US1326112A - Method of and apparatus for lasting boots and shoes - Google Patents

Method of and apparatus for lasting boots and shoes Download PDF

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US1326112A
US1326112A US1326112DA US1326112A US 1326112 A US1326112 A US 1326112A US 1326112D A US1326112D A US 1326112DA US 1326112 A US1326112 A US 1326112A
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last
cavity
shoe
fluid
heel
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    • AHUMAN NECESSITIES
    • A43FOOTWEAR
    • A43DMACHINES, TOOLS, EQUIPMENT OR METHODS FOR MANUFACTURING OR REPAIRING FOOTWEAR
    • A43D11/00Machines for preliminary treatment or assembling of upper-parts, counters, or insoles on their lasts preparatory to the pulling-over or lasting operations; Applying or removing protective coverings
    • A43D11/14Devices for treating shoe parts, e.g. stiffeners, with steam or liquid

Description

W. A. STUBBS. METHOD 0F AND APPARATUS FOR LASTING BOOTS AND SHOESL APr ucMnoN FILED JUNE24. 191s.
1,32651 1 2. Patented Dec. 23,1919.
45 be necessary, and hence my invention con- UNITED STATES PATENT onricn.
WILLIAM A. STUBBS, 0F WINTHIROP, MASSACHUSETTS.
METHOD OF AND APPARATUS FOR LASTING BOOTS AND SHOES.
Specification of Letters Patent. Patented D 23 191 Application filed June 24, 1916. Serial No. 105,682.
To all whom it may concern .1 I
Be it known that I, WILLIAM A. STUBBS, a citizen of the United States, residing at Winthrop, in the county of Suffolk and State of Massachusetts, have invented new and useful Improvements in Methods of and Apparatus for Lasting Boots. and Shoes,
absorbent stiffening members and impregnating or coating them, just prior to the lasting OPBI'iltlOIl, With a stlftening compound in a fluid state, but in most cases the stiffening members are so prepared, or aremade of such material, that they require softening prior to lasting.
a My present invention contemplates broadly the operation of treating a shoe stiffener from the inside of the pulled-over or lasted shoe while the latter is upon a last. Such treatment may be a softening treatment or a stiffening treatment, according to the condition of the stiffening member prior to the treatment. jFor example, a turned shoe that has a relatively limp toe box would be more easily turnedthan one having a relatively stiff box, and it wouldbe within the scope of this invention to last a shoe with a toe} box made ofa-bsorbent but untreated material, and to apply a stiffening substance in fluid form to the latter after the shoe has been turned and while it is upon a last. But the stiffener be stifl before it is incorporated into the shoe a softening treatment would templates the feeding of a softening fluid to the stiffenerwhile the latter is in the 'shoe and while the shoe is in a pulled-over or lasted condition upon a last. Such feed ing of fluid, in either case, is made possible by using a last that has one or more internal ducts arranged to carry the fluid to the stiffeningmember or members. If a softening fluid is needed steam or hot air, depending upon the character of the substance to be softened, could be fed through such ducts. Every last is provided with a jackpost cavity in its ankle portion, and accordingly the duct or ducts are arranged to have communlcation with such cavity. The fluid would be fed into the'jackpost cavity, and the ducts are arranged in communication with such cavity and extend to points adacent the heel stiffener or toe stiffener or both, according to the disposition of stiffening members in the shoe. A pulled-over or lasted shoe may therefore be steamed or otherwise heated internally, in which casethe heating fluid would reach the stiffening member or members without having to pass through the upper and would be for this reason more effective than if it were directed agalnst the exterior of the shoe.
The invention further contemplates an apparatus for feeding fluid into the jackpost cavity ofthe last, which apparatus may be used in con unction with or independently of a toe steamer.- In the event ofusing it in conpinction wlth a toe steamer, a fluid may be fed through the last and emitted inside the shoe while at the same time. the toe portion of the last may be heated externally by the toe steamer. In this respect the irivent ion embodies devices for utilizing the motion of the shoe toward and from the toe steamer to control the feeding of steam to the latter and to control the feeding of the fluid that is fed into the jackpostcavity of the last. 1 The fundamental idea of providin the last with internal ducts is capable of fieing embodied in lasts that have removable instep portions but that are otherwise unitary, and in lasts that have relatively movable heel-parts and foreparts.
Referring to the accompanying drawings:
Figure 1 represents a longitudinal section of a hinged last embodying the present invention. I
Fig. 2 represents a plan view thereof.
Fig. 3 represents a section through the structure intersected by line 3-3 of Fig. l. Fig. 4 represents a longitudinal section through a last that has a removable instep portion but that is otherwise a one-piece last, embodying the present invention. In this figure the last is shown mounted upon a tubular supportin member through which the heating 1118(1111'11 may be fed into the j ackpost cavity.
Fig. 5 represents an elevation showing a hinged last similar to that shown by Fig. 1. a pulled-over shoe thereon, and heating apparatus including a toe steamer, means for feeding a heating medium to the last, and valve mechanism for controlling the feeding of the heating medium to the interior of the last and for controlling the feeding of steam to the toe steamer.
Fig. 6 represents an end elevation of the apparatus shown by Fig. 5, as viewed from ri ht to left.
Fig. 7 represents a sectional view through the valve structure intersected by line 7-7 of Fig. 6.
Fig. 8 represents a view of the same structure as that shown by Fig. -7 but showing the parts in a different relation.
Fig. 9 is a sectional View, on a larger scale, of the duct joint included in Fig. 1.
Fig. '10 is a sectional view through the structure intersected by line 1()10 of Fig.
5, looking down.
Fig. 11 is a section through the structure intersected by line 1111 of Fig. 5.
The same reference characters indicate the same parts wherever they occur.
The two-part last shown by Figs. 1, 2 and 5 includes a forepart 12, heel-part,13, and jointed means connecting said parts so that the latter are capable. of relative movement. In the present instance the jointed connecting means is a simple hinge indicated as a whole at 14. In this respect the last is well known. It is customary to provide such a last with a s ring or locking means adapted to keep the orepart and lieel-part in the relationshown, which is the cooperative relation for lasting, but for the present purposes it is not necessary to illustrate any spring or locking means, and I have therefore omitted the latter to avoid undue coinplication of the drawings. The usual jackpost bushingis indicated at 15, and is. arranged in the ankle portion of the last. This bushing provides a cavity into which a heating medium may be fed and from which it maybe conducted through internal ducts in the'last to the points where it is most desirable and necessary.
The heel portion is provided with a hollow metallic member 16 into which the heat ing medium is conducted by ducts or passageways formed in the heel-par't. These ducts or passageways, and also all other ducts and passageways hereinafter described, are preferably lined with metal tubing to protect the wood of the last, as much as possible, from the warping effect ofheat and n'ioisture. The tubular lining members through which the heating medium is conducted from the jackpost cavity to the hollow member 16 are indicated at 17, 17. The inner ends of these ducts register with elongated holes 18 formed in the bushing 15. The reason for elongating the holes 18 is to maintain communication between the ducts and the jackpost cavity in case the ackpost bushing should be moved endwise by the pressure that is put upon the last by a heeling machine or sole-laying machine. The hollow member 16 is substantially U-shaped, as shown by Fig. 2, and its outer surface conforms to the surface of the counter portion of the last. The last is rabbeted for the reception of the member 16, and the latter is set in so that its outer surface will lie flush with the counter surface of the last. The outer side of the member 16 is provided with emission ports 19, and there may be as many such ports as desired,-and they may be arprovided, and the steam or other heating mediumthat is emitted from the ports 19 may reach the counter stifl'ener close to the pulled-over edge 20 of the heel-part.
If it is desired to emit a heating medium in the toe portion of a pulled-over or lasted shoe, the last may be provided with another duct or ducts having communication with the jackpost cavity. As shown by Figs. 1 and 2, a metal bushing or lining member 21 is set into the toe portion of the last. The last is preferably bored from the sole to form the cavity for such bushing, and the opening thus left in the bottom of the last may be closed by a wooden plug such as that indicated at 22. The cavity provided by the bushing affords means of communication be tween amain duct and a large number of distributing ducts. These ducts are provided, in the presentinstance, by tubular metal lining members 23 and 24:, the member 23 constituting the main duct and the members 24 being the distributing ducts. The
'latter are arranged in substantially radial relation in the toe portion, as shown by Fig. 2, and all have communication with the cavity of the bushing 21. The main duct 23 cannot extend "without interruption to the jackpost cavity in the form shown by Fig. 1, because the heel-part and forepart have angular movement relatively to each other. For this reason the heel-part is provided with a tubular lining member 23 that is arranged to register with the member 23 in the forepart when the forepartand heel-part are in cooperative relation for lasting. A substantially tight joint between the members 23 and 23 can be made by forming the meeting ends thereof with cooperative frusto-conical surfaces as shown by Fig. 9.
Such joint is indicated as a whole at 24* and is substantially coincident with the abutting Mammal frusto-conical formation of the tubular members causes the latter to become centered relatively to each other as the forepart and heel-part are moved into the relation shown.
The last 25 shown by Fig. 4 is provided with substantially the same elements as the hinged last shown by Figs. 1, 2 and 5, but inasmuch as there is no division between the forepart and heel-part of the last 25, the bore for the main duct 23 has to be begun at the back of the heel. This bore is made before the jackpost bushing is inserted, and the portion that is at the rear of said bushing is closed by a wooden plug 38. Inasmuch as the essentially new elements of the last 25 are the same as those shown in Fig. 1,
the same reference numerals are used to' indicate them. a
It will be understood, of course, that the number and disposition of the distributing ducts 24 in the toe part ma will. in member 26 the upper end of which is a apted to go into the jackpost bushing. This member has an external frusto conical portion 27 adapted, to fit tightly in the mouth of the bushing to form a substan tially tight. joint. The member 26 is adapted to conduct steam or other heating medium into the last from a source of supply. Figs. 5 and 6 show a steam pipe 28 which for present purposes may be regardedas the source of supply. For reasons that will appear in due course, a flexible tube 29 is connected to supply pipe 28 and is coupled to a metal pipe '30. Pipe 30 is afiixed to a block.
31, and said-block is arranged upon a bench 32. A swinging joint is indicated as a whole at 33 in Figs. 5 and 6. In Fig. 6 the axis dicated at m.
of the joint is indicated by broken line m .v, and in' Fig. 5 the center ofthe joint is-in- The essential details of this joint are shown by Figs. 7 and 8. The -stationary member of the joint is indicated at 34:, and the oscillatory element is indicated at 35. The lower end of the supporting member 26 is fitted into the member 35, and communication between the stationary member 34 and the member 26'is afforded-by ports 36 and 37. These ports are arranged to register with each other, as shown by Fig. 7, when the member 26 is in an upright posi tion, as shown by Fig. 4 and as shown by solid lines in Fig. 5; but the supporting member 26 is capable of swinging to the angular position shown by dotted lines in Fig. '5 and shown also by Fig. 8, in which position the port 37 is out of register withport 36. The members 34 and 35 thus constitute a valve by which communication between the last and the source of supply is opened and closed according to the position of the supportingmember 26.
In practice this device may be used as be varied at,- Fig. 4. includes a tu ular support follows. Assuming that the necessary elements of a shoe are assembled upon a last of the character hereinbefore described, with the upper pulled over preparatory to lasting, the laster would mount the last upon the member 26 While the latter is in the angular position represented by dotted lines in Fig. 5. Having so mounted the last with the pulled-over shoe thereon, the laster would swing the member 26 to the upright position to open communication between the last and source of supply from which the heating medium is fed. The last may be left in the position shown by Fig. 5 as long as may be necessary to heat the stiffening members of the shoe, and in the meantime the laster may beperforming a lasting operation on another shoe. As each lasted shoe fis set aside the lastermay remove the last fand pulled-over shoe from the support 26 and mount another last with a drafted and pulled-over shoe on such support. It would be desirable toiswi'ng the support 2-6 to the inclined position prior to removing the last therefrom, inorder to close communication Y with the source of supply. 'Each heated shoe, with the last therein, wouldbe ready for the lasting operation as soon as it is removed from the heating device.
Although both lasts shown are provided i was ducts arranged to emit a heating medium into the toe portion of a shoe, the latter portion may nevertheless be heated externally while being heated internally, and I have therefore included a toesteamer in. Figs. 5 and 6 to illustrate a .desirablecombination of the two heating devices. The toe steamer is represented conventionally at 40. Its details of constructionare not of special importance for presentpurposes, and it will besufiicient to state that this device has a chamber into which the toe portion of a pulled-over shoe may be inserted as shown by Fig. 5, and that it comprises a steam easing into which steam may be conducted 7 and from which'it may be emitted'adjacent the shoe. As shown by Fig. 5, communica,
tion between the toesteamer and the supply pipe 28 1s provided-by a connecting pipe 41.
A valve is indicated at .42. I In order to simplify the work of the laster as much as possible, the valve 42 is connected with the last-supporting member 26 in such manner as to utilize the angular movement of the latter to operate the valve. For this purpose the stem of the valve is provided with an operating arm 43. This arm is connected with the member 26 by a link 44 and coupling device 45. It is not necessary to completely close communication between the supply pipe 28 and the toe steamer when the shoe is removed from the latter, but
it is desirable, at least, to reduce the volume of steam that is being fed at such time.
valve 42 may therefore be adjusted to aflord a relatively slight passageway for steam when the link 44 is moved to the right from the position shown, in which case there would 5 be a relatively small flow of steam when the supporting member 26 is inclined to the right, and a relatively large flow when the supporting member is in its upright position. Whenever it is desired to close all communication between the toe steamer and the supply pipe 28, the shut-ofl' valve 46 may be'closed. The pipe connection between the supply pipe 28 and the pipe 30 is provided with a shut-off valve 47.
In order to. compensate for the difference in the length of lasts, when using the internal heating apparatus in conjunction with a toe steamer, it is necessary to adjust one relatively to the other. So far as the principle of combination is concerned, it would not matter which one were fixed and which one were adjustable,.but I have shown the toe steamer as being the fixed element, and the internal heating apparatus as being the adjustable element. T e block 31 is capable of movement toward and from the toe steamer for this purpose, and thebench 3-2 is provided with guides 48 in which the block is adapted to slide. In order to make allowance for such movement of the block relatively to the supply pipe 28, the flexible pipe 29 hereinbefore mentioned is used to conduct the heating medium to the pipe 30. Pipe'30, being carriedby block 31, has movement relatively to the bench, and consequently the bench is provided with a slot 49 (Big. 5) in which the pipe may move. The device indicated at 50 is afiixed to one of the sliding block to lock the latter in any desired position of adjustment. For this purpose the block is provided with av series of sockets 51, and the device 50 is provided with a bolt 52 adapted to enter any one of said sockets. As shown by Fig. 6 the right hand end of bolt 52 is in one of the sockets.
The left-hand end of the bolt is provided with a head whereby it may be withdrawn .to free the block for adjusting.
Shifting the block 31 would affect the adjustment of valve 42, in the absence of some compensatory adjustment, and for this reason the link 44 is provided with a series of holes 53, any one of which is available for connection with the operating arm 43 of the valve. As shown by Fig. 11 the arm 48 is provided with a stud 54 extending through one of the holes in the link, and provided with a.thumb-nut 55 to keep the link on the stud. The holes in the link correspond to the holes 51 in the block, and when the desired position of the block has been determined, the corresponding position of the link relatively to the arm 43 the guides 48 and is adapted to coact withisaaiia may be obtained by unscrewing the nut 55, slipping the link from the stud 54, placing the stud in the desired hole 53, and replacing the nut.
The coupling device 45 that connects the link with the last-supporting member 26 is capable of adjustment toward and from the axis of the swing joint, and is therefore adapted to impart more or less motion to the valve arm 43. This coupling device comprises a metal stri formed to embrace the member 26 and having substantially parallel extremities. (See Fig. 10). One end of the link 44 is disposed between such extremities and is pivotally connected to them by the shank of a screw 56. A nut 57 coacts with the screw 56 to clamp the devices to the member 26, and the clamping strip is so formed as to clamp the member 26 without clamping the link. The screw thus acts asv a pivotal'connection for the link in addition to acting as a clamping device.
Although I have described the structure of the-last and other apparatus as though a heating fluid were to be used, the term heating is not intended to have a limiting efl'ect so far as the last is concerned, for, as explained at the beginning of the specification, the last is capable of having a stiffening fluid fed throu h it. The metal element 16 that is embedded in the counter portion of the last has a considerable area. exposed for contact with the shoe elements, and when a heating fluid is used this metal element hasa heating effect upon the counter portion of the shoe in addition to the heating effect of the heating medium that is emitted from it.
While emission of-steam would probably be the most efiicient way to utilize heat for the purpose of the present invention, it might not be desirable to use steam when operating upon ladies slippers that are .made of light-colored materials, such as satin, suede, or kid. In such cases steam might have a discoloring effect upon the outer material. In a great many factories a supply of heated air might not be available, and for this reason some other form of heating device could be substituted, to advantage, for the heating devices 16 and 24. For example, it would be possible to substitute elect-ric'heating coils for the heating devices 16 and 24, and in such case the connection with the source of current could be made by a contact plug designed to go into the jackpost cavity. A last so equipped would have the advantage of utilizin dry heat without any special piping in the uilding, for every modern factory is supposed to be wired for electric lights and for other electric apparatus.
.I claim:
1. A wood last having the usual jackpost a heel-part, 'jointed means connecting ysjaid; partsand affording 1 relative movement-J thereof, said heel-part having ayjackpost cavity and a ductextending from the, latter cavity in its heel-part, and a duct extending from said jackpost cavity to an extremity of the last. g
2. A WOOd last having the usual jackpost a cavity in its heel-part, and ducts extending from said jackpost cavity to both extremities of the last.
3. A last having a fluid-transmitting duct extending therethroughafrom its heel portion to its toe-end. I i Q y 4. A last having a cavity in its heel por tion, and a duct extending therethrough'; from said cavity to the surface of the toeportion. Q
5. A last having a U-shaped conduit embedded in its counter portion and arranged adjacent and substantially. parallel to the pulling-over edge of the heel portion, the latter portion havin a ackpost cavity, and one or more ducts ormin communication between said cavity and said U-shaped con- 7 duit.
j 6. A hinged last comprising a heelpart and a forepart pivotally connected together, 25-. a cavity in the heel-part, and a separable conduit extending from said cavity into the i forepart for the passage of a heating'me- H dium.
sol
said parts and aifordmg relatlve movement thereof, said heel-part having a cavity and a duct. extending from the latter to the operative relation for lasting.
8.-A two-part last comprising a forepar-t,
i them will move into and out of an end portoand from cooperative relation,
L in its heel portion, 'and a support having 7. A two-part last comprising a forepart, a heel-part, and. jointed means connecting front face of said heel-part, said forepart having ,a' duct jextendin from its rear face. to another face .thereo said ducts being-Q arranged to register-with each other in' end- 1" to-end relation when-said parts are infco :jj
to the front face of 'said heel-part, said; forepart having a duct extending from its j rear face toanother'face thereof, said ducts being arranged to register in end-to-end; relation-when said partsarein cooperative" r relation for lasting, and two tubular mem- 5 f bers arranged in said ducts respectively and arranged soth'at an end 'portion of one of tion of the other as said parts are moved feed a fluid, thereinto, said last having a duct in communication with said cavity and arranged to emit such fluid into the toe portion of a shoe on said last.
11. In combination, a last having a cavity in its heel portion, and a pipe having a portion adapted to go into said cavity to feed a fluid thereinto, said last having a duct extending from said 'cavity to f the counter portion and having an 0utlet"arranged to emit such fluidinto the counter portion of a shoe on said last. V
' 12. In combination, a last having a jackpost cavity in its heel portion, and ampport com rising two pipe-jointfinembers one of w ich is. adapted to turn 'on the other, and a pipe one end of which is coupled to the said one of said members, the. other end of said pipe being adapted to go into said cavity. to hold saidlast, said pipei joint members having ports arranged to be moved into and outof register with each other by such l'turnin to .open and close communication throng them,,said last having aduct/arran'ged tolemit'fluid from said cavity into a'shoe' o'ntholastJ 1 13. In combination,a last having a bushing in its heel portion, twocooperative pipejoint members, anda pipe one end of which is coupled to one of said members and the other end of whieh has an externally taper-j .1 'ing "portion adapted to fit tightly in the -115 imouth of said bushing, said pipe-j oint mem' "-bershaving cooperative ports adapted to 1 feed fluid into said pipe, said one of said membersbeing adapted to turn on the other to unreglster said ports, said last having a duct arranged to emit fluid from the cavity ofjsaidbushing into ashoe on the last. i
10 5 "-fl Ll LIIn combination,i a z toi teamer Sand pipe arranged to. feed fste'am' thereto, a. last' 1 gfxai jack ost ca'vity, aiinovable mem'i- .;ber having a -tubular portion adapted to go 'Y iHtO said eavitylto support said-last and to feed'a fluid into said cavity,' said last 'hav ing a duct communication with said ca -;ity andarranged to emit such gfluid into a shoeupper arranged on'said last, said sup porting member-being'movableto carry the last'to and from cooperative position relativelytd'said'toe steamer, a feed conduit connected to said supporting member to 'feed such fluid thereto, a valve arranged to com trol the feeding of such fluid,'through said 9. In'combination, a last having a cavity conduit, said valve being connected to said i supporting member to be operated by move- -a portion adapted to go'into "said cavity, i said support having 'a "duct arranged'tofeed 60 a fluid into saidcavity, andsaid last'hav- ,ing a. duct in communication with said vcavity and arranged to emit such fluid intof ;;"ashoeonsaid last: I j Y 10. In combination, 'a' last having a 6.5 cavity in its heel portion, and a pipe having" ment ofthe latter, a valve arranged to con and means controlled by movement of said support to control the supply of heat.
.16. In combination, a last having a cavity, a movable tubularsupport adapted to project into said cavity, means connected to said support and to a source of fluid to feed such fluid through said support and into the last, said last. having a duct in communication with said cavity to emit such fluid into a shoe on'the. last, and means operable by movement of said support to control the supply of such fluid through said support.
per while the latter is pulled over upon a last and insole.
20. The hereindescribed method of preparing a shoe upper for lasting, Which consists in assembling the upper and an insole upon a last that has a duct extending through it, and feeding a heated fluid into the upperthrough such duct.
21. The hereindescribed method of softening a stiffening member of a shoe upper, which consists inplacing such upper, with such stifiening member therein, upon a last that has a duct extending through it to a point contiguous to such stiffening member, and feeding a heated fluid through such duct to such stiffening member.
22. The hereindescribed method of treating an absorbent stiffening member of a shoe upper, which consists in feeding a fluid substance to such-stifi'ening member through the interior of the shoe while the latter is upon a last.
In testimony whereof I have aiiixed my signature.
WILLIAM A. STUBBS.
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Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2638776A (en) * 1947-08-01 1953-05-19 Andrew A Aines Mechanical footwear testing machine
US2782431A (en) * 1954-12-16 1957-02-26 United Shoe Machinery Corp Methods of and apparatus for conditioning the uppers of pulled-over shoes
US3105250A (en) * 1961-04-05 1963-10-01 Kamborian Shoe stiffener heating apparatus
US3115651A (en) * 1961-02-21 1963-12-31 Jacob S Kamborian Method and apparatus for heating shoe stiffeners
WO1997041750A1 (en) * 1996-05-08 1997-11-13 Daley Peter A Method and apparatus for heating thermoformable material in footwear

Cited By (6)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2638776A (en) * 1947-08-01 1953-05-19 Andrew A Aines Mechanical footwear testing machine
US2782431A (en) * 1954-12-16 1957-02-26 United Shoe Machinery Corp Methods of and apparatus for conditioning the uppers of pulled-over shoes
US3115651A (en) * 1961-02-21 1963-12-31 Jacob S Kamborian Method and apparatus for heating shoe stiffeners
US3105250A (en) * 1961-04-05 1963-10-01 Kamborian Shoe stiffener heating apparatus
WO1997041750A1 (en) * 1996-05-08 1997-11-13 Daley Peter A Method and apparatus for heating thermoformable material in footwear
US5885622A (en) * 1996-05-08 1999-03-23 Daley; Pete Method and apparatus for heating thermoformable material in footwear

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