US1289856A - Building-silencer. - Google Patents

Building-silencer. Download PDF

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Publication number
US1289856A
US1289856A US20778117A US20778117A US1289856A US 1289856 A US1289856 A US 1289856A US 20778117 A US20778117 A US 20778117A US 20778117 A US20778117 A US 20778117A US 1289856 A US1289856 A US 1289856A
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Prior art keywords
air
room
rooms
building
halls
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Expired - Lifetime
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US20778117A
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Hiram Percy Maxim
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Hiram Percy Maxim
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    • FMECHANICAL ENGINEERING; LIGHTING; HEATING; WEAPONS; BLASTING
    • F24HEATING; RANGES; VENTILATING
    • F24FAIR-CONDITIONING; AIR-HUMIDIFICATION; VENTILATION; USE OF AIR CURRENTS FOR SCREENING
    • F24F13/00Details common to, or for air-conditioning, air-humidification, ventilation or use of air currents for screening
    • F24F13/08Air-flow control members, e.g. louvres, grilles, flaps or guide plates
    • F24F13/10Air-flow control members, e.g. louvres, grilles, flaps or guide plates movable, e.g. dampers
    • F24F13/14Air-flow control members, e.g. louvres, grilles, flaps or guide plates movable, e.g. dampers built up of tilting members, e.g. louvre
    • F24F13/1426Air-flow control members, e.g. louvres, grilles, flaps or guide plates movable, e.g. dampers built up of tilting members, e.g. louvre characterised by actuating means
    • YGENERAL TAGGING OF NEW TECHNOLOGICAL DEVELOPMENTS; GENERAL TAGGING OF CROSS-SECTIONAL TECHNOLOGIES SPANNING OVER SEVERAL SECTIONS OF THE IPC; TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10TECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC
    • Y10STECHNICAL SUBJECTS COVERED BY FORMER USPC CROSS-REFERENCE ART COLLECTIONS [XRACs] AND DIGESTS
    • Y10S454/00Ventilation
    • Y10S454/906Noise inhibiting means

Description

H. F. MAXIM.

BUlLDlNG SILENCER.

APPLICATION m50 05u18. |917.

H. P. MAXIM.

BUILDING S\LENCER.

M'mlcATloN FILED DEC. la. 1911.

Patented Dec. 31, 1918.

2 SHEETS--SHEET 2.

BUILDING-SILENCER.

Speocation of Letters Patent.

Patented Dee. 31, T9118.

Application filed December 18,1917. Serial No. 207,781.

To all whom it may concern:

Be it lmown that I, HLRAM PERCY MAXIM, a citizen of the United States, residing at Hartford, in the county of Hartford and State of Connecticut, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in Building- Silencers, of which the following is a specication.

This invention relates to what I might for convenience term a building silencer. As will be inferred the silencing means can with advantage be used in conjunction With structures of-widely different classes. It is of particular utility, however, when associated with or forming part of a human habitation whether the same comprises one ore more compartments or rooms. An illustration of a building of this character is a hotel or apartment house. While as I observe, the invention is of prime importance in this particular field, I am in no sense restricted thereto, for it is conceivable that it might be used in other connections,'for example a hospital where noise is especially objectionable. Cnc of the fundamental purposes I have in view is the provision of means for the elimination as far as practicable certainly, of noise from a room or compartment without affecting the proper entrance of air, and when required the supply of a cooling or a heating agent thereto. I therefore provide in connection with a room intended for human habitation, means for Ventilating the room, and positive silencing means applied to dampv or check all noise vibrations of the air entering said room. While as I have noted, the invention is susceptible of general use, I have for the purpose of showing its nature, illustrated it in one of its several forms as presenting a. part of what might be considered either an apartment house or hotel. This showin is provided to enable those skilled in the uilding and allied arts to compre.- hend the improvement. As will be clear I am not restricted to this disclosure; I may depart therefrom in several respects within the scope of the invention defined by the claims following said description.

Referring to said drawings:

Figure l is an elevation partly in section of a building equipped with silencing means involving the invention.

Fig. 2 is a horizontal section on the line 2-2 of Fig. 1, looking` in the direction of the arrow.

Fig. 3 is a horizontal section of a group of rooms. Fig. 4 is a detail in section of a duct.

Fig. 5A is a horizontal section on the line :3d-5 of Fig. 1, looking in the direction of the arrows.'

Figs. 6 and 7 are vertical sections on the lines 6 6 and 7-7 respectively of Fig. 3, looking in the directions of the arrows applied to the respective lines.

Like characters refer to like parts throughout the several views which as will be clear, are on widely diiferent scales.

I have already made it clear that the invention is capable of general use. In Fig. 1 I have shown practically in full a building as 2. This building may be either a hotel or apartment house. `The number of stories is not a matter of moment. Each living room I have denoted by 3. Obviously these rooms may be of any number on each floor. The halls on each floor are denoted by 4. The size of the rooms, their arrangement, and similar remarks applying to the halls, are it will be understood not matters of importance. In reality there'may be a structure where there is no hall or even an equivalent. The living rooms 3 as I might consider them, are provided with windows 5, While the halls 4 vhave practically similar windows 6. In like manner this in itself is not a feature of importance. It is in edect vital, however, that in all seasons I can keep these windows shut without interfering with the proper supply of the necessary constituents to maintain life and at the same time furnishing either heat or cold in conformity naturally with the season or the individual taste. By closing the windows 5 l not only exclude exterior sounds which is a point of value. but what is of greater importance exclude the entrance of dust and other foreign matter into the room or rooms. This' I accomplish, of course, without affectingthe vision ot an occupant as to what is occurring outside the building.

Extending depthwise or the building 2 for example at the center. although this may not lid@ always be necessary, is a shaft or well 7 open at its top for the entrance of a duct member as 8 which might he considered as a main. This duct member or main 8 is virtually coextensive with the depth or height of the building as common in several different arts. It extends above the roof of the building and is associated in an operative 10 incloses a cylindrical wall 14 extending from the top 12 to the bottom 13 unbrokenly. Below the bottom 13 is the ange 15 which presents in effect a continuation of the wall or partition 14. This wall or partition 14 is of course, spaced or separated from the wall of the casing or shell 10, and the reason for this will hereinafter be set forth. The top g 12 has as shown a central opening 16 for the admission of atmospheric air, silencing means as will be clear being interposed in the path of the atmospheric air, in view of which circumstance the air will be supplied to the various rooms as I will hereinafter pointout as free from'sound as possible. Connected with the top 12 and depending therefrom for a certain distance is the vane 17, this vane being practically of spiral form. Its upper edge is united to the top 12 around the opening 16. Around this v vane 17 is a larger vane 18. while in turn around the 'vane 18 isa third vane 19. All three of these vanes as will be understood are connected with the topy 12. They are united at the bottom by the plate 20 which is spaced from the bottom 13. The vanes 17.18 and 19 have outlets 21, 22 and23 which are in staggered relation with each other. that is to say the outlet 21 is not in radial line with the outlet 22, vnor is the latter in radial line with the outlet 23, as will be seen best on inspection of Fig. 2. It will be clear. therefore, that atmospheric air enters the silencer 9 by way of the inlet 16, passing from thence into the leaving the outlet 21 of the latterand entering the space surrounded by the vane 18, passing through the outlet 22 and entering the space surrounded by the outer vane 19, being discharged through the outlet 23 into the chamber inclosed by the cvlindrical wall 14, to which I have already referred and taklng a downward course and entering the ductor main 8 from which it is conveyed, as I will hereinafter explain to the several .rooms 3 and halls 4. t

The parts of the silencer 9 to which I have already referred are generally made from metal. although this is is not a primary conslderation. The substance in-question, however, 1s satisfactory. To augment the effect of the silencer its various interior surfaces may' be -provided with a sound-deadeningI spiral tube 17.,

substance as 24.- which may consist of felt or other convenient material adhesively unlted to the surface. As I will hereinafter point yout this same material is connected to other This fan obviously draws atmospheric air into the inlet 16 and drives it into the main 8 to be subsequently supplied to the various rooms-and halls of the building.

` As I have already explained one of the purposes of the main 8 is to furnish fresh air to the several rooms 3 and halls 4, and this can be obtained in any desirable manner. As shown the main 8 has leading therefrom in suitable order and laterally, the branches 27 joined to openings 28 in the walls of the respective rooms and halls. These openings 28 are near the ceilings of the several rooms and halls. The rooms and halls in turn have openings 29 therein situated near the ioors thereof. From the respective branches 27 extend branch fines as 30 leading to the respective openings 29. The branches 27 are located in or near the ceilings, while the branches 30 may be in the walls. The openings 28 and 29 are provided respectively with valves which I shall for convenience denote as 31 in each case. In summer it is desirable that the cold, fresh and silenced air enter the rooms and halls in the upper portions thereof, say near the ceilings. In this case lthe upper dampers or valves 31 as shown in Fig. 7 will be opened to accomplish this particular result. In winter or lcold weather when warmth is desirable if not imperative, this condition will be reversed, the upper valves or dampers 31 being closed and the lower ones being opened, in View of which latter result it follows that the silenced and warm air enters the rooms and halls at or near the floors thereof. I provide means for carrying ofi the stagnant or foul air, and this without the necessity of opening lthe windows or doing some other thing which would result in the entrance of objectionable or undesirable noises or sounds. It is practically necessary that the air generally stagnant or in effect in .that condition. should be conveyed from the rooms and halls. For this purpose I provide for instance in the partition walls, lues 32, the walls of the several rooms and halls having openings l33 connecting said rooms and halls with these dues. As shown the openings 33 are situated at or near the floors as the foul air descends Passing from the rooms or halls by Way of the openings 3B into the tlues 32 it ascends, leaving the upper ends of the fines and passing into the connecting fine 34 on the roof of-the .building Q. From this connecting flue 34.- is

the discharge duct 35 opening into the silencer 9 and having direct communication with the space between the shell or body 10 and the partition 14. From the casing l() leads the disch-arge connection 36 from which the foul air is finally discharged into the atmosphere. The several discharge fines and their connections just described may be lined with silencing material as indicated at 37. The air lthus discharged acts before it reaches the atmosphere to either initially heat or cool the incoming air.

-What I claim is:

1. The combination of a room intended for human habitation, means for supplying air to the room, and positive silencing means applied 'to said air supplying means.

The combination of a room intended for human habitation, a flue leading from the outside atmosphere to said room, and positive silencing means in correlation with the room and the flue for silencing the air entering the room by way of said fine.

The combination of a room intended for human habitation,means for the supply of air-to Ithe room, positive silencing means applied to damp or check noise vibrations in said air, and means for modifying theair supplied to the room.

l. The combination of-a room intended for human habitat-ion, a main having branches leading to the upper and lower sides of the room for the supply of air thereto, means for shutting off the air as desired to the upper and lower portions of the room, and silencing means applied to damp or check noise vibrations in said air.

The combination of a room intended for human habitation, a. main having branches leading -to the upper and lower sides of the room for the passage of air, means for shutting oii' thesupply of air as desired to the upper and lowerpo'rtions of the room, definite silencing means applied to damp or check noise vibrations in said-air, and air modifying means associated with the 6. Thel combination of a room intended for human habitation,` means for supplying air to the room, definite silencing means applied to damp or check the noise vibrations in the air, and means for discharging aii` from the room and causing the outgoing air to modify the incoming air.

10. The combination of a room intended for human habitation, and positive silencing means .arrangedto damp or check any sound producing air vibrations from entering said room.

11. In combination a room intended for human habitation, means for Ventilating said room, and positive silencing means applied -to damp or check noise Vibrations of the air entering said room.

In testimony whereof I aiix my signature in'the presence of tWo Witnesses.

I-IIRAM PERCY MAXIM.

Witnesses:

Caen. POWELL, `O'r'ro HILTON.

US20778117A 1917-12-18 1917-12-18 Building-silencer. Expired - Lifetime US1289856A (en)

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Cited By (8)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2679795A (en) * 1950-05-24 1954-06-01 Geiger Josef Breathershaft safety ventilating system
US3085647A (en) * 1960-11-07 1963-04-16 Jenn Air Products Company Inc Acoustic curb
US3110357A (en) * 1960-01-22 1963-11-12 Jenn Air Products Company Acoustic curb
US6332510B1 (en) 1996-09-30 2001-12-25 Silentor Holding A/S Gas flow silencer
US6520286B1 (en) 1996-09-30 2003-02-18 Silentor Holding A/S Silencer and a method of operating a vehicle
US7491120B1 (en) 2005-07-27 2009-02-17 St. Cloud Window Inc. Trickle vent
US20100300645A1 (en) * 2009-05-28 2010-12-02 Michael Glover Building energy system
US20120318475A1 (en) * 2009-05-28 2012-12-20 Michael Glover Building Energy System

Cited By (9)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2679795A (en) * 1950-05-24 1954-06-01 Geiger Josef Breathershaft safety ventilating system
US3110357A (en) * 1960-01-22 1963-11-12 Jenn Air Products Company Acoustic curb
US3085647A (en) * 1960-11-07 1963-04-16 Jenn Air Products Company Inc Acoustic curb
US6332510B1 (en) 1996-09-30 2001-12-25 Silentor Holding A/S Gas flow silencer
US6520286B1 (en) 1996-09-30 2003-02-18 Silentor Holding A/S Silencer and a method of operating a vehicle
US7491120B1 (en) 2005-07-27 2009-02-17 St. Cloud Window Inc. Trickle vent
US20100300645A1 (en) * 2009-05-28 2010-12-02 Michael Glover Building energy system
US20120318475A1 (en) * 2009-05-28 2012-12-20 Michael Glover Building Energy System
US9897332B2 (en) 2009-05-28 2018-02-20 Michael Glover Energy efficient fenestration assembly

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