US1311515A - Eoe pttbnaces - Google Patents

Eoe pttbnaces Download PDF

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US1311515A
US1311515A US1311515DA US1311515A US 1311515 A US1311515 A US 1311515A US 1311515D A US1311515D A US 1311515DA US 1311515 A US1311515 A US 1311515A
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gas
air
burner
combustion chamber
ducts
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F23COMBUSTION APPARATUS; COMBUSTION PROCESSES
    • F23GCREMATION FURNACES; CONSUMING WASTE PRODUCTS BY COMBUSTION
    • F23G7/00Incinerators or other apparatus for consuming industrial waste, e.g. chemicals
    • F23G7/06Incinerators or other apparatus for consuming industrial waste, e.g. chemicals of waste gases or noxious gases, e.g. exhaust gases
    • F23G7/061Incinerators or other apparatus for consuming industrial waste, e.g. chemicals of waste gases or noxious gases, e.g. exhaust gases with supplementary heating
    • F23G7/065Incinerators or other apparatus for consuming industrial waste, e.g. chemicals of waste gases or noxious gases, e.g. exhaust gases with supplementary heating using gaseous or liquid fuel
    • F23G7/066Incinerators or other apparatus for consuming industrial waste, e.g. chemicals of waste gases or noxious gases, e.g. exhaust gases with supplementary heating using gaseous or liquid fuel preheating the waste gas by the heat of the combustion, e.g. recuperation type incinerator
    • F23G7/068Incinerators or other apparatus for consuming industrial waste, e.g. chemicals of waste gases or noxious gases, e.g. exhaust gases with supplementary heating using gaseous or liquid fuel preheating the waste gas by the heat of the combustion, e.g. recuperation type incinerator using regenerative heat recovery means

Description

J. G. HESS. GAS BURNER FOR FURNACES. I APPLICATION FILED MAR. 22. 1919. 1,31 1,51 5. Patented July 29, 1919.
3 SHEETS-SHEET I.
J. G. HESS.
GAS BURNER FOR FURNACES. APPLICATION FILED MAR. 22. 1919.
Patented July 29, 1919.
3 SHEETS-SHEET].
J. G. HESS.
GAS BURNER FOR FURNACES. APPLICATION FILED MAR. 22. 19:9.
Patented July 29, 1919.
3 SHEETS-SHEET 3.
AV/I
\III
% AV/I II I III III m I To all whom it may concern:
'J'OHN chosen miss, 0]? Anms'ron, wns'r VIRGINIA. 4
'- Gas-BURNER roe summons.
Be it known that I, JOHN Adamston, in the county of Harrison and State of West Virginia, have invented a new and useful Gas-Burner for Furnaces, of which the following is a specification.
This invention relates to improvements in as burners for furnaces, the object'of the mvention being to provide an improved burner for furnaces which are known as continuous heating furnaces, by means of which athorough .intermingling 'of the gas and heated air before entrance into the combustion chamber is accomplished.
A further object of the' invention is to provide a burner whichmay be used for either natural or artificial gas-without the necessity of rebuilding the furnace.
A further object of the invention is the provision of a burner of the character set forth which iscoinparatively simple in construction and extremely economical in operation. With these and other ob ects 1n v1ew,
which will appear as the description prop the claims.
ceeds, the invention consists in the novel features of construction and combination of parts which will be more fully set forth hereinafter and particularly pointed out in In the burners heretofore which I amfamiliar, the gas is conducted through one flue and the air through another, usually on top of the gas flue; consequentlythe gas comes in contact with the air onone side only, which results .in a waste of I fuel. Moreover, when it is desired to force the furnace to create a higher degree of heat it frequently happens that the gas will smoke because of insufficient mixing with hot air. Furthermore, furnaces. intended for the use of natural gas were built with only one set of checkers, since natural gas is led into the furnace directly from the side without preheating, while artificial "o'r producer. gas'requires preheating, and for this reason should it become necessaryilo resort to the use of artificial gas, as is e' quently the case, this can only-be done by building an additional set of checkers, and as in many furnaces there is not sufiicient room for. this additional set of checkers it necessary to, go to the enormous expense Specification of Letters Patent.
Grouse Hess, a citizen of the United States, residing at in use with Patented July 29, 1919.-
Application filed March 22, 1919. Serial Ila-284,289.
of tearing out the entire furnace and re building the same;
The present invention aims to overcome the defects referred to and to produce a burner in Which the air is supplied to the gas in sueh a manner that a perfect intermingling is obtained, which results in the consumption of all of the gas and producing better combustion and a brighter fire; and in addition, owing to the construction hereinafter set forth, should it become necessary to change from the use of natural gas to artificialor producer gas the necessity for building an additional set of checkers is avoided, since, owing to the relative locations of the gas and air lines, the gas is preheated by the air which has been heated in the checker chamber to a very much higher degree than in thefurnaces as ordinarily constructed.
In the drawings accompanying and forming part-of thi specification, and in which only 'so much oil-a furnace is shown as is necessary to illustrate my invention,
Figure 1 is a; sectional plan view of the combustion chamber of a continuous heating furnace embodying my improved burner;
- 2 is a vertical section on an enlargct'l scale, taken on the line 22.of Fig. 1, looking in the direction -of the arrows, and showing1 the arrangement of gas and air ducts; an
Fig. 3 is a horizontal section through my improved burner adapted for the use of natural gas.
The same characters of reference designa'te the same parts in the different figures of the drawings. 7 In the embodiment herein illustrated, 2 designates the combustion chamber reinforced by the usual Lbeams 3 and having the usual conduits 4 leading to the stack 5 and provided with a reversing valve 6. Since the operation of such reversing 'valves is well known and forms no part of my invention, I have not considered it necessary to illustrate herein the mechanism by which the same is reversed. Neither is it deemed necessary to illustrate-the manner in which the air is led-through. the checker chambers for preheating such air, well known in the art.
Fig. 1 shows four of my improved burners arranged on'either side of the combustion chamber 2,3,gas supply tube or'conduit ,7
since this also is extending over each series of burners and communicating therewith, each conduit being provided with a water sealed valve 8 4 for controlling the supply of gas to the burner. Asshown in Fig. 2, the burner is Constructed on top of the checker chamber 9 through which the air is passed for preheating the same, and in the present instance the burner consists of a pair of air ducts or flues l0 communicating at their lower ends with the checker chamber, and a gas flue 11 located between said air fiues'and extending some distance downwardly betWeen said airflues. Each of the gas flues is entirely closed at its lowerv end, as clearly shown in Fig. 2-, and'eommunicates at its upper end with the conduit or supply pipe 7, whereby is formed a pocketbetween the two air fiues within which the g s delivered from the pipe 7 is trapped and t ius receives a preliminary heating by reason of its con-' tact with the heated walls of :the air fines. In the practical use of the burner it is contemplated that a depth of twelve feet will be sufiicient for the purpose desired. The gas and air fines merge Just prior to entering, the combustion chamber into a single port 12, as shown in Fig. .l, where combustion takes place.
In the useof the structure above set forth, when the reversing valve is set as shown in Fig. 1, cold air is drawn in through the port 13 in the conduit 4 and is conducted through the checker chambers at the right-hand side of Fig. l, and thence upwardly through the air fiues 10, mingling with the gas at 12, where combustion takes place. The. products of combustion are then drawn across the combustion chamber and down through the air fiues at the opposite or left-hand side of the combustion chamber and through the checker chambers below the same, whereby the checker chambers are heated to a high temperature, the products of combustion then passing out through the conduit 4 at the left-hand side ofFig. 1 andup through the stack 5. When thecheckers on that side are heated sufficiently, the valve 6 is reversed and cold air is now taken in through the conduit 4 at the'left, passing through the checker chambers and in contact with the now highly heated checkers therein and then up through the air flues 10, by means of which the gas in the flue 11, between the fines 10 is also heated to the desired degree, combustion taking place at 12 as before described, the products of combustion being drawn across the combustion chamber toward the right and down the air flues, through the checker chambers and out through the conduit 4'to the stack. By thus alternating the circulation through the checker chambers and the combustion chamher the checkers on either side of the fur- In Fig. 3 I have shown the burner arranged for the use of natural gas. In this case the gas is delivered through small pipes 14 entering directly from the sides'of the burner. It.will thus be seen that in changing from the use of natural gas to artificial gas the only change necessary is to place the gas supply pipe above theburner so-that the gas is delivered into the duct l1 to be heated by reason of the contiguity of said duct to the hot air ducts 10 on either side thereof. Ido not desire to limit myself to. any particular relative sizes between the ducts 10 and 11, but practical use has demonstrated that the most satisfactory results are obtained by making the gas duct ap proximately one-thirdlarger than either of the air fiues.
It will be observed from the foregoing time the circulation was reversed more or less gas was left in the checker chamber to be carried off up the stack, and as such reversing ordinarily takes place at least three times an hour the loss from this reversing was considerable; but, by forming the gas ducts as herein described a pocket is formed wherein is retained any gas that maybe in such ducts oi pockets when the reversal takes place. 1
While I have described in detail the structure herein illustrated, it is to be understood that I do not thereby limit m invention to the precise features of const iction shown, as I am aware that many mechanical changes may be made without departing-from the spirit and scope of the invention as set forth in the appended claims.
Having thus described my invention, what I claim is: A I
1. In a gas furnace having a combustion chamber and a plurality of.checker chambers, a burner associated with each of said checker chambers and'comprising a pair of vertical air flues communicating .at their lower ends with the checker'chamber and a vertical gas flue located between said air fines, said gas flue being closed at its lower from said supply and preheated by contact" with the walls of the air fines, the gas and airflsies amociated with each checker chamber merging into a single port at the entrance to the combustion chamber.
2. In a gas furnace having a combustion chamber, a burner comprising a plurality of air ducts and a gas duct, said gas duct located centrally of said air ducts and extending in parallelism therewith, all of'said ducts merging into a single port at the entrance to the combustion chamber, and said gas duct forming a gas-retaining pocket at the lower end thereof. 3. In a gas furnace having a combustion chamber and an air preheating chamber, a burner comprising a pair of air ducts comn'mnicat-ing with said chambers, and a gas duct extending between said air ducts in parallelism therewith and in communication only with said combustion chamber, all of said ducts merging into a single port at the entrance to said combustion chamberand said gas duct forming a gas retaining pocket at its lower end.
combustion chamber,
4. In a gas furnace having a combustion chamber and a series of air preheating chambers, a series of burners, one for each preheating chamber and comprising a pair of air ducts in communication with said combustion chamber and said preheating chamber, a gas duct located between said air ducts and extending in parallelism therewith and in communication only with said the ducts of each burner merging into a single port at the entrance to said combustion chamber, said gas ducts forming pockets at their lower ends, and means for reversing the direction of draft through said air ducts.
In testimony that I claim the foregoing as my own, I have hereto affixed my signature in the presence of two witnesses.
. JOHN GEORGE HESS. Witnesses JoirN G. Hess, J12,
Amman J. BASTIN.
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4676744A (en) * 1983-03-11 1987-06-30 British Gas Plc Regenerative heating apparatus

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US4676744A (en) * 1983-03-11 1987-06-30 British Gas Plc Regenerative heating apparatus

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