US1328378A - Micrometer and gage attachment - Google Patents

Micrometer and gage attachment Download PDF

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Publication number
US1328378A
US1328378A US195999A US19599917A US1328378A US 1328378 A US1328378 A US 1328378A US 195999 A US195999 A US 195999A US 19599917 A US19599917 A US 19599917A US 1328378 A US1328378 A US 1328378A
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Prior art keywords
micrometer
screw
attachment
shaft
anvil
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US195999A
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Johnson Frank Maurice
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Johnson Frank Maurice
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    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01BMEASURING LENGTH, THICKNESS OR SIMILAR LINEAR DIMENSIONS; MEASURING ANGLES; MEASURING AREAS; MEASURING IRREGULARITIES OF SURFACES OR CONTOURS
    • G01B3/00Instruments as specified in the subgroups and characterised by the use of mechanical measuring means
    • G01B3/18Micrometers
    • GPHYSICS
    • G01MEASURING; TESTING
    • G01BMEASURING LENGTH, THICKNESS OR SIMILAR LINEAR DIMENSIONS; MEASURING ANGLES; MEASURING AREAS; MEASURING IRREGULARITIES OF SURFACES OR CONTOURS
    • G01B3/00Instruments as specified in the subgroups and characterised by the use of mechanical measuring means
    • G01B3/22Feeler-pin gauges, e.g. dial gauges

Description

F. M. JOHNSON.
MICROMETER AND GAGE ATTACHMENT.
APPLICATION FILED OCT. 11. l9l7.
Patented Jan. :20, 1920.
2 SHEETS-SHEET l.
21 a zz J6 43 140214 601 lflfzfakwaiz WMM em anion x21 0 ,1/ 3,316 l 'I MM F. M. JOHNSON.
MICROMETER AND GAGE ATTACHMENT.
APPLICATION FILED OCT. 11, m7.
2 SHEET S-SHEET 2.
1 dfi'kizaai attoz m: up.
Patented J an. 20, 1920. I
FRANK MAURICE JOHNSON, OF DENVER, COLORADO.
MICROMETER AND GAGE ATTACHMENT.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Jan. 20, 1920.
Application filed October 11, 1917. Serial No. 195,999.
To all whom it may concern:
Be it known that I, n RAIIK ll IAURICE JOHN- SON, a citizen of the United States, residing at Denver, in the county of Denver and State of Colorado, have invented a new and useful Micrometer and Gage Attachment, of which the following is a specification.
The subject of this invention is an attachment for micrometers and similar gages, and the objects of the invention are, first, to provide a micrometer which may be accurately used in the hands of a novice, second, to provide a micrometer which will accurately indicate minute variations from a correct setting, third, to provide means for locking the micrometer at a desired reading, fourth, to provide an attachment which may be applied to the usual micrometer or gage with a minimum of change in the structure thereof, fifth, to provide a simple and eflicient micrometer attachment.
lVith the foregoing and other objects in view, which will appear as the description proceeds the invention resides in the combination and arrangement of parts and in the details of construction hereinafter described and claimed, it being understood that changes in the precise embodiment of the invention herein disclosed can be made within the scope of what is claimed, without departing from the spirit of the invention.
Practical embodiments of the invention are shown in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a central longitudinal section of the attachment;
Fig. 2 is a section on the line :22, Fig. 1;
Fig. 3 is a view in elevation of the attaching lug, a fragment of the micrometer frame being shown;
Fig. 4 is a cross section on the line 1-:t of Fig. 1;
Fig. 5 is a section on the line 55 of Fig. 1;
F ig. 6 is a view in elevation of a modified form of the device;
Fig. 7 is a longitudinal section of the same with the dial and its casing broken away.
Referring to the drawings by numerals of reference An arm of the yoke of a micrometer frame is indicated at 1 and the end of this arm is reduced to form the tongue 2. An attaching lug 3 is bifurcated to straddle thetongue 2 to which it may be secured by a screw 1 and pins 5 or in any other suitable and convenient manner.
The attaching lug is formed with a barrel 6 for the reception of the reduced end 7 of the attachment.
The attachment consists of a preferably cylindrical tube 8 of which the reduced end 7, heretofore mentioned, forms a part. The reduced end 7 extends through the barrel 6 and has its projecting end threaded for the reception of a clamping nut 9, as seen most clearly in Fig. 1.
The reduced end 7 and a portion of the main body of the cylinder 8 adjacent the reduced end is formed with a reduced bore in which slides a shaft 10 to the outer end of which is securec. an anvil 11. The bead of this anvil is formed with a rounded annular flange, as shown, to cause the device to ride more easily onto the work or object to be measured.
The inner end of the shaft 10 is bored and tapped to receive the reduced and threaded end 12 of a shaft 13 which is preferably provided at its outer end with a knurled head 14.
A sleeve 15 slides in the cylinder 8 and is interiorly threaded to receive the threaded portion 16 of the shaft 13. This sleeve is preferably split, as indicated in Fig. 4, and is bound by a screw 17. The purpose of this structure is to compensate for wear and keep the parts in proper adjustment. The screw 17 is formed to project beyond the sleeve at each end and enter slots 18 which are provided in the cylinder 8. The movement of the sleeve within the cylinder is limited by this screw and the slots within which the screw projects. As will be apparent from Fig. 1, the sleeve 15 normally abuts the wall 19 which is formed by the thickening of the walls of the cylinder at that part containing the reduced bore.
The free end of the cylinder 8 is threaded to receive a tensioning screw 20 which is preferably formed with a knurled head 21. The tensioning screw 20 is longitudinally bored to receive the shaft 13 with a sliding fit, and the screw is operated to tension a coiled spring 22 which surrounds the shaft 13 and is confined between the inner end of the screw 20 and the opposed end of the sleeve 15.
At a median point the cylinder 8 is tapped transversely to receive a locking screw 23. The inner end of the screw 23 is provided with a longitudinal socket in which turns the stem 24 of a contact point. The head 25 of the contact point enters a cut out formed at one point on the shaft 10. A lever 26 is threaded onto the outer end of the screw 23 on which it is bound by a lock nut 27.
This structure permits the anvil to be locked against motion so as to preserve the measurement which has been taken, if desired.
Hung from the cylinder 8, to which it is secured in any suitable manner is a casing 28 which houses the indicating mechanism of the device. Within this casing a plate 29 is adjustably mounted. One end of this plate is pivotally secured by a pin 30 to the cylinder 8 while adjacent the other end the plate has pivoted connection with a screw 31 which passes through a block 32 in which it is adjustable by the lock nuts 33. The plate is formed with a longitudinal slot 34 in which is adjustably secured a pivot pin 35 which is clamped in position upon said plate by the thumb nut 36.
A lever 37 is pivotally secured at one end, to the sleeve 15, which is provided with an aperture for the reception of such end. This lever is provided with a longitudinal slot.
38 through which projects the adjustable journaling pin 35.
The free end of of the lever 37 is angled as shown at 39 and to this angled end is pivotally secured a yoke 40 the inner face or edge of one arm of which is formed to provide a rack 41.
The rack 41 engages a pinion 42 which is suitably journaled in the casing 28 and which is integral with or otherwise connected to a segmental gear 43. The segmental gear 43 meshes with apinion 44 which is rigid on the same shaft with or integral with a gear wheel 45. The shaft on which the pinion 44 and gear wheel 45 are mounted is as will be readily understood, journaled in the casing 28. A pinion 46, which is rigid on the pointer shaft, meshes with the gear wheel 45.
A hair spring 47 surrounds the pointer shaft and has one end secured to the pointer shaft and the other end secured to the casing 28. This spring prevents back lash of the pointer and serves to bring the pointer quickly to rest at the proper point on the dial. A dial 48 is provided on the front of the casing 28 and a pointer 49 which is mounted on the pointer shaft, oscillates over the dial.
While the dial may be divided to suit the convenience of the maker and the work to which the micrometer is to be put, the one herein shown is divided into two-hundred equal graduations, each group of five graduations being suitably indicated, and each ten such groups of five being further indicated, as will be evident from Fig. 6.
From the foregoing it will be evident that, with a micrometer, the screw of which advances the ten-thousandth of an inch for a revolution of the screw, the mechanism of the attachment is set so that one revolution of the screw will advance the pointer 49 through ten groups of five, or through fifty divisions, and an advance of the pointer through one division will represent an advance of the micrometer screw of one fiftythousandth of an inch. In the foregoing it is assumed that the micrometer screw is so situated as to move the anvil, as by having work placed between its contact point and the anvil, or the contact point brought against the anvil.
lVhile the division between every tenth group of five divisions has been indicated herein by a zero, it is to be understood that any desired method of indicating these points may be resorted to.
In the modification shown in Figs. 6 and 7, the attachment embodies the same principles as those forming the basis of the structure just described. There are, however, differences in structural details which will now be described.
The cylinder 8 is of uniform diameter and bore throughout and through this cylinder extends the shaft 13 which is formed with a head 50. The end of this head is apertured and threaded to receive an adjusting screw 51 which is bound in adjusted position by a lock nut 52.
A collar 53 is rigid on the shaft 13 and is provided with extending lugs 54 which enter grooves 55 formed in the cylinder 8 and serve to limit the movement of the shaft 13.
A coiled spring 22 surrounds the shaft 13 and abuts the collar 53 and the adjusting nut 20" which is threaded in one end of the cylinder 8.
The anvil 56 of the micrometer 1 is apertured, as shown in Fig. 7, to slidably receive the end of a screw 57 which is threaded into the cross head 58 of a strap 59. The screw 57 is locked in any adjusted position by a lock nut 60 with its head normally 'contacting the protruding end of the adjusting screw 51.
The strap 59 embraces the arm of the micrometer 1, and is slidable thereon, and carries a cap 61 which fits over the head of the anvil 56.
A lug strap 62 extends from the casing 28 and embraces the arm of the micrometer 1 and is clamped in place about the arm by the screws 63.
As will be readily apparent, other forms of gearing may be used for transferring movement to the indicator needle 49 or 49 and other forms of adjustment may be resorted to. Changes in the details of construction and methods of attachment may also be resorted to when the attachment is to be used on a snap gage, or when it is to be applied to a micrometer intended for interior measurements.
In practice the device is used as fol lows The shaft 13 is adjusted to bring the pointer 19 on the zero between the .003 and .001 (for the position see the dial, Fig. 6, and the position of the needle i9), and theipivot 35 and plate 29 so adjusted that movement of the sleeve 15 through a distance of four thousandths of an inch will cause the needle to make one revolution.
The distances herein given are selected from one form of device as here shown but it is understood that the ratio between the movement of the sleeve and hand may be changed as also the amount of movement of which the sleeve is capable. This will depend entirely on the character of work the micrometer is designed to measure.
IVith the parts so adjusted, the article or work to be measured is brought between the arms of the micrometer yoke, as usual, and the sleeve of the micrometer turned in the usual way until the indicator needle is brought to rest upon the zero between plus and minus on the dial, that is the zero at the top of the dial. The reading on the micrometer will then give the eXact dimension of the part measured.
WVhen reducing a piece of Work to a required size, the micrometer may be set to that size, and the work inserted, from time to time between the end of the micrometer screw and the anvil, when the indicator 4:9 or 19, as the case may be, will tell at a glanceif the work is down to the required size. If the work is still over size, the pointer will be forced to the right of the zero mark at the top of the dial and, reading from such zero mark, will indicate the amount which the work is still to be reduced. If the indicator fails to reach the zero mark at the top of the dial, it will indicate that the work has been too much reduced and is undersize.
In using the modified form shown in Figs. 6 and 7, the parts are adjusted so that the end of the screw 51 will contact the head of the screw 57 and hold the cap 61 of the strap 59 out of contact with the anvil head. Movement of the work to be measured against the cap 61 will then cause the shaft 13 and its head to be moved rectilinearly, which will actuate the mechanism of the attachment and indicate such movement on the dial in the manner heretofore described in relation to the preferred form.
Having thus described the invention what is claimed as new and sought by Letters Patent, is
1. A micrometer attachment, comprising a movable anvil, a tubular member, an element sliding in the tubular member and actuated by movement of the anvil, resilient means for holding the sliding element in normal position, a lever secured to the sliding element, an adjustable fulcrum for the lever, and means controlled by the lever for indicating the movement of the anvil.
2. A micrometer attachment, comprising a movable anvil, a tubular member, an element sliding in the tubular member and actuated by movement of the anvil, means for holding the sliding element in normal position, a plate secured to the tubular member, means for adjusting the plate, a lever pivoted to the sliding member and fulcrumed on the plate, and means controlled by the lever for indicating the movement of! the anvil.
In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own I have hereto aflixed my signature in the presence of two witnesses.
FRANK MAURICE JOHNSON.
Witnesses:
ROBERT BELL, THOS. T. MARTIN.
US195999A 1917-10-11 1917-10-11 Micrometer and gage attachment Expired - Lifetime US1328378A (en)

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Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2447282A (en) * 1944-03-03 1948-08-17 Trico Products Corp Gauge
US2481078A (en) * 1944-12-08 1949-09-06 Howard A Burdwood Indicating caliper gauge
RU2630292C1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2017-09-06 Акционерное общество "Московский вертолетный завод им. М.Л. Миля" Device for measuring side locking of shear connection

Cited By (3)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2447282A (en) * 1944-03-03 1948-08-17 Trico Products Corp Gauge
US2481078A (en) * 1944-12-08 1949-09-06 Howard A Burdwood Indicating caliper gauge
RU2630292C1 (en) * 2016-04-29 2017-09-06 Акционерное общество "Московский вертолетный завод им. М.Л. Миля" Device for measuring side locking of shear connection

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