US1269340A - Method of treating threads of cellulosic material and the threads so produced. - Google Patents

Method of treating threads of cellulosic material and the threads so produced. Download PDF

Info

Publication number
US1269340A
US1269340A US11329116A US1269340A US 1269340 A US1269340 A US 1269340A US 11329116 A US11329116 A US 11329116A US 1269340 A US1269340 A US 1269340A
Authority
US
Grant status
Grant
Patent type
Prior art keywords
threads
cellulose
thread
copper
solution
Prior art date
Legal status (The legal status is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the status listed.)
Expired - Lifetime
Application number
Inventor
Charles E Vanderkleed
James Ed Brewer
Original Assignee
William M Field
Harry J Verner
Fritz Heidlberg
Charles E Vanderkleed
James Ed Brewer
Priority date (The priority date is an assumption and is not a legal conclusion. Google has not performed a legal analysis and makes no representation as to the accuracy of the date listed.)
Filing date
Publication date
Grant date

Links

Images

Classifications

    • DTEXTILES; PAPER
    • D06TREATMENT OF TEXTILES OR THE LIKE; LAUNDERING; FLEXIBLE MATERIALS NOT OTHERWISE PROVIDED FOR
    • D06MTREATMENT, NOT PROVIDED FOR ELSEWHERE IN CLASS D06, OF FIBRES, THREADS, YARNS, FABRICS, FEATHERS, OR FIBROUS GOODS MADE FROM SUCH MATERIALS
    • D06M11/00Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with inorganic substances or complexes thereof; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment, e.g. mercerising
    • D06M11/58Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with inorganic substances or complexes thereof; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment, e.g. mercerising with nitrogen or compounds thereof, e.g. with nitrides
    • D06M11/59Treating fibres, threads, yarns, fabrics, or fibrous goods made from such materials, with inorganic substances or complexes thereof; Such treatment combined with mechanical treatment, e.g. mercerising with nitrogen or compounds thereof, e.g. with nitrides with ammonia; with complexes of organic amines with inorganic substances
    • D06M11/62Complexes of metal oxides or complexes of metal salts with ammonia or with organic amines

Description

C. E. VANDERKL EED A: J. E. BREWER. n METHOD OF TREATING THREADS OF CELLULOSIC MATERIAL AND THE THREADS S0 PRODUCED.

APPLICATION FILED AUG. 5. I9I6- 1,2693%, I Patented June 11, 1918 are;

CHARLES E. VANDERKLEED, F CQLLINGSWOOD, NEW JERSEY, AND JAMES ED. BREWER, 0F NORBISTQWN, PENNSYLVANIA, ASSIGNORS 0F ONE-FIFTH TQ WILLIAM M. FIELD, OF HAVERFORD, PENNSYLVANIA, ONE-FIFTH T0 HARRY J. VERNEIR, 0F BEYN MAWR, PENNSYLVANIA, AND ONE-FIFTH T0 FRITZ HEIDI- BEBG, 0F JERSEY CITY, NEW JERSEY.

PRODUCED.

METHOD 03E TREATING THREADS 0F GELL'ULOSIC MATERIAL AND THE THREADS SQ specification of Letters Patent.

Application flled August'li, 1916. Serial No. 113,291.

-T all whom it may concern:

Be it known that we, CHARLES E. VAN- DERKLEED, a citizen of the United States and a resident of Oollingswood, county of Camden, State of New Jersey, and JAMES En. BREWER, a citizen of the United States, and a resident of Norristown, county of Montgomery, State of Pennsylvania, have invented certain new and useful Improvements in the Method of Treating Threads of Cellulosic Material and the Threads so Produced, of which the following is a specification.

Our invention relates to a new and novel method of treating threads, the principal ingredient of which is cellulose, such,'for example, as cotton threads as Well as the threads so produced. Our invention may be employed also in the treatment of threads of other material, the principal constituent of which is cellulose, such as hemp and flax.

One of the objects of our invention is to subject threads of cellulosic material (such ,as cotton threads) to a treatment whereby such threads are rendered very smooth, their luster and also their tensile strength increased.

A further object of our invention is to produce a thread consisting of cellulosic material. in which the interior portion thereof is in a natural state, that is to say, remains unafieoted by the chemicals and the treatment to which it has been subjected, such central portion constituting in effect a. corelike fibrous portion which is surrounded by a thin coating of cellulose or oellulosic materialwhich first has been softened or dis solved by a chemical agent and subsequently precipitated by the action of t a suitable chemical agent.

Other objects and advantages of our invention will be referred to and more fully pointed out and described in the detailed description thereof which follows or will be apparent from such description.

" Our invention is not limited to any par ticular form of apparatus by means of which the samemay be carried out, but for the purpose of facilitating the description of the same and aiding in its understanding reference maybe had to the accompanying drawing in which is indicated one form of apparatus which may be employed.

In the drawing Figure l, is a transverse vertical sectional view of a form of apparatus which may be employed; and

Fig. 2, is a sectional view showing a detail of construction.

In the carrying out of our invention in the treatment of threads of cellulosic material,

we first subject the same to the action of a copper ammonium solution or its equivalent. From this solution the threads are passed through a volume of either sulfuric or acetic acid or some other substance having an equivalent action, may be wound upon a spool revolving in water. After the quantity of thread desired has been wound upon such spool, the spool is removed and is further washed in water.

During the passage of the thread through after which the threads Patented June til, rats.

the ammoniaoa'l copper solution (copper as a precipiacal copper solution maybe varied and controlled by varying the speed of travel of said leaving the core-like po'r-T threads through said solution. In other wordsby varying the time or period during which the threads are subjected to the action of the solvent the amount of material which is softened or dissolved is varied.

Such amount may be varied also by varying the strength of the solvent.

In the drawing, the ammoniacal copper I solution is shown at 1 in a container 2. The

sulfuric acid or acetic acid, as the case may be, or their equivalent, is shown at 3 in a container 4.

Each thread to be treated is taken from a spool such as 5, and passes over a guide roll 6 and underneath guide-rods 7, near the bottom of the container 2. Only one thread is shown but it will be understood that as many threads as desired may be treated simultaneously. lFrom the second rod 7 the threads pass forwardly over the guide roll 8 and thence underneath the guide rods 9 near the bottom of the container 4. The threads are carried or drawn forward from the precipitating liquid 3 over a guide roll 9 to a spool 10 and are wound upon the latter which projects into a volume of water 11 held in a container 12, so that as the threads are wound upon the spool they are preliminarily washed and partially freed from the copper sulfate (or acetate as the case may be) and ammonium sulfate. To completely remove these compounds the threads are subjected to additional washing in a further quantity of fresh water. It will be understood that if the precipitating bath or liquid does not consist of sulfuric acid or of acetic acid but of some other sub-.

stance, the resulting compounds will be different.

It is desirable that the threads treated in the manner indicated should be smooth and of uniform diameter at all points. This condition is affected and brought about b causing capillary-like openings situated intermediate the ammoniacal copper solution and the precipitant; that is, the sulfuric or acetic acid. In the construction as illustrated the device employed for this purpose consists of a short section of tube 14, one end of which is reduced to form a small capilla like opening 15 as indicated. It will understood that the diameter of the tube as shown in Fig. 2 of the enlarged; also that there are as many of these devices as there are threads being treated. Another threads through such small openings is that any excess of solvent threads and caused to container 2,--thus constituting a saving of the solvent and reventing the unnecessary transference of t e same to the container 4: and the consequent contamination of the precipitant 3.

We have found also that the resulting product is somewhat improved if the copper ammonium solution through which the threads are caused to pass is provided previously with a quantity of purified celludrawing is greatly advantage of passing the the threads to pass through sma l is removed from the fall back into the.

aaeaaac lose in solution. When such cellulose is present in solution it penetrates into and is deposited upon the surface of the threads as they are passed through the copper ammonium solution. These threads are rendered smooth and of uniform diameter by being passed through small capillary-like openings as previously described and by subsequently passing the same through the precipitant consisting of sulfuric acid, acetic acid or some other equivalent material and thereafter washing, the copper and the ammonium are removed also as previously described, leaving a coating of precipitated and hardened cellulose. It will be seen that by this latter method there is what may be termed and described a step in addition to that employed in carrying out the method and process as first described. That is to say, not only are the filamental projecting portions from the thread dissolved or softened but there is added to the thread as a deposit a coating of pure cellulose. By such addition both the luster and the tensile strength of the threads are somewhat increased.

Our invention may also be applied to the treatment of fabric consisting of woven threads of cellulosic material. As described in connection with the treatment of threads of such material the fabric may be passed through a solvent consisting of ammoniacal copper (copper ammonium) solution which. acts to dissolve or soften the outer surfaces of the threads of which the fabric is comosed. Such fabric preferably, in order to essen or remove the interstices between the threads, should be subjected to compression, as by means of revolving compression rollers, after which it is subjected to the action of a precipitating substance, such as sulfuric acid or acetic acid or their equivalent, and should then be washed in water so as to remove the compounds of copper and ammonium as described in connection with the treatment of the threads.

As a result of the method above described, whether in connection with the treatment of the threads or in connection with the treatment of a fabric composed of threads, the threads of the final product consist of a central core-like portion of what may be termed raw or untreated fibrous cellulosic material surrounded by a coating of cellulose produced by first treating the threads, as threads per 86 or as a fabric, in copper ammonium solution, thereafter subjecting the same to the action of a precipitant (such as sulfuric acid or acetic acid) and finally washing the same thoroughly in water so as to remove therefrom such compounds of copper and ammonium as may have been formed.

We claim 1. Theart of treating threads of cellulosic hit lib

naeaeao material which comprises the softening or dissolving of'the outer portions of such threads, depositing a coating of dissolved cellulose upon such threads, and thereafter subjecting the same to the action of a precipitant. 1

2. The art of treating a thread of cellulosic material which consists in dissolving a thin outer layer thereof, depositing a thin layer of cellulose upon such thread and thereafter subjecting. the said thread with the thin'layer of cellulose deposited thereon to the action of a precipitant and finally washing the'said thread in water.

3. The art of treating material consisting of cellulose which comprises the softening or dissolving of theouter portions of such material, depositing a coating of dissolved cellulose upon such material, and thereafter subjecting the same to the action of a precipitant to harden and precipitate the said softened and dissolved cellulose.

4-. The art of treating a thread composed of cellulosic material which consists in subjecting the said thread to the action of a copper ammonium solution containing cellulose in solution and softening or dissolving a thin outer portion of the sald thread, leaving a fibrous central portion, thereafter subjecting the said thread to an acid to form soluble compounds of copper and ammonium and precipitate and harden the layer of dissolved and softened cellulose upon said thread and thereafter remove said compounds.

5. The art of treating a thread composed of cellulosic material which consists in subjecting the said thread to the action of a copper ammonium solution containing cellulose in solution and depositing a thin layer of such cellulose upon said thread, next subjecting it to the action of an acid precipitant to precipitate and harden the dissolved cellulose and to form compounds of copper and ammonium and thereafter washingthe said thread in water to remove the said copper and ammonium compounds and afiid any should have adhered to the said t rea 6. The art of treating cotton threads j which consists in passing thesamethrough a volume of copper ammonium solution containing cellulose in solution and dissolving a thin outer layer of the said thread and depositing a portion of the collulose upon said threads, next passing the same through a precipitant having the capacity of prefcipita-ting the dissolved cellulose and of formingcopper and ammonium compounds and subsequently washing the said thread to remove the said copper and ammonium compounds and leaving the dissolved cellulose material as a coat g surrounding the undissolved core-like portion of the said. thread.

7. The art oftreating cotton thread which washing in water to precipitate consists in passing the same through a volume of copper ammonium solution containing cellulose in solution and thereby softening or dissolving a thin outer layer of the sa1d thread and also depositing a coating of cellulose from said solution upon such thread, next passing the same through a volume of sulfuric acid to precipitate rd harden the dissolved and so tened cellulose and form compounds consisting of copper sulfate and ammonium sulfate and subsequently washing the said thread to remove the said compounds, leaving the precip tated and hardened cellulose material as a coating upon the undissolved central core-like portion of the said thread.

8. The art of treating threads composed of cellulosic material, which consists in passing the same through a quantity of copper ammonium solution containing cellulose in solution, thereafter smoothing the surfaces of said threads and rendering them of uniform diameter throughout their length, subsequently subjecting the said threads to the action of an acid to precipitate and fix the dissolved cellulose thereon and to form compounds of ammonium and copper and thereafter washing the said threads to remove said compounds.

9. The art of treating threads composed of cellulosic material which consists in passing the said thread through a copper ammonium solution having therein a quantity of pure cellulose in solution, softening or dissolving a thin layer of the said thread and simultaneously depositing thereon a thin coating of (pure cellulose, subsequently passing the sai thread through a precipitant to the dissolved cellulose and to form compounds of copper and ammonium and thereafter washing the said thread to remove the said compounds therefrom and leaving a coating of said precipitated cellulose surrounding the now 'unafl'ected portion of said thread. j 10. The art of treating fabrics composed of cellulose threads which consists in passing the said fabric through a copper ammonium solution containing cellulose in solution and depositing a lose as a layer upon the threads of said fabric, thereafter passing the said fabric through a liquid which precipitates and fixes dissolved and softened cellulose upon said fabric and monium solution held upon the said fabric to form compounds of copper and ammonium and thereafter washing the said fabric to remove the said compounds.

I 11. The art of treating a fabric composed ofthreads of cellulosic material which con-- sists. in passing the said fabric through a copper ammomum solution containing cellulosem solution and depositing a portion of portion of said celluf hit 11bit which acts'upon the copper amsaid cellulose as a layer upon the threads of 1 meeeeo said. fabric, thereafter subjecting the said with it coating of previously precipitated fabric to compression, next passing the same cellulose.

through sulfuric acid to precipitate and fix In testimony that We claim the foregoin dissolved and softened cellulose upon said as our invention We have hereunto slgne 5 fabric and to form copper and ammonium our names this 3rd day of August, A. D.

sulfates and subsequentl Washing the said 1916. fabric to remove the sai sulfates and leziv- CHARLES E. VANDERKLEED.

ing the threads oi the said fabric surrounded JAMES ED. BREWER.

US1269340A 1916-08-05 1916-08-05 Method of treating threads of cellulosic material and the threads so produced. Expired - Lifetime US1269340A (en)

Priority Applications (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1269340A US1269340A (en) 1916-08-05 1916-08-05 Method of treating threads of cellulosic material and the threads so produced.

Applications Claiming Priority (1)

Application Number Priority Date Filing Date Title
US1269340A US1269340A (en) 1916-08-05 1916-08-05 Method of treating threads of cellulosic material and the threads so produced.

Publications (1)

Publication Number Publication Date
US1269340A true US1269340A (en) 1918-06-11

Family

ID=3336978

Family Applications (1)

Application Number Title Priority Date Filing Date
US1269340A Expired - Lifetime US1269340A (en) 1916-08-05 1916-08-05 Method of treating threads of cellulosic material and the threads so produced.

Country Status (1)

Country Link
US (1) US1269340A (en)

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2442973A (en) * 1944-07-12 1948-06-08 Sidney M Edelstein Treatment of textile material with alkaline cellulose zincate solutions
US2470039A (en) * 1945-05-04 1949-05-10 Edward E Lovig Apparatus and process for making filaments
US2953424A (en) * 1954-02-15 1960-09-20 Bayer Ag Aftertreatment of tows consisting of continuous artificial filaments
US5356680A (en) * 1991-07-16 1994-10-18 Akzo N.V. Industrial fabrics of controlled air permeability and high ageing resistance and manufacture thereof
US5581856A (en) * 1990-01-12 1996-12-10 Akzo N.V. Process for the production of uncoated technical fabrics with low air permeability

Cited By (5)

* Cited by examiner, † Cited by third party
Publication number Priority date Publication date Assignee Title
US2442973A (en) * 1944-07-12 1948-06-08 Sidney M Edelstein Treatment of textile material with alkaline cellulose zincate solutions
US2470039A (en) * 1945-05-04 1949-05-10 Edward E Lovig Apparatus and process for making filaments
US2953424A (en) * 1954-02-15 1960-09-20 Bayer Ag Aftertreatment of tows consisting of continuous artificial filaments
US5581856A (en) * 1990-01-12 1996-12-10 Akzo N.V. Process for the production of uncoated technical fabrics with low air permeability
US5356680A (en) * 1991-07-16 1994-10-18 Akzo N.V. Industrial fabrics of controlled air permeability and high ageing resistance and manufacture thereof

Similar Documents

Publication Publication Date Title
US1491604A (en) Device for applying lubricant to textile slivers
US6706224B2 (en) Process and device for the production of cellulosic moulded bodies
US2002996A (en) Continue process and apparatus
US2598608A (en) Preparation of collagenous materials
US2267117A (en) Treatment of textile fabrics
US2815559A (en) Cellular synthetic fibre thread and a method of making the same
US2340377A (en) Process of making artificial fibers
US2823576A (en) Method of making slip-free fish netting
US3124631A (en) Process for providing high density dry spun
US2308576A (en) Method for the manufacture of artificial fibers and staple fiber yarns
US2642333A (en) Method of spinning polyvinyl alcohol fibers
Zeronian Fine structure and tensile properties of decrystallized products prepared from cotton
US1921504A (en) Composite web and method of making the same
US2736946A (en) Polyacrylonitrile fibers having a scaly integument
US2515834A (en) Cellulose filaments and method of producing same
DE3637130C1 (en) A method for electroless plating of textile material
US2174878A (en) Yarn and method of producing same
US2044130A (en) Textile yarn and the manufacture thereof
DE4426966A1 (en) Prodn. of highly-filled cellulose fibres and films
US1986319A (en) Process of manufacture of threads of textile material
US2155067A (en) Manufacture of improved products of cellulose and cellulose derivatives
US2452130A (en) Method of spinning high tenacity viscose rayon
US1998551A (en) Mercerizing process
US2822237A (en) Process for producing filament of vinyl chloride polymer
US2345622A (en) Continuous manufacture of viscose rayon