US1378641A - Art of producing lifelike simulations to inanimate objects - Google Patents

Art of producing lifelike simulations to inanimate objects Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1378641A
US1378641A US15596217A US1378641A US 1378641 A US1378641 A US 1378641A US 15596217 A US15596217 A US 15596217A US 1378641 A US1378641 A US 1378641A
Authority
US
United States
Prior art keywords
casing
simulations
spring
producing
tentacle
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Williamson John Ernest
Original Assignee
Williamson John Ernest
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Application filed by Williamson John Ernest filed Critical Williamson John Ernest
Priority to US15596217 priority Critical patent/US1378641A/en
Application granted granted Critical
Publication of US1378641A publication Critical patent/US1378641A/en
Anticipated expiration legal-status Critical
Expired - Lifetime legal-status Critical Current

Links

Images

Classifications

    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A63SPORTS; GAMES; AMUSEMENTS
    • A63JDEVICES FOR THEATRES, CIRCUSES, OR THE LIKE; CONJURING APPLIANCES OR THE LIKE
    • A63J7/00Auxiliary apparatus for artistes
    • A63J7/005Disguises for one or more persons for life-like imitations of creatures, e.g. animals, giants

Description

habitat. To these and other ends, therefore, the

PATENT orifice.

JOHN ERNEST WILLEAMSON, NORFOLK, VIRGINIA.

ART OF PRODUCING LIEELKE SIMULATIONS TO INNIMATE' OBJECTS.

isra'eei.

Specilcation of Letters Patent.

Patented May i7, 1921.

Application led March 19, 1917. Serial No. 155,962.

T 0 all whom t may concern.:

Be it known that l, JOHN ERNEST WIL- LIAMSON, a citizen of thev United States, residing` at Norfolk, in the county of Norfolk and State of Virginia, have invented certain newand useful Improvements Vin the Art of Producing Lifelike Simulations 4to Inanimate Objects, of which 'the following is a specification.

This `invention relates to apparatus for producing life-like simulations Y to inanimate'objects, and more particularly to vapparatus designed to ysimulate the movements of under-water creatures.

Movements oiE many of the under water creatures are sinuous or squirming in character-as for instance, the movements of an eek-while others have memberssuch Jfor instance, as tentaclespwhich have Inovements of this type although the 'creature itself may be stationary. For instance, creatures of the mollusk type', such `as the octopus,the squid, etc., illustrate the latter type.

The present invention is designed for the purpose of more or less accurately simulatingthe motions of these creatures, and, where the apparatus is employed for theatrical or other purposes, may serve as an illusion-creating structure. For instance, the general principles ot the invention may be employed` in producing an apparatus having the'appeai'ance of a sea-serpent, so that b y locating the apparatus at a suitable point where close inspection can be prevented and the apparatusbe operated to give movementsk which appear life-like, theL illusioncan not well be detected. (lr the apparatus may be in the form of an octopus with its several tentacles, the latter being .given movements simulating the movements which the tentacles have in the creature itself. i Y A The apparatus is preferably operated wholly ork partially under water so as to increase the ell'ectV of the illusion and also render it possible to provide simulations oi creatures heretofore immune -from simulation by reason of theV peculiar motions oi? the creatures and their under-water nature 'of whichwill be readily understood as the invention is `.hereinafter disclosed, said invention consists in the improved construtcion yand combination of parts and the methods of providingfthe simulation,

.of the `head and body, with the operator in position.

Fig.` 3 is an enlarged fragmentary sectionalview of the khead and body showing operating connectionstherein. f

Fig. 4 is a detail view oi. one of the tentacles.

Fig. 5 is a composite view vshowing the rvseveral parts which areeniployed in producing one form of tentacle.

F or the purpose of illustrating the general principles Vof the inventiony l have shown the apparatus as in the form of an octopus having a head and body and a plurality of tentacles, these parts vpreferably having the general contour and appearance of the creature itseli". Obviously, the general idea disclosed herein can be emgilcyed' in simulating other creatures, and it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to any particular type of objeft being simulated. As heretofore pointed out, it is preferred to employ the apparatus in simulation of under-water creatures, but the invention is not to be considered as limited in this respect. Y

The head l0 and body l1. are preferably in the form of a shell molded or otherwise formed to simulate these parts of the octopus. The shell is preferably formed with an open bottom through which the tentacle and certain operating elementsv are led.

The shell is adapted to receive theoperator, the head preferably beingformed with a hinged portion kwhich 'can be raised to permit the entrance Vof the operator. As the apparatus is designed to be operated under-water, the operator preferably wears a divers suit, and, for the purpose of increasing the illusion, the suit is preferably of the self-contained type, a well-known structure, thus eliminating the necessity of iool hiding the escape ot air bubbles trom the head ot the octopus, a result which would be present Where the breathing air for the operator is dilevered through suitable connections. Since the shell is formed with an open bottom, there is no material pocketing` of air within the shell, thus practically eliminating any buoyancy ot. the shell, permitting it to retain its position without the necessity of employing a heavy Weight.

its shown in Figs. 2 and 3, the shell carries a plurality ot' independent members or casings which have the contour and appearance oi tentacles, each tentacle, indicated at 12, being secured to the shell-'at its inner end by suitable means such as straps 13 secured to the shell.

rlhe tentacles extend outward through the bottom et the shell and have any desired length.

The illusion eiiect is mainly produced by the sinuous and squirming movements of the tentacles and more particularly the outer end portions thereof. These movements are in no particular cycle or direction, and hence the illusion becomes more perfect, since they appear to be apparently tree trom mechanical source. its the movements are provided under water the illusion is increased as a mechanical structure would apparently be attested by buoyancy conditions, and no ineens et compensation are seen.

Each tentacle is built up in the form of a composite structure designed to provide the various movements, the structure being shown more particularly in Figs. Ll and 5, in which the visual portion is provided by an outer cover 15 formed of light canvas or the like, the cover having an open end l i and having the general contour oi' the tentacle. To increase the effect ot' the illusion, the cover may have secured thereto suitable cup-shaped members 16 which may Aie 'termed in a simple manner by the use ot the ordinary rubber ball cut in halt, these members being an imitation oli the suckers of the tentacle. Cover 15 is adapted to internally receive in nested relation a second cover 17 also preferably ot canvas, this cover being provided with a pocket extending ap proxiinately throughout the length ot' the cover and which is ada ated to receive a tapered spring 17a, the tapering effect being toward the advance end ot the spring, thus tending to vary the resistance ot the spring, the advance end ot the spring offering the least resistance. The spring may be considered as a constant pressure producing structure and tends to retain the free end ot the `tentacles curved inwardly to a greater or less extent.

lllounted within the cover 17 is a spiral spring structure 18 which provides a light form or shape for retaining the covers eXf panded cross sectionally. Being in the form ot' a coil, however, the spring permits comparatively tree movements of the free end of the tentacle as presently described.

Positioned within spring 18 is a rubber tube, bag or sack 19 having its advance end imperforate and being formed at its opposite end with an opening. Within tube 19 is mounted a chain 'structure or flexible member 20, the links of which gradually decrease in size and weight toward the advance end, the opposite end of the chain being in the form' of a plug 21 about which parts 19, 1T and are secured, thus closing the inner end ot the tentacle. The plug is prefere sly 'formed with a suitable passageway with which a pipe connection 22 is in open communication, as shown in Figs. 3 and 4,-, said connection leading to a pair oi pipe conncctions 23 and 2l located within the shell, a suitable valve structure 25 being'provided to control communication between pipes 23 and 211 and the individual connection, it being understood that each tentacle is provided with such connection with pipes 23 and 2l.

@ne of said 1pipes (preferably pipe 23) forms what may be termed a feed pipe, said pipe having an operative connection with a suitable source of air supply under pressure, the connection being preferably a flexible one as at 23a and leading outward from the shell through the open bottom, extending to the source which may be in the form of mechanism carried by a boat or punt on the surface of the water within which the octopus is being exhibited. Pipe 24 forms thev cxh aust, and is similarly connected, this pipe being extended to the surface and, if

desired, to an exhaust mechanism, through a connection 24a. The exhaust structure is preferably employed in order that the air which may be let out of a tentacle will not escape within the shell or outside of the shell and thus l'orm bubbles; the connections leadv this air to the water surface. Where the structure is designed to produce an illusion, connections 23a and 24ar may be placed out of the view in suitable manner as by burying these connections in the sand for a suliicient distance to retain the ascending portions out ot view.

A s will be seen, each tentacle is thus made up oi instrumentalities each of which is designed to produce its efl'ert intentacle manipulations. Spring 18 maintains the canvas covers expanded cross sectionally-preserV ing the cross-sectional contour and yet permits ot substantial freedom oit movement of the tentacle under the action of the pressures in the casing. Tube 19 forms a collapsible air chamber which, by reason of its shape will cause movements of the tentacle against the resistance of spring 17a, when air is introduced into the tube, the amount otmove'- ment being dependent to a more or less extent upon the amount of air which is introduced. Bag or saclr 19, being Within the casing moves With the latter under the action oi spring 17a. Introduction of air into the bag or sack tends to cause the latter to straighten out and ythus produces a pressure opposing the pressure of spring i752 By varying the pressure and amount of air in the bag or sack, the difference in value of the two pressures can be varied and thus control the movements of the tentacle to a more or less extent. Chain 20 serves to counteract the effect of buoyancy When tube 19 is inflated. K

' ls Will be seen, the particular formation of these elements is such that changes in.

position of the free end of the tentacle are compensated to a more or less degree by the particular' arrangement of the parts. For instance, the free end of the tentacle has considerably greater flexibility than the intermediate portion, the decrease of resistance tovvard'the outer end of spring 17a, due to the taper formation, is more or less compensated by the decreased cross sectional area of tube 19 toward such free end and a corresponding decrease in the size and Weight of the chain links which affectthe buoyancy.-

As a result, control of the introduction of air into tube 19 enables the movements of the freeend of Vthe tentacle to be partially controlled especially as to extent of movement. rThis increase in flexibility also is of advantage by reason of the fact that the movements `are made against the resistance of the Water so that the movements may be affected to a more or less extent by'this fact,a result which increases the illusion effect in that the free end of the tentacle d oes not move in any definite orbit but has its movements controlled through the combined action ofthe several parts and any resistance afforded by the Water.

The outeil' casing l2 may be normally held in either straight or contorted position by the proper shaping ofleaf spring la, depending upon the, nature of the organism that is to be simulated; but, in any event, the normal shape ofrubber tube or sack i9 differs substantially from the normal shape of casingl as controlled by leaf spring lTa. The intlation off sack 19 naturally tends to malre it assume its normal contour, with a force varying With the amount of air introduced therein', and as this contour diifers from that of the casing l2, the casing Will be moved from its normal form and Willt'end to assume the normal form of saclr 19. In the exemplilication illustrated, the casing l2 ordinarily is sinuous and irregular in form, While the sack 19 is normally straight. It Will consequently be apparent that sack 1,9, when inflated, will exert its pressure mainly at the bends of casing l2,`the pressure of the sack upon intermediate and yrelatively straight portions being much less than on the bends. En any desired construction, the difference in contour of casing and sack will inevitably'result in a variation'in the pressure exerted at spaced points. As shown. in Fig. 3 the tentacles have their' inner ends located in positions Where the valves 25 which control them are readily accessible to the operator. By providing openings 10b at suitable points in the shell, the operator isable to see theexposed portions of the tentacles and thus be able to readily control the inlet of air to or exhaust or" air from the tube i9 of either of the tentacles.

The valves 25 are of a Well-known type by means of which the admission ot air to the tentacle and its exhaust therefrom is entirely Within the control of the operator. c

As will be understood, the illusion effect is based on the movements of the tentacles, so that the latter forms the main essential feature of' 'the structure; Obviously, this idea can be employed in connection with other creature simulations Where, for instance, a single structure of the type of tentacle shown herein is employed. F or inl stance, if but one element of the tentacle type is employed, the shell may be omitted and the control of the air supply, and ex-` haust may be located at a considerable distance from such element, in which case it may be desirable to employ separate inlet and exhaust passages in plug 21, these leading to the valveivhich would be positioned at a material distance from the element, thus placing the operator outside of the vier;T of the spectators. lSuch an arrangement could be employed to simulate the movements of an eel or a larger creature and could be employed in simulating the mythical sea-serpent. Vhile I have herein shown and described one Way in which the principles of the invention may be embodied, it is readily understood that such principles may be `employed'through a Wide range of simulations and illusion efects by changes and modifications in the design and construction kof parts, and l desire to bev understood as reserving the rifrht to make any and all such changes `as may be found necessary or desirablek in producing the results aimed at, in so Afar as such changes and modifications may fall within the spirit and scope of the invention as expressed in the accompanying claims. c n v It is to be understood, of course, that Where the invention is employed underv conditions Where buoyancy is not a material factor, as for instance, Where the structure is used on the surface of the Water,on land, or inthe air, chain 29 may be omitted.

laying thus described lmy invention, what I claim as new, is

l. Means for producing life like motions of an inanimate object, comprising a main casing representing the body of said object, anV elongated casing extending from the main casing, means for normally holding the elongated casing in a bent condition and air controlling means for varying a pressure uniform throughout the inner surface of the elongated casing to vary the effect of the bending means.

2. Means-for producing life like simulations to an elongated inanimate object comprising a strong wear resisting elongated casing, a fluid tight casing within said first mentioned casing, means for normally holding both casings in a bent condition and fluid controlling means for varying a pressure uniform throughout the inner surface of the fluid tight casing to vary the effect of the bendingmeans. Y

3. Means for producing life like simulations to an elongated inanimate object comprising an elongated outer wear resisting casing, an inner fluid tight casing, means for holding both casings extended, a spring for normally holding the casings in a bent condition and means for varying a pressure uniform throughout the surface of the inner casing to vary the effect of the bending sprinof.

Ll. Means for producing life like simulations to an elongated inanimate object under Water comprising an elongated casing, a coil for holding the casing extended and increasing its buoyancy, means for holding the casing in a bent condition and means for varying a pressure uniform throughout the inner' surface of the casing to vary the effect of the bending means.

5. Means for producing life like simulations to an elongated inanimate obj ect under water comprising an elongated casing, means for normally holding the casing in a bent condition, an elongated flexible tapering weight for the casing to overcome the water buoyancy and means for varying a pressure uniform throughout the inner surface of the casing to vary the effect of the bending means.

6. Means for simulating a devil sh consisting of a main casing and tentacles radiating therefrom, each tentacle comprising,

an elongated casing, means for normally holding the elongated casing in a bent condition and means within the main casing for varying a pressure uniform throughout the inner surface of the elongated casing to vary the eect of the bending means.

7. Means for simulating a devil sh consisting of a main casing and tentacles radiating therefrom, each tentacle comprising an elongated casing, means for holding it in a bent condition, air pipes to and from the main and elongated casing, and air valves therein for varying the pressure Within the elongated casing to vary the effect of the bending means andthus producing life like movements of the tentacle.

8. The method of producing life-like simulations of under-water creatures, which consists in positioning under Water an inanimate casing simulating the appearance of a movable portion of the creature, subjecting such casing to the action of opposing pressures applied internally of thecasing and variable relatively to each other to produce movements of the casing, and concurrently compensating for change in buoyancy conditions produced by such movements.

9. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations to elongated inanimate objects, a hollow casing of substantially-constant cross-sectional contour, and means operative within the casing for subjecting the casing to the action of opposing pressures variable relatively to each other and applied internally of the casing at spacedpoints so as to produce sinuous or wriggling motion.

l0. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations to elongated inanimate objects, a hollow casing of substantially constant cross-sectional contour, means carried by the casing for providing a substantially constant pressure effect within the casing, and means for producing a variable pressure within the casing variably opposing said constant pressure effect at spaced points, whereby the casing may be subjected to the internal application of pressure differences variable at will.

1l. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations to inanimate objects, a hollow casing of substantially constant cross-sectional contour, said casing having a general longitudinal contour' tapering toward a movable end, means within the casing for providing a substantially constant pressure therein, and means for producing an opposing pressure of variable magnitude within the casing, said constant pressure means decreasing in resistance toward such movable end.

l2. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations to inanimate objects, a hollow casing of substantially constant cross-seo tional contour, said casing having a longitudinal contour generally tapering toward a movable end, a spring Within the casing and adapted to produce a substantially constant pressure therein, said spring being varied as to resistance to decrease such resistance adjacent the movable end, and means for introducing and applying a fluid pressure within the casing in opposition to said substantially constant pressure, said fluid pressure means including control mechanism for varying fluid pressure.

13. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations to elongated inanimate objects, a hollow casing of substantially constant cross-'sectional contour, a spring Within tbe` casing adapted to provide a predetermined positioning of casing portions, and means for applying fluid pressure Within the casing in opposition to the pressure of said spring to effect movements of spaced casing portions from such positions in different directions to produce sinuous or ivriggling motion.

14l. In apparatus for producing lifelike simulations to inanimate objects, a hollow casing of substantially constant cross-sec tional contour, a spring extending longitudinally of the casing and adapted to provide a substantiall)T constant pressure therein,` fluid pressure receiving element Within the casing, and means for 'controllably introducing a fluid pressure medium into said element, said element vbeing positioned to provide an opposing` pressure to said spring with such pressure, variable by control of the introducing means.

15. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations to inanimate objects, a hollow casing of substantially constant cross-sec tion and having an external configuration in simulation of the movable portion vof the creature being simulated, saidcasing including outer and inner casing members in nested relationship7 saidy inner member having a longitudinal pocket, a flexible frame Within the inner member adapted to maintain the cross-sectional contour of the cas-Y ing substantially constant, a spring in said pocket adapted to provide a substantially constant pressure to the casing, and means for applying a variable fluid pressure Within the casingsaid means being ineffective to vary the cross-sectional contour and op'-v erating in opposition to such constant pressure to provide movements to the casing.

16. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations to inanimate objects, a hollow casing of substantially constant Vcross-section and having an external'configuration in simulation of the movable portion of the creature being simulated, said casing includingpouter and inner casing members in nested relationship, said inner member having a longitudinal pocket, a flexible frame Within the inner member adapted to maintain the cross-sectional contour of the casing, a tubular bag or sack Within said flexi-V ble frame, and means for controllably introducing a fluid pressure medium to said bag or sack to provide a pressure oiLiposing the substantially constant pressure of said spring. y

17. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations to inanimate objects, a hollow casing of substantially constant cross-section and having an external configuration in simulation of the movable portion of the creature being simulated, said casing including outer and inner casing members in nested relationship, said inner member having a longitudinal pocket, a flexible frame Within the inner member adapted to. maintain the cross-sectional contour of the casinf)1 substantially constant, a spring in said pocket adapted to provide a substantially constant pressure to the easing, a tubular n bag or sack Within said flexible frame, a flexible member Within and extending lonf gitudinally of said bag or sack, andmeans for controllably introducing a fluid pressure medium into said bag or sack to provide pressure opposing the constant pressure of said spring, said flexible member being adapted to compensate for cliangein buoy-r ancy conditions of the casing. i

18. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations of under-Water creatures, a hollovv casing of substantially constant cross section and having an external configuration in simulationof the movable portion of 'the creature being simulated, said casing including a casing member having a longitudinal pocket, Va flexible frame within such member adapted to maintain the cross-sectionalcontourV of the casing substantially constant, a spring in said poelret adapted to c provide a substantially constant pressure to lthe casing, a tubular bag or sack Within said flexible frame and adapted to receive,

a fluid pressure medium tending to vary the buoyancy of the casing, means for controlling tlie admission and Withdrawal of such fluid pressure medium, and a flexible member Withinl and extending longitudinally of the bag or sack, said flexible member being adapted to compensate for change in buoyancy conditions of the casing;

19. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations of under-Water creatures, a hollow casing of substantially constant crossseotion and having an externalv configuration in simulation of the movable portion of' the creature being simulated, said cas-V in'g including a casing member having a longitudinal pocket, a flexible frame Within such member adapted to maintain the crosssectional contour of' the casingr substantially constant, a spring in lsaid pocket adapted to provide a substantially constant pressure to the casing, a tubular bag or sack Within said flexible frame and adapted to receive a fluid pressure medium tending to vary the buoyancy of the casing, means for controlling the admission and Withdrawal of such fluid pressure medium, said casing frame and spring having a general' tapered configuration toivard a movable end of the casing, and a flexible member Within and extending longitudinally of said bag or sack and adapted to compensate' for change in buoyancy conditions of the casing, said memlos simulations to inanimate objects, a structure having an external cenliguration simulating the external appearance of the creature being simulated, said structure including a shell and a casing extending from said shell7 means for subjecting` the casing to the aetion of opposing' pressures variable relatively to each other and applied internally of the casing, said means including mechanism for introducing a fluid pressure inedium Within the easing, and means operative Within the shell for controlling' the admission of such medium to the easing.

2l. ln apparatus for producing life-like simulations to inanimate objects; a structure having an external conguration siinulating` the external appearance oit the creature heing simulated`r said structure including a shell and a casing extending from said shell, means for subjecting the casing to the action of opposing pressures variable relatively to each other and applied internally of the casing7 said means including mechavnism for introducing a fluid pressure medium to and withdrawing it from the casing, and means operative Within the shell for controlling such admission and Withdravval of the medium.

22. In apparatus for producing life-like simulations to inanimate objects, a structure having an external configuration simulat ing the external appearance of the creature beingsimulated, said structure includinga shell and a plurality of' independent casings extending from said shellr means Whereby one or more of said casings may be subjected to the action of opposing pressures variable relatively to each other and applied internally of such casing or casings individually, said `means including mechanism for introducing a fluid pressure medium to and withdrawing` it from the casin'g to provide movement-activityV thereto, and means operative Within the shell for controlling the fluid pressure operations of the active casing or casings individually and at Will. Y

In testimony whereof I alix my signature.

JOHN nnngtsr WILLIAMSON.

US15596217 1917-03-19 1917-03-19 Art of producing lifelike simulations to inanimate objects Expired - Lifetime US1378641A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15596217 US1378641A (en) 1917-03-19 1917-03-19 Art of producing lifelike simulations to inanimate objects

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US15596217 US1378641A (en) 1917-03-19 1917-03-19 Art of producing lifelike simulations to inanimate objects

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1378641A true US1378641A (en) 1921-05-17

Family

ID=22557479

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US15596217 Expired - Lifetime US1378641A (en) 1917-03-19 1917-03-19 Art of producing lifelike simulations to inanimate objects

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1378641A (en)

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100233932A1 (en) * 2007-09-19 2010-09-16 On-Art Corp. Costume suit of large size animal

Cited By (2)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US20100233932A1 (en) * 2007-09-19 2010-09-16 On-Art Corp. Costume suit of large size animal
US7997991B2 (en) * 2007-09-19 2011-08-16 On-Art Corp. Costume suit of large size animal

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US6586859B2 (en) Electroactive polymer animated devices
CN103696591B (en) Wave pool and wave-producer
US6494763B1 (en) Life-like doll
US9282724B2 (en) Pet toy with noise making device activated by expansion and contraction of toy
Turner et al. Voice and Speech in the Theatre
US2274303A (en) Interchangeable figure structure
US5219315A (en) Water effects enhanced motion base simulator ride
US2083431A (en) Donkey's bray
US4136484A (en) Stuffed doll with bendable framework and method of making framework
Riskin Eighteenth-century wetware
US4944755A (en) Motorized joint
US20080293028A1 (en) Breathing Manikin
US2787074A (en) Wildfowl decoy mount
US3346989A (en) Pneumatic space capsule
US2691233A (en) Duck decoy
US6554669B1 (en) Inflatable flotation device
US20080139082A1 (en) Expressive eyes with dilating and constricting pupils
JP2001512998A (en) Apparatus and method for providing large inflated wavy figures
BRPI0602795A (en) gastric band type accordion
US5069387A (en) Cibernetic fountain apparatus and valve therefor
US20010034178A1 (en) Animated, foam filled toy figure
KR101229633B1 (en) Amusement ride vehicle with sensory stimulation effects
US3591975A (en) Inflatable toy
Dickson et al. History of the Kinetograph, Kinetoscope, and Kineto-phonograph
US20020178638A1 (en) Inflatable decoy