US1312510A - Sound-controlled dirigible torpedo. - Google Patents

Sound-controlled dirigible torpedo. Download PDF

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US1312510A
US1312510A US18817917A US1312510A US 1312510 A US1312510 A US 1312510A US 18817917 A US18817917 A US 18817917A US 1312510 A US1312510 A US 1312510A
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torpedo
motor
switch
sound
battery
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George Baker
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George Baker
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F41WEAPONS
    • F41GWEAPON SIGHTS; AIMING
    • F41G7/00Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles
    • F41G7/20Direction control systems for self-propelled missiles based on continuous observation of target position
    • F41G7/22Homing guidance systems
    • F41G7/2273Homing guidance systems characterised by the type of waves
    • F41G7/228Homing guidance systems characterised by the type of waves using acoustic waves, e.g. for torpedoes

Description

G. BAKER.
SOUND CONTROLLED DIRIGIBLE ToRPEDo.
APPLICATION FILED AUG.25, |91?.
l .nlm .m @n m m m WH. M 3 K n Am U B m 4 .w R O D.. E G Nv Md a o:
Nm IZOU ZOFrUDOZ- m2 d mo.
G. BAKER.
SOUND CONTROLLED D'IHIGIBLE TORPEDO.
APPLICATION FILED AUG.25| 19lf.
Patelltd Allg. 12, 1919.
4 SHEETS-SHEET a GEORGE BHKER APPLICATION FILED AUG.25, |917- PamndAug.12,1919.
4 SHEETS-SHEET 4.
GEORG BAKER.
attain,
GEORGE BAKER, OQF GOLDFIELD, COLORADO.
SOUND-CONTROLLED DIRIGIBLE TORPIEDO.
Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented Aug. 12, 1919.
Application filed August25, 1917. Serial No. 188,179.
provide a torpedo which shall be automatically guided or steered toward the object which it is designed to attack, without the necessity of using land wires or Wires leading to a. vessel from which the torpedo is discharged.
Another object is to provide a torpedo which will be released or discharged from the torpedo tube automatically upon the arrival of an enemy craft within a certain radius or zone, without vthe necessity ofany intervention on the part of the operators, except in soA far as the regulation of the automatic mechanism is concerned.
A further object in this connection is to provide a propelling mechanism and motor within the torpedo Which is normally inactive while the torpedo is Within its tube, but which becomes active when an enemy vessel arrives within a predetermined distance of the ship or other object upon which the torpedo is mounted, and in this connection to provide that the putting of the propelling mechanism into activity shall act to release the torpedo from its anchorage Within the torpedo tube, so that the torpedo shall be automatically discharged.
A further object is to provide a torpedo in which the propelling mechanism is set in motion by sound waves caused by the approach of an enemy vessel. y
Still another object in this connection is to provide a torpedo which is guided toward the enemy vessel by sound waves set up by said vessel.
Still another object isto provide for this i purpose a plurality of microphonesdisposed in the head of the torpedo, one'of said microphones being used for ,setting in action the propelling mechanism, two of the microphones being used for settingsinto operation the mechanism which actuates'the elevating or depressing rudders and two more of the microphones being used for setting into operation the mechanism which acts to shift the laterally guiding rudders, these steering microphones being so arranged that if one of the microphones receives more sound waves than a coacting microphone, the torpedo will be turned in the direction from which the sound proceeds until the sound is equalized in both of said microphones, whereupon the torpedo will proceed in a straight course toward the object, the veering of the torpedo ont of said course being immediately corrected by the increased action of the sound waves upon one microphone and the decreased action on the other microphone to thereby properly shift the steering rudders.
Still another object in this connection is to provide in the head of the torpedo means for controlling the propulsion thereof or the steering thereof, either horizontally or vertically, comprising a plurality of hydrophones or microphones, as they may be termed, each consisting of two conductive members connected to each other, but in contact and forming when loosely engaged with each other a predetermined resistance to the passage of electric current, which members when forced into greater contiguity with each other through the action of a sound receiving diaphragm will cause a variation in the intensity of the currentr as by permitting a greater amount of current to fiow through the members, this current when it reaches a predetermined strength first acting to start the propelling mechanism and operate the propeller and then acting to steer the torpedo toward the object from which said sound proceeds.
Still another object of the invention is to provide charge detonating means in the head of the torpedo which is normally in an inoperative position but which, when the torpedo strikes the object it is aimed at. is forced inward into active position to explode the charge, and provide a latch holding the detonating means in an inoperative position so long as the torpedo is within its tube, mechanism being provided, however. whereby as soon as the propeller starts to operate, the latch will be withdrawn to perlnit the detonating mechanism to be renv dered active.
Still another object is to provide means whereby the degree of current which will operate the initial propelling mechanism may be regulated to thereby regulate and controlthe distance at which the torpedo llO . peller.
A further obj ect is to provide what I term 'a hydrophone for controlling the propelling mechanism and the steering mechanism, the hydrophone being so constructed that the wave action of the water through which the torpedo is being propelled will not effect thel microphone which forms part of the hydrophone.
Still another object in this connection is to provide an equalizing device connectedwith the hydrophone so that the internal pressure on the diaphragm of the hydrophone 'and microphone 'shall be the same as the external pressure, without however allowing water to enter the interior of the hydrophone.
Another object is to provide a hydrophone in which only the relatively .rapid sound vibrations will affect the diaphragm or diaphragams and these diaphragms will not be affected by the relatively slow waves set up in the water itself.
Other and more detailed objects will be stated later. My invention .is illustrated in the accompanying drawings, wherein Figure 1 is a. longitudinal sectional view of a torpedo constructed in accordance with my invention, the middle section of the torpedo being broken out and the torpedo tube being shown in section;
Fig. 2 is a diagrammatic view of the electrical mechanism for operating the lpropeller and one set of steering rudders, this however also showing 'one of the hydrophones and its equalizing chamber in section;
Fig. 3 is a simplified diagrammatic view showing the connections of the several hydrophones to their induction coils;
Fig. 4 is an end elevation of the head of the torpedo;
Fig. 5 is a horizontal sectional view on the line 5 5 of Fig. 2;
Fig. 6 is a section on the line 6-6 of Fig. 1, showing the manner in which the rudders are interconnected;
Fig 7 is a section on the line 7-7 of Fig. 1;
Fig. 8 is a diagrammatic section through one of the microphones forming part of the hydrophones.
Referring to these drawings, and particularly. to Fig. 1, 10 designates the outer shell of the torpedo, which is approximately cigar shaped in the usual manner and tapering toward its rear end, the rear end of the torpedo being provided with the usual p-ropeller '11, mounted upon the propeller shaft 12, which extends out of the rear end of the torpedo and is provided with the screwthreads 13. This propeller shaft is driven by means of the motor ,14, this motor being shown as an electric motor of any suitable type, the drawing being purely illustrative in this regard. The torpedo is guided laterally, that isv toward the right or toward the left, by means of the rudders 15 disposed above and below the rear end of the torpedo, these rudders being mounted upon shafts 16 and the torpedo is guided vertically, that is, elevated or depressed by means of the elevating or depressing rudders 17, mounted upon shafts 18. Rectangular frames 19 are illustrated as being mounted upon the rear end of the torpedo exten-ding rearward therefrom and supporting the shafts 16 and also supporting the shaft 12 rearward of the propeller 11.
The head 20 of the torpedo, as illustrated in Fig 1, is somewhat rounded and is provided with a plurality of forwardly projecting concentrically disposed annular walls 21, certain of said walls defining hydrophonc chambers or hydrophones, as the structure may be called, and certain other of the walls 22 defining equalizing chambers. Each of the lrydrophones is correlated with an equa-lizing chamber and one of these hydrophones, and its corresponding equalizing chamber, is shown in sec-tion in Fig. 2. All of the hydrophones and equalizing chambers are constructed in the same manner. Therefore a description of one will suffice for all.
Referring to Fig. 2, which illustrates in section the hydrophone which controls the propelling mechanism and thev equalizingA chamber therefor, it will 'be seen that the wall 21 defines a chamber 23. The forward end of this, chamber is closed by a transversely extending imperforate diaphragm 2l and in front of this diaphragm is disposed a perforate plate 25, this plate and the diaphragm being held to the circular walls 21 by means of the screw-threaded ring 26, which has a flange which extends over the perforate diaphragm and holds it in place. Inward vof the diaphragm 24 is a diaphragm 27 and disposed within the chamber 23 is a microphone 28. This microphone is that form of microphoney in which carbon granules are used, the granules being disposed between outer and inner plates, as illustrated in Fig. 8, these plates being designated 29 and 30.y The plate 30 is fixed within the case 28 of the microphone While the plate 29 is movable toward or from the plate 30 and is connected'by a stem to the diaphragm 27.
means of a wire 33 to a contact member 34 mounted upon a transversely extending wall 35 which is of insulating material, this contact 34 electrically engaging the binding screw 36 which passes out through the rear wall of the chamber23. T-he plate 30 is provided with a stem 37 which extends rearward through the wall 35 and is provided with a binding screw 38 ycarrying a contact 39,' in turn engaging with the binding screw 40 extending out through the rear wall of the hydrophone. It will thus be seenthat the circuit extends through the binding screw 3G -to the plate 29, thence through the carbon granules 31 to the plate 30 and so back by way of the binding screw 40.
Coacting with each chamber 23, that is, with each hydrophone, is an equalizing chamber 41 defined by the wall 22. The forward end of this chamber is partially closed by a transversely extending plate 42 formed with perforations a'nd held in place by a locking ring 43. Also held in place in the forward end of this chamber 41 is a rubber or other elastic pouch 44, which isbulged inward and which receives the full pressure of the water against the head of the torpedo. The chamber 41 is connected to the space behind the diaphragm 27 by means of a passage 45 and the space in front of the diaphragm and rearward thereof is connected by one or more by-passes 46.
Now it will be seen that the pressure of the waves will be against the diaphragm 24 and against the rubber or elastic diaphragm 44, but that nasmuch as this pressure is equalized and is the same upon the inner face of the diaphragm 24 as upon the outer face thereof, that this pressure will not affect the diaphragm. This diaphragm 24 only responds to relatlvely rapid vibrations and not to slow vibrations, and as a consequence, the variations in pressure caused by the action of water against the diaphragm 24 will not aifect it. Sound waves, however, which are of relatively high rapidity will affect this diaphragm 24 and this will cause the vibration of the coacting diaphragm 27, thus in the well known manner causing va.- riations in the resistance offered by the pressure of the carbon granules to the electric current. If the sound is suiiiciently intensev` the diaphragms 24 and 27 will be vibrated with great rapidity in the usual n'ianner and this will reduce the resistance of the carbon microphones and permit of a greater amount of current passing through the microphonesl than when there is no sound, that is, when the microphones are not vibrated or when the sound is of relatively slow intensity.
As before stated, all of the hydrophones and equalizing chambers are constructed in exactly the same. manner and operate on the same principle. The only difference hetween the several hydrophones and their equalizing chambers exists in the axial direction of the hydrophones.
Referring now to Fig. 4, Iit will he seen that I have provided a hydrophone desig nated A and an equalizer a. These are disposed approximately nearthe center of the head and theaxis of the hydrophone A 'extends practically parallel to the axis ol the torpedo. The hydrophone B is directed downward, that is, its axis extends down ward and forward. The hydrophone C has its axis extending upward and forward. The hydrophone B is, of course, operatively connected to the equalizer b and the hydrophone C to the equalizer c. These hydrophones B and C in the arrangement I have illustrated control the vertical movement of the torpedo and cause it to either move upward and forward or downward and forw-ard, depending upon the greater intensity of the, sound on one of the hydrophones than the other, or if the sound impinges with equal intensity upon both of said hydrophones, then the torpedo will proceed in a normal horizontal course.
For the purpose of directing the torpedo toward the right or toward the left. l provide the hydrophones D and E with their corresponding equalizers cl and c. The hydrophones E and D are directed forward and toward the axial center of the torpedo in the manner illustrated and if the sound waves impinge with greater force upon one of these hydrophones than upon another, the torpedo will be turned by mechanism hereafter to be described toward the direction from Which the sound proceeds` and when the torpedo arrives at a position where the impact of the sound waves is equal. then the steering mechanism will be turned so as to cause the torpedo to proceed in a straight lin'e toward the object at which it' is directed.
Disposed in the spaces between the several equalizers and the hydrophones are a plurality of detonating pins or rods designated 47, these pins extending in through the head of the torpedo and being converged, as illustrated in Fig. 2. to a collar 48 mounted upon a detonating rod 49, which extends rearward to a detonating cap 50. as illustrated in Fig. 1. The space within the head of the torpedo is designed to be suitably filled with an explosive compound` designated there. being a wall which holds the explosive compound in place within the head. The detonating pins 47 project out beyond the head and beyond the Several circular walls of the adapted to engage behind the collar 48.
This latch is urged out of this position by a spring 56, but is held initially in the position shown in Fig. 2, by mea-ns of a detent 57,. which is carried by a lever 58, in turn carrying an armature 59, coacting with an electro-magnet 60. When this magnet 60 is energized, the armature 59 will be drawn against the magnet which will shift the detent 57 out of its engagement with the latch 54 and the latch'will be thrown outward so that the rod 49 with the detonating pins attached thereto may be shifted rearward by the impact with the vessel or other object. A. stop 61 is provided which limi-ts the movement of the armv 58 in one direction, and a spring 62V urges the arm toward the stop and resists the movement of the arm toward the electro-magnet 60.
The immediate means for shifting the steering rudders 15 and the steering rudders 17 are the two electric motors 63 and 64, one of these motors being designed to operate the rudders 15 and the other the rudders 1.7, the shafts of each of these motors being operatively eared with these rudders in the manner illqustrated in Fig. 6. Inasmuch as Various gearing can be used for this purpose and inasmuch as the gearingwill be obvious,
there is no necessity of describing a specific gearing which may be used for this purpose. It will be assumed that the motor 64 is designed tooperate the elevating and depressing rudders 17, while the motor 63 is designed to operate the laterally shiftable rudders 15. Each of these motors is operated by a battery, as for instance a storage batter contained within the torpedo, and the hy rophones which control the operation of these motors operatively cause the opening or closing of the circuit between these batteries and the motors and eut in or cut out resistance so as to control the speed of the motors, and when one of the motors operates, it shifts the corresponding rudders either rapidly or slowly in one direction to thereby cause the torpedo to move toward the object and when the torpedo is directed toward the object, tlgeiicurrent is cut off from the corresponding motor and the action of" the water tends to return the rudder to its normal straight position so that the torpedo will move directly toward the object.
The mechanism for accomplishing this result will be described now, it being understood, however, th-at the mechanism for operating the motor 64 is precisely the saine the mechanism for operating the motor 6 nisms, that for the motor 64, will be described.
The mechanism for initially setting in motion the propelling motor 14 when an enemy vessel arrives within a predetermined dist alice comprises an induction coil 65 constructed in the usual manner. The secondary of this coil is connected to an electro-magnet 66 by means of the secondary wires 67. Primary connections from the induction coil will be later stated. The electro-magnet 66 eoacts with an armature 68 mounted upon a pivoted lever 69, which is norm-ally held in one position by a spring 70 and a spring 71, this lever having an arm 7 2, which carries a contact 7 3 coacting with a' contact 7 4. From the contact 73 extends a conductor 75 to the electro-magnet 76 and from the other terminal of this magnet extends a conductor 77 to the battery 78. From the other pole of this battery extends a conductor 79 and from this conductor branches a conductor 80, which extends to the contact 74. It will thus be seen that when the magnet 66 is energized and the lever 69 is shifted to connect the contacts 73 and 74, the current will pass through the battery 78 to the electro'- magnet 76. From the wire 77 extends a conductor 81 which is carried forward to the electro-magnet 60 and/from this electromagnet extends a conductor 82 to a contact 83 carried upon the arm 54. Coacting with the electro-magnet 76 is an armature 84 carried upon a pivoted angular lever 85, which constitutes a detent or latch. Coacting with this lever 85 is a lever 86, the extremity of which is angularly bent as at 87, the angular end-88 of the vlever 85 bearing against this angular extremity 87 and reventing a movement of the lever 86 in ig. 2, under the action of the spring 89. To this lever 86 there is connected a rod 90, which engages with a switch 91. This switch when it is thrown in the direction of the arrow' by means of the spring 89 engages with a contact 92 and the switch and the contact'92 are connected in circuit with the motor 14 rand with a battery 93 by wires and g/ asshown in Fig. 1. Thus when the switch 91 is thrown in the direction of the arrow, the motor 14 will be energized and the propeller will be operated to drive the torpedo forward, this action initially releasing the torpedo from its engagement with the torpedo tube. v
It is necessary that as soon as the pro- Therefore, only one of these mecha-v ence of the magnet 76 operatively engages with a contact 97 carried upon an arm 98 project-ing from the member 85. This arm 98 is electrically connected to one pole of the battery 78 by means of the conductor 7 9, as illustrated in Fig. 2, and therefore as soon as the marmet 76 has been energized the magnet 60 will be energized to retract the latch which obstructs the actuation of the firing pins and the detonating rod. Two other contacts 99 and 99a are mounted upon the arm 98 and act as switches for certain circuits, which will be hereafter described.
The primary of the induction coil 65 is connected by a wire 101 to the binding post and the other end of the primary is connected by a wire 103 to the controlling mechanism on the ship. The binding post 36 is connected by a Wire 102 to the controlling mechanism on the ship, as illustrated in Fig. 2. On the ship, or at any other desired controlling` point, there is a battery 104 which on one side is connected by a Wire 103a to thc wire 103 andon the other side isconnected by a wire 102a to the wire 102. A
socket 169a is disposed between the Wires 102 and 103 and 102a and 103a so that when the torpedo is initially propelled from the torpedo tube, the wires 102 and 103 will disengage from the wires 102a and 1031. In circuit with the battery 104 is the rheostat 105 having the usual controlling arm 106 and between the battery and this controlling arm is disposed the switch 107. vFrom the wire 102a just beyond the rheostat 105 extends a branch Wire 108 which is connected to the wire 103al and in this branch is disposed the voltmeter 109 and the wire 102a is connected to the ammeter 110. The object of the voltmeter and ammeter will be later stated, but it is obvious that by operating the rheostat arm 106, thatthe resistance may be increased or decreased and thus the amount of effective current passing through the hydrophone and through the microphone therein or forming part thereof can be increased or decreased', to thereby control the distance at which the motor starting hydrophone will operate. i
For the purpose of operating the motor 64 (and the description applies equall well to the operation of the motor 63) and7 thereby operating the elevating rudders, I provide nected by the wires 113 to an electro-magnet 114 and the secondary winding of the coil 112 is also connected by wires 113 to al magnet 115. The primary winding of the induction coil 111 is connected by a wire 116 to the binding screw 36 of the corresponding hydrophone B and the other end of the primary Winding is connected by a wire- 117 to one pole of a battery 11'8. From the binding post 40 of the corresponding hydrophone extends a wire 119, which extends to the Contact 120, which is engaged by the contact 99 on'the arm 98, when the propeller is started in the manner heretofore described. From the member 98 extends a Vwire 121 which extends to the other pole of the battery 118, and thus it will be seen that current'is constantly passing through the inductlon coil 111 and through the corresponding hydrophone B.
The induction coil 112 has its primary Winding connected at one end to the binding screw 36 of the hydrophone C, whilethe other end of the winding is connected to the wire 117 and so to the battery 118. From the binding post 40 of the hydrophone C a wire extends and makes connection with the wire 119, as at 122. It will thus be seen that there is a constant current passing through the primary winding of the induction coil 112 and through the corresponding hydrophone The induction coils 65, 111 and 112, and the induction coils 111 and 112 for the hydrophone E transform the current from a relatively low voltage to' a high voltage as used in the magnets 66, 114 and 115.
It will be seen that when a suifciently high current passes through the induction coils 111 and 112, the magnet 114 or 115 will be energized and coacting with these magnets are the armatures 123 and 124 mounted upon a lever 125 which is pivoted at its middle, this lever having a rearwardly projecting arm 126. Springs 127, engaging against opposite ends of the arm 125, act to hold the arm 125 in a neutral position with both armatures spaced from the poles of the corresponding electro-magnets. The arm 126 carries upon it a pair of contacts 128, these contacts bein electrically connected by a wire 129 to a attery 130. l
Disposed on each side of the arm 126 and in normally spaced relation to the contacts 128 are resilient contacts 131 and 132. These are mounted upon supports 133 and disposed outward of these contacts 131 and 132 are the contacts 134 and 135. The'contact 134 '1s connected by a wire 136 to a magnet 137 and from this magnet a wire 138 extends to the positive pole of the battery 130. The contacty 131 is connectedto resistance 139 disposed between said contact 131 and the the two induction coils 111 and 112. The secondary wnchng of the coil 111. iS con- Wire 136. The contact 135 is connected by a wire 140 to the magnet 141P While the con1 ing a rearwardly extending arm 146. The
arm 146 is held in its middle position by means 'of the springs 147. Mounted upon i the arm. 146 fare thel contacts 148 an'd 149, these contacts being electrically connected by a wire 150 to the negative pole of a battery 151. From the positive pole of this battery a wire 152 leads to a second pair of contacts 153 Iand 154 mounted on the arm 146.
Coacting with the contact 153 is a resilient contact 155 and in spaced relation to this contact 155 is a resilient -contact 156 from which extends a wire 1'57, which leads to the motor 64. Connected to the contact 2155 is the resistance 15-8 which is also connected .to the wire 157. Thus the current can pass directly from the battery 151 to the motor or in another position of the arm 146 pass to the motor through the resistance 158.
Coacting with the contact 154 is Jche contact 159 and coacting with this contact 159 lbut spaced therefrom is the resilient contact 160 connected by a wire 1'61 to the other side of the motor. The contact 159 is connected to resistance 162 which in turn is connected to the wire 161. Thusthe motor may be caused to rotate in either direction depending upon the connection'of the wires 157 and 161 to the positive pole of the battery. The negative pole of the battery is connected by the wire 150 to the contacts 148 and 149, as previously stated and these contacts coact with the contacts 163 and 164. From the contact 163 a wire 165 extends to the wire 161, while from the Contact 164 a wire 166 extends to the wire 157.
As before stated, the means for operating the motor 63 is precisely the same as the means for operating the motor v64, this means being illustrated in Fig. 1, but not in Fig. 2, but as illustrated in Fig. 2, the arm 98 which constitutes a three point switch has mounted on it a pin or contact 99 which engage's with the contact 120, whereby the circuits through the induction coils 111 and 112 .are completed. r1`he inember 98 is also provided with a point or contact 983L which engages with the contact 120a whereby the circuits are completed through Ithe induction coils 111a and 112a which operate and coact with the motor 63.
As illustrated in Fig. 1, the torp-edo tube 167, which may be of any desired length, is closed at its rear end by a breech block 168, this breech block being so formed that it may be swung outward out of the breech and entirely clear thereof to permit the introduction of a torpedo into the torpedo tube Iandso Iconstructed that it may be rotated into locking engagement with the torpedo tube. This is an ordinary and common construction and therefore needs no specific construction. The breech block 168 has therein a socket 169a into which the plug on the ends of wires 102 and 103 engage, this plug being designated 169 in Fig. 1. The breech block is also provided at its center with a cross bar 171 having an outwardly projecting socket 170, which is interiorly screw-threaded for engagement with the exterior screw-threads 13 on the shaft 12.
The operation of this mechanism is as follows: Normally, assuming that the torpedo is wit-hin the tube 167, the shaft 12 is in engagement with the anchoring socket 170 and the plug 169 operatively engages the wires 102 and 103 to the wires 102 and 103a and therefore to the controlling mechanism illusthe torpedo to fire a-t a certain range and the switch 107 provides means whereby the operator mayv render the firing mechanism and the torpedo harmless when not within the war zone or when mee-ting a vessel of the same nationality. The rheostat 105 with its lever 106 isused to adjust the current so as to cause the torpedo to start when an enemy is within a certa-in range. This range is indicated upon the voltmeter 109 which shows the pressure of the current. pointer on this voltmeter moves toward zero Kas the sound waves caused by the enemy vessel commence to vibrate the diaphragm 24 of the hydrophone A.
When the carbon granules of the microphone disposed within the hydrophone A are only relatively lightly pressed together, then a relatively large voltage passes through the voltmeter but as the carbon granules are forced into more intimate contact with each other by the sound waves pressing against the diaphragms orvibrating the diaphragms 24 and 27, then the voltage drops and the indicator of the voltmeter moves over toward Zero as before stated. In the almneter, on the other hand, the indicator will move from Zero under The ordinary conditions but when an enemy is the carbon granules of the hydrophone A are pressed more closely together, and thus more current flows to the induction coil from the battery 104 0n the deck of the ship. When the current induced by the induction coil 65 is of such strength as to energize the magnet 66 to a degree suiiicient to pull over 'the armature 68 against the action of the spring 70, then the circuit is closed from battery 78 through the electro- ,magnet 76. This acts upon the armature 84 and pulls over the lever 85 releasing the latch88 from its engagement with the mem-A ber 86 and the spring 89 then shifts the switch 91 to a position to connect the motor 14 with the battery 93, to thus rotate the propeller shaft. As soon as the propeller shaft commences to rotate, it disengages from the anchoring socket 170 and the torpedo moves out from the torpedo tube, the slip joint formed by the plug 169 and the socket 169a becoming disengaged. The torpedo has now been tired and is now free of the ship.
At the same time that the arm 85 is moved toward the electro-magnet 76, the switch 98, through the point 97 and the contact 96 causes the energizing of the electro-magnet 60.' This rotates the arm 58 against the action of the spring 62 and releases-the latch 54 which drops downward, thus unlocking the detonating mechanism. At the same time, the switches formed'by the points 99 and 120 are closed and the switch formed by the point 99a and 120a is closed.
Now if the torpedo is moving directly toward the enemy vessel, the impact of the sound waves or vibrations upon the hydrophones B and C and D and E will be equal, and thus taking for instance the motor 64 with its two connected induction coils 111 and 112 and its two connected hydrophones B and C, then it will be ob-vious that the same amount of current will pass through both of the coils 111 and 112. Both of the magnets 114 and 115 willbe energized to the same degree, lthe lever 125 will be held in a neutralposition and as a consequence, a circuit will not be closed through either one of the magnets 137 or 141, Thus the lever 144 will be in its neutral position and the circuit lwill not be closed from the battery 151 to the motor 64.
Assuming now, for instance, that the torpedo is above a level where it will strike an enemy vessel, as for instance a sub-marine, and therefore must descend, it is obvious that the sound waves coming from the enemy vessel will strike the hydrophone B with more force than they will the hydrophone C for the reason that the hydrophone B will be directed more directly toward an enemy vessel than the hydrophone C. In other words, the hydrophone C would be pointing more upwardly and would not receive the sound waves or vibrations as strongly as would the hydrophone B. As a consequence of this, the current .Will How more strongly through the induction coil 111 than it will through the induction coil 112. The induced current in the magnet 114 would, therefore, be stronger and the attraction of the magnet 114 would be stronger than the attraction of the magnet 115. Therefore -thc lever 124 would rotate on its bearing against the force of the spring 127 and the contact 128 would be shifted into engagement with the contact 131. This will cause current to flow from the battery 130 through the resistance 139 t0 the wire 136 to the magnet 137 and thence Fback to the battery 130 and the magnet 137 would be energized.
The energizing of the magnet 137 shifts the lever 144 against the action of the lower spring 147a carrying the contact 148 into engagement with the contact 163 and the contact 153 into engagement with the contact 155. .As a consequence current will flow from the positive pole of the battery 151 to the contact point 153, thence to the contact 155, thence through the resistance 158 to the wire 157, thence t0 the motor 64, back by way of wire 161 to wire 165 and contact 163 to contact 148 and then by wire 150 back to the battery 151. The rotation of the motor 64 in this direction will depress the elevating rudders 17, so that the torpedo will take a downward slant until such time as the force 0f impact of the sound waves 0n the diaphragms of the hydrophones B and C is equal, whereupon the several armature levers 124 and 144 will return to their normal positions, breaking the current to the motor 64. The action of the water will then return the elevating and depressing rudders to their normal positions and the torpedo will move straight for the object. If there is any variation in the movement of the torpedo so that the sound waves will not inipinge equally upon the two hydrophones then the rudder will again be actuated to cause the depression or the elevation of the nose of the torpedo.
Assuming again that the torpedo needs to be depressed so as to move downward and forward, but that this downward and forward turn must be relatively sudden, then it will be seen that the sound waves will impinge upon the diaphragm of the hydrophone B with considerably greater force than they will upon the diaphragm of the hydrophone C and, as a consequence, a relatively great amount of current will flow 'engage with the contact 131, but will force this contact, over and into engagement with the Contact 'point 134. Thus the resistance 139 is cut out and a relatively large amount of current will pass through the corresponding magnet 137 which will cause the armature lever 144 to move over to its full extent against the action of the spring 147 and thus the contact 153 will not only engage the -contact 155 but 'will force this contact 155 into engagement with the cont-act 156 so that the current from the battery 151 will pass with full force through the motor 64. When the current passes through the resistance 158 or the resistance 162, the motor 64 will be rotated at a relatively slow rate so that the turning move- 1nent (in this case a vertical turning movement) will be relatively slow. After the resistance 139 or 142 is cut out, the motor 64 will rotate at a relatively high speed and the turning movementwill be relatively quick.
What is true of the mechanism Where the greater amount of current passes through the coil 111 and thus turns the nose of the torpedo downward is equally -true where the greater amount ofthe current passes through the coil 112 and turns the nose of the torpedo upward, and what is truehof the mechanism for operating the rudders 17 is equally true of the mechanism for operating the rudders 15. In this case also the torpedo will be directed by the action of that hydrophone which receives the greatest force of the sound waves.
When the torpedo strikes an enemy vessel, the detonating pins will be forced inward, forcing inward the detonating rod and this will cause the firing of the charge and the blowing up of the enemy vessel. It is ,to be moted with regard to the hydro- -phones that the outside diaphragm keeps the Waves from pressing against the carbondisks and starting the torpedo, as would be the case if the'diaphragm24 were absent and the water should press immediately against the diaphragm 27. The air between the diaphragms 24 and 27 passes out through the by-passes 46 when thediaphragm 24 is pressed inward.
Inasmuch as the movements of the diahragm 24 under the action of water waves 1s of low frequency, it will have no effect on the diaphragm 27 lbut sound vibrations which would be produced by the mechanism of an enemy ship, the noise being transferred through the water by sound waves, will produce vibrations of high frequency in the diaphragm 24 and these highly frequent vibrations will be transmitted to the diaphragm 27, cause it to vibrate, and thus increase the contiguity between the particles or granules of carbon within the microphone. The more intense the sound,` the greater will be the vibration of the diaphragmy 27 and the greater the vibration of the diaphragm 27 the more the current will,
be caused to flow through the induction coils 65, 111, and 112.
By providing the equalizing chamber 41, the pressure against the diaphragm 24 and the diaphragm 27 caused by the speed of the torpedo through the water and by the static head will be equalized, and the rubber pouch 44, while causing this equalization of pressures, prevents the water from passing into the chamber 41 and thusinto the chamber 23 and acting against the microphones.
While I have heretofore described a particular form of my invention, yet I wish it understood that the drawings are purely illustrative as to the exact construction of the various parts and the arrangement of these parts and that the detaiis of construction and of the arrangement of parts may be varied in many ways, without departing from the principle of the invention.
Thus in Fig. 6, I show a means for connecting the motor operated steering shafts 63a and 64a with the corresponding rudder operating shafts 63b and 64", by means of cross sprocketchains 172, but it is obvious that other forms of gearing-may be used from one motor operated shaft to the corresponding shaft. I have also illustrated beveled gear wheels 173 for transmitting power from the longitudinally extending shafts to thedshafts 18, but this, of course, may be varle In Fig. 7 and in Fig. 1 I have illustrated the breech block 168 as being provided with a cross bar 171, this cross bar fitting in notches 174 formed in the rear end of the torpedo tube, these notches preventing any rotation of the socket 170 when the propeller is initially operated.
In Fig. 3 I have illustrated diagrammatically the connections of the several microphones in the hydrophones A, B, C, D and E with their respective induction coils and the batteries, so as to show just how the circuit is completed through the microphones and the induction coils 1n order to increase the current induced by the several induction coils. While I have described and illustrated a particular form of microphone in which carbon granules are used, it is to be understood that other forms of microphone which accomplish the same end, that is, which decrease in resistance as the diaphragms are vibrated, may be used in place of the granular carbon microphones, without departing from the spirit of the invention.
' The reason for using magnets 114 and 115 and the-,magnet 66 is that these magnets act as relays to control the passage of current from the batteries 78 and 130 to the magnets 76, 137 and 141 and the necessity of using the induction coils 65, 111, 112, and 11].a and 11.2a 1s due to the necessity of nin or cut out resistance between the batteries 78 and 130andth'e magnets 137, 141 and 76 tothereby either exert a relatively small attractive force upon the switches coacting with these lasty named magnets or a relatively great attractive force thereon to thereby throwthe switches to a greater degree and' cut out resistance between the batteries 151 and the motors 63 and 64, to thus cause the motors to run either fast or slow, and thus cause the turning movement to be either rapid or relatively slow.
The purpose of the latch formed by the member 69 is, of course, obvious, but it is to be noted that the angular end of the lever 86, when the lever 69 is drawn over toward the magnet 76, passes under the upper end of the lever 69, so as to hold this lever from any retraction which would open the circuit controlling switch points connected thereto. If the lever 86 is not provided with the angular end, then as soon as the magnet 76 was denergized by the breaking of the connection between 169 and 1698, the armature on the member 69 would be released and the member 69 would shift to a position to open the switch point'connected thereto. It will, therefore, be seen that the member 69 acts as a latch for the member 86 and that when it has released the member 86, the member 86 acts as a latch for the member 69'.
In the accompanying claims, i-t is to be understood that when I refer to controlling circuit, I mean the circuit which includes the microphones, the induction coils and the magnets 66, 114 and 1,15. The controlling switches are the switches controlled bythe magnets 114, 115 and 66 and the reversing switches are the switches controlled by the magnets 137 and 141.
A dirigible torpedo constructed in accordance with this specication may be used for any purpose for which the ordinary dirigible torpe-do is used, as for attacking ordinary vessels and sub-marines, but it is also intended to be used for the purpose of attacking and exploding any enemy torpedoes and in fact attacking any floating object in which there is mechanism which, when operated, will produce sound vibrations capable of traveling through water. It is also obvious that if any of the hydrophones are above the surface of the water they will be affected by a sound traveling over the surface of the water in the same manner as if the sound w-aves were traveling in the water itself. The torpedo tube may be located in any suitable place aboard ship, f
but is preferably disposed beneath the water level, so that the ropeller 11 Will immediately act to force t e torpedo out of the tube as soon as the propeller commences to revolve, due to the proximity of an enemy vessel. It will, of course, be understood that where a vessel carrying a torpedo is sailing through waters Where it is not likely to be attacked or Where it is in proximity to friendly vessels, the controlling switch 107 on ship-board will be shifted so as to break the circuit between the ships battery and the torpedo, through the connections 102 and 103. When an enemy vessel is sighted, however, or when it is believed that enemy vessels are in the neighborhood, as for instance, sub-marines, and there is no danger to friendly vessels, then the switch is closed and as soon as the enemy vessel has arrived in such proximity as to reduce the resistance of the microphone in the propeller'controlling hydrophone to a point where sufficient current may pass to the induction coil as will operate the magnet 66, then the torpedo will automatically release itself from its anchor 107 and will automatically be propelled from the vessel and will automatically steer itself toward the enemy vessel. The accuracy of this steering operation will, of course, depend upon the delicacy of the microphones and thel intensity of the sound waves proceeding from the enemy vessel. The sound waves produced by the mechanism of sub-marines, particularly when the sub-marine is submerged, are relatively strong, have a high rate of vibration, and these sound 'waves do affect delicate microphones, as has been proven in many cases.
. Having described my invention, what I claim is 1. The combination with a floating body, propelling means therefor, steering means therefor, and normally inoperative charge detonating means, 'of sound affected controlling means therefor causing the initial operation of the propelling means, continuously controlling .the steering means andA rendering the detonating means operative when the sound affected means is acted upon by sound waves of a predetermined intensity.
2. The combination with a torpedo including propelling means and steering means, and a torpedo tube in which the torpedo is vinitially disposed, of rotatable means for anchoring the torpedo withln the tube, a
motor for said propelling means normally disconnected from its source of energy, and sound receiving means mounted on the torpedo acting` upon the receipt of sound waves of a predetermined intensity to cause a rotation of the said anchoring means Ain a direction to release the torpedo, to connect the motor with the source of power and to control the steering means to cause the torpedo to approach a source of sound vibrations.
3. The combination with a torpedo including propelling and steerin means, of means for anchoring the torpe o including a fixed member with whichthe torpedo engages, the torpedo, relatively fixed means separable from the torpedo for manually controlling and variably predetermining the intensity of the sound which shall operatively aect said sound receiving means, and means controlled by said sound receiving means acting upon the receipt of sound waves of a predetermined intensity in the receiving means' to release the torpedo from the fixed memlber of said anchoring means and from said to the rudder to cause its movement in either 4 direction from a neutral position by the rotation of the motor in one direction or the other, and a pair of electrically operated devices controlling the direction of movement of the current through said motor,each electrically operated device being controlled by the corresponding receiver, said devlces being both inoperative when the sound has the same intensity at both of said receivers, but one or the other of the devices being rendered operative when the intensity of the sound is greater at one receiver than at another, each of said electrically operated motor controlling 'devices being shiftable by the action of the sound receivers to a plurality of positions to thereby control the voltage of the current passing through the motor to thus control the speed of the motor.
6. A dirigible torpedo having a propelling shaft, a torpedo tube -having a socket to receive the end of the torpedo shaft, the socket and shaft being released from engagement with each other upon a rotation of the shaft, a motor for the shaft, and means rendering said motor operative and thereby causing a rotation of the shaft to release the torpedo and propel it, said means being automatically actuated upon the arrival of an enemy vessel within a predetermined distance of the torpedo.
7. A dirigible torpedo including a propelling shaft projecting rearward from the sound receiving means mounted on torpedo and having screw-threads, an anchoring device including a screw-threaded, socket to receive the screw-threaded end of the propelling shaft, a motor for driving the propelling shaft, and means for rendering said motor operative to thereby rotate the propelling shaft to disengage the shaft from the socket, said-means being actuated by sound waves of a predetermined intensity.
. 8. A dirigible torpedo having a propelling shaft, an electric motor therefor in a normally open circuit with a source of current, a switch adapted when shifted in one direction to close the circuit through the motor and source, and means operatin said switch including a sound receiver embo ying a microphone having members therein variably resisting passage of electric current in proportion to the degree of pressure forcing the members toward each other, said members being detachably connected in circuit with a fixed battery, and manually regulatable means for controlling the amount of current passing from the battery through said members whereby to control vthe degree of pressure between said members which will cause the operation of said switch.
9. A dirigible torpedo having a propelling shaft, an electric motor therefor in a normally open circuit with a source of current, a switch adapted when shifted in one direction to close the circuit through the motor and source, and means operatingsaid switch including a sound receiver embodying a microphone having members therein variably re- 100 sisting passage of electric current in proportion to the degree of pressure between the members, said members being detachably connected in circuit with a fixed battery, and means for controlling the amount of current passing from the battery through said members whereby to control the degree of pressure between said members which will cause the operation of said switch, said controlling means including a manually operable rheostat.
10. A dirigible torpedo having a propelling shaft, an electric motor therefor in a normally open circuit with a source of current, a switch adapted when shifted in one direction to close the circuit through the motor and source, and means operating said switch including a sound receiver embodying` a microphone having members therein variably resisting passage of electric current in proportion to the degree of pressure between the members, said members being detachably connected in circuit with a fixed battery, means for controlling the amount of current passing from the battery through said members whereby to control the degree of pressure between said members which will cause the operation of said switch, said controlling means including a manually operable rheostat, and an ammeter and volt-meter support for the torpedo having a socket inl which said plug is received, a fixed battery,
electrical connections extending from Said` battery to the socket, and means for controlling thevvoltage in the circuit between the battery and the microphone.
l2. A dirigible torpedo having a propeller shaft, an electric. motor therefor in a normally open circuit with a source of energy,
a switch for closing said circuit, electrical devices for operating the switch including a variable resistance microphone mounted in the head of the torpedo, a torpedo tube having a breech block, the breech block carrying a socket detachably engaging the propeller shaft, the shaft releasing from the socket upon a'rotation of the shaft, a pair of conductors connected in circuit with the microphone and extending rearward vtherefrom and through the rear end of the torpedo, a pair of conductors connected to a fixed battery and passing through the breech block, the first and second named pair of conductors being provided with a coacting plug and socket detachable from each other under strain, and means for manually controlling voltage in the circuit formed by said. conductors, the microphone and the battery.
13. A torpedo including a propeller shaft and electric motor therefor connected in a normally open circuit with a source of energy, a switch for closing said circuit, a charge detonating means movable in one direction to detonate the charge, a latch normally holding the charge detonating means from movement into operative position, and a soundreceiver operatively engaged with said switch and with said latch to :close the motor circuit and release said latch upon the receipt of a sound of a predetermined intensity.
14. -A torpedo having a propeller shaft and an electric motor therefor connected in a normally open circuit with a, source of en'- ergy, a switch for closing said circuit, a normally projected detonating member in the head of the torpedo but rearwardly movable upon impact to detonate the charge, said detonating member having a collar, a catch normally engaging said collar and preventing the rearward movement of the detonating member, a latch holding said catch in its operative position and including an armature, and an electro-magnet connected in a normally open circuit with the Ysource of current and coacting with the armature, a switch for .closing said circuit to thereby release the latch, and means for simultaneously operating both of said switches to cause the operation of the propelling motor and the release of said detonating devices.
15. A torpedo having a propeller shaft and an electric motor therefor connected in a normally open circuit with a source of energy, a swltch for closing sald c1rcu1t, a nortmally projected detonating member in the head of the torpedo, but rearwardly movable upon impact to detonate the charge, said detonating member having a collar, a catch normally engaging said collar and preventing the rearward movement of the detonat- "ing member, a latch holding said catch inits operative position and including an armature, and an electro-magnet connected in a normally open circuit with the source of current and coacting with the armature, a switch for closing said circuit to thereby release the latch, and means for simultaneously operating both o f said switches to cause the operation of the propelling motor and-the release of said detonating devices, said means including a. variable resistance microphone disposed in the head of the torpedo and connected in circuit with a source of current.
16. A dirigible torpedo including a propelling shaft, an electric motor therefor connected in a normally interrupted circuit with a source of energy, a variable resistance microphone in the head of the torpedo and responding to sound vibrations, an induction coil having its primary connected in circuit with a fixed battery and the microphone, an electro-magnet connected to the secon-d-ary of said coil and energized thereby, a switch controlled by said electro-magnet and yiel'dingly held in an open position, a second electro-magnet connected in an open circuit with a source of energy and controlled Iby said first named switch, a second spring operated switch for closing the circuit through the motor and its source of energy, and a latch holding the second named switch open, but released by the energizing of the last named electro-magnet.
17. A dirigible torpedo including a propelling shaft, an electric motor therefor connected in a normally interrupted circuit with a source of energy, a variable resistance microphone in the head of the torpedo and responding to sound vibrations, an induction coil having its primary detachably connected in circuit with a fixed battery and the microphone, an electro-magnet connected to the secondary of said coil and energized thereby, a switch controlled by said electro-magnet and yieldingly heldin a neutral position and inoperative until the voltage in the electro-magnet has risen to a predetermined degree, a second electro-magnet connected in a normally open circuit with a source of energy, said circuit being controlled by the first named switch, a second spring operated switch for closing the circuit through the motor and its source of energy, a. latch holding the last named switch' in an open position, said latch being controlled by the last named electro-magnet and being released by the energizing of said magnet, electrically operated sound controlled steering devices, and switches operated by said latch when it moves to unlatching position closing circuits through said steering devices.
18. A dirigible torpedo including a profpelling shaft, an electric motor therefor connected in a normally interrupted circuit with a source of energy, a variable resistance microphone in the head of the torpedo and responding to sound vibrations, an induction coil having its primary detachably connected in circuit with a fixed battery and the microphone, an electro-magnet connected to the secondary of said coil and energized thereby, a switch controlled by saidl electro-magnet and yieldingly held in a neutral position and inoperative until the voltage in the electro-magnet has risen to a predetermined degree, a second electromagnet connected in a normally open circuit with a source of energy, said circuit being controlled by the first named switch, a second spring operated switch for closing the circuit through the motor and its source of energy, a latch holding` the last named switch in an open position, said latch being controlled by the last named electro-magnet and being released by the energizing of said magnet, and charge detonating Vmechanism including rearwardly shiftable detonating pins mounted in the head of the torpedo and projecting therefrom, a -catch normally holding said pins from rearward movement, a latch holdp ing the catch from movement out of its operative position, an electro-magnet controlling the latch and when-energized shifting it to its inoperative position, a source of energy for the electro-magnet, and a switch carried by the first named latch and electrically connecting the last named electromagnet with its source of energy upon the movement of the first named latch to its unl'atchin'g position.
19. A dirigible torpedo including a rudder, van electric motor therefor, a pair o-f varlable resistance microphones mounted in the head of the torpedo and each connected in circuit with a source of current, induction coils, the primaries of which are each connected in'circuit with said source of current and a corresponding microphone, an electro-magnet connected to the secondary of each induction coil, a double throw switch yieldably held in a neutral position, but controlled by said magnets and shiftable in one direction or the other thereby, a secl ond pair of electro-magnets, a battery therefor, said switch when thrown in one direction or the other causing passage of current through one or the other of the last named magnets, a second double throw switch yieldably held in a neutral position, a battery for the motor, and means causing the passage of the current through the motor in one direction or the other upon a movement of the last named switch in one direction or the other. v
20. A dirigible torpedo including a rudder, an electric motor therefor, a pair of variable resistance microphones mounted in the head of the torpedo and each connected in circuit with a source of current, induction coils, the primaries of which are each connected in circuit with said source of current and a corresponding microphone, an electro-magnet connected to the secondary of each induction coil, a double throw switch yieldably held in a neutral position but controlled by said magnets and shiftable in .one direction or the other thereby, a second pair of electro-magnets, a battery therefor, said switch when thrown in one direction or the other causing passage of c'rrent through one or the other of the last named magnets, a second double throw switch yieldably held in a neutral position, a battery for the motor, op-positely disposed pairs of contacts on each side of said switch, oppositely `disposed pairs of contacts carried by the switch, one pair of conta-cts being connected to the motor battery on one side and the other pair of contacts being connected to the battery on the other side, direct connections leading from one of each pair of the first named contacts tothe motor, and reverse connections leading' from one of each pair of the first named contacts to the motor.
k21. A dirigible torpedo including a rudder, an electric motor therefor, a pair of variable resistance microphones mounted in the head of the torpedo and each connected in circuit with a source of current, induction coils, the primaries of which' are each connected in circuit with said source of current and a corresponding microphone, an electromagnet connected 'to the secondary of each induction coil, a double throw switch yieldably held in a neutral position but controlled by. said magnets and shiftable in one direction or the other thereby, a second pair of electro 1nagnets, a battery therefor, Said switch when thrownin one direct-ion or the other causing passage of current through one or the other of the last named magnets, a second double throw switch yieldably held in a neutral position, a batteryv for the mo. tor, and means causing the passage of current through the motor in one direction or the other upon a movement of the last named switch in one direction or the other including an arm extending from the switch, a pair of oppositely projecting contacts mounted on the arm and connected to one side of the motor battery, a pair of contacts projecting in opposite directions from the arm and connected to the other side of the motor battery, a pair of contacts disposed in each Side of the arm and coacting with the last named contacts on the arm and connected to the motor, and pair of contacts coacting with the first named contacts on the arm crossing each other and connected to the wires leading from the motor contacts.
22. A dirigible torpedo including a "rudder, an electric motor therefor, a pair of variable resistance microphones mounted in the head of the torpedo and each connected in circuit with a source of current, induction coils, the primaries of which are each connected in circuit with said source of current and a corresponding microphone, an electromagnet connected to the secondary of each induction coil, a double throw switch yieldably heldin a neutral position but controlled by said magnets and shiftable in one direction or the other thereby, a second pair of electro magnets, a battery therefor, said switch when thrown in one direction or the other causing passage of current through one or the other of the last named magnets, a second double throw switch yieldably held in a neutral position, a battery for the motor, said last named pair of contacts having resistance disposed between them and the motor, and a second pair of contacts disposed outward of the motor contacts with which Said resistance engages whereby to cause a passage of current through the resistance to the motor upon a predetermined movement of the Switch in one direction and then to cutout said eresistance and cause a direct current to the motor upon a further movement of the switch in the same direction.
23.- In a torpedo, a battery, a steering rudder, a motor therefor, oppositely disposed spaced yieldable contacts each connected through resistance to the motor, a pair of contacts disposed outward of the first named contacts and in normal spaced relation thereto and connected directly to the motor, a switch yieldingly held in a neutral position having an arm disposed between the first named contacts and having oppositely projecting contacts thereon conn to one pole of a battery, and coacting with said yieldable contacts, said switch also having a Second pair of oppositely projecting contants connectedto the other pole of the battery, spaced' contacts with which the last vsignature in named switch contacts coact and connected t0 the motor reversely of the first named contacts, a pair of electro-magnets controlling the switch and acting to throw the switch in one direction or the other and to a greater or less degree in proportion to the voltage of the current passing through the respective magnets, and sound a'ected means controlling the passage of-current through the respective magnets.
24. In a torpedo, a battery, a steering rudder, a motor therefor, oppositely disposed -spaced yieldable contacts each connected through resistance to the motor, a'pair of contacts disposed outward of the first named contacts and in normal spaced relation thereto and connected d-irectly to the motor, a switch yieldingly held in a `neutral position having an arm disposed between the first named contacts and having oppositely projecting contacts thereon connectedl to one pole of a battery, and coacting with said yieldable contacts, said switch also having a second pair of oppositely projecting contacts connected to the other pole of the battery, spaced contacts with which the last named switch contacts coact and connected 'to the motor reversely of the rst named contacts, a pair of electro-magnets controlling the switch and acting to throT the switch in one direction or the other and to a greater or less degree' in proportion to the voltage of the current passing through the respective magnets, and sound affected means controlling the passage of current through the respective magnets and including a double throw switch yieldingly held in a neutral position and having a projecting arm carrying oppositely projecting contacts connected to one pole of a battery, oppositely disposed contacts each connected through resistance to a corresponding one of the first named magnets, contacts disposed outward of the last named contacts and with which the last named contacts are adapted to engage when the switch is thrown in one or the other direction to its full extent and connected directly' to said rst named magnets, a pair of electro-magnets controlling the movement of the second named switch, and variable resistance sound affected means controlling the passage of current through the second named magnets.
In testimony whereof I hereunto affix my the presence of two witnesses.
GEORGE BAKER. Witnesses D. C. WANAMAKER, H. E. NoL'rE.
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Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
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US2457393A (en) * 1942-01-14 1948-12-28 Muffly Glenn Apparatus for causation and prevention of collisions
US2498772A (en) * 1941-05-15 1950-02-28 Bendix Aviat Corp Aerial torpedo
US2889772A (en) * 1957-07-09 1959-06-09 Earle A Howard Protective nose cap for torpedoes
US2961961A (en) * 1947-05-26 1960-11-29 James M Kendall Torpedo exploder mechanism
US2964265A (en) * 1948-03-26 1960-12-13 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Steering system utilizing thermalenergy radiations
US2974621A (en) * 1947-05-08 1961-03-14 Charles H Tindal Torpedo steering mechanism
US2974623A (en) * 1951-08-17 1961-03-14 Brooks Harvey Torpedo depth steering engine control
US2995100A (en) * 1944-06-02 1961-08-08 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Control system for torpedo steering
US2996029A (en) * 1944-11-20 1961-08-15 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Torpedo steering system
US2997970A (en) * 1944-06-02 1961-08-29 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Control system for torpedo steering
US3000215A (en) * 1951-09-27 1961-09-19 John V Atanasoff Microbarophone
US3005434A (en) * 1953-04-14 1961-10-24 Arthur F Bennett Torpedo control system
US3045624A (en) * 1953-12-23 1962-07-24 Thomas A Daly Speed change system for torpedoes
US3053217A (en) * 1957-05-14 1962-09-11 Thomas A Daly Steering system for a torpedo
US3054371A (en) * 1956-03-02 1962-09-18 Clevite Corp Depth control for search torpedo
DE1273357B (en) * 1959-02-13 1968-07-18 Ibak Helmut Hunger Method for searching a sea area by means of an underwater television set
DE977729C (en) * 1959-04-28 1968-11-14 Josef Hochstrasser Sea barrage weapon
US3738270A (en) * 1966-03-24 1973-06-12 Us Navy Homing depth bomb for searching for an underwater target
US4001765A (en) * 1975-03-31 1977-01-04 Marine Resources, Inc. Pressure compensating sound transducer apparatus
US4895074A (en) * 1987-09-18 1990-01-23 Gebruder Junghans Gmbh Ignition trigger device

Cited By (20)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2498772A (en) * 1941-05-15 1950-02-28 Bendix Aviat Corp Aerial torpedo
US2457393A (en) * 1942-01-14 1948-12-28 Muffly Glenn Apparatus for causation and prevention of collisions
US2997970A (en) * 1944-06-02 1961-08-29 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Control system for torpedo steering
US2995100A (en) * 1944-06-02 1961-08-08 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Control system for torpedo steering
US2996029A (en) * 1944-11-20 1961-08-15 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Torpedo steering system
US2974621A (en) * 1947-05-08 1961-03-14 Charles H Tindal Torpedo steering mechanism
US2961961A (en) * 1947-05-26 1960-11-29 James M Kendall Torpedo exploder mechanism
US2964265A (en) * 1948-03-26 1960-12-13 Bell Telephone Labor Inc Steering system utilizing thermalenergy radiations
US2974623A (en) * 1951-08-17 1961-03-14 Brooks Harvey Torpedo depth steering engine control
US3000215A (en) * 1951-09-27 1961-09-19 John V Atanasoff Microbarophone
US3005434A (en) * 1953-04-14 1961-10-24 Arthur F Bennett Torpedo control system
US3045624A (en) * 1953-12-23 1962-07-24 Thomas A Daly Speed change system for torpedoes
US3054371A (en) * 1956-03-02 1962-09-18 Clevite Corp Depth control for search torpedo
US3053217A (en) * 1957-05-14 1962-09-11 Thomas A Daly Steering system for a torpedo
US2889772A (en) * 1957-07-09 1959-06-09 Earle A Howard Protective nose cap for torpedoes
DE1273357B (en) * 1959-02-13 1968-07-18 Ibak Helmut Hunger Method for searching a sea area by means of an underwater television set
DE977729C (en) * 1959-04-28 1968-11-14 Josef Hochstrasser Sea barrage weapon
US3738270A (en) * 1966-03-24 1973-06-12 Us Navy Homing depth bomb for searching for an underwater target
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