US1413314A - Knitted glove and method of making same - Google Patents

Knitted glove and method of making same Download PDF

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US1413314A
US1413314A US30888219A US1413314A US 1413314 A US1413314 A US 1413314A US 30888219 A US30888219 A US 30888219A US 1413314 A US1413314 A US 1413314A
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strip
needles
finger
knitting
strips
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George P Bosworth
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Hemphill Co
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Hemphill Co
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B9/00Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles
    • D04B9/42Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration
    • D04B9/58Circular knitting machines with independently-movable needles specially adapted for producing goods of particular configuration gloves
    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D04BRAIDING; LACE-MAKING; KNITTING; TRIMMINGS; NON-WOVEN FABRICS
    • D04BKNITTING
    • D04B1/00Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes
    • D04B1/22Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration
    • D04B1/24Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration wearing apparel
    • D04B1/28Weft knitting processes for the production of fabrics or articles not dependent on the use of particular machines; Fabrics or articles defined by such processes specially adapted for knitting goods of particular configuration wearing apparel gloves

Description

G. P. BOSWURTH.

KNITTED GLOVE AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME.

APPLICATION FILED JULY5. i919.

Patented Apr. 18, 1922.

Ira/226211302 fieor ge liosworfi w,

M W 3 a UNITED STATES PATENT OFFICE.

GEORGE P. BOSWORTH, OF CENTRAL FALLS, RHODE ISLAND, ASSIGNOR- T0 HEMPHILL COMPANY, OF PAWTUGKET, RHODE ISLAND, A CORPORATION OF MASSACHUSETTS.

KNITTED GLOVE AND METHOD OF MAKING SAME.

Specification of Letters Patent.

Patented Apr. 18, 1922.

Application filed July 5, 1919. Serial No. 308,882.

T 0 all whom it may concern:

Be it known that I, GEORGE P. Boswoa'rn, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Central Falls, in the county of Providence and State of Rhode Island, have invented an Improvement in Knitted Gloves and Methods of Making Same, of which the following description, in connection wlth the accompanying drawings, is a specification, like characters on the drawings representing like parts.

This invention relates to knitted gloves and to the method of making the same. The invention particularly relates to machine knitted gloves, and is an improvement over the gloves disclosed in my co-pending application Serial No. 262,645, filed November 15, 1918.

The object of the invention is to provlde a neatly fitting glove, the blank whereof has structural features which not only effect the production of a neatly fitting glove, but greatly facilitate the final seaming operations of said glove. In the accompanying drawings, I have merely for the purposes of illustration disclosed certain embodiments of my invention Wherein,

Fig. 1 is a front elevation of a completed glove; and

Fig. 2 is a perspective view of the blank therefor.

Although I shall herein refer to the glove as a machine knitted glove and to its formation upon a machine of the general type known as a circular knitting machine wherein either the needle carrier or the knitting cams may have relative rotary movement, it is distinctly to be understoorLthat within thescope and purpose of the invention, the glove may be knitted otherwise as by hand or upon other types of machines than those to which reference has been made; as, for example, upon a straight bar knitting machine or knitting frame so-called.

In the drawings, referring particularly to Fig. 1, I have illustrated a glove haying a fashioned or shaped wrist 1, a tapering hand 2, a thumb 3 formed integral with the hand. said thumb being neatly shaped as hereinaftermore fully set forth. Alsolformed integral with the hand 2 I have illustrated suitably shaped first, second, third and fourth fingers 4, 5, 6 and 7 respectively, sa d fingers being separated by integrally knitted gussets 8, 9 and 10 between the first and second, second and third, and third and fourth fingers respectively. It will be obvious that the knitting of the blank from which the glove illustrated in Fig. 1 is composed, which blank is shown more fully in Fig. 2, may be started either at the end of the front side of the hand, or it may be start ed at the end of the back side thereof, but herein knitting preferably begins at the end 11 of the portion of the strip constituting the palm of the hand. Furthermore, knitting may be begun upon a group of needles less than the full number of needles employed in the machine. Preferably, however, the knitting begins upon the full set of needles to knit the wrist 1. but during the formation of said wrist the loops are preferably made shorter at the start, and gradually increased in length until the line 1212 is reached, whereby said wrist section Will be roperly shaped or fashioned to fit the smaller part of the wrist of the wearer thereof. It will likewise be obvious that similar results may be obtained by employing in connection with the varying of the length of the loops a different type of yarn, that is to say, a smaller yarn than that employed in knitting the hand and finger portions of the glove and by so doing the loops of the fabric may be drawn smaller and thus effect the desired shaping or fashioning of the wrist. Having reached the line 1212 knitting is continued upon the full complement of needles to knit an oppositely selvaged strip as heretofore, up to the base 13 of the thumb 3.

It is within the scope and purpose of the invention to form a thumb separately. that is, upon a different machine, and attach the same in any desired manner to the strip constituting the glove blank, but here'm the thumb is formed integral with the said strip. Therefore, when said base line 13 is reached, all of the needles except those reguired to knit the thumb strip. are withrawn from action retaining their loops, and knitting then continues upon the full thumb group of needles for a portion of the lengthof said strip, that is, in the present instance, to the points 14, 14.

It is sometimes desirable, as in the present case, to produce a glove blank consisting of a single longitudinal strip having single width finger strips, each twice the length of the finger and folded transversely at the tips and also to form a thumb strip in a similar manner, that is, having a strip of fabric the width of the thumb, but double the length thereof, knitted integral with the front or palm portion of the hand covering of the glove, and when such a glove is formed the final stitching or seaming operations, whereby the ed es of the hand, thumb and finger covering are properly united, will be greatly assisted if the edges of said several strips are tied together or integrally united at predetermined intervals in and by the knitting operation. The same operations which effect the uniting of the opposite edges of said finger, thumb and hand strips also effect the shaping of the fingers so as to give all of the digit coverings a gradual taper from the bases thereof to their tips, thereby producing a very neat and nicely fitting glove.

In order to effect the formation of said taper and also to form the uniting loops, I employ a system herein consisting of narrowing and widening by means of suitable picker instrumentalities, and these narrowing and widening operations may take lace at desired intervals along the edges of the said strips. The first of such loops, I have shown at 14-14 in the thumb strip of the glove, and to produce them. the knitting of the thumb strip is commenced upon the full set of thumb needles until the points I i-14 are reached, at which points the two end needles of the group are withdrawn from action by suitable well-known means, but retaining their loops. Knitting then proceeds upon the lessened number of needles and reciprocatingly as before until the points 1515 on opposite sides of the thumb strip are reached, at which points the next needles of the series of needles forming said thumb strip are withdrawn from action retaining their loops. Thus the width of the strip will again be reduced by the spaces of two needles, one at each side of the said strip.

In the present instance, the points 15*15 indicate the beginning of the fashioning of the tip of the thumb, although it is to be understood that the glove is not limited to this construction, for if desired the knitting may continue for a number of courses upon said narrowed series of needles until the tip end of the thumb is reached. Preferably, however, the thumb is as hereinbefore described, fashioned by narrowing and widening, and t accomplish this result, the opposite end needles of the series are gradually withdrawn herein at successive courses until the strip has been narrowed the required amount, all of said withdrawn needles retaining their loops in the usual well-known manner. When said strip has been narrowed 'sufliciently, widening thereof is next effected by the gradual restoration of the previously withdrawn needles in a reverw order to that of their withdrawal thereby to complete the narrowing and widening courses 16-16 upon opposite sides of the tip of the thumb strip. The knitting of the said tip having proceeded to the points 1515 the needles which were 'withdrawn at these points are again restored to operation and knitting will continue thereon to knit the back portion of the thumb strip from the points 1515 to the points 14-14. At the points 14-44 the needles which were withdrawn during the knitting of the forward or front portion of said strip are again restored to action to unite the front and back faces of said thumb strip by the inter-knitting of new loops formed upon said restored needles with the loops previously held by said needles during the period of inaction. 85

From the points 1414 to the base of said thumb all of the thumb needles will be functioned to knit an oppositely selvaged strip equal in width to the corresponding front section thereof. The effect of the operations just described is to produce a double length, single width, thumb strip fashioned at its tip and having adjacent portions of the folds thereof united by loops formed in and by the knitting operation.

When knitting of the thumb strip has been completed, the remaining needles of the hand are again restored to action and knitting will proceed thereon reciprocatingly as before. to knit the remaining portions of the 100 palm of the hand.

It is often desirable and in the present case I have shown, the front and back sections of the hand united by loops formed in and by the knitting operations in the same 10 manner as were the front and back folds of the thumb strip and such uniting loops may be formed at predetermined intervals along the opposite edges of the hand strip. Herein I have illustrated uniting loops at 11 17-17 which loops are formed as heretofore described, that is, when knitting has proceeded to the oint where it is desired to unite the edges of the strip, opposite end needles of the series of needles forming said 115 strip are withdrawn from action, but retaining their loops, and thereafter knitting proceeds upon the lessened series of loops until the next uniting loops are to be formed or until some variation in the knitting of the 120 strip is to occur. In the form of blank illustrated in Fig. 2 I have shown a second set of uniting loops 18-18 formed substantially coincident with the base line of the fingers 4, 5. 6 and 7 so that when knitting has 125 reached the oourse corresponding to the points l818, the opposite end needles of the series of needles now in use are withdrawn from action, but retaining their loops. Following the operations just described, the 18 various strips composing the fingers 4, 5, 6 and 7 are knitted in any desired sequence or said strips may be knitted two or more at a time. For convenience, however, I will describe the operation as starting with the strip composing the little or fourth finger 7, which strip is knitted upon a selected group of needles, while the remaining needles of the series upon which the hand strip was knitted are withdrawn from action retaining their loops. Knitting now proceeds upon said selected group of needles to knit reciprocatingly, a strip having oppositely selvaged edges and extending to the points 19-19 of said strip, and here again needles are withdrawn, preferabl the opposite end needles of the series to e ect a further narrowing of the said strip. Needles which are thus withdrawn from action retain their loops until again restored to action as hereinafter set forth.

Knitting is continued upon the lessened series of needles until the next narrowing point in the finger strip is reached, which herein occurs at the base of the tapered tip of said finger 7 as shown at 20-20, and from these points on for a predetermined number of courses narrowing continues in the usual manner either in consecutive courses or following two or more similar courses, to fashion the tip portion of said little finger strip. hen the narrowest course has been knitted, widening is then effected by the restoration in reverse order, of the withdrawn needles to unite the loops of said withdrawn needles with loops formed thereon, thus producing the usual narrowing seams 2121. From the points 20 20 to the points 1919 knitting proceedsto form the back section of the strip for the finger 7, the same having oppositely selvaged edges and corresponding in width with the adjacent front portions of said strips. At 1919 the withdrawn end needles are restored to effect the union of the edges of the front and back sections or folds of said finger 7, and the full set of fourth finger needles being now in action, knitting will continue thereon until the base line of said finger is reached and the loop at 18 formed by restoration of the needle previously withdrawn at this point, to unite the front and back folds of said finger and hand strips.

Although I do not limit myself to the formation of the third finger strip as the next step in the operation of knitting the glove, I will nevertheless for convenience at this time describe the formation of said third finger strip. To accomplish this, a

machine bein withdrawn from action, but retaining their loops in the usual manner. By employing a portion of the needles previously used in knitting the strip of the finger 7, an over-lapping of the third and fourth finger strips will be effected, which over-lapping upon the subsequent stitching together of the adjacent or corresponding edges of the finger strips produces the gusset 10.

The method of knitting the third finger strip is substantially the same as in the previous case,that is,a double length single width strip will be formed having a fashioned tip 22 produced by narrowing and widening, and the front and back folds will be united at certain intervals herein shown at 23-23 by loops formed by narrowing and widening. Following the formation of the strip for the finger 6, the strip for the finger 5 will be formed in a similar manner, that is, upon a selected group of needles, which group includes a portion of the needles used in knit ting the strip of the finger 6, thus to form the gusset 9 by the over-lapping of said finger strip, and the previously formed finger strip, the front and back folds of the strip for the finger 5 will be tapered as in the previous instances, and the tip thereof will be fashioned at flat-24 by narrowing and widening. Also the front and back folds of this finger strip which is automatically doubled during the narrowing and widenin of the tip thereof will be united at interva s as for example at 25-25 by a single course of narrowing and widening.

Likewise the first finger strip will be formed and upon a selected group of needles' including a portion of the needles used in the knitting strip for the second finger 5. This finger is fashioned at the tip 26 which automatically doubles said strip, and the front and back folds thereof are also united at 27-27 by loops formed in and by the uniting operation. 1

The first and second finger strips are overlapped as in the previous cases to produce the integral gusset 8. When all of the finger strips have been completed to the line 1818 and the needles withdrawn at these points, during the formation of the front strips, have been restored, knittin then continues upon all of the needles of tie several finger groups and said restored needles to form an oppositely selvaged back hand strip in length equal to the distance between the points 18 and 17 when the points 17-17 are reached in the knitting operation, the needles withdrawn at these points are restored to operation, thus completing the. restoration of all withdrawn needles, and upon the full complement of needles, knitting proceeds to form the back portion of the wrist 1 preferably to correspond with the front strip thereof. Having now completed the knitting 0peratio'ns of the glove blank, said blank may b removed from the machine and the corresponding edges of the front and back, thumb, hand and finger strips, united by stitching, which operation is assisted mate- 'rially by the uniting loops produced at various points along the edges of the several sections of the glove blank which loops insure a perfect registering of the front and back folds thereof.

Although I have described the formation of the uniting loops as taking place at opposite ends of the same courses it will be evident that these loops may be formed in different courses, that is to say on one side of the hand or finger strips, the inter-engaging or uniting loops may be formed in one course and then in the successive or a subsequent course the opposite edges of said strips may be united in the same manner, thus effecting a staggering of the uniting loops at opposite edges of the strips.

Logically the number of intervening courses betweenthe uniting loops may be varied according to the size of the glove or length of the fingers, or according to the texture of the fabric, for instance if a glove of fine texture is being knitted u on the machine, uniting loops may be ormed very much nearer together than Where the texture of the glove is very coarse. Furthermore the yarns composing the various sections of the glove may contrast in color, size or quality as desired.

Having thus disclosed one illustrative embodiment of my invention, I desire it to be understood that although specific terms are employed they are used in a generic and descriptive sense and not for the purpose of illustration, the scope of the invention being set forth in the following claims.

Claims:

1. As an article of manufacture, a glove blank consisting of a single longitudinal strip having finger strips, each twice the length of the finger and folded transversely at the tip, and means inte rally uniting, at predetermined intervals, t e edges of the folds of said finger strips.

2. As an article of manufacture, a love blank consisting of a single longitu inal strip having folded finger strips, and means integrally uniting, at intervals, adjacent edges of the folds of said finger strips.

3. As an article of manufacture, a love blank consisting of a single longitu inal strip having finger strips, each twice the length of the finger and folded transversely at the tip, and loops formed uniting at predetermined intervals, the edges of the folds of said finger strips.

.4. As an article of manufacture, a glove blank consisting of a single strip having opposite selvaged dges with finger strips each having selvaged edges and each being of twice the length of the fingers, and means integrally uniting, at predetermined intervals, corresponding selvaged edges of the folds of said finger strips.

5. As an article of manufacture, a glove blank consisting of a longitudinal strip substantially the Width of the hand and including front and back hand coverings and double length finger strips folded transversely at the tips, and loops formed at predetermined intervals uniting adjacent opposite edges of said hand and finger strips.

6. As an article of manufacture, a glove blank consisting of a single longitudinal strip including front and back hand coverings, and finger strips, each being twice the length of the finger and folded transversely at the tip, the Wrist portion of said hand covering being fashioned, and means integrally uniting, at predetermined intervals. the edges of said hand coverings and said finger strips.

7. As an article of manufacture, a knitted glove consisting of a single longitudinal oppositely selvaged strip including double length finger strips each having opposite selvaged edges, said finger strips being transversely folded at their tips, the folds of said strips being correspondingly tapered throughout their lengths by narrowing and Widening, said hand and finger strips being seamed along their opposite edges.

8. A knitted glove blank having oppositely selvaged front and back hand coverings and oppositely selvaged front and back finger coverings, respectively united by loops formed at predetermined intervals along opposite edges thereof.

9. A knitted glove blank having oppositely selvaged front and back hand strips, op ositely selvaged front and back finger strips knitted integral with said hand strips, the tips of said finger strips being fashioned, loops formed at predetermined intervals to unite correspondin ortions of said front and back hand and finger strips, a thumb strip knitted integral with said front hand stri twice the length of the thumb and fol ed transversely at the tip, and loops formed at predetermined intervals, uniting corresponding edges of said thumb strip.

10. A knitted glove blank having a double length thumb strip folded transversely at the tip and fashioned at said tip, and loops formed in and by the knitting operation at predetermined intervals along opposite edges of said thumb strip uniting the folds of said thumb strip.

11. A knitted g ove blank having oppositely selvaged front and back hand strips and a plurality of double length transversely folded overlapping finger strips knitted integral with and uniting said front and back hand stri s, said hand strips and the folds of said nger strips being integrally united by loops formed at predetermined intervals along opposite edges thereof.

12. That method of knitting a glove or like hand covering which consists in knitting a fiat oppositely selvaged strip substantially the width of the hand and constituting one side of the hand, knitting integrally with said side of the hand fiat selvaged digit strips each being substantially twice the length of their respective dlgits, uniting corres onding portions of said digit strips at pre etermined intervals by narrowing and Widening, and finally knitting integral with said digit strips as a fiat oppositely selvaged strip the other side of the hand.

13. That method of knitting a glove or like hand covering which consists in knitting reciprocatingly upon a series of needles an oppositely se vaged strip substantially the width of and constituting one side of the hand, and in withdrawing at predetermined intervals certain end needles of said series and in causing said end needles to retain their loops; knitting integral with said side of the hand, upon selected groups of needles, flat double length, selvaged digit strips, and in causing certain end needles of said selected groups to be withdrawn from action but retaining their loops during the knitting of a portion of said strips, and in restoring said needles during the knitting of the remaining portions of said digit strips to effect the formation of digit strips, each including transversely doubled substantially coextensive folds having their edges united at predetermined intervals; and finally knitting integral with said digit strips a fiat oppositely selvaged strip constituting the other side of said hand and in causing the end needles retracted during the length selvaged digit strips folded transversely at the tips at least one of said strips having loops formed at predetermined points integrally uniting the edges of said strip.

In testimony whereof, I have signed my name to this specification.

GEORGE P. BOSWORTH.

Certificate of Correction.

It is hereby certified that in Letters Patent No. 1,413,314, granted April 18, 1922, upon the application of George P. Bosworth, of Central Falls, Rhode Island, for an improvement in Knitted Gloves end Methods of Making Same, an error appears in the printed specification requiring correction as follows: Page 4, line 59, claim 3, after the word formed insert the words from the yam of said strips and that the said Letters Patent she'eld be read with this correction therein that the some may conform to the record of the case in tho Phtent Oifiee.

Signed and sealed this 6th day of Jena, A; 1)., 1922.

' WM- A. KUHHLII,

Hating O'ommiuaiomr Pait te.

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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10455885B2 (en) 2014-10-02 2019-10-29 Adidas Ag Flat weft-knitted upper for sports shoes

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US10455885B2 (en) 2014-10-02 2019-10-29 Adidas Ag Flat weft-knitted upper for sports shoes

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