US1310460A - Plamooraph co - Google Patents

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US1310460A
US1310460A US1310460DA US1310460A US 1310460 A US1310460 A US 1310460A US 1310460D A US1310460D A US 1310460DA US 1310460 A US1310460 A US 1310460A
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shuttle
loop
casing
thread
needle
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    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D05SEWING; EMBROIDERING; TUFTING
    • D05BSEWING
    • D05B57/00Loop takers, e.g. loopers
    • D05B57/08Loop takers, e.g. loopers for lock-stitch sewing machines
    • D05B57/10Shuttles
    • D05B57/14Shuttles with rotary hooks

Description

F. s. WILLIAMS.
SEWING MACHINE. 1,310,460.
APPLICATION FILED APR. II, 1918.
Patented July 22, 1919.
4 SHEETS-SHEET I- 'rm-2 coLumlxm PLAxnmzarn cm, WASIHNUTQN. n. c.
F. S. WILLIAMS.
SEWING MACHINE.
1,310,460. APPLIcATIoN FILED APR. II. I9Is. Patented July 22 1919.
v4 SHEETS*SHEET 2.
Tux: CULUAIIIIA PLANOGRMII Cn., WASHINGTON. I7. c.
F. S. WILLIAMS.
SEWING MACHINE.
APPLICATION FILED APR. II 191B.
1,310,466. Patented July 22, 1919.
4 AvSHEETS--SHEET 3 36 l l5 if y 4l 4Z III. 4.
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l ,//I/I/E/I/ofr F/Pff/IP/c 5. M//L L #1 /v5 WITNESS ES 65 APPLICATION FILED APR. II. |918.
F. S. WILLIAMS. sE-wlwe MACHINE.
Patented July 22, 1919.
4 SHEETS-SHEET 4.
I y 'IN ATTORNEYS THE COLUMBIA PLANOGRAPH co., WASHINGTON. D. c.
'rnvrrnn s'rafrns ramena* ernten FREDERIC S. WILLIAMS, OF BROOKLYN, YORK, ASSIGNOR TUFREDERICK KLEIN, TRUSTEE, OF NEW YORK, N. Y.
SEWING-MACHINE.
To all whom t may concern.'
Be it known that I, FREDERIC S. VIL- LIAMs, a citizen of the United States, and resident of the borough of Brooklyn, county of Kings, city and State of New York, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Sewing-Machines, of which the following is a specificati-on.
My invention relates to sewing machines and more particularly to that type thereof commonly known as lock-stitch sewing machines and has for its object to provide an improved and simplified construction in which the shuttle is stationary, in that it does not rotate, oscillate or reciprocate during the operation of the machine, as is generally the case, but has simply a freedom of movement which may be best expressed by the term floating. A further object of my invention is to arrange and construct the shuttle in such a manner that it is readily accessible and easily removable from the ma.A chine without interference with `other ele ments of the mechanism. Other objects will appear from the description hereinafter and the features of novelty will be pointed out in the appended claims.
In the accompanying drawings which for illustrative and descriptive purposes show an example of my invention, Figure 1 is a front elevation partly in section of a. lockstitch sewing machine; Fig. 2 is a horizontal section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1; Fig. 3 is a similar view on the line 3 3 of Fig. 1; Fig. 4 is a detail end view partly in section; Fig. 5 is a detail side view partly in scctic-n; Figs. G and 7 are views corresponding respectively to Figs. 4 and 5 but showing the parts in different positions; Fig. 8 is a detail elevation of the shuttle ease and adjacent elements; Fig. 9 is a view illustrating the shuttle case in position to permit the removal of the shuttle and Fig. 10 is a plan A view thereof.
The machine as shown in Fig. l may comprise a `bed-plate 15 supporting the usual upright pillar 16 from which extends the customary overhanging arm 17 adapted to support and provide bea-rings for the various mechanisms mounted thereon and inclosed therein in the well known way. The driving `mechanism also may =be of any typical and customary construction and, as shown in Fig. l, may comprise a drive or Specification of Letters Patent.
Patented July 22, 1919.
Application filed April 11, 1918. Serial No. 227,872.,
pulley wheel 18 combined with the fly wheel 19 mounted upon the main shaft 20 and arranged to be driven by suitable power in the usual or in any preferred manner.
The machine in the illustrated form further includes a bracket 21 rigidly mounted upon the arm 17 and provided with spindle 22 for rotatably holding a spool of thread 23. A second bracket 24 extends upwardly from the arm 17 at a distance from the bracket 21 and carries tension disks 25 and guide members 26 between and over which the thread 27 from the spool 23 passes. A tension spring 28 is also mounted on the bracket 24 and guide hooks 29 and 30 are provided for the accommodation of the thread 27 which passes over a pulley 3l journaled on the outer end of a. lever 32 forming part of the take-up mechanism and operated in any well known way. From the pulley 31,s the needle thread 27 passes over a pulley 33 rotatably supported at the outer end of the arm 17 and is then led downwardly through a runway 34 on said arm 17, to and through the eye `of the needle 35. The latter is carried by the needle bar 36 which may be actuated to reciprocate up and down in any well known way, the needle lbeing mounted on the bar 36 in such a manner that a line through the eye of the needle is parallel with the direction of feed; in other words, the eye of said needle faces in the direction in which the material being sewed travels in Fig. l. The arm 17 further supports the usual movable presser foot 37 which in the machine illustrated is used, in addition to its other functions, as the feed mechanism for advancing the work, stitch by stitch, as required in machines of this character. This feed mechanism may be operated in any desired manner and need not be described in `detail as it forms no part of the present invention; the customary arm 38 may be provided for lifting the ypresser foot 37 out of contact with the work when necessary or desired.
In the machine chosen for illustrative and descriptive purposes, which is of a type particularly adapted for sewing gloves and the like, an upright hollorw work support 39 projects upwardly from and is secured upon the bed-plate 15 in registry with an opening L10 therein; the upper end of said work support 39 in the form shown, is closed by means of an end piece 41 provided with an aperture 42 in registry with the needle 35 and through which said needle is adapted to reciprocate. The construction further includes a hollow shuttle-casing 43 which in its operative position is located in registry with an opening 44 formed in and extending lengthwise of the work support 39. That side of the casing 43 which faces the work support 39, in the operative position of the parts, is open whereby communication between the interior of said casing 43 and work support 39 is established; the casing 43 also is provided at its one end with an opening adapted t'o register with the opening 40 of the .bed-plate 15. As shown in' the drawings, the upper end wall 45 of the casing 43 inclines upwardly when in the operative position shown in Figs. 1, 5 and 7, said wall 45, if desired, loing formed with a bead 46 at its outer edge which may serve, in combination with a wall of the opening 44, to frictionally maint-ain said casing 43 in its operative position. The latter is further ,constructed with an interior surface 47 forming a continuation of the interior surface of the end wall 45 through the medium of a curved interior surface 48, said casing 43, in addition, being provided with interior surfaces 49 .located opposite each other and converging downwardly in the operative position of the casing, toward its lower open end. In the preferred arrangement the casing 43 is pivotally connected at 50 with the bed-plate 15 so as to be capable of being swung from the operative position shown in Figs. 1, 5, and 7, to the inoperative position shown in Figs. 9 and 10 and back again for the purpose to be more fully described hereinafter.
The shuttle casing 43 contains the shuttleI 51 and positions the same in registry with the opening 44 of the work support, 39, said shuttle 51 being shaped to correspond to the interior surfaces, 45, 47, and 48, of the casing and being further provided with oppositely located converging surfaces 52 adapted to rest upon the converging surfaces 49 of the casing whereby the shuttle is prevented from dropping through the opening 40 of the bed-plate 15 by gravity. The shuttle 51 at its one end is formed with a recess 53 and with a projection 54 preferably tapering outwardly, the purpose of both of which will be more fully pointed out further on in the description; in addition, the shuttle 51 is provided with a circular recess 55 for the accommodation of the bobbin, 56, which in the present case is constructed in the form of a circular spool, as shown in Figs. 1, 5 and 7. A groove 57 is formed in one face of the shuttle 51 and inclines upwardly from the bobbin recess 55 to a thread aperture 58 formed in said shuttle, a suitable tension spring 59 being secured upon the shuttle in close proximity to said thread aperture 58, as shown in Figs. 4 and 6; with this arrangement the bobbin. or shuttle thread 60 passes from the bobbin 56 along and in the groove 57 and through the aperture 58 and after passing beneath the spring 59 is led upward through the work support 39 to the work in the customary manner. In its normal position, and with the parts in their operative positions, the surfaces 52 of the shuttle 51 rest upon the surfaces 49 of the casing by gravity, the shuttle extending downwardly beyond the open end of said casing and through the opening 40 of the bed-plate 15, as shown in Figs. 1, 5 and 7. lVith the parts in their operative positions, it will be seen that the shuttle 51 is loosely held in the casing 43 so as to be capable of a freedom of movement therein, which may be best expressed by the term floating, the shuttle being otherwise stationary so far as any rotating or oscillating movements are concerned; the oating movement of the shuttle, it will be understood, never comprises more than a slight movement and in no way depends upon its mounting but is wholly under the control of the needle thread 27 during the formation of a stitch, as will be more fully described hereinafter. i
In machines of the type illustrated, the needle 35 is rcciprocated and the needle thread 27 is formed into a loop a at the upper end of the work support 39 in the well known way; in order to carry out the stitch forming operation, it is necessary to draw this loop a downwardly in the work support 39, as will appear more fully in the description of the operation of the machine appearing hereinafter. Any suitable mechanism may be provided for this purpose, the arrangement illustrated having been found satisfactory. This mechanism, as shown, comprises a hook 61 located at the end of a rod 62 adapted to slide vertically in a guideway G3 formed in a pivoted rock-arm 64. The latter may be pivotally connected at its lower end, as indicated at (35, with a bracket 66 depending from the bed-plate 15, the pivot preferably being in the nature of a universal joint, as illustrated in Figs. 4 and 6. The rod 62 is of sufficient length to move upwardly into the work support 39 the required distance and has its lower end bent outwardly, as indicated at '67, and provided with a ballhead or the like, G8, arranged to fit within a socket, 69, located at one end 0f a rock-lever, 70. The latter is carried by a sleeve 71 pivotally mounted at 72 upon a bracket, 7 3, which depends .from and is secured to the bed-plate, l5, as shown in Fig. 1; an arm, 74, extends from the sleeve, 71, in a direction opposite to that of the lever, 70, and at its free end carries a roller or the like, 75, extending into and arranged to follow the groove 76 of a cam,
77. The latter is mounted upon a vertical shaft, 7S, Journaled 1n a suitable bearing 79 comprising, for instance, an integral art of the bracket, 73, said shaft 78 exten ing` upwardly into the pillar 16 and being operatively lconnected with the Vmain shaft 20 in any well known and customary manner. The groove 76 of the cam 77 is so shaped as to rock the arm 74 and the lever 7 0 in a mannerto reciprocate the rod 62 and hook 61 in the desired manner and in proper synchronism with the othermechanism.
In order `to properly `carry out the in tended operations the hook 61, in, addition to its vertically reciprocating movements, is rocked at the proper time in directions transverse to its length. For this purpose the rock-arm 64 is provided near its upper end with a socket member, 80, in which the ball-head 81 of a link, 82, is located, as shown in Figs. 1, 2, 5 and 7. The link 82 is pivotally connected at 83 with a lever, 84, pivoted at 85 upon a bracket, 86, also depending from the bed-plate, 15, as yillustrated in Fig.` 1. Theglever, 84, rotatably carries a roller or the like, 87, extending into and arranged to follow the horizontally located groove, 88, of a cam, `89, which al-so is carried by the upright shaft, 78, as shown in Figs. 1 and 2. It will be understood that the cam groove, 8S, also is so shaped and arranged as to brin about the desired transverse swinging of t ie hook, 61, at the proper time and in synchronism with the other mechanisms. For thepurpose of overcoming undesirable vibration and in order to steady the swinging movement of the rockarm, 64, it may be provided at its upper end with a. lguide member, 90, arranged to slide in a guideway, 91, formed in a bracket, 92
asshown in Figs. 1, 4, 5, 6 and 7. The
bracket 92 may be carried by the bracket, 66 and is preferably detachably and adjustably connected therewith by means of a slot 'and screw, 93, it being understood that any otherr suitablemea-ns adapted for the purpose may be substituted if desired.
. Intheoperation of the machine, the shut- I tle, after having been raised or floated under the action of the needle. thread, 27, as
will be fully described further on, will ordinarily return to or retreat to its normal position bygravity. For the purpose, how-` ever, of positively avoiding the danger of a failure of said shuttle 5l to thus return to said normal position and also to arrest the floating movement of said shuttle under the actionof the thread 27, in case this should become necessary, a stop-lug 95 arranged to coperate with the projection 54 for the above mentioned [purposes may be provided. This stop-lug` 95 is carried by Aarod 96 slidable lengthwise in bearings 97 located in spaced relation to each other lengthwise of and upon the rock-arm 64; a coil spring 98 surrounds said rod 96 between one of the bearings 97 and a collar 99 secured upon the rod 96, as shown in the drawings. The lower end of the rod 96 is formed with a compound bend so as to provide a member 100 located in the path of the bend 67 of the hook-rod 62; with this arrangement the rod 96 and the stop-lug 95 are actuated in the intended manner and at the proper time by said bend 67, as will be more definitely brought out hereinafter.
In utilizing my improved machine in the form illustrated, the operation is as follows: As before stated, the needle 35 is reciprocated vertically in the customary manner and by penetrating the material or work held on the end of the work support 39 carries the needle thread 27 downwardly into said hollow work support, which needle thread .27 is formed into the loop a within said hollow work support as the needle 35 retreats in an upward direction. Owing to the fact that the eye of the needle 35 faces in the direction of the line of -feed of the machine, the loop a, is formed in a plane parallel with said line of feed, as is indicated in the drawings. Previous to the formation of the loop a, the rod 62 'is moved upwardly into said work support 39 through the medium of the lever, 70, and arm, 74, by the action of the cam groove, 76, to a point favorable to the engagement of said loop (L by the hook 61. After the loop a has been formed as hereinbefore described, the rockarm 64, is moved sufficiently through the action of the cam groove S8, lever S4 and link 82, to cause the hook 61 to engage the loop a and to bring the rock-arm 6 4 to the positions shown in Figs. 4 and 5. As the operation of the machine continues, the action of the cam groove 76 will reverse the movement of the rod 63 and will now move the hook 61 downwardly so that the loop a is drawn downwardly in the work support 39 in the manner indicated in Figs. 4 and 5, and, in Fig. 1, the latter showing the loop a nearing its lowest position. The downward movement of said hook 61 continues until the lowerl end of the loop a is at a point somewhat below the projection 54 of the 115 shuttle 5l, it being understood that said projection 54 tapers toward said loop. At this stage the action of the horizontal cam groove 88 swings the lever 84 on its pivot 85, which movement is communicated to the 120 link 82 and causes the rock-arm 64 to be swung on its pivot 65 toward the shuttle 51. This brings the loop a into engagement with the tapering projection 54 which now acts as a spreader or separator to spread or sepa- 125 rate the two strands of the loop a, which as a result partly encircles the shuttle 51 at its lower end. This swinging movement of the rock-arm 64 at the same time brings the hook 61 into registry with the recess 53 of 130 the shuttle 51 although somewhat below the same and also moves the stop-lug 95 to a po sition over the projection 54.
The action of the cani groove 7 6 now 0perates the arm 74 and lever 70 to impart a slight upward movement to the rod 62 which causes the hook 61 to move up into the recess 53 of the shuttle 51, as shown in Fig. 7 of the drawings. As the hook 61 thus moves upwardly into said recess 53, the loop a carried by the hook 61, will, by engagement with the shuttle at opposite sides of said recess 53, be withdrawn or released from said hook 61, 0r, in other words, said loop a willA be freed therefrom. At this point the take-up mechanism through the medium 0f the pulley 31 and lever 32, begins to draw the needle thread 27 upwardly, thus bringing the loop a under an upward tension which is consequently exerted on the shuttle 51 and slightly lifts same or causesit to float upwardly in the casing 43. As the operation of the mechanism proceeds, the upward movement of the loop t is continued and said loop a is drawn over the shuttle 51 between it and the surface 47 0f the casing and continuing passes between the shuttle and the curved surface 48 and finally moves between the shuttle and the surface 45 out of the casing 43. The shuttle 51 is in this manner passed completely through the loop a which, after leaving the casing 43, continues onward underthe action of the mechanism to finally complete the locking of the stitch. It will be understood that the arrangement of the shuttle within the casing and the proportion of the parts is such that the thread forming the loop a readily passes between the shuttle 51 and the casing 43, after the shuttle has been iioated by the action of the needle thread 27 as described; the passing of the loop a over the shuttle 51 and out of the casing 43 is further facilitated by the form of both the shuttle and said casing. During the time the loop a passes over the shuttle in the manner described, the hook 61 is located within the recess 53 and thus at no time, after the loop a has been released, interferes with the passage of said loop over the shuttle. The slight raising or floating of the shuttle 51 brings the projection 54 from the position shown in Fig. 7 to a slightly higher position in which said projection actually or very nearly contacts with the stop-lug 95.
After the loop a has passed completely over the shuttle 51 and out of the casing 43, the shuttle 51 being relieved from the tension exerted by the needle thread 27, or, more specifically, the loop a, will ordinarily drop back by gravity to its initial position in which its surfaces 52 rest upon the converging surfaces 49 of the casing 43, where it would remain were `it not for the fact that the loop a when it reaches the under side of the work, draws a small amount of the thread 60 from the bobbin 56 in the shut tle 51.
The drawing of threadl'60 under the tension spring 59 on shuttle 5l ordinarily would cause said shuttle to again rise, from its normal position in contact with the converging surfaces 49- of case 43, yto a suspended position on thread 60 but for the, fact that just previo-us to the drawing of the thread 60 from the shuttle 51 as described, the cam groove 76 causes the rod '62 to move downwardly out of the recess 53 to la point somewhat lower than it finally occupies in the operation of drawing the loop a of the needle thread 27 downwardly as previously set forth. j
This Aexcessive 'downward or over-running movement of the rod 62 brings the bend 67 into contact with the member 10.0 of the rod 96 and causes it to move downwardly a sufficient distance to bring the stop-lug 95 in-to engagement with the projection 54 of the shuttle 51, thereby holding said shuttle in its normal or restingV position during the withdrawal of the requisite amount of thread 60 from the bobbin to complete the locking of the stitch, and resisting the lifting action exerted bysaid thread 60,
After the completion of the stitch the rod 62, through the medium of the cam groove 76 again moves upwardly -to a slight extent thus relieving the pressure of the bend 67 on the member 100 and permitting the rod 96 to move upwardly under the influence of the spring 98 acting upon collar 99 which is fastened on said rod 96.
The described upward movement of the rod 96 moves the stop-lug 95 out 4of Contact with the projection 54 of the shuttle and thus permits the rock-arm 64 to move freely back to the position shown in Fig. 1 through the action of cam groove 88, and without exerting any force -upon the projection 54 through frictional contact therewith, tending to disturb the shuttle 51; during `the transverse swinging movementsof the rockarm 64 on its pivot 65, the member 90 slides in the groove 91 and maintains said roel:- arm 64 in a constant path.
lVith my improved construction the shuttle 51 is stationary at all times, excepting for the slight lifting or floating movement which periodically takes place under the iniiuence of the loop e of the needle thread 27 and at no time during the operation of the machine, does said shuttle rotate, oscillate or partake of any movement other than the one referred to. In machines having a rotating, an oscillating or otherwise constantly movable shuttle, there is always the danger that the thread loop and shuttle, both generally speaking being in motion, will miss each other particularly if the machine is run at a high speed. With my improved arrangement the thread loop is moved toward a spreader which at the stage when such step takes place, is stationary so that the possibility of the shuttle being missed by the thread loop is reduced to a minimum, i-f not entirely obviated. The action of the machine is thus extremely positive at all times and the most efficient results are obtained regardless of the speed of operation. The
stitching with my impro-vedarrangement, is also even and uniform and the formation of knots during sewing is practically eliminated thus permitting a continuity of operation free from interruptions.
With my improvement, itis also always possible to locate the shuttle ata readily accessible point so that said shuttle may easily be removed from or replaced in the machine; in the illustrated example the shuttle is located above the bed-plate and is made readily accessible by simply swinging the casing i3 on its pivot 50 to the position shown in Figs. 9 and 10. With the casing .'in this position the shuttle may be easily lifted therefrom or readily placed thereon,
no particular skill being necessary as the form of the shuttle with respect `to that of the casing is such that it is impossible to place the shuttle in the casing in any position other than the correct one. It will, of course, be understood :that the illustrated form of casing and shuttle. may be obviously replaced by other forms coperating in the desired manner; thus while the illustrated arrangement may be the preferred arrange- ',ment, it is not to be construed as being the only one possible.
It is to be further understood that I have shown my invention in combination with a sewing machine of the glove sewing type simply for illustrative and descriptive purposes and that I do not wish to be restricted to this type of machine. Obviously variations in the specific details of constructions,
,may be made within the scope of the claims without departing from the spirit of my invention and whereby the same may readily be adapted to sewing machines of any kind.
I claim:
l. In a sewing machine, the combination of sewing mechanism arranged to form a thread loop, an independent shuttle over which said thread loop is passed, said'shuttle being unrestrained in its normal position and being moved from said normal position entirely by tension imposed through the thread to permit the passage of said loop and mechanism arranged to engage said shuttle whereby the latter is positively returned to its normal position after the passage of said loop. n l" iii. In a sowing machine the combination ranged to form` a needle-thread loop, a shuttle over which said loop is passed, said shuttle being floated by the needle thread to permit the passage of said loop, means whereby said floating movement of the shuttle is arrested and mechanism for actuating said means to positively return said shuttle to its normal position after the passage of said loo In a sewing machine the combination of sewing mechanism including a needle arranged to form a needle thread loop, a shuttle over which said loop is passed, said shuttle being floated by the needle thread to permit the passage of said loop, a projection on said shuttle, and means coperating with said projecton to arrest the floatng movement of said shuttle and to assist the return thereof to normal position after the passage of said loop. j
4. A sewing machine comprising sewing mechanism arranged to form. a thread-loop, ashuttle` casing, a shuttle loosely mounted therein over which said loop is passed, said shuttle being lifted in said casing by tension imposed through said thread-loop to provide a passage between said shuttle and casing for the passage of said loop, a projection on said shuttle, a lug coperating with said projection to arrest the lifting movement of said shuttle, la rod carrying said lug and means whereby said rod is actuated to cause said lug to assist the return movementof said shuttle to normal pointo said recess whereby said loop is released from -said hook, said shuttle being moved by said needle thread to permit the passage of said loop.
6. In a sewing machine, the combination of a reciprocating needle arranged to form a needle-thread loop, a shuttle having a recess, a hook adapted to engage said loop, a tapering projection on said shuttle in advance of said recess,.and means for moving said hook toward said projection into registry with said recess whereby said loop is spread to encircle said shuttle and for moving said hook into said recess whereby said loop is released from said hook, said shuttle being moved by the needle-thread "to permit the passage of said loop.
7 .j In a sewing machine, a shuttle-casing open at one end and at one side, oppositely located surfaces in said casing converging toward its open and, a shiittle in said casing itlriread.l
and converging surfaces on said shuttle arranged to cooperate with the converging surfaces of the casing to position the shuttle therein.
8. In a sewing machine, a bed plate, a shuttle-casing pivotally connected with said Ibed plate and located entirely above the saine, and a shuttle in said casing.
9. In a sewing machine, a bed plate, a hollow work support having an opening, a shuttle located in registry with said opening, a needle reciprocating in said work suppor-t to form a thread loop ltherein, and means for passing said loop over said shuttle, the latter being inioved entirely by tension imposed through the needle thread to permit the passage of said loop.
10. In a sewing machine, a bed plate, a hollow work support having an opening eX- tending lengthwise thereof, a casing on said bed plate in registry with saidopening, a shuttle in said casing, a spreader carried by said shuttle, a needle reciprocating in said work support, to form a thread loop therein, and means for drawing said loop lengthwise of said support and for moving said loop into engagement with said spreader whereby said loop is passed over said shuttle, the latter being moved in said casingy by the needle thread to permit the assage of said loop.
11. In a sewing mac ine, a bed plate having an aperture, a hollowwork support in registry with said aperture and having a lengthwise extend-ing opening, a casing open at its lower end and at one side, said casing being hinged upon said bed plate and normally having its lower end in registry with the bed'` plate aperture and its open side in registry with the opening of said work support, a shuttle located in said casing, a needle reciprocating in said work support to form a thread loop therein, and means for passing said loop over said shuttle, the latter being lifted in said casing by the needle thread to permit the passage of said loop.
12. In a sewing machine, a bed plate having an aperture, a. hollow work support in registry with said aperture and having a lengthwise extending opening, a casing open at its lower end and at one side, said casing being hinged upon said bed plate and normally having its lower end in: registry with the bed plate aperture and its open side in registry with the opening of said work support, a shuttle located in said casing, a needle reciprocating in said work support to form a thread loop therein, means for passing said loop over said shuttle7 the latter being lifted in said casing by the needle thread to permit the passage of said loop, and means for assisting the return of said shuttle to its normal position after it is relieved from the` tension exerted by said needle 13. In a sewing machine, a bed plate having an aperture, a hollow work support in registry with said aperture and having a lengthwise extending opening, a casing open at its lower end and at one side, said casing being hinged upon said bed plate and normally having its lower end in registry with the bed plate aperture and its open side in registry with the opening of said work support, `a shuttle located in said casing, a needle reciprocating in said work support to form a thread loop therein, means for passing said loop over said shuttle, the latter being lifted in said casing by the needle thread to permit the 'passage of said loop, a stop lug whereby said shuttle is maintained in its normal position after the final passage of said loop and a rod connected with said lug and arranged to be operated by said means.
14. A sewing machine comprising a bed plate -having an aperture, a hollow work support in registry with said aperture and having a lengthwise extending opening, a casing on said bed plate open toward and in registry with the opening of said work support, said casing having an open end in registry with the bed plate aperture, a shuttle loosely mounted in said casing and extending into said bed plate aperture, said shuttle' being provided with a recess, a spreader carried by said shuttle, 1n advance of said recess, a needle reciprocating 1n said work 'support to form a thread loop therein, a
hook arranged to engage said loop, means for actuating said hook to draw said loop downwardly in said work support, means for moving said hook transversely to its length into registry with said recess whereby said loop is spread by said spreader and caused to encircle said shuttle, said means moving said hook into said recess whereby said loop is released from the hook and passed over the shuttle and out of the casing, said shuttle being lifted in said casing by the needle thread to permit the passage of said loop, a stop-lug cooperating with said spreader to maintain said shuttle in its normal position after the passage of said loop and a rod whereby said lug is actuated, sai rod being operated by the hook actuating means.
l5. 'In a sewing machine, the combinationof a reciprocating needle having its eye facing in the direction of feed of the material being sewed, and arranged to form a thread loop, a shuttle, a spreader on said shuttle extending at a right angle to the direction of feed, and means for moving said threadloop into engagement with said spreader whereby said loop is spread and passed over said shuttle, the latter being lifted by the peedle thread to permit the passage of said oop.
16,v Ink a sewing machine, a reciprocating needle for forming a thread-loop, a shuttle having no operative movement of its own and being unrestrained against upward movement, a take-up mechanism for drawing said thread-loop completely over said l shuttle and for causing said thread-loop to exert alifting tension whereby said shuttle is raised to permit the passage of said loop and mechanism arranged to engage Said shuttle whereby the latter is positively re- 10 turned to its normal position after the passage of said loop.
In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand.
FREDERIC S. WILLIAMS.
copies of this patent may be obtained for ve cents each, by addressing the Commissioner of Patents,
' Washington, D. G."
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Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2989017A (en) * 1956-10-29 1961-06-20 Taketomi Bunsaku Mechanism in a sewing machine for enlarging loop of the upper thread for the purpose of performing zig-zag stitching

Cited By (1)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2989017A (en) * 1956-10-29 1961-06-20 Taketomi Bunsaku Mechanism in a sewing machine for enlarging loop of the upper thread for the purpose of performing zig-zag stitching

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