scene in which is delineated an object merged with the general pictorial scheme so that the configuration is concealed in a manner for practicing one form of my improved puzzle device.

Fig. 2 is a front view of the puzzle when solved or completed, and which shows the picture illustrated in Fig. 1 when transformed into an entirely different picture.

Fig. 3 is a front elevation of the surfac element with the picture removed.

Fig. 4 is an elevation of the transformer or screen element used in the device, and which shows one of its forms divided into irregular sections, and

Fig. 5 is a section taken on the line 55 of Fig. 2.

The device has a surface element 10 which may be of any suitable size and shape, though the form of the surface element shown is substantially rectangular, and this element may consist of a board of wood, sheet of metal, cardboard, paper or other ap propriate material of any desired thickness.

On one of the entire faces of the surface element 10, or preferably on its central part isprovided a picture 11. The picture 11 may be of a single color or of varied colors as well as being a representation of a landscape, exterior or interior view, animal, bird, one or more persons or other objects which may be portrayed singly or in groups so that the subject matter will be attractive in appearance, besides being of an instructive character if desired. Forms of the element 10 may be provided having a plain black or colored ground or surface, in order to produce silhouetted subjects by the solving or working-out the puzzle, but when the picture represents a definite subject matter in the pictorial scheme and is delineated a determined object is merged with other parts of the picture so that the configuration of the puzzle object is concealed whereby its real formation would not be generally recognizable. For example, in the picture 11 is delineated a merged or obscured animal, such as a cat 12, Fig. 2, which represents a complete picture of a different a pictorial scheme from the character scheme of the master picture 11. However, in the master picture 11 the cat 12 is defined in detail by portraying in a portion of the design of the vase 14 the forelegs 15 of the.cat. The part of the master picture which represents the carpet 16 is designed and arranged to provide a detail portrayal of the cats tail 17 as obscured in Fig. 2. Also in the master picture 11 is portrayed part of a portiere, as 18, which is designed so that the cats knee 19 is delineated, while the details of the cats head 20 including the ears, nose, eye and mouth are delineated in an obscured fashion in the flowers 21 in the vase 14. In like manner other master pictures having a large variety of interesting, or amusing or instructive subject matters may be provided for practicing the puzzle device.

The rectangular surface element 10 may be larger than the master picture 11, and on the marginal edge ofthe surface element --may be a frame or closure or guide, as 22.

This frame may be of wood, mat board, cardboard or other suitable material, as well as being of plain or ornamental design, as occasion requires.

The interesting feature of the device which constitutes the working-out of the puzzle is provided by converting the master picture 11, Fig. 1, into another picture, as illustrated in Fig. 2, by employing a trans former or screen element, as 23. This screen element has a cut-out or mortised part 24 which is preferably in the central part of the element, and the mortise 24: is of a shape and form conforming with the configuration of the concealed object 12 of the master pic-- ture. The screen element 23 may be divided into a suitable number of complemental sections 26, which may be of various irregular shapes so that to properly assemble the sections to form a complete screen each section which is complemental to the next adjacent sections must be selected, in order that they may be fitted together. The irregularities of the sections may be somewhat of tongue and groove types, as at 27, and the size of the screen element when its sections are completely assembled is such that the screen will removably fit snugly within the closure or frame 22 of the surface element 10 so that the mortise 24 will accurately register upon the part of the master picture 12 whereby the concealed object in the master picture will appear clearly and in definite form through the mortise.

Another phase of the surface element and frame idea is that both may be separate or inseparable by having the picture printed on the space inside the frame. The surface element and frame combined has the advantage of allowing free scope for differences in design, color and proportion of each frame to agree artistically with corresponding principles as they are found embodied in each different pictorial representation.

A further, and important advantage per taining to the frame is that it serves as an enclosure tor the covering sections beyond which they cannot move, nor readily be shifted when once they are placed in position over the picture which they only partially cover and thereby transform. And when the entire transformation is accomplished, asdis'played by Fig. 2, the novel representation, including frame, may then be viewed in'a perpendicular attitude. This elevated view, needless to say, almost wholly eliminates from sight the upper and side edges of the mortise which its previous horizontal position so plainly showed.

By thus combining two pictorial representations to appear to the eye as asingle production, there is seen in the combination an effect of intense and vigorous delineation which no single picture could possibly possess. Thus, to the thickness of the opening, or mortise, is due the uncommonly strong effect of the figure it reveals. Depth is given, in this Way, producing the quality of strength which easily seems t pervade the entire surface of the picture as the eye perceives but one pictorial harmonizing whole.

While the above transformed production, Fig. 2, is now seen in an upright position, I wish to direct attention to the novel, zigzag or tongue and groove form shown by all the united sections; and more especially do I wish attention respecting the vertically longitudinal interfitting shape presented by each of the assembled mortise-producing sections, by which means all the joined parts, while elevated, rigidly maintain their true positions with respect to the figured mortise which they produce. Thus the natural tendency of the assembled sections to sag through. gravitational influence and thereby distort the true outline of the figure shown by the mortise is obviated in the manner above described.

Tn specifying cardboard as the preferred material from which the interfitting sections are made I wish here to mention also wood as a suitable substance for the purpose. A thin layer of wood could also serve as a suit-able material for the construction of the mortise forming sections.

U11 the surface of this layer of wood, prior to the ultimate cutting of same into separate interfitting shapes, is secured plain white paper, or other suitable material to give a clear background to the representation I shown by the mortise. Again, this paper, or

figure revealed by the mortise and the picby other directions, the player must know in advance which interfitting section to begin with and its exact osition on the icture inside the frame. in incorrect beginning, such as placing in either f the lower corners a covering section belonging in an upper diagonal corner, while it may lead to a correct interfitting of all-the parts, will only result in showing the mortise inversely p0 sitioned, and presenting, when viewed upright, a gruesome and unnatural representation. wholly different to the-one intended to be shown. This guide for starting the game aright, as well as the simple manner of producing the transformation with few interfitting sections, as shown by Fig. 2, is for the purpose of making this puzzle game easy and interesting for children.

This novel picture-puzzle will, therefore, be seen to present amusing and interesting features for old or young people. And by a still more simplified form of the mortise producing sections, wherein are seen fewer and larger interfitting parts than are shown by Fig. 2, this picture-puzzle will be found to appeal to the very youngest player for whom it provides fun without fatigue. Another and different phase ofthe game, to make it entertainingand puzzling for adults, may be shown by having each interfitting section much smaller in size, with, therefore,-a necessarily greater number required, to complete the mortise and cover theentire surrounding portion of the picture beneath. And to add to this complex form of producing the transformation, the several zig-zag edges 27 describing the'interfitting of the assembled sections may show various curves and t'wists resembling parts of the outline, or shape of the figure revealed by the mortise. Still further complications for the adult player may be seen by having several of the intermediate covering sections of the screen element show acute right angle shapes to resemble the shapes of the outermost interfitting sections.

In my puzzle device I include various puzzle-pictures which, like Fig. 1 are complete and definite and give no suggestion, by distortion of their details and accessories that they contain unobserved animals or other representations.

While various other puzzle-pictures might be mentioned, showing how readily their different delineations are made to absorb the hidden figures they contain, it is considered that the above-named pictures will -ters Patent, is

be sufficient to give a clear idea of the character and scope of these puzzle-pictures which form the basic principles of my pic torial puzzle device.

Having thus described my invention, what I claim as new and desire to secure by Let- 1. A pictorial puzzle device, comprising a picture having as part of its subject mat ter a determined object delineated so that its configuration is concealed, and a separate screen element adapted to be disposed upon the picture so that the object will be exposed 'to view, while .the other portions of the picture are hidden from observation.

2. A pictorial puzzle device, comprising a picture having as part of its subject matter a determined object delineated so that its configuration is concealed, and a separate screen element adapted to be disposed upon the picture so that the object will be ex posed to view, while the other portions of the picture are hidden from observation, and the screen being divided into irregular interfitting sections whereby sections complemental to the adjacent sections must be fitted to each other to assemble the-screen in complete form on the picture. 3. A pictorial puzzle device, comprisin a picture having as part of its subject matter a determined object delineated so that its configuration is concealed, and a separate screen element adapted to 'be disposed upon the picture so that the object will be exposed to View, while the other portions of the picture are hidden from observation, said screen being divided into irregular interfitting sections whereby sections complemental to the adjacent sections must be fitted to each other to assemble the screen in complete form on the picture, and a closure. surrounding the marginal edge of the picture for removably holding the assembled sections of the screen element in position on the picture,

4. A pictorial puzzle device, comprising a picture having a definitely delineated subject matter, and a transformer composed of interfitting sections of various sizes and shapes so as to require the selection of certain complemental sections for enabling the transformer to be assembled for covering parts of the picture whereby an entirely different picture will be exposed.

*5. A pictorial puzzle device, comprising a picture having a definitely delineated subject matter, a frame surrounding the picture, and a transformer composed of interfitting sec tions of various sizes and shapes so as to re-' quire the selection of certain complemental sections for enabling the transformer to be assembled within the frame for covering parts of the picture whereby an entirely different picture will be exposed.

' 6. A pictorial puzzle device, comprising asurface element having a pictorial representation in which is delineated an object merged with other parts of the pictorial rep resentation so that the configuration of the object is obscured, and a screen element of a size adapted to cover the pictorial representation, said screen. element having a mortised part conforming to the size and shape of the obscured object whereby it will appear as a distinct picture through the mortise of the screen when disposed upon the pictorial representation and the screen element being divided intosections of irregular shapes so that sections complemental to the adjacent sections must be fitted to each other to assemble the screen in complete form on the surface element.

7 A pictorial puzzle device, comprising a surface element having a pictorial representation in which is delineated an object merged with other parts of the pictorial representation so that the configuration of the object is obscured, a screen element of a size adapted to cover the pictorial representation, said screen element having a mortised part conforming to the size and shape of the obscured object whereby it will appear as a distinct picture through the mortise of the screen when disposed upon the pictorial representation of the screen element and the screen element being divided into sections of irregular shapes so that sections complemental to the adjacent sections must be fitted to each other to assemble the screen in complete form on the surface element, and a closure on the pictorial face of the surface element, surrounding the'picture.

8. A screen element having a mortised part conforming to the configuration of an object so that when the screen element is positioned upon a surface element a profile of the object will appear through the mortise, and the screen element being divided into sections of irregular shapes whereby sections complemental to the adjacent sections must be fitted to each other to assemble the screen in complete form on the surface element. 5

In testimony whereof I atiix my signature in the presence of two witnesses.

JAMES J. KENNEDY.

Witnesses:

LEONARD LEWIN, FRANK J. DOELGEJR.

US1415245A 1920-04-26 1920-04-26 Picture puzzle device Expired - Lifetime US1415245A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1415245A US1415245A (en) 1920-04-26 1920-04-26 Picture puzzle device

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1415245A US1415245A (en) 1920-04-26 1920-04-26 Picture puzzle device

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1415245A true US1415245A (en) 1922-05-09

Family

ID=23486627

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US1415245A Expired - Lifetime US1415245A (en) 1920-04-26 1920-04-26 Picture puzzle device

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1415245A (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3575418A (en) * 1969-04-22 1971-04-20 Alex D Palmer Puzzle assembly with inner periphery defining an identifiable shape
US3682479A (en) * 1970-05-11 1972-08-08 Edmund S Miller Three dimensional puzzle
US4336020A (en) * 1980-07-15 1982-06-22 David Zacharin Jigsaw puzzle for use in bilingual education
US5472199A (en) * 1994-03-28 1995-12-05 Rainey; Rodd B. Individually collectible puzzle pins
US20150035231A1 (en) * 2013-07-31 2015-02-05 Rainstorm Ventures Puzzle game having associated internal and external images

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US3575418A (en) * 1969-04-22 1971-04-20 Alex D Palmer Puzzle assembly with inner periphery defining an identifiable shape
US3682479A (en) * 1970-05-11 1972-08-08 Edmund S Miller Three dimensional puzzle
US4336020A (en) * 1980-07-15 1982-06-22 David Zacharin Jigsaw puzzle for use in bilingual education
US5472199A (en) * 1994-03-28 1995-12-05 Rainey; Rodd B. Individually collectible puzzle pins
US20150035231A1 (en) * 2013-07-31 2015-02-05 Rainstorm Ventures Puzzle game having associated internal and external images

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
Jones The grammar of ornament
Halpern Shakespeare among the Moderns
Schapiro Nature of abstract art
Harper Painting in Canada: A history
Ruskin The elements of drawing
Karp EXHIBITING CULTURES PB
Barringer et al. Reading the Pre-Raphaelites
Kemp et al. Leonardo on Painting: An anthology of writings by Leonardo da Vinci, with a Selection of Documents Relating to his Career as an Artist
Hibbard Bernini
Schapiro Courbet and popular imagery: An essay on realism and naïveté
Giorgis et al. Children's books: Visual literacy
US2984488A (en) Artistic game apparatus
Harbison Reflections on baroque
Taylor Nineteenth-century theories of art
Friedlander On art and connoisseurship
US4161831A (en) Picture mounting and display
Ives The great wave: the influence of Japanese woodcuts on French prints
Maguire Truth and convention in Byzantine descriptions of works of art
US3682479A (en) Three dimensional puzzle
Beach The Gulshan Album and Its European Sources
US2037966A (en) Interchangeable sectional picture
US2440205A (en) Toy block
Gardner A handbook of Greek sculpture
US3692312A (en) Method of fabricating picture puzzle and puzzle produced thereby
Loizeaux Yeats and the visual arts